Issuu on Google+

AS18: Accommodations for Parents With Disabilities Karen Haase Tuesday, April 30 – 1:30 p.m. – 2:45 a.m. Wednesday, May 1 – 9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.


Statutory & Regulatory Background


IDEA • Schools must ensure that parents “are afforded the  opportunity to participate.”  34 C.F.R. § 300.322(a)  • School districts “must take whatever action is  necessary to ensure that the parent understands the  proceedings ... including arranging for an interpreter  for parents with deafness.”  34 C.F.R. § 300.322(e)  


Section 504 • “No otherwise qualified individual with handicaps  ...  shall, solely by reason of her or his handicap, be  excluded from the participation in, be denied the  benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination.”  – Facilities  – “Qualified handicapped persons” with respect to  “other services” if eligible


ADA • Public entity is required to ensure that  communications with individuals with disabilities are  as effective as communications with others. • Title II of the ADAAA prohibits disability  discrimination by all public entities – Facilities – Service dogs


Physical Access • Two legal standards, depending on whether the facilities  are “existing facilities” or “new construction”  – Under Section 504, existing facilities are facilities  constructed prior to June 3, 1977  – Under Title II, existing facilities are facilities  constructed prior to January 26, 1992 • Must operate programs so that they are accessible when  “viewed in their entirety”


Case Law


Tacoma (WA) Sch. Dist. No. 10, 108 LRP 1045 (OCR 03/21/07)

• A parent with mobility impairment • Neighborhood school was built in 1901; not  accessible  • Parent complained repeatedly; “constant conflict" • Parent requested student accessible building for  first grade   • Requested transportation; school denied


Tacoma (WA) Sch. Dist. No. 10, 108 LRP 1045 (OCR 03/21/07)

• OCR: – The district did not provide accessible programs  during kindergarten year  – Transfer was acceptable method for providing  accessibility  – Failure to initially provide transportation was not a  violation (initially) – Failure to publish the name, title, or contact info of  the disability coordinator was a violation


Talbot County (PA) Pub. Schs., 45 IDELR 45 (OCR 2005)

• Parent with severe hearing loss  • Asked district to use CART during IEP meetings   • District refused and instead instructed staff to  accommodate in other ways  • The parent showed that during some of the  meetings accommodations were not used


Talbot County (PA) Pub. Schs., 45 IDELR 45 (OCR 2005)

• OCR found violation  – Parent was unable to participate in her son’s  meeting effectively – District was not required to adopt the parent’s  preferred methodology – District ordered to provide a means of  communication that would allow the parent  to participate in the meeting effectively


Los Angeles Unified Sch. Dist., 107 LRP 2570 (SEA CA 12/21/06)

• Non‐English‐speaking parent argued that the school  district denied her meaningful participation in her  child’s IEP because it failed to provide a state  “certified” interpreter • ALJ: no requirement that a state “certified”  interpreter is required • Interpreter can be staff member


Colo. Sch. for the Deaf and the Blind, 113 LRP 2971 (SEA CO 12/05/12)

• Staff fluent in ASL; parents are not  • During an IEP meeting, staff members held  conversations in ASL • Parents claimed this excluded them from  meaningful participation in the development of  student’s IEP


Colo. Sch. for the Deaf and the Blind, 113 LRP 2971 (SEA CO 12/05/12)

• State complaints officer found as a matter of fact  that the staff did have a brief exchange in ASL at one  of student’s IEP meetings   – The exchange related to a snack fee that the  parents had not paid, and as such, was unrelated  to any substantive discussion of the student’s IEP.


Colo. Sch. for the Deaf and the Blind, 113 LRP 2971 (SEA CO 12/05/12)

• The complaints officer wrote: “Regardless of the content of the exchange, communicating in  ASL at an IEP meeting when Parents are not proficient in ASL  excludes Parents from that discussion. In fact, [Grade] Teacher  chose to communicate in ASL because she was unsure of  whether she should bring the matter up at the IEP meeting  and wanted to check with CSDB Special Education Director  before doing so.”


Colo. Sch. for the Deaf and the Blind, 113 LRP 2971 (SEA CO 12/05/12)

• Concluded that this “brief and isolated incident  ... did not prevent Parents from meaningfully  participating in the development of Student’s  IEP”


Recording IEP Meetings


Regulations • “An SEA ... has the option to require, prohibit,  limit, or otherwise regulate the use of recording  devices at IEP meetings.” • Policy “must provide for exceptions if they are  necessary to ensure that the parent understands  the IEP or the IEP process or to implement other  parental rights guaranteed under Part B.”


Kaskaskia (IL) Special Educ. Dist. 801, 16 IDELR 132 (OCR 1989)

• Parent alleged his learning disability prevented him  from taking notes  • Staff members objected to being taped  • District offered to provide an unbiased note‐taker  who would provide the parent with written, legible  notes at the conclusion of the IEP meeting, at the  district’s expense


Kaskaskia (IL) Special Educ. Dist. 801, 16 IDELR 132 (OCR 1989)

• OCR:  – Tape recording was not the only means of  assisting the parent with a disability – District’s offer of note‐taker was a good faith  effort to meet the parent’s needs – District could refuse to allow the parent to  tape record


Belvidere Cmty. Sch. Dist. No. 100, 112 LRP 12955 (SEA IL 02/27/12)

• Mother has ADHD and dyslexia, asked to tape IEP  meeting • District offered to retain a third‐party service  organization  – Could advocate  – Could answer questions – Could take notes • Parents refused; filed due process


Belvidere Cmty. Sch. Dist. No. 100, 112 LRP 12955 (SEA IL 02/27/12)

• Hearing officer: – District’s offer constituted a “reasonable  accommodation” – District is not required to allow tape recording  absent mutual agreement of both the parents  and the individual IEP team members


E.H. v. Tirozzi, 16 IDELR 787 (D. Conn. 1990)

• Mother’s native language was Danish • Student’s teacher refused to be tape recorded,  claiming that tape recording “alienates people  and creates tension” • State hearing officer ruled in favor of school;  parents appealed to District Court


E.H. v. Tirozzi, 16 IDELR 787 (D. Conn. 1990)

• District Court:  “Without a clear understanding of what that plan  entails, E.H. cannot effectively evaluate the program  to determine whether she believes it to be in her  child’s best interest. Accordingly, she cannot  complain, in any meaningful way, with respect to any  matter relating to the IEP, which is her right.”


E.H. v. Tirozzi, 16 IDELR 787 (D. Conn. 1990)

• District Court rejected the school district’s argument  that the special education teacher had a privacy  interest in not being tape recorded – Expressed skepticism if there was a privacy right  to not be tape recorded – If there was, teacher’s expectation of privacy was  diminished in light of her position and the  context of an IEP meeting 


V.W v. Favolise, 16 IDELR 1070 (D. Conn. 1990)

• Basis for demand to tape: – Injury to mother’s hand prevented note‐taking – Dad had to work

• School refused • Hearing officer ruled for school; parents  appealed


V.W v. Favolise, 16 IDELR 1070 (D. Conn. 1990)

• District Court: “Plaintiffs need not demonstrate some  wellspring for their right to tape record  meetings, particularly where, as here, they are  given a statutory right to attend and participate  in those meetings. It would seem that such a  right is, and should be, innate.”


V.W v. Favolise, 16 IDELR 1070 (D. Conn. 1990)

• Special ed director testified that if taping were  allowed, teachers would predetermine and  parents would be “left out of the collaborative  ‘loop’”  • If team “resort[s] to illegal ‘consensus‐building,’”  parents could go back to due process.


My Advice on Taping • Assume every conversation is being taped  (check state wiretap laws) • Always be the most reasonable people in the  room • Review district policy. • If taping prohibited, be ready to accommodate  parental disabilities


Access to IEP Documents


Letter to Boswell, 49 IDELR 196 (OSEP 2007)

• “IDEA does not specifically require school  districts to provide written translations of IEP  documents.” • Documents translated into a parent’s native  language could help a district to prove parental  consent.


New Haven Unified Sch. Dist., 110 LRP 44200 (SEA CA 07/14/10)

• The parents’ primary language was Spanish  – One member of each IEP team was able to interpret  from English to Spanish – School did not provide the mother with copies of the  IEP documents in Spanish

• Mother filed for due process, claiming that she  was denied meaningful participation


New Haven Unified Sch. Dist., 110 LRP 44200 (SEA CA 07/14/10)

• ALJ: – District’s failure to translate documents resulted in  denial of meaningful participation.   – Since the mother could not understand the  documents, she was deprived of timely information in  her native language and thereby, deprived of  meaningful participation in the IEP process. *California has specific statute


Sidney Pub. Schs., 110 LRP 19430 (SEA NE 01/23/10)

• Mother had a visual impairment which prevented  her from reading text which was not in at least 36  point bold font   • District:  – Provided some documents in requested font  – Other times read the documents aloud – Mailed forms to mother’s scribe – Refused request for large‐print textbooks and other  homework materials


Sidney Pub. Schs., 110 LRP 19430 (SEA NE 01/23/10)

• Mother filed due process claiming inability to  meaningfully participate  • Hearing officer: – No particular format required – Mailing regular print forms to address of mother’s  reader was permissible – Non‐disabled parents were not expected to read  students’ textbooks or other homework papers,  therefore no discrimination  


School Activities


Rothschild v. Grottenthaler, 16 IDELR 1020 (2d Cir. 1990)

• Deaf parents asked for ASL interpreter at school  activities and meetings. • School: parents not qualified because “Section 504  was designed to protect children, not their parents.” • District Court: school pays for school‐initiated  activities; parents pay for extracurricular.


Rothschild v. Grottenthaler, 16 IDELR 1020 (2d Cir. 1990)

• 2d Cir.: Ruled for parents in entirety  – Parents qualified to participate in any “Parent‐ oriented” activities incident to their children’s  education that are offered by the school district. – The fact that a particular institution is primarily  engaged in the provision of one category of service  does not exempt it from Regulation 104.3(k) in its  provision of other services. 


Rothschild v. Grottenthaler, 16 IDELR 1020 (2d Cir. 1990)

• 2d Cir.: (cont’d) – Parents “are not excluded from the protection  of section 504 merely because they are parents  and not school children.” – Reversed District Court re: extra‐curriculars and  graduation – school must pay for interpreter at  all events and activities.


Mt. Diablo (CA) Unified Sch. Dist., 44 IDELR 261 (OCR 2005)

• Hearing impaired parents asked for interpreter so  they could chaperone their child’s field trip. • The district refused; policy was to provide  interpreter services to parents only for  “mandatory” activities. • The parents filed a complaint with OCR.


Mt. Diablo (CA) Unified Sch. Dist., 44 IDELR 261 (OCR 2005)

• OCR: no violation – Must provide equal access “to communication or  participation in programs that are intended to benefit  them.” – Field trips for benefit of students, not parents.  – Parents entitled to interpreter for graduation  ceremonies, parent‐teacher conferences, etc.   – OCR cautioned that only providing interpreters for  “mandatory” activities could violate 504.


Escondido (CA) Union Elem. Sch. Dist., 17 IDELR 767 (OCR 1991)

• Hearing impaired parent demanded licensed ASL  interpreter at conferences. • District provided teacher who was qualified but  not licensed in ASL. • Parents cancelled parent/teacher conference,  filed OCR complaint.


Escondido (CA) Union Elem. Sch. Dist., 17 IDELR 767 (OCR 1991)

• OCR: –Interpreter offered by the district was  adequate. –No obligation to provide “independent”  or “licensed” interpreter.


Letter to National Holistic University (CA), 103 LRP 47165 (OCR 06/11/03)

• • • •

University refused to provide ASL interpreter at  graduation. University argued that it had no obligation to  father. Father paid for interpreter, filed OCR complaint. University agreed to revise its policy and to pay  the parent his costs for the interpreter.


Hillsboro (OR) Sch. Dist. 1J, 59 IDELR 82 (OCR 2012)

Parent who used service dog tried to volunteer  in kindergarten class.

Principal asked: ‒ ‒ ‒

Why she needed dog; what it did Proof of insurance  Vaccination records and training certifications

Mother filed OCR complaint.


Hillsboro (OR) Sch. Dist. 1J, 59 IDELR 82 (OCR 2012)

OCR: ‒ ‒

Principal’s inquiries and requests violated both Title  II and Section 504. Other volunteers weren’t required to provide  insurance information as they were covered by the  district’s liability and workers’ compensation  policies.  Ordered school to allow mom to volunteer with dog  and without answering questions.


Hillsboro (OR) Sch. Dist. 1J, 59 IDELR 82 (OCR 2012)

OCR (cont’d): ‒ ‒

Referenced DOJ’s regs re: service animals  Public entity may only ask if a service animal is  required because of a disability and what work or  task the animal has been trained to perform Cannot require documentation, such as proof that  the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as  a service animal 


Lake-Lehman (PA) Sch. Dist., 20 IDELR 546 (OCR 1993)

• • •

Hearing impaired parent wanted sign language  interpreter at board meetings. District refused to pay. District: no interpreter unless the meeting  involved the academic or disciplinary situation  of student. Parent planned to attend every board meeting  until further notice.


Lake-Lehman (PA) Sch. Dist., 20 IDELR 546 (OCR 1993)

OCR: ‒

District’s board meetings constitute “other  services” as defined in 34 C.F.R. § 104.3(k)(4) ‒ Limiting interpreters to meetings involving  academic or disciplinary situation of disabled  person’s child was discriminatory ‒ Disabled entitled to equally effective access to  meetings – understanding board, asking  questions, and making comments


Practical Suggestions Be proactive regarding:  ‒ Parents’ access to IEP meetings ‒ Parent/Teacher Conferences ‒ Public events (graduation, school play,  concerts, etc.) • Locate Disability Coordinator • Train building staff • Look reasonable •


Thank you! Karen Haase Harding & Shultz (402) 434-3000 khaase@hslegalfirm.com H & S School Law @KarenHaase


Parents with Disabilities - LRP 2013