Page 1


Museum Cinema Resident

Office

Lower Level Studio Restaurant

Office Resident

NORTH EAST ELEVATION SOUTH WEST ELEVATION

Distance between Skin 1 and Skin 2

Office Resident Studio

Facade Location

Restaurant Higher Level Studio

Located Program

Office Atrium Restaurant Lower Level Studio

Program, user, circulation, and the quality of space are CONFINED within the envelope of a typical static, isolated, mundane high rise. By MOBILIZING programs [inspired by the San Francisco VERNACULAR], the typology is challenged. Programs are re-arranged into MODULES that are then DIFFERENTIATED by the quality of space according to program. Users would then be able to engage the horizontal cityscape through vertical experiences. Essentially freeing the high rise experience from its envelope in an inner functional aspect.

N NORTH EAST ELEVATION SSOUTH WEST ELEVATION

0 0’

-MINIMUM distance between skin 1 and skin 2 -HIGHER sun light penetration -allowable AIR circulation

SAN FRANCISCO FOG

1’

3 3’

6’ 6

8’ 8

18’ 8

24’ 24

-MAXIMUM distance between skin 1 and skin 2 -LOWER sun light penetration -allowable PHYSICAL circulation

Amount of Natural sun light

8’

3’

3’ 8’

6’ 6’ 24’

3’ 3’

3’ 3’

3’

24’ 24’

18’

24’

18’

8’

6’

6’

24’

3’

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION - JESSIE SQUARE

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - MISSION STREET

3’

3’

3’

3’

NORTH EAST ELEVATION - 3RD STREET

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION - JESSIE SQUARE

NORTH WEST ELEVATION - THE WESTIN HOTEL

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - MISSION STREET

NORTH EAST ELEVATION - 3RD STREET

NORTH WEST ELEVATION - THE WESTIN HOTEL

THIRD STREET

N

H

MISSION STREET

A

F A

B

G

B

D H

C

D

C

E

F

E

A H

H

A MONOLITHIC TEMPERED GLASS B INSULATING GLASS

A LAMINATED GLASS B SEATING F

G

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION - JESSIE SQUARE

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - MISSION STREET

C D E F G H

INSULATING GLASS

C SPIDER CLAPMS D LOUVER E SUSPENDED CEILING WITH

MONOLITHIC TEMPERED GLASS SUSPENDED CEILING WITH TRANSLUCENT GLASS STAIRCASE RAISED FLOOR

F INTERIOR GLASS WALL G STRUCTURAL GLASS FINS H RAISED FLOOR

SPIDER CLAMPS

TRANSLUCENT GLASS

1’ 1’

NORTH EAST ELEVATION - 3RD STREET

SCALE 1/16” = 1’


HOW CAN WE CIRCULATE PUBLIC SPACES IN THE TOWER TO CREATE A VERTICAL CITY?

L

Linkage

MODULARIZED

DIFFERENTIATE

TECH

NICA

L

Linkage

OFFICE/PRIVATE

H

L URA CULT E SIT

ATRIUM

RETAIL ext/ PUBLIC

OPEN SPACES/GARDENS

TYPICAL HIGHRISE HIGGHRISE

PROPOSED HIGHRISE H

L NICA ULTURAL ITE C S

LEVEL OF PRIVACY

Linkage

TECH

Separation

SEQUENCE DIAGRAMS

L NICA TECH A L UR CULT E SITGE IL NKA ICAL N TENCKHAGE LI AL UR CULT E SITAGE K LIN TE SI

MODULARIZE

CLIENT ENTRY SHOWCASE SPACE RETAILL STORE STUDIO ENVIRONMENTAL MIMICING SPACE SERVICE & REPAIR CENTER WORLDWIDE NETWORK CENTER MEETING ROOM CAFE ENTRY SHOWCASE SPACE OPTICAL SHOP OPTICAL LABORATORY CAFE STORAGE ENTRY MUSEUM GALLERY (PROFESSIONALS) GALLERY (NOVICE) PRINTING ROOMS MEETING ROOM STUDIO COMPETITION DEPARTMENT CAFE STORAGE ENTRY OFFICE SPACE DEVELOPING DEPARTMENT LABORATORY STORAGE RESIDENTIAL CAFE

_LEICA FOCUSING ON PERCEPTION AND HAS DEVELOPED INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTS THAT AFFORD A UNIQUE SEEING EXPERIENCE. THE PRODUCTS EXPAND THE NATURAL LIMITS OF PERCEPTION, OPEN UP NEW DIMENSIONS FOR HUMAN VISION AND INSIGHT. _The San Francisco Film Society encourages the progressive evolution of film culture and individual lives by celebrating the transformative power of the moving image in all its forms. Through a combination of intelligent programming and exemplary service, it creates singularly vital experiences for audiences of all kinds. _TO RAISE AWARENESS, INFLUENCE OPINION, CHANGE BEHAVIOR, ENCOURAGE ACTION, BUILD COMMUNITIES, EVEN INSTIGATE SOCIAL MOVEMENT. _DEEPLY ROOTED IN APPRECIATION OF PICTURE AND FILM AS ART FORM AND MEANINGFUL AGENT FOR SOCIAL CHANGE. _DEMOCRATIC, EGLITARIAN

EA R ND ER AR TE INC FU Y N NT AY EN K AN LT IO CE E B C OR S LO TB TH CE TW CE AT E Y C N F R R T E I C N O NC ES NI IO E O OU N V IO IC MU & A UT ES MA ER RP LIA AT O US D AT TIT R DE S RV OM E C AL N C Y D INS VING HE RT U T SE IIA C TIC O I R G L I P F S UN Y IN IVE FO NA T L YM PO O Y ER IL ORN JUS S P IO F Y T V N L U T G M IF U H S UB IL O RE NA DE AL S AL I FA AL OR IS H N UN ER EN ON D CL AM C F RK W S CA O INT DEP ATI HIL A I F PE L SS RN R AEN LY E H A IN N C RR SK PA E LW EI T ION IC M TH T E P O K I A U IT AM O OR EN EA AT O S T D N C N C C F T M S

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS CO BUSINESS COMPANIES BU

ARH 410 YUAN YUAN

SITE 1600 FEET RADIUS AREA


USE LINKAGE AS DATUM TO RECONSTITU program PLACEMENT diagram GALLERY G RESTAURANT R

GALLERY LE RESTAURANT TAU

SSFFS RESTAURANT AURANT

DIO STUDIO RESTAURANT RE ESTAU TAU

Linkage

Linkage SFFS RESTAURANT AU URANT

AU AUDITORIUM RE RESTAURANT

OFFICE CE AL MEDIA SOCIAL EU MUSEUM AU RESTAURANT

TU STUDIO SERVICE ERV ETA STORE RETAIL EST RESTAURANT

REMOVE

MORPHING CORRESPOND TO PROGRAM

RECESS TO SHIELD FROM SUN PUBLIC CIRCULATION

PRIVATE CIRCULATION

LEVEL 13 THEATER

BEHIND ARONSON

Linkage


UTE THE TOWER INTO VERTICAL SPACES program EXPOSURE diagram WEST

STITCHING STAIRS diagram SOUTH

GALLERY STUDIO STUDIO

RESTAURANT SF FILM SOCIETY

CINEMA OFFICE

MUSEUM

MUSEUM

OFFICE

CINEMA

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

STUDIO

GALLERY

VIEW UP THE VOID

VOID diagram

VERTICAL CIRCULATION diagram

PRIVATE PROGRAM SECTOR

PUBLIC PROGRAM SECTOR

CORES

STOPS FOR PRIVATE ELEVATOR

STOPS FOR PUBLIC ELEVATOR

OPENING FOR PRIVATE ELEVATOR

OPENING FOR PUBLIC ELEVATOR

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3

4

5

6

6’

Level Roof 355’

Level 26 342’

Hat truss

Level 25 329’

Compression

Level 24 316’

Tension (floors suspended from hat truss)

Level 23 303’

Discontinuation

Public seating area

Discontinuation

Auditorium

Discontinuation

Public Entrance lobby

Discontinuation

3rd street Entrance lobby

Level 22 290’

Level 21 277’

Level 20 264’

Level 19 251’

Level 18 231’

Level 17 218’

Level 16 205’

Level 15 192’

Level 14 179’

Level 13 166’

Level 12 150’

Level 11 137’

Level 10 124’

Level 9 98’

Level 8 111’

Level 7 98’

Level 6 85’

Level 5 72’

Level 4 59’

Level 3 39’

Level 2 26 ’

Level 1 13’

Level 0 Ground level

0’

Level -1 -10’

Level -2 -20

Level -3 -30’


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3 4

5

6

L A HIGH LEVEL PLAN 8 Level 289’

1

2

3 4

5

6

L A MID LEVEL PLAN 2 Level 220’

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

N

LEVEL 85’

1

2

LEVEL 39’

3 4

5

LEVEL 26 ’

6

GROUND LEVEL L PLAN A Levell 0’

SCALE 1/40” = 1’ LEVEL 13’

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3

4

5

6

6’’

Level Roof 355’

Level 26 342’

Level 25 329’

Level 24 316’

Level 23 303’

Level 22 290’

Level 21 277’

Level 20 264’ HIGH LEVEL PLAN

Level 19 251’

Level 18 231’

Level 17 218’

Level 16 205’

Level 15 192’

MID LEVEL PLAN

Level 14 179’

Level 13 166’

SSFF FILM FILM LM FES LM FEFES

Level 12 150’

Level 11 137’

Level 10 124’

Level 9 98’

Level 8 111’

Level 7 98’

Level 6 85’

Level 5 72’

Level 4 59’

Level 3 39’

Level 2 26 ’

GROUND LEVEL PLAN

Level 0 Ground level

Level 1 13’

0’

Level -1 -10’

Level -2 -20

Level -3 -30’

SCALE 1/16” = 1’


JESSIE SQUARE

NIGHT VIEW FROM YERBA BUENA GARDEN


CRIME RATE The estimated South Of Market crime index is 43% lower than the San Francisco average and and the San Francisco crime index is 47% higher than the California average. South Of Market is safer than 38.2% of the neighborhoods in San Francisco.

VILOENT CRIMES THEFT

Most Criminal activities occur in or near the Tenderloin Area. These Crimes include violent and non-violent crimes. The crimes which occur South of San Francisco include violent crimes, but mostly regarding theft.


ECONOMY “

The evidence is not hard to find. A phalanx of construction cranes from Rincon Hill to upper Market Street. At Mission and Fremont streets, Los Angeles' Kilroy Realty Trust is building a 27-story tower for Salesforce.com. Kilroy is building 560,000 square feet of space in Sunnyvale for LinkedIn, one of a slew of new projects in Silicon Valley. In the East Bay, work begins in 2013 on the $1 billion transformation of the old Oakland Army Base into a regional shipping and logistics center.

For 2013 as a whole, the economy grew a tepid 1.9 percent, weaker than the 2.8 percent increase in 2012, the Commerce Department said Thursday. Growth was held back by higher taxes and federal spending cuts that kicked in early in 2013.

Consumers will spend more. Government will cut less. Businesses will invest more. And more companies will hire. (SFGate 2013)

5 percent 4 3.2%

3 2 1 0 -1

“San Francisco’s unemployment rate decreased to 4.8 percent in December, the third lowest among California’s 58 counties.”

-2 2010

2011

2012

2013

US Economic Growth grew at a 3.2 percent rate over the past year

Consumer spending surged in the October-December quarter at an annual rate of 3.3 percent — the best pace since 2010 and a big jump from the 2 percent growth rate of the previous quarter. Consumer spending is particularly important because it accounts for about 70 percent of the economy. With that drag diminished, many economists think growth could top 3 percent in 2014. That would be the best showing since the recession ended in mid-2009..

San Francisco’s unemployment rate decreased to 4.8 percent in December, the third lowest among California’s 58 counties.

Foreclosure Activity in San Francisco was 2,358 in the fourth quarter, a 56.3 percent drop from 5,399 in 2012, stating that the economic standpoint of San Francisco currently is improving steadily.

If property was purchased in 2003, it would be worth 20 percent more in 2013.


If property was purchased in july 2012, it would be worth 25 percent more in July 2013.

“

Housing prices in the Bay Area continued to rise through the 4th Quarter of 2013. However, December sales volume in the Bay Area declined when compared with December of 2012, with the exception of San Mateo County where sales volume for the month increased by 18 percent.

“

Bay Area median prices went up 23.9 percent over the last year


ADJACENT BUIDLINGS ADJACENT HOTELS RITZ CARLTON CLUB PALACE HOTEL

THE WESTIN ST. REGIS

W SAN FRANCISCO

CARTOON ART MUSEM

SFMOMA

MOSCONE CENTER

YERBA BUENA

METREON

JEWISH MUSEM

CITY COLLEGE OF SF

ADJACENT BUILDINGS

WESTFIELD MALL

MARRIOTT

Approximately 20,000 of these rooms are within walking distance of the Moscone Center.

TOURISM “

Tourists are the primary source of financial and economic growth in San Francisco.

San Francisco hosted 16.5 million visitors in 2012, including hotel guests, those staying with friends and relatives, those staying in accommodations outside the city but whose primary destination was San Francisco, and regional visitors driving in for the day. Visitor spending reached the highest ever in 2012, with more than $8.93 billion spent in local businesses (up 5.5% from 2011). This means during an average day in San Francisco, 131,128 visitors are spending $24.46 million.


YERBA BUENA The picture (right-top) is the site of Yerba Buena in 1976. As an effort to kick out industry in San Francisco, the Bay-Area Council forced an urban reneweal in San Francisco, which could destory jobs of the working people and weaken the City’s economy. However, keeping the parking lot made it difficult for new apartments and future residential buildings to be built. To allow more visitors overall and for Moscone Center, Yerba Cuena was built as an act to create a financially stable region. “Create a new management structure and qualified provider to manage, operate and staff Yerba Buena Gardens on behalf of local government agencies. Transform a derelict area in to a safe, comfortable and active focal point. Establish a sense of community among diverse audiences. Integrate diverse and overlapping needs of City department’s nonprofits, educational and cultural institutions, hospitality and convention businesses, and local businesses. The Yerba Buena Gardens presently, has identified an estimates $4.6 Million, in renewal and management funds for over the next ten years. The reneals include: Roof Repairs and replacements Electrical, lighting, cooling and fire system upgrades Elevator Repairs Boiler Replacements Open space restorations and water proofing There are approximately 4.5 Million Visitors annually, and Gardens festival which attract 120,000 visitors. More than 2,500 new residences has been built in the last 10 years.

“YBG generates over $8 billion annually for the local economy, and this amount is increasing. The district now attracts nearly ten million visitors per year; that number will increase within three years when major additional facilities are completed.”


MOSCONE CENTER Moscone Center is responsible for 21% of Tourist activities in San Francisco, providing a global threshold for business employers and an important factor to the welfare of economic stability in San Francisco, providing jobs for residents. Moscone Convention Center is the primary source for hotel room demands in San Francisco. Theres are 20,000 Hotel rooms within walking distance from Monscone Center. However, it is the smallest out ofr 13 convention centers which are outlooked as compeitions. If Moscone Center does not expand, it will lose a number of current conventions losing 2,057,000,000 billion dollars in direct spending towards San Francisco from 2010- 2019.

“Moscone Center currently hosts 1 million visitors each year and generates more than $1.6 billion in visitor spending. This spending contributes millions of dollars to the City’s General Fund and supports thousands of jobs. Tourism is San Francisco’s major industry, generating almost $8.5 billion in economic activity, supporting more than 71,400 jobs, and contributing $524 million to the General Fund to help support neighborhood services such as police protection, parks, roads maintenance and firefighters.” “San Francisco has already lost meetings representing $2.057 billion in direct spending as a result of space limitations for meetings with dates between 2010 and 2019. and exhibit space – especially contiguous exhibition space.”

The Proposed Moscone Center acffects both North and South Buildings creating an expansion and direct connection undeground.

Proposed Site Plan


GEARY INTERACTIVE YAEL DESIGNS ADVISORY BOARD CO HERMAN MILLER INC INTER TAX FITZSIMMONS HELEN BRITISH AMERICAN BUSINESS COUNCIL COPY CENTRAL DESIGN CHAIN ASSOCIATES, LLC SMALL BUSINESS EXCHANGE INC COTE & CO DOMO TECHNOLOGIES INC 365OUTSOURCE COMPASSPOINT NONPROFIT SERVICES GVIS INSURANCE AND BENEFITS UC BERKELEY EXTENSION-SOMA CENTER ST GILES SAN FRANCISCO SEDWAY CONSULTING REVERE ACADEMY OF JEWELRY ARTS TMP DIRECTIONAL MARKETING LIC KENSHOO INC

COMPASS FAMILY SERVICES NORTHERN CALIFORNIIA COMMUNITY LOAN FUND CENTER FOR JUSTICE & ACCTBLTY CITICENS HOUSING CORPORATION FAMILY CAREGIVER ALLIANCE CENTER TOOLWORKS DEATH PENALTY FOCUS NATIONAL UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF THE BAY AREA INDEPENDENT LIVING RESOURCE CENTER NATIONAL LYMPHEDEMA NETWORK INC CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES STUPSKI FAMILY FOUNDATION MAKE-A-WISH FOUNDATION SIERRA CLUB

SOCAL ORGANIZATIONS

BUSINESS COMPANIES

SITE

1600 FEET RADIUS AREA


HIGH POPULATION INTENSITY

60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 1990 2000 2010 2012 WHITE ASIAN AFRICAN AMERICAN

ESTIMATED DAYTIME POPULATION 945,480

TOTAL CRASHES MOTORIST FAULT

LOW

NIGHT TIME


CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL URBAN PICNIC LA BOULANGE PSOSH BAGEL CAFE CLAUDE GITANE HAKKASAN SUPER DUPER BURGER BLU SUPER DUPER BURGER CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN DUCCA MASO GROVE YERBA BUENA AME RESTAURANT AMBER INDIA RESTAURANT BLUESTEM BRASSERIE PRESS CLUB TROPISUENO THE VIEW ANNABELLE’S BAR & BISTRO TOKYO EXPRESS DENNY’S MEL’S DRIVE-IN GREEN PAPAYA TRACE

GRAYSTONE HOTEL HOTEL PALOMAR SAN FRANCISCO THE MOSSER HOTEL FOUR SEASONS HOTEL MARRIOTT MARQUIS THE MOSSER HOTEL HOTEL PALOMAR SAN FRANCISCO THE WESTIN SAN FRANCISCO PALACE HOTEL THE ST. REGIS W SAN FRANCISCO

HOTELS

RESTAURANTS

SITE

1600 FEET RADIUS AREA


Four SHAFTS rises from a CUBE

1X

2X

+

3X

+

5X

+

+

_The cube divided diagonally into quadrant. As the structure moves upward, the mass is diminished one quadrant at a time until it is reduced to a single, triangular prism 70 stories (1028 ft) above grade. _This means that the floor plan varies with the height.

LEVELS 4 - 24

LEVELS 25- 31

LEVELS 32 - 44

LEVELS 45 - 70

Whole structure supported by the FIVE STEEL COLUMNS at the corners of the building _Tower structural lines are pull just inside the building envelope + shape of envelope changes dramatically = position of columns joggle out-of-plumb as they make their way down = eccentrically loaded columns

A single eccentricity in a column will cause bending, but two or more lines of eccentricity, joined by a uniform shear force mechanism, will counteract and

Conceptual plan diagram on 25th story Shows the two major partitions of the architectural geometry. The line of the glass curtain wall falls on the pure geometry of the square divided diagonally into quadrants. The structural line for steel and the positions of concrete columns are held within the pure geometry, forcing shifting alignment. The potential bending problem caused by misalignment is solved by the concrete when used as a uniform shear force mechanism.

glass

concrete

concrete


MEGASTRUCTURE _There are four megacolumns, one at each corne, but due to the changing floor shape, a fifth central megacolumn is required at the higher lever. 4

3

4

3

3

5 1

2

70

58

1

5

5 2

The bank of China tower is a ‘stack’ of five twelve-story ‘buildings’, each of which are supported by the megastructure.

1

2

1

2

Load from central megacolumn at Level 25 Pyramid Megatructure

45 MEGASTRUCTURE

Reaction from corner megacolumn

32 12 STOREYS 19 TRUSSED FLOOR

6

The central megacolumn stops at Level 25, its load being transferred to the corner megacolumns by a pyramid structure.

TRUSSED FLOOR & PERIMETER COLUMNS _At the bottom of each 12 storey building is a storey height trussed floor. This act as the ‘foundation’ for the 12 storey building, transferring the loa d to the megacolumns. _ The vertical loads in the perimeter columns are transferred directly into the facade megastructure at the points of structural intersection.


1 2 3

_At Level 4 the horizontal wind loads from the facade megatrusses are transferred to the vertical steel/concrete core by forces in the plaine of the steel diaphragm structure.

Force from Megatrusses

Reaction from Tube

Steel Diaphragm

Force from Megatrusses

_The CORE transfers these horizontal loads by shear forces in the core walls to the concrete

diaphragm at Level 0.

Wind Load

Shear Force in Tube

Concrete Diaphragm

_There are also vertical forces in the CORE caused by the push/pull forces from the bending moment. These are carried down to separate core foundation. Wind Load

Level 4

Concrete Diaphragm

Level 0

Foundation Reactions


_The horizontal forces in the Level 0 concrete diaphragm are transferred to the top of

the vertical basement by forces in the plane of the diaphragm structure. _The forces in the WALLS are transferred to THE GROUND by friction forces on the faces and the base of the walls.

Wind load from Tube

Forces in Diaphragm Concrete Diaphragm

Forces Between Wall and Ground Perimeter Basement Walls

COMPOSITE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM _Requires 40% less steel structure than other skyscrapers _Achieved by the efficiency of the overall structure form, and most significantly by the way the megastructure joins were constructed. _The facade megatrusses were built as Individual Plane Trusses with simple joints. Where they met at the corners to form the three dimensional megastructure they were connected by CASTING CONCRETE around them to form the megacolumnsand the joints of themegatructure.

Megacolumn Steel Plane Frames

HIGHT LEVEL

LOW LEVEL


_Wind load are resisted by the truss action of the facade megastructure. the external facades have cross-braced trusses. 70

1 2

4 3

44

31

18

1

3

2

_At the higher levels there are also external facades on the plan diagonals. these facades have diagonally braced trusses.

5

6

70

44

70

5

31

18

7

31

18

6

4


N

Bank of China tower on an intricate inland site. Tall unique headquarter in a Typhon region (double the wind loads carried by the Chicago and New York skyscrapers) Twice of SF’s Seismic

force

Land sold in low price with the growing concern over the future of Hong Kong in the run-up to the transfer of sovereighty. Represent the aspirations of the Chinese people, yet also symbolize good will

N

FACTS: OFFICIAL NAME: Bank of China Tower STATUS: Completed COUNTRY: China CITY: Hong Kong BUILDING FUNCTION: office STRUCTURAL MATERIAL: composite Proposed: 1977 Start of Construction: 1985 Completion: 1990 Global Ranking: #23 tallest in the World Regional Ranking: #14 tallest in Asia (excluding the Middle East) National Ranking: #11 tallest in China City Ranking: #4 tallest in Hong Kong FIGURES: Height: Architectural 367.4 m/ 1205 feet Height: Occupied 288.3 m/ 946 feet Height: To Tip 367.4 m/ 1205 feet Floors Above Ground: 72 Floors Below Ground: 4 # of Elevators: 49 Tower GFA: 135,000 m² / 1,453,128 ft² # of Parking Spaces 370

CRITICISM: _The bank is the only major building in Hong Kong to have bypassed the convention of consulting with Feng Shui masters on matters of design prior to construction.

The solution assimilates ARCHITECTURE and ENGINEERING simutaneously. _Asymmetrical tower that informs both skyline and street. _Four shafts rise from a cube _Whole structure supported by the five steel columns at the corners of the building _Triangular frameworks transferring the weight of the structure onto the five columns. _A modern composite structural system resists high-velocity winds eliminates the need for many internal vertical supports the building uses less steel than typical for a building its size (40%) _Bamboo as a significant inspiration symbolically: livelihood, prosperity, hope and revitalization structurally: with each node, the building grows higher

_In China, the “X” shapes is seen as a symbol of death(replaced by ‘diamonds’).


_The vertical laods from the floors are transferred to the four corner megacolumns. These loads

counteract the tension forces caused by the wind loads on the facade megatrusses. This maintains upward reactions at the base of the building under wind loading.

+

RW

RW

=

RV

RV

RV R W

R V +R W

TRANSFER OF HORIZONTAL WIND LOAD AND VERTICAL LOAD TO THE GROUND

_Perimeter walls of the basement _Five elements in the load path for the horizontal wind forcese: 1. The facade megatrusses 2.A horizontal steel diaphragm structure at Level 4 3.Avertical steel/concrete core between Level 4 and the foundation 4.A horizontal concrete diaphragm strecture at Level 0 5.Vertical concrete perimeter basement walls Facade Megatruss

Wind Load

Horizontal Steel Diaphragm Steel/Concrete Tube Concrete Diaphragm Perimeter Basement Wall

Foundations


N

1”=80’


15 stories atrium

1 2

3

1”=80’


At ground level, the tower is pulled back from the street to create an amicable pedestrian atmosphere that is fully accessible and sheltered from the urban bedlam. It is surrounded by a broad promenade, and flanked by cooling water gardens that muffle the activity and noise of surrounding traffic.


Holding the new digital M today, nothing feels different. The same precise focus, the same intuitive light measuring, wonderfully smooth click of a shutter, and exactly the same relation between what you just saw outside, and the inner image that precise each photogragh. And even if in the on going digital revolution, Leica is manage to preserve and translate into the digital age, eveything what could only dream of. A camera like your eye, your hand, and your heart.


Once photographing meant a large box camera on a tripod, shifting film plate after each shot - and working with a dark cloth over your head and the camera. But then something happened...

A test shot done by Oskar, 1914, in the city of Wezlar

In the venerable optical factory, which had been successfully developing world-class microscopes at Leitz, Wetzlar since 1849, a new idea caused a real stir: Oskar Barnack wanted to move away from the traditional, heavy plate cameras then used for most photography and search for a completely new form of photographic technology. He developed the Ur-Leica, arguably the first truly successful small-format camera in the world. The small picture format of 24x36mm was achieved at that time by doubling the 18 x 24 mm cinema format. Delayed due to WW1, the first Leica (a contraction of Leitz Camera) did not enter series production until 1924 and was introduced to the public in 1925.


PROGRAMS

ENTRY SHOWCASE SPACE RETAIL STORE STUDIO ENVIRONMENTAL MIMICING SPACE SERVICE & REPAIR CENTER WORLDWIDE NETWORK CENTER MEETING ROOM CAFE STORAGE

PRIMARY OCCUPANTS

TECHNICAL STORE FRONT: SALES FACULTY TECHNICIAN OPTICIAN

ENTRY SHOWCASE SPACE OPTICAL SHOP OPTICAL LABORATORY CAFE STORAGE

BEHIND THE SCENE: TECHNICIAN OPTICIAN ENGINEER COPYWRITER DIGITAL CONTENT SPECIALIST SYSTEMS ENGINEER TECHNICAL SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE

ENTRY MUSEUM GALLERY (PROFESSIONALS) GALLERY (NOVICE) PRINTING ROOMS MEETING ROOM STUDIO COMPETITION DEPARTMENT CAFE STORAGE

CULTURAL MUSEUM MANAGER MUSEUM FACULTY TECHNICIAN HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS FILM MAKERS SOCIAL MEDIA SOCIAL WORKERS

ENTRY OFFICE SPACE DEVELOPING DEPARTMENT LABORATORY STORAGE

MISSION STREET PROPOSED HIGHRISE

MODULARIZED OFFICE/PRIVATE

H

TYPICAL HIGHRISE ATRIUM

LEVEL OF PRIVACY

L

RETAIL ext/ PUBLIC OPEN SPACES/GARDENS


Leica: that means best German Engineering and a special culture of the picture. Leica has a long history of focusing on perception and has developed innovative instruments that afford a unique seeing experience. The products expand the natural limits of perception when the distance is too great or the light too weak and open up new dimensions for human vision and insight. ntuitive controls, combined with upgradeable, top-quality systems, provide the best picture results and offer unparalleled creative freedom. Leica helps transform vision into personal creative fulfilment, in many cases nurturing a fervent passion for expression that spans the decades. Focus on the essential Long-standing values Perfect tools With Oskar Barnack's sensational new small-format camera, photojournalism was brought closer to actual events and began telling stories in a more dynamic and truthful manner. "new form of vision" "integral part of the eye" "extension of the hand". S ince this momentous development, users have been able to focus their full concentration on the subject and the picture. Building on this first invention and on the innovative spirit demonstrated by Oskar Barnack, Leica is constantly working to create the perfect tools to extend that unique vision and the unlimited possibilities it represents.

LFI – Leica Fotografie International is presenting selected areas of the gallery, and news from round the world of photography, in a completely overhauled App. In the LFI gallery, photographers from around the world show the pictures they have taken with their Leica cameras. Exhibitions, current photo projects and technical innovations – with the LFI App News you are always up-to-date.


To see and be seen

Manhattan Street Corner New York, New York

Higher Ground Jakarta, Indonesia

Homeless in the Tent City Greenville, South Carolina


CIRCULATION

Separation

OVERALL RELATIONSHIP

Linkage Linkage Linkage


Leica: that means best German Engineering and a special culture of the picture. Our eyes have the greatest influence over how we perceive and understand our world. Leica has a long history of focusing on perception and has developed innovative instruments that afford a unique seeing experience. The products expand the natural limits of perception when the distance is too great or the light too weak and open up new dimensions for human vision and insight. The optical performance in unmistakeable - Leica quality is in a class by itself - both in analog and digital capture modes. Intuitive controls, combined with upgradeable, top-quality systems, provide the best picture results and offer unparalleled creative freedom. In this way, Leica helps transform vision into personal creative fulfilment, in many cases nurturing a fervent passion for expression that spans the decades. Focus on the essential In today's market, many products attempt to attract buyers with countless features and unusual forms. Almost anything is possible. But it is often the things that appear simple which prove to be the most difficult to attain. Long-standing values Leica stands for visual enjoyment and lasting value. Our approach and Leica's unique technical expertise make our optical instruments ideal companions offering the highest possible reliability and durability. Even under extreme conditions such as severe temperature fluctuation or impacts, our products meet or exceed the highest expectations. Perfect tools With Oskar Barnack's sensational new small-format camera, photojournalism was brought closer to actual events and began telling stories in a more dynamic and truthful manner. The reaction among photo artists to the possibility of achieving a "new form of vision" was extremely enthusiastic. The Leica became an indispensable companion for all situations, an "integral part of the eye" or an "extension of the hand". Since this momentous development, users have been able to focus their full concentration on the subject and the picture. Building on this first invention and on the innovative spirit demonstrated by Oskar Barnack, Leica is constantly working to create the perfect tools to extend that unique vision and the unlimited possibilities it represents.


MORPH

STAGE 1: SPLIT

STAGE 2: EXPAND Open space

STAGE 3: SHIFT/SUSPEND Hiearchy, Atrium

STAGE 4: BEND Sun angle, Step back


MODULE

STAGE 5: REDIRECT THE CHANNAL

STAGE 6: PLUG IN OPEN SPACES


TECHNICAL CULTURAL


PRIVATE ENTRENCE E

PRIVATE EN

C TREN


What  is  the  difference  between  program  and  agenda?     Rem  said  that  he’s  been  trying  to  find  ways  that  we  could  circumvent  or  avoid  the   architect’s  passivity,  and  it  means  his  or  her  dependence  on  the  initiatives  of  others,   so  my  understanding  of  program  in  general  is  something  that  is  fixed,  decided  by   others,  which  in  a  way  is  generic.  However,  agenda  is  something  that  we  make  up   for  ourselves  to  follow  in  order  to  achieve,  define  or  arrange  programs.  It  is  a   strategy,  a  certain  way  of  approaching.         Architect’s  passivity?  What  is  an  example  of  an  architect  being  passive?     An  architect’s  passivity  is  his  or  her  dependence  on  the  initiatives  of  others.  My   understanding  is  that  if  the  architect  just  simply  relies  on  others  to  provide  him  or   her  a  guideline  without  his  or  her  own  understanding  or  input,  every  decision  is   made  by  others.         Why  would  an  architect  want  to  pursue  his  or  her  own  interest?  What  are  some   examples?     The  initial  goal  is  to  create  something  more  than  just  a  building  or  object,  but   meaning,  meaning  that  is  given  by  the  architect  to  express  his  or  her  point  of  view  of   the  culture,  the  politics,  it’s  a  manifesto.  Or  simply,  just  avoiding  the  architect’s   passivity.  The  Prada  store  in  NYC  by  Rem  expressed  more  than  what  the  client   wanted  which  is  a  retail  store,  It’s  an  expression  of  Rem’s  understanding  of   consumerism,  or  his  proposal  of  what  could  be  done  that  is  more  than  just  a  generic   high-­‐end  retail  store.         How  does  Tschumi  differentiate  bubble  diagrams  from  spatial  connections  or   sequential  route?     The  major  difference  is  one  is  highly  influenced  by  the  given  site,  one  is  not.  Spatial   connections  or  sequential  routes  are  inserted  into  a  given  site,  it  has  a  context,   according  to  his  own  words,  that  in  turn  affects  the  selection  or  the  expression  of  the   programmatic  concept.  


TECHNICAL STORE FRONT: SALES FACULTY TECHNICIAN OPTICIAN BEHIND THE SCENE: TECHNICIAN OPTICIAN ENGINEER COPYWRITER DIGITAL CONTENT SPECIALIST SYSTEMS ENGINEER TECHNICAL SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE CULTURAL MUSEUM MANAGER MUSEUM FACULTY TECHNICIAN HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS FILM MAKERS SOCIAL MEDIA SOCIAL WORKERS

ENTRY SHOWCASE SPACE RETAIL STORE STUDIO ENVIRONMENTAL MIMICING SPACE SERVICE & REPAIR CENTER WORLDWIDE NETWORK CENTER MEETING ROOM CAFE

PROGRAMS

PRIMARY OCCUPANTS

ENTRY SHOWCASE SPACE OPTICAL SHOP OPTICAL LABORATORY CAFE STORAGE

ENTRY MUSEUM GALLERY (PROFESSIONALS) GALLERY (NOVICE) PRINTING ROOMS MEETING ROOM STUDIO COMPETITION DEPARTMENT CAFE STORAGE ENTRY OFFICE SPACE DEVELOPING DEPARTMENT LABORATORY STORAGE RESIDENTIAL CAFE

MISSION STREET

MOBILIZING programs. re-arrange programs into MODULES that are then DIFFERENCIATED by the quality of space according to program, creating a flexible circulation system that allow program to be mobilized. Users would then be able to engage the horizontal cityscape through vertical experiences.


ATRIUM SHOWCASE SPACE RETAIL STORE STUDIO

SALES FACULTY TECHNICIAN

SERVICE & REPAIR CENTER

HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

RESTAURANT

SFFS FACULTY

GALLERY

FILM MAKERS

RESIDENTIAL OFFICE SFFS CINEMA MUSEUM

PRIVACY EXPOSURE TO NATURAL LIGHTING TRANSPORTATION TRANSPARENCY

MOBILIZED SHARE SPACE

RESIDENTIAL RESTAURANT

STUDIO RESTAURANT

SFFS RESTAURANT

FILM CENTER RESTAURANT

OFFICE SOCIAL MEDIA MUSEUM RESTAURANT

STUDIO SERVICE RETAIL STORE RESTAURANT

TECHNICAL SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE MUSEUM FACULTY

CONPETTITION DEPARTMENT

GALLERY RESTAURANT

SYSTEMS ENGINEER

DARK ROOM

MEETING ROOM

GALLERY RESTAURANT

SOCIAL WORKERS MEDIA FACULTY STUDIO FACULTY RESTAURANT FACULTY GALLERY FACULTY RESIDENTIAL FACULTY


GALLERY STUDIO STUDIO

RESTAURANT SF FILM SOCIETY

CINEMA OFFICE

MUSEUM

WEST

RETAIL

SOUTH

EAST

NORTH


GALLERY GAL

STUDIO

LER Y

REST AUR A

NT

O

I D U ST

RESTAURANT

STUDIO

RES

TAU RA

NT

O

I D U ST

SFF

S MU

A M E IN

C

SEU

RES

M

TAU RA

SFFS

CINEMA

OFFICE

IO D U

NT

ST

RE

IL T A T RE RAN U A T S

MUSEUM

RETAIL


T/E MEN WOM V J MECH F SH SH

higher level

M M H M H

F SH SH V

T/E MEN WOM V J MECH F SH SH

mid level

M M H M H

M M H M H

V T/E MEN WOM F MECH F SH SH L L L J V

F SH SH V

T/E MEN WOM V J MECH F SH SH lower level

V T/E MEN WOM F MECH F SH SH L L L J V

F SH SH V

V T/E MEN WOM F MECH F SH SH J V

office shuttle public elevator elevator elevator

PRIVATE PROGRAM

office shuttle public elevator elevator elevator

PUBLIC PROGRAM

CORE LAYOUT & VERTICAL CIRCULATION & PROGRAM DIAGRAM


Stairs Private elevator opening

Public elevator opening

CORE LAYOUT & VERTICAL CIRCULATION & PROGRAM DIAGRAM


GALLERY: 1 level 821 sqft RESIDENTIAL: 3 levels 19608 sqft RESIDENTIAL: 3 levels 47453 sqft

SFFS OFFICE: 5 levels 41056 sqft MIX USE STUDIO: 3 levels 17947 sqft

OFFICE: 6 levels 39597 sqft CINEMA: 1 levels 4240 sqft

STUDIO SPACE: 5 levels 18715 sqft

MUSEUM: 2 levels 9090 sqft

OFFICE: 3 levels 27726 sqft

CORE LAYOUT & VERTICAL CIRCULATION & PROGRAM DIAGRAM


CORE LAYOUT & VERTICAL CIRCULATION & PROGRAM DIAGRAM


ARH  410     YUAN  YUAN   SPRING  BREAK  ASSIGNMENT           HOW  CAN  WE  CIRCULATE  THROUGH  THE  PUBLIC  SPACES  IN  THE  TOWER  TO   CREATE  A  VERTICAL  CITY?   USE  LINKAGE  AS  DATUM  TO  RECONSTITUTE  THE  TOWER  INTO  VERTICAL   SPACES       CONCEPT  STATMENT  &  PROGRAM  AGENDA   Program,  user,  circulation,  and  the  quality  of  space  are  CONFINED  within  the   envelope  of  a  typical  static,  isolated,  mundane  high  rise.   By  MOBILIZING  programs,  programs  are  re-­‐arranged  into  MODULES  that  are  then   DIFFERENTIATED  by  the  quality  of  space  according  to  program.     Users  would  then  be  able  to  engage  the  horizontal  cityscape  through  vertical   experiences.  Essentially  freeing  the  high-­‐rise  experience  from  its  envelope  in  an   inner  functional  aspect.     CLIENT  ASPIRATION   _LEICA  HAS  A  LONG  HISTORY  OF  FOCUSING  ON  PERCEPTION  AND  HAS   DEVELOPED  INNOVATIVE  INSTRUMENTS  THAT  AFFORD  A  UNIQUE  SEEING   EXPERIENCE.  THE  PRODUCTS  EXPAND  THE  NATURAL  LIMITS  OF  PERCEPTION,   OPEN  UP  NEW  DIMENSIONS  FOR  HUMAN  VISION  AND  INSIGHT.     _DEEPLY  ROOTED  IN  APPRECIATION  OF  PICTURE  AND  FILM  AS  ART  FORM  AND   MEANINGFUL  AGENT  FOR  SOCIAL  CHANGE.     _DEMOCRATIC,  EGALITARIAN     _The  San  Francisco  Film  Society  encourages  the  progressive  evolution  of  film  culture   and  individual  lives  by  celebrating  the  transformative  power  of  the  moving  image  in   all  its  forms.  Through  a  combination  of  intelligent  programming  and  exemplary   service,  it  creates  singularly  vital  experiences  for  audiences  of  all  kinds.     _TO  RAISE  AWARENESS,  INFLUENCE  OPINION,  CHANGE  BEHAVIOR,  ENCOURAGE   ACTION,  BUILD  COMMUNITIES,  EVEN  INSTIGATE  SOCIAL  MOVEMENT.       FORMAL  LANGRUAGE   MOBILIZING  programs.  Program  elements  are  re-­‐arranged  into  MODULES  that  are   then  DIFFERENTIATED  by  the  quality  of  space  according  to    program.  In  addition,   the  formal  langruage  is  highly  influenced  and  based  on  the  need  of  the  program.  


PROGRAM  AGENDA   PRIMARY  OCCUPANTS  are  separated  into  two  types:  technical  and  cultural.     TECHNICAL   STORE  FRONT:   SALES  STAFF   TECHNICIAN   OPTICIAN   BEHIND  THE  SCENE:   TECHNICIAN   OPTICIAN   ENGINEER   COPYWRITER   DIGITAL  CONTENT  SPECIALIST   SYSTEMS  ENGINEER   TECHNICAL  SUPPORT  REPRESENTATIVE     CULTURAL   MUSEUM  MANAGER   MUSEUM  STAFF   TECHNICIAN   HUMAN  RESOURCE   PROFESSIONAL  PHOTOGRAPHERS   FILM  MAKERS   SOCIAL  MEDIA     SOCIAL  WORKERS       And  then  are  modularized  into  several  modules  according  to  the  program  function,   then  inner  connected  by  the  “Linkage”.  Each  module  has  independent  supporting   programs,  for  example  lobby,  café.     ENTRY   SHOWCASE  SPACE   RETAIL  STORE   STUDIO     ENVIRONMENTAL  MIMICING  SPACE   SERVICE  &  REPAIR  CENTER   WORLDWIDE  NETWORK  CENTER   MEETING  ROOM    CAFÉ         ENTRY   SHOWCASE  SPACE   OPTICAL  SHOP  


OPTICAL  LABORATORY   CAFE   STORAGE       ENTRY   MUSEUM   GALLERY  (PROFESSIONALS)   GALLERY  (NOVICE)   PRINTING  ROOMS   MEETING  ROOM   STUDIO   COMPETITION  DEPARTMENT   CAFE   STORAGE       ENTRY   OFFICE  SPACE   DEVELOPING  DEPARTMENT   LABORATORY   STORAGE         RESIDENTIAL   CAFÉ   LOBBY  


The  Function  of  Ornament     a. What  is  an  example  of  “mechanisms”  that  allows  architecture  to  engage  the   city?   Architects  have  been  capturing  the  forces  that  shape  society  as  material  to  work   with  in  order  to  use  mechanisms  to  connect  to  culture.  There  are  several  examples   of  using  style  as  a  way  to  achieve  this.  For  example  modernism  used  transparency  to   achieve  a  “direct”  representation  of  architectural  elements  of  space,  structure  and   program.     Another  example  is  Sigfried  Kracauer’s  suggestion    “  bestow  form  to  a  given  matter”.   These  buildings  produce  affects  that  seem  to  grow  directly  from  matter  itself.       b. Why  is  it  difficult  to  maintain  a  pure  transparency  in  glass  in  contemporary   practice?   Pure  transparency  can  be  seen  as  cynical  and  dull,  there  is    no  trace  of  individuality   but  on  the  contrary,  to  it  is  suppressed.       c. What  are  the  opportunities  when  buildings  no  longer  “represent  the  interior   ”through  an  “obsession  with  transparency”?   One  of  the  opportunities  is  using  décor  to  integrate  buildings  into  the  urban  realm   and  give  them  meaning  in  the  eyes  of  the  public.       d. How  does  “direct  sensation”  help  architecture  engage  the  contemporary  city   where  cultural  references  are  diverse?   Operating  through  direct  sensations,  they  bypass  the  need  for  the  codification  of   language  and  are  able  to  shift  across  space  and  time.  Direct  sensation  may  produce   indirect  analogies,  but  their  primary  purpose  is  to  render  the  invisible  forces  in   contemporary  culture  visible.       e. What  are  some  examples  of  our  contemporary  ornaments  according  to  the   author?   Contemporary  ornaments  are  based  on  new  systems  of  production  that  opens  up   possibilities  for  differentiation  and  customization,  which  are  explored  through   investigations  of  patterns  in  the  structure,  screen  and  surface  chapters.      


NORTH EAST ELEVATION Located Facade SOUTH WEST ELEVATION Distance between Skin 1 and Skin 2

Resident

Cinema

Museum

Office

Lower Level Studio Restaurant

Office Resident

Studio

Office Resident

Restaurant Higher Level Studio

Lower Level Studio

Restaurant

Office Atrium

Located Program

NORTH EAST ELEVATION SOUTH WEST ELEVATION

0’

1’

3’

6’

8’

18’

24’

Amount of Glazing (Module / Panel)

8’

3’

3’ 8’

6’ 6’ 24’ 3’

3’

3’ 3’

3’

24’ 24’

18’

24’

18’

8’

6’

6’

SKIN 1

24’

3’

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION - JESSIE SQUARE

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - MISSION STREET

3’

3’

3’

3’

NORTH EAST ELEVATION - 3RD STREET

NORTH WEST ELEVATION - THE WESTIN HOTEL

VOID


SAN FRANCISCO FOG

CLEAR EDGE

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION - JESSIE SQUARE

-MINIMUM distance between skin 1 and skin 2 -HIGHER sun light penetration -allowable AIR circulation

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - MISSION STREET

-MAXIMUM distance between skin 1 and skin 2 -LOWER sun light penetration -allowable PHYSICAL circulation

NORTH EAST ELEVATION - 3RD STREET

NORTH WEST ELEVATION - THE WESTIN HOTEL


TRANSLUCENCY LEVEL

SKIN 2

LOW

HIGH


SKIN 2


FLOOR HEIGHT TRUSS SYSTEM

LOAD PATH


F A

G

B

C

D

E

H

1’ 1’ A MONOLITHIC TEMPERED GLASS B INSULATING GLASS UNIT C D E F G H

SUMMER

WINTER

SPIDER CLAMPS

LOUVER

SUSPENDED CEILING WITH TRANSLUCENT GLASS INTERIOR GLASS WALL STRUCTURAL GLASS FINS RAISED FLOOR


IMAGE LAMINATED BETWEEN GLASS

A

B

D

H

C

F

_SELECT SECTIONS OF ARONSON FACADE _ALTER THE MODULE OF THE PIXELS _DISTRIBUTE THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE BUILDING TO CREATE FOG PATTERN E

A

H

F

G

A LAMINATED GLASS B SEATING C D E F G H

SPIDER CLAMPS

INSULATING GLASS

MONOLITHIC TEMPERED GLASS SUSPENDED CEILING WITH TRANSLUCENT GLASS STAIRCASE RAISED FLOOR


Wall type Load Path DIAGRAM

STRUCTURAL PLAN A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3 4

5

6

HIGHER LEVEL STRUCTURAL PLAN

1

2

3 4

5

6

MIDDLE LEVEL STRUCTURAL PLAN

A

N

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3

4

5

6

6’

Level Roof 355’

Level 26 342’

Level 25 329’

Level 24 316’

Level 23 303’

Level 22 290’

Level 21 277’

Level 20 264’ HIGH LEVEL PLAN

Level 19 251’

Level 18 231’

Level 17 218’

Level 16 205’

Level 15 192’

Discontinuation

Level 14 179’

MID LEVEL PLAN

Level 13 166’

Level 12 150’

Level 11 137’

30’

1

Level 10 124’

Level 9 98’

Level 8 111’

30’

2 Level 7 98’

Level 6 85’

Level 5 72’

3

Level 4 59’

Discontinuation

4 Level 3 39’

Level 2 26 ’

5

Discontinuation

Level 1 13’

GROUND LEVEL PLAN

0’

Level 0 Ground level

Level -1 -10’

Level -2 -20

6

Level -3 -30’

GROUND LEVEL STRUCTURAL PLAN

STRUCTURAL PLAN A

Level Roof 355’

Level 26 342’

Level 25 329’

Level 24 316’

Level 23 303’

Level 22 290’

Level 21 277’

Level 20 264’ HIGH LEVEL PLAN

Level 19 251’

Level 18 231’

Level 17 218’

Level 16 205’

Level 15 192’

MID LEVEL PLAN

Level 14 179’

Level 13 166’

Level 12 150’

Level 11 137’

Level 10 124’

Level 9 98’

Level 8 111’

Level 7 98’

Level 6 85’

Level 5 72’

Level 4 59’

Level 3 39’

Level 2 26 ’

GROUND LEVEL PLAN

Level 0 Ground level

Level 1 13’

0’

Level -1 -10’

Level -2 -20

Level -3 -30’

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3

4

5

6

6’

Hat truss Dead Load Load hold upwards by hat truss


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

1

2

3 4

5

6

A HIGH LLEVEL PLAN 8 Level 289’

1

2

3 4

5

_CONSTRUCTION TYPE: 1-A _PROPERTY BUILDING STRUCTURE FIRE RATING: 3 hr _2 FIRE EXIT STAIRS (WITH SPRINKLERS): 3a minimum, or 30 feet minimun distance _MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE TO FIRE EXIT STAIRS: 300 FEET

6

A MID LLEVEL PLAN 2 Level 220’

N EXIT

1

2

3 4

EXIT 5

6

GROUND LEVEL L PLAN A Levell 0’


Arh 410 s14 yuan yuan archive bound optimized  

AAU ARH 410 Spring 2014 Student Work Example

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