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KAREN X. WANG PORTFOLIO 2018


contents 5

Curriculum Vitae

8 — 17

Floreo

18 — 27

Uninhabit

28 — 33

Hypostyle 7

34 — 43

Blocks Cooperative

44 — 49

Moriyama & Teshima

50 — 53

ECDM Architectes


hello. I am a third year student at the University of Waterloo’s School of Architecture. The following selection of works aims to showcase the skills and interests I have developed these past few years. Thank you for your consideration. t. e.

+1 647 717 9959 karenwxy@gmail.com


curriculum vitae education

Candidate for Bachelor of Architectural Studies, Honours Co-op

University of Waterloo 2015 - Present

Relevant Courses: Design Studio, Cultural History, Environmental Design, Building Construction

skills

experience

awards

DIGITAL

ANALOG

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Rhinoceros 3D AutoCAD Maxwell Render Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Grasshopper V-Ray Sketchup

Model Making 3D Printing Hand Drafting Lasercutting Photography

BILINGUAL

• •

English Mandarin

Architectural Assistant

Moriyama & Teshima

Competition Work Created 3D models, plans, elevations, and sections using Grasshopper, Rhino, and AutoCAD

September - December 2017

Architectural Intern

ECDM

Created plans, elevations, sections, diagrams, and collages using Adobe Creative Suite, AutoCAD, Sketchup, and V-Ray Designed bathrooms and kitchens for mixed-use residential/commercial complex

January - April 2017

Studio Instructor

Varley Art Gallery

Helped run art therapy courses for children with ADHD and ADD

June 2012 - April 2014

Excellent Academic Standing

University of Waterloo

Academic achievement above 80%

September 2015 - Present

International Experience Award

University of Waterloo

Scholarship for work experience abroad

2017

President’s Scholarship

University of Waterloo

Achieved entrance average above 90%

2015

Honour Roll

Unionville S.S.

Academic average over 80%

2011 - 2015


Recommendation letter

Paris, the 16th Juin 2017

To whom it may concerns

Karen Wang was employed as an Intern at E Combarel D Marrec Architectes during 2017. Karen was exposed to a diversity of projects varying in concept and scale during his time at ECDM. She worked on a large scale on two residential buildings in Nantes et in Cergy Pontoise (France) and an office building in Saint Denis (France). She contributed to these projects during the Design Development phase sketching concept designs, researching materials and creating presentation models for the project’s most complex and vital features. Alternatively, Karen also gained experience working on smaller scaled projects. At ECDM, Karen continually emerged as a key team member for every project in which she participated. She works extremely well within a team as well as independently. She is a dedicated team member, consistently exhibiting a clear understanding of the project and demonstrating good judgment and reliability. She regularly employs excellent communication skills, asking important questions and offering constructive suggestions. Likewise, her presentations are articulate and compelling. Her ability to respond and perform both to unexpected challenges under a tremendous pressure has been invaluable.

Emmanuel Combarel Dominique Marrec


FLOREO ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH SUPERVISOR

Reactor Cells Philip Beesley

FLOREO is an exploration of responsive architecture in relation to physical transformation. Is it possible that in our future, architectural fabrics will be able to move and change in response to conditions like humidity, sunlight, temperature, and movement? The FLOREO is an attempt at divining the structure that may allow for this based on the research of Chuck Hoberman. In this phase of the project, the FLOREO is an exterior roof structure that is connected by various rotatable joints. When several cells are connected, it forms a porous fabric that can open and close, changing its permeability in response to sunlight. In further phases, perhaps it will be possible to layer these cells in roof and floor systems to create a multi-storey structure that is permeable, kinetic, and constantly undergoing transformation. Its transformations could be powered by affixed photovoltaic cells. These cells could be used to regulate the balance between sunlight and shade. When the space it covers is needed for a festival or other event, the cells could open to create a shady space with a canopy for the public. When the space is not in use by many people, the cells close to allow sunlight and rain through to support the growth of vegetation in the park. If these systems are layered, the voids at can be created could be lined up to allow for circulation of people, sound, wind, and light. Or, the voids could be closed to avoid these same things.


CLOSED

OPEN


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CONCEPTUAL ELEVATION

11


12


CONCEPTUAL AXONOMETRIC

13


14


15


16

TEST 3

TEST 2

TEST 1


TEST 4A TEST 4B

EXPERIMENTATION AND ANALYSIS TEST 1

TEST 2

TEST 3

TEST 4

This was the first attempt at a circular deployable structure. However, research and understanding of the principles outlined by Hoberman were lacking. As a result, Test 0 doesn’t function correctly. Each scissor joint was made up of four joints connected at their ends so that the rotation of one didn’t affect any of the other three. This made Test 0 flimsy and unable to retain its circular structure.

After more careful examination of Hoberman’s experiments, it became clear that the scissor joint had to be made up of two joints connected in the middle where they crossed each other. This made the circle stable. However, this test failed as well because it would not expand and contract. As the circle expands, the joints would break apart trying to accomodate the change.

Here the pivot point of the two joints is placed more towards the center to see how this would affect the expansion and contraction. The joints are curved rather than straight to see if this would affect the nature of the structure. Test 2 also failed. The frame does expand and contract to a certain point but the material would curve with the effort and snap back to it’s original position when you let go.

The hypothesis that resulted from the previous tests is that the distance from the pivot point to either end need to be exactly the same. This is so each branch of the joint will move the same distance in reaction to the same rotational angle. This makes it so that the joints don’t break apart as the circle expands and contracts, making it possible for the strucutre to move smoothly. Test 3 proves this hypothesis. 17


UNINHABIT 2B DESIGN STUDIO SUPERVISOR LOCATION

Ontario Place Masterplan Lola Sheppard Toronto

UNINHABIT began as an exploration into creating a more generous architecture, one that can serve multitudes of species and link us in new and meaningful ways. It has two dedicated programs; one is to restore wildlife habitats and the other is to create an intensified experience of nature that envelops its inhabitants. The tower is a focus point, a dense concentration of the wildlife around it. It intersects three realms of living, two of which we rarely associate with: air, land, and water. The top is for the birds, the middle the humans, and the lowest depths for the fish. The project experiments with what it would be like to give the same consideration to wildlife habitats as to human. After all, we are not the sole inhabitants of a domain, nor are we dominant over all others. Instead of attempting to mimic nature and create something organic, a method which has been tried numerous times and failed just as many, the Tower uses modernist principles to inform the logic of the building. Rather than attempting to imitate something I don’t understand, using the teachings of modern architecture allows me to build as efficiently as possible. The core of the building is where the circulation, the program, and the structure are concentrated. It links the bird and fish habitats with the human portion which acts as an education and research center. Going through the core is a “hypernatural” experience. The tower is a modular unit which is meant to be repeated multiple times throughout the park. It can be customized to suit the needs of specific species depending on location, time of year, and the surrounding ecosystem. The tower is not so much a building as it is a dream of science fiction, an Exquisite Corpse whose strange limbs together manage to miraculously function.


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MASTERPLAN 21


22

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

GRID

GRID

FISH

HABITAT

HABITAT

FISH

BIRDS

BIRD

1:100


SECTIONAL MODEL

23


PLAN G

PLAN E

PLAN C

PLAN B

PLAN A


PLAN F

PLAN D

SUMMER

WINTER

SECTION


26


PLAN A

PLAN B

PLAN C

PLAN D

PLAN E

PLAN F

PLAN G 27


HYPOSTYLE 7 DIGITAL FABRICATION SUPERVISOR LOCATION

Outdoor Pavillion Connor O’Grady University of Waterloo

This design is a geometric intervention in the landscape of the BC Matthews Hall Green located on the Waterloo campus. Currently, it is simply an open field with long, thin paved roads where students cross everyday to get to their classes and access different facilities. That is approximately 6300 square meters of severely under-utilized green space. Because of its lack of shading, seating, and shelter, it is not a comfortable place to be. Hypostyle 7 will provide an interesting architectural space that students will like being in and revitalize the BC Matthews Hall Green. The two major precedents used for this project are the works of Richard Serra and the Hypostyle Hall of Ancient Egypt. Hypostyle 7 combines these two forms to create a labyrinth of different sized columns and a variety of spaces. The column is perforated with diamond shapes to allow ventilation and create an interesting lighting condition in the space. These columns are arranged by size, getting larger as you get closer to the center. The larger spaces can be used for large gatherings and games while the smaller ones can provide privacy for more solitary activities like reading. The connections between the disparate spaces gives an experience not unlike that of a labyrinth. The model of the perforated columns were made with Grasshopper through UV mapping. This perforated surface was then unrolled in Rhino and nested in the lasercutting template. The CNC machine cut and scored the chosen material (mylar) into several pieces which were then folded and glued in place.


30


E

D

E C

F D

B E

C

A C

E

D B A E F D

C

F

C E

D E F

PLAN

31


STEP 1 — LAYOUT

A

32

B

C


C

STEP 2 — FOLD

D

STEP 3 — GLUE

E

F

ELEVATION — SIZE COMPARISON

33


BLOCKS COOPERATIVE 2A DESIGN STUDIO SUPERVISOR LOCATION

The Grand Domestic Revolution Adrian Blackwell Toronto

BLOCKS COOPERATIVE is an attempt to create a new housing typology for multi-generational living in an urban ennvironment. It also explores the relationship between nature and the domestic home through modularity and a redefinition of “the terrace”. The paradigm of the traditional American nuclear family is becoming less prevalent as the neighbourhood around Bloor Street becomes heavily populated by immigrant families who bring their own traditions of domestic living. Many come from cultures that customarily have extended family members living together in symbiotic relationships of give and take. Even though this particular style of living is becoming more widespread, the architecture has not evolved to accommodate it. Modern housing complexes often disregard an element of space fundamental to human nature, that of the terrace. The terrace is the only space in the home that acts as an intermediary between nature and hearth. Jean Renaudie, a French architect, articulated it as such: “It is marvellous when it rains to stand inside your house and watch the rain fall on your terrace… It is one of those things which are not essential yet really matter in everyday life.”


FIRST FLOOR PLAN (+1)

SECOND FLOOR PLAN (+2) 36


THIRD FLOOR PLAN (+3)

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN (+4) 37


38

TYPOLOGY 1

TYPOLOGY 6

TYPOLOGY 4

TYPOLOGY 3

TYPOLOGY 5

TYPOLOGY 2


All the units are modular and made up of two boxes crossed together. These “Blocks” stack to create parks, courtyards, and private balconies at different levels of the building. These three types of terraces make up the hierarchy of green spaces that are the heart of the building. All circulation goes through these terrace spaces and most of the stairs are exterior. The blocks are offset to maximize light in the six story building. Four blocks share a large courtyard with one kitchen and dining room at the center. Each block also has its own private terrace space of varying sizes. A large net of ETFE, a plastic polymer, hangs over the entire complex to make the outdoor spaces comfortable year round.

ETFE NET

NET FRAME

CIRCULATION

STRUCTURE

3

2 1 6

LEGEND 5

RESIDENTIAL KITCHEN/DINING

BLOCKS

4

PRIVATE TERRACE CIRCULATION

39


PRIVATE TERRACE PERSPECTIVE

TYPOLOGY 5 MODEL

40


CLUSTER CIRCULATION 41


42


EAST-WEST SECTION

43


MORIYAMA & TESHIMA ARCHITECTS

Moriyama & Teshima Architects is an award-winning architecture firm based in Toronto. They are known for their transformative civic, cultural, and educational projects. The office is very multidisciplinary, with departments for architecture, planning, and interiors. During my time at M&T, I worked mainly on a mixed-use tower competition in Taiwan. The project was meant to be a new city center for Taichung. It was an extremely exciting and fast-paced experience as I got on board only two months before the deadline. I mainly worked on presentation orthographics and diagrams in AutoCAD, Sketchup, VRay, and Illustrator. The internship taught me the importance of time management, strong leadership, and collaboration. It also gave me invaluable experience being involved in large, cultural architecture projects.


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47

EAST ELEVATION


FLOOR 45

FLOOR 46

FLOOR 43

FLOOR 44

FLOOR 25

FLOOR 26

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ECDM ARCHITECTES

ECDM is a Parisian architecture firm established in 1993. The design philosophy focuses on a rigorous logic that dominates throughout the site to create a simple architecture. My work at ECDM varied from mixeduse residential/commercial complexes to the product design of an air-purifing unit. Throughout these, I had the oppurtunity to work on interiors, details, and presentations. I was able to develop my skills in AutoCAD, Sketchup, VRay, and Photoshop. Working in a foreign office taught me a lot about overseas architecture and culture.

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51


LOGEMENTS PAIRIE AU DUC — PLAN

LOGEMENTS PAIRIE AU DUC — COLLAGE

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AIR PURIFIER

AMELIE (2001)

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54


55


t. e.

+1 647 717 9959 karenwxy@gmail.com

Karen Xinyi Wang Portfolio 2018  

University of Waterloo Architecture Student

Karen Xinyi Wang Portfolio 2018  

University of Waterloo Architecture Student

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