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Captain Randell Bagwell: The Man with a Mission for Fishin’ -Military OneSource is Here to Listen -A Mom’s Mission -The Vet Center

Dare to Dream Ranch


Meet the Team Karen Dalton - Founder/Editor Megan McCarthy -Project Manager Jack Dakin -Creative Director Josh Carlson -Interview Director Linh Phan -Interview Editor Lourdes de la Vina Vargas -Sales manager

3 _________________Editor’s Article 5___The Man with a Mission for Fishin’ 7_______________ A Mom’s Mission 10______________Stronger with Help 11___________A Patriot of Plymouth 12_________Teaching with A Purpose 14___Military OneSource is Here to Listen 15__ Finding Family Through Family Medicine and How the Military Made a Difference 17________________The Vet Center 18_____________Resource Guide 2|P age


Dare to Dream Ranch Update by Linh Phan & Karen Dalton

Dare to Dream Ranch is a non-profit organization located in Foster, Rhode Island that assists, service members, veterans and their families with emotional challenges. Since 2014, Karen Dalton, the Executive Vice President of Dare to Dream Ranch, has assisted many veterans and their families in need of support. The organization’s goal is to help service members, veterans, and their families be successful civilians by utilizing services such as equine therapy, horticulture therapy, nutritional cooking, woodworking, fly tying/fishing, and career coaching, military and their family. Karen and her team are dedicated to ensuring the ultimate success for their clients. Some of these programs are group activities in which veterans talk and listen to one another’s experiences in order to foster a sense of safety and comradery.

In our last edition we discussed our

internship program. We have currently suspended that program as it is being reevaluated. Currently, The Dare to Dream Ranch is working on clearing land for an indoor riding arena with an attached barn so clients can enjoy the peaceful space and continue working on their goals even during New England’s inclement weather. Karen and her team recently coordinated a music benefit event and golf tournament to support

offering these FREE services. She is also coordinated with volunteers for building two more horse pastures, two meditation areas, land clearing, and improving the ranch’s facilities through corporate community service programs. Dare to Dream Ranch is always looking for more corporate partners and volunteers to help fund our programs and manage the facility. To be able to support the ranch’s operating expenses and programs funding is crucial so that we may continue to offer these programs for FREE.

We recently held our first overnight, week

long retreat, for a combat veteran from Georgia. We have more requests to continue that in the Spring. We have 2-8 individual sessions on the weekends where we offer 60-90 min equine therapy sessions for service members, veterans and their families. In September we also brought our miniature horses to the Veterans Home in Bristol, RI. The residence loved their visit from Freedom and Spirit.

Together, we can truly change lives for the

better. For more information on Karen Dalton and Dare to Dream Ranch, visit the website: https://www.daretodreamranch.org/. To Make a Monthly donation you can click on this link, https://www.paypal.me/DareToDreamRanch US, enter the amount you wish to donate and click on monthly. If you have a company that would like to participate in our Corporate Community Service Program, please see below.

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Kimberly McHale Real Estate Expert Mott & Chace Sotheby's International Realty RI & MA (401) 692-1644 Every day, I help buyers and sellers make the most of their real estate investments. Let's talk to see how I can help you! 4|P age


The Man with a Mission for Fishin’

by Jack Dakin As a current employee for the Dept. of Veteran Affairs Benefits Office, the passionate 60-year-old former-Navy cook, Randell Bagwell, owns a father-son charter business, and also donates free fishing trips to any veteran service member who is interested through a non-profit called Veteran Angler Charters. Born of Texas blood and then moving to Rhode Island with his wife and son in 1989, his southern accent infatuates his audience with deep, emotional stories of U.S. soldiers, on and off enemy lines. During my interview with him in October 2018 at the VA in Providence, he was both humbled and proud of his success in improving many veterans’ well-being. Marine Veteran-Kevin Dubois sat in on the interview, attesting to the excitement and therapeutic value of Randy’s charters. Randy had been deployed in the Navy for 10 years, from 1974-1984, on several aircraft carriers including the U.S.S. Ranger and the U.S.S. Destroyer, cooking meals for the military every day. When I asked him when he made the decision to serve, Bagwell admitted; “I had an uncle who was a P.OW. for seven years in Japan, he was in the Bataan Death

March, and a few of the other family members served… So what are you gonna do when you’re coming out of high school and you’re not a star pupil…”. He went on to explain how after boot camp his superiors informed him that we would have to wait another 3 months for deployment, or he could transfer as a cook and leave almost immediately. Throughout his tours he gained irreplaceable experiences as well as a deep pride for our nation and the people who defend it, he also mentioned the how he left due to a severe injury in his left leg as a result from falling off a ladder. During the mid-nineties Randy had registered for his captain’s license and began working for various captains as their first mate. He formed the idea for his charter business with his son in 2006, The River Rebel Charters, operating out of Bristol, RI. His charter joined the non-profit Veteran Angler Charters (VAC) founded by Kathy Granfield in 2013, providing free trips to all branches of the military.

Kathy is a school teacher in West Haven, CT, after learning more vets had committed suicide than died in the line of duty in the early 2000’s, she started to volunteer fishing charters out of the West Haven Veteran Center. With the eventual goal to provide no-cost fishing charters for every Military or 5|P age


Service member in every state. She asked Randy in 2013 if he would be the Rhode Island captain, with both of them sharing the same ideals, he enthusiastically accepted. As of this year, the VAC have five charter locations, two in Connecticut, one out of Plymouth, MA, another in Maine, and Captain Bagwell’s in Bristol, RI. The VAC have donated at least 70 charters, serving at least 420 veterans this year alone. Each charter offers an effective way for veterans to cope with their fellow comrades and reach out to others who are willing to help them. As noted earlier, Kevin Dubois joined our interview and was able to provide first-hand experience on how successful the VAC is from the perspective of a returned veteran seeking treatment for any personal handicap. Kevin lost both legs while serving his tour, but he never lost his American pride or spirit. The humble soldier was not enthused to boast about his trials overseas, instead he just wants to be treated as any other civilian. In regards to the charter trip Randy offered, Kevin states, “It’s a nice, stress-free day, just a good day to get out on the water and do some fishing.” Randy admitted that on that day Kevin caught his first striped bass, along with the other veterans on the charter, making the whole experience that much more fulfilling. Kevin was invited on charter along with two other vets because Randy had raffled off a free charter for a fundraiser, the winner asked Randy if he could bring a few vets with him. Randy had met Kevin a

few weeks earlier from another bear hunting non-profit called Beyond the Battle. One of the most impactful stories Randy describes is about an 82-year-old veteran who was dying of cancer. The WWII Air-force veteran, Royal Reed had been commercial fisherman for 50 years in New Bedford, and his last wish was to go fishing on Randy’s charter. When Randy got notice of this last wish, he prepared by recruiting nurses online. He received an enormous amount of support and decided to pick three former military personnel, currently two were nurses and the other was a firefighter. Captain Bagwell depicts the toughest and dramatic part of the trip, “At the end of it he caught a big sea bass, and he wanted me to reel it in, I said “no you reel it in”. He finally reeled it up and took a picture, then he grabbed me and says “Cap’ I’ve had a great day, I think it’s time to go home.”” The realization of Reed finally catching his last fish made Randy empathize with his fellow veteran, and his vision for the charter was successful in making a visible difference in the well-being of others. For more information go to: http://www.veterananglercharters.org/.

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A Mom’s Mission by Linh Phan Matthew Patton was a special kid who loved to take risks. After he graduated from Mount Hope High School, he wanted to serve his country, so he decided to join in the US Army in 2009. Despite having been diagnosed with depression and having multiple suicide attempts, he was accepted. He served in the Army for almost five years, including a deployment to Afghanistan from October 2009 to October 2010. In 2011, Matthew returned home a different person, since he faced several horrific experiences that resulted in survivor’s guilt and PTSD symptoms. Unfortunately, in May 2013, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his head, when he only had six months left to serve and would have been home on terminal leave in four months. The loss of Matthew devastated his mother, Lynn Patton, but she wanted something good out of this; therefore, Lynn started The Matthew Foundation (MPF) with her husband, John Patton, and became the president and CEO. Lynn attended Rhode Island College to earn her Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1989 and 1993, respectively. She then worked as a staff nurse at Women and Infants Hospital in the LDR, ER, and IVF for a total of 12 years. During her time at Women and Infants Hospital ER, she served on a committee evaluating the hospital’s plan to expand the ER and she also was a preceptor to train new ER nurses. After that, she got her certification in fall prevention personal trainer from 2006 to 2014. When Matthew

took his life, she was in the middle of her MHA program at the University of Phoenix. Despite her experiencing immense feelings of loss and grief, Lynn managed to complete her MHA degree in 2014. Losing Matthew is the hardest thing Lynn had to face, but it serves as her primary motivation to help Veterans and Active duty members. Especially those who are experiencing mental health problems, she hopes to reduce the risk factors while building a resiliency to prevent suicide in others. After her speeches through multiple venues, including 400 soldiers at Fort Hood, Lynn and her husband decided to start The Matthew Patton Foundation as an educational platform to help improve the military mental health system. On top of that, Lynn is an advocate for Active duty, Veterans and their Families who need help. People told her it would take at least 5 years to get this program started but being highly motivated Lynn was able to get it started in under two years, since she “wanted to have some positivity come out of this.” She had to “walk all the way up to national level, 7|P age


state level and individuals, trying to stop this from going on.” Running the organization for 3 years, 30 lives have been saved and she is currently checking up on one returning Soldier to help him get through his first 30 days’ home, which can be the most challenging for them. She created a website where Active duty service members, Veterans and their Families can go to share stories or feelings without worrying about being identified, since it is completely anonymous. Lynn tries her best to write the content on the website in a way that it would be readable at a high school level because a lot of Veterans have a hard time concentrating as a result of PTSD. By doing this, Lynn wants to get them to understand they can ask for help. The relationship she forms with Veterans and Active duty members who she had talked with has deeply influenced her. The trust they give her, as well as them opening up to her has encouraged Lynn to continue telling Matthew’s story despite how difficult it is for her. When I asked her what keeps her going, she said, “I do not want another mother to live through this horror, so I call it Saving Another Mother’s Matthew.” One of her goals is to help Active duty members, Veterans and their Families talk about the stigma surrounding mental health. She wants them to be comfortable with opening up about mental health issues rather

than hiding them. One of the approaches she uses is to talk about it like it’s a flavor of ice cream where different ice cream flavors represent different mental illnesses. She sees depression as death by chocolate, TBI as Rocky Road, PTSD as vanilla, and so on. While it may seem silly, the goal is to get the real facts out in the world to reduce the fears and ignorance surrounding mental illnesses. Even though working with military service members at the individual level is rewarding, Lynn knew she had to expand upward, so she wrote to Michelle Obama’s “Joining Forces” Suicide Prevention team, telling Matthew’s story and how they can help other Veterans like him. She recommended using Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), which is the only preventative rather than reactive tool. It assesses and ranks risk factors such as financial problems and/or family issues that can lead people toward suicide and assess and rank resiliency factors that lead people away from suicide. Consistently applied over time, overall risks are determined and acted on. One healthcare agency completed a successful study about how a prevention tool like this works and now follows at-risk Veterans more closely. “It’s a beautiful feeling when you help them reduce their risk factors and increase their resiliency factors, so suicide is a less viable choice. At that point you begin to help them pursue their

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dreams and their careers. They learn they can live with a new norm.” Lynn explained. Despite facing a mom’s worst nightmare, the loss of her son, Lynn Patton has created the Matthew Patton Foundation and now devotes her life to preventing this from happening to anyone’s Matthew. If you are in need of assistance, or just someone to talk to, visit the Matthew Patton Foundation website at https://matthewpattonfoundation.org/. You can also contact Lynn Patton at email: lynn@matthewpattonfoundation.org and phone number: (401) 524-6233. If you would like to make a donation, please contact Lynn or find information through website: https://www.matthewpattonfoundation.org/f unding

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Stronger with Help by Megan McCarthy

Did you know that every day 22 veterans or current members of the military commit suicide? What if there was a way to make this number decrease? The answer is that there are many programs that can help, one being The Suicide Prevention Foundation at the Providence VA Medical Center. On a daily basis, they treat and counsel veterans that experience suicidal thoughts, feelings, or actions. They provide assistance to veterans through support, counseling, referrals for additional care, and mental health services. Through these services they can educate veterans and their families on services to help prevent suicide. Minerva Thomas, an employee at The Suicide Prevention Foundation, explains

how there are some common events that happen in a soldier’s life at war that can cause an increased risk for suicide. Some examples are frequent deployments to hostile environments, exposure to extreme stress through the combat environment, physical and sexual trauma, extralong lengths of deployment, or a service related injury as in a loss of a limb, PTSD, depression, brain injury, etc. Experiences like this can enhance the thought or feeling of suicide. It is much more common than many think. Around “18% of all suicide in adults are veterans,” says Thomas, which is a very concerning percentage. Because of these experiences, veterans can exhibit signs of hopelessness, or feeling like there’s no way out, no reason to live. These thoughts lead to serious health defects including, but not limited to: anxiety, insomnia, bipolar disorders, and depression. Another side effect of negative experiences includes participating in activities that are self-harming or perverse. Whether it’s driving recklessly, consuming excessive drugs or alcohol, withdrawing from family and friends, or experiencing destructive thoughts. After fighting for our country and freedom, the last thing any veteran should feel is unimportant. If you see a veteran struggling with the symptoms above or they disclose to you that they are suicidal, you should call 911 immediately. Other options are going to a local ER or the VA urgent care which is open from 8am-5pm. The suicide prevention hotline is also available at 1800-273-8255 and press 1. 10 | P a g e


After a crisis, you should comfort and reassure them. However, make sure you do not put yourself in harm’s way or immediate danger. A common attitude, seen by Thomas, in veterans is feeling weak when they receive help. Receiving help does not make us weak, it only makes us stronger. Peers, family, friends, and military family do not consider it a sign of weakness and only want what is best for the veteran in need. At the Suicide Prevention Foundation, they try to minimize this feeling. They want the veterans to look at all the good things going for them and use that to help them through treatment. They look for unique motivating factors in a veteran’s life that makes their world keep spinning. For example, family, friends, religion, activities, pets, etc. The Suicide Prevention Foundation staff try to help the veteran think about what their future may be like, along with showing the veterans they are resilient. Remember, a veteran is never alone.

Equine Therapy for Survivors Guilt. Dare to Dream Ranch held their first week long retreat for a veteran from GA who lost his medic and driver in an IED explosion.

Sergeant Danny Hill and his equine partner, SGT. Xander (a percheron/gypsy vanner draft horse)

“Ms. Karen and her Veteran Friends and EVERYONE involved has made my stay a wonderful. Learning different views and ways of thinking about myself and JOYS of life and to always look forward not only on what TODAY has for you but TOMORROW as well. No giving up or giving in. Seek Help. I will be paying this therapy forward and will help in SUPPORT of it. It has been AWESOME and AWARDING for me nothing but TLC. 11 | P a g e


A Patriot of Plymouth

by Jack Dakin

During the fall of 2018, I was fortunate enough to interview Christopher C. Hart on his new farm facility on Beaver Dam Road in Plymouth, MA. Chris was born in Boston in 1963, he grew up in Dorchester with his parents, while visiting his grandparents every summer in Plymouth. Chris wanted to enlist in the U.S. military at 18, unfortunately, he failed the physical examination. Coming from a large family of veterans, he was determined to make a difference for veterans that involved helping each individual achieve their version of success after they return from duty. Hart states, “I started out just after 9/11 trying to provide transportation for vets to the VA. Eventually I realized I would need to do more for these vets than just a few bake sales or car rides, so I quit my job, and formed the idea for a non-profit.” He continues on how he wrote his mission statement, filled all the paperwork, and invested 70 hours each week into this service. The Nathan Hale foundation was formed in 2005, 2 years after he quit his job, and the outreach centers now provide free transportation, counseling, art classes, multiple forms of therapy, yoga, food, clothing, entertainment, and across 16 communities reaching approximately 7,500 veterans. The main outreach centers are located in Plymouth and Middleboro, however the foundation recently created the Three Harts Farm located on Beaver Dam Road in Plymouth. Hart explained how this site is the weekly meeting place for the

program called “Farmily Day”, in which veterans bring as many of their family and friends who are available to the farm. Chris offers them a place to meet, socialize, volunteer with the garden, or grab some bikes to stay active. I asked why he chose Nathan Hale for the name of the non-profit, Chris responded by admitting to be a dedicated historian and believer in the leaders of the American Revolution. He stated how he has hundreds of family members that have participated in the military dating back to the Revolutionary War. Chris said, “Nathan Hale volunteered knowing he would never be looked at as a hero, same here. "I only wish to be useful to my Nation" those were his words, and now they are mine.” Chris is very optimistic for the future, he is hoping to attract more veterans to his outreach center and expand his helping hand into more communities across New England. This starts with making each outreach location more approachable and more effective. All in all, Chris is very satisfied of his non-profit, but he will always do more for those who ask. For information, visit

www.thenathanhaleveteransoutreachcenter.com

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Teaching with a Purpose by Josh Carlson Sue Katz has had a long career in the financial industry. An accountant by trade, she began work as a tax specialist in 1990. While Sue excelled in her field and had an illustrious career for nearly two decades, she knew that she wanted to make a greater impact on society. With a passion for finance and a desire to help people, Sue began looking for a non-profit to become a part of. Shortly after her search began, she came across a non-profit organization called American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC). Not only was ACCC in line with Sue’s mission, but like a true accountant, she couldn’t help but admire their perfect audit. In 2009 Sue began working for ACCC, where she still works presently. ACCC is a 501C Not for Profit Organization, that specializes in financial counseling for individuals. Budget counseling, credit counseling, debt management, student loan counseling, and bankruptcy certificates are just a few of the resources that ACCC provides. While her non-profit offers counseling to all individuals, Sue found her purpose in helping active military and veterans. The reason that Sue believes so many veterans struggle financially is because of the pre and post deployment cycle. Many soldiers who enter the military right out of high school have never had to support themselves financially. They go from their parents taking care of them to the

government providing their necessities once enlisted. Even after soldiers leave active duty, they often times still struggle finding jobs. Employers are less apt to hire National Guard or reserve members, due to their other responsibilities. Sue recognizes these issues as a real problem in society and works to combat them. Not only does Sue teach classes to educate veterans on their financial well-being, she also works one-on-one with people to guide them in achieving their financial goals. Sue is a proud supporter and participant in the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program. This program is run by the department of defense and works to improve the wellbeing of reserve and National Guard members, through the various resources they provide. On top of all of this, Sue also helps veterans with pre and post deployment cycle and is an outreach specialist. At the end of the day, Sue does the work that she does to feel fulfilled. As a teacher and an accountant, she is able to combine her talents in order to work toward a greater 13 | P a g e


good. The aspect that makes it all worthwhile to her is the impact on her students that she is able to see firsthand. When Sue was asked about this she stated, “I have worked with several veterans and active service members who have made major achievements…it is the best thing in the world to me.” When talking with Sue, she told the story of one of these veterans who had made such achievements, and had inspired her. This individual had made the ultimate sacrifice to his country, losing both of his lower limbs in combat. When Sue first met this soldier, he was moving from shelter to shelter just managing to scrape by with the awful circumstances handed to him. After attending her course and meeting with her one-on-one, he was able to find a job and obtain his own apartment. Sue had such a positive impact on his life, he decided to go to school and become an accountant like her. “Things like this make my job worthwhile,” Sue enthusiastically pronounced.

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This is just one of the many success stories that Sue has been a part of. It is the people like him where she was able to see her impact on somebody’s life, making it all worthwhile to. If you are interested in working with Sue Katz directly you can reach her at skatz@consumercredit.com.

To see all of the financial resources that the ACCC has to offer you can call them at 1 (800) 769-3571.

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by Linh Phan “Military OneSource is here to listen” is one of the missions of Military OneSource - a Department of Defense funded program that offers a wide range of individualized consultations, coaching and counseling to warrior guardians, military families, and the military community. With robust online information and resources vetted by the Department of Defense, Military OneSource is trying their best to support the military community. All service members that are active-duty, Guard, reserve, veterans (up to 365 days after their retirement date or discharge date), and their immediate family members, have access to the entire Military OneSource network and are assisted by phone and online 24/7. If you feel like you need someone to talk to or address your problem, Military OneSource also provides free, confidential non-medical counseling conducted by licensed clinicians. Through their expertise, these professionals can help you take charge and address any issue that comes from common stressors such as deployment and reintegration, parenting, marital relations, grief and loss, and financial concerns. In addition, consultants also provide services such as elder care, family members with special needs, adoption, wounded warrior care, education, and even personal health. As a member of the military communityyou have gone through events that are impossible for an outsider to understand. It would be difficult to explain or paint a clear picture to your partner, your children, your friend, or anyone else who has never served or been in the situations that you have experienced. This is why it is beneficial to talk to someone who specializes in working with the military community. Sometimes, talking to a peer who’s shared the same experiences, the same situation, or

the same concerns, helps you go through the issues you are struggling with, to find new and better solutions. Through Military OneSource’s free confidential peerto-peer specialty consultants, you can do just that. Talking to a peer support specialist is a relaxed conversation that can be about any of the stresses or challenges of military life, such as deployments or frequent relocation. Peer support consultants have a master's degree in psychology or in a social science field. They also have firsthand life experience as service members or military spouses. Sometimes, you may feel you have been left out of your important relationships and things have changed. It is completely normal and you are not alone. Military OneSource has designed Building Healthy Relationships coaching sessions, in which you are provided with practical tools, resources, and problemsolving techniques that help strengthen your important relationships – with your spouse, your children, parents, siblings or any important relationship you have. Military OneSource’s health and wellness coaches can help you control your weight, keep you fit, manage your health condition, learn about nutrition and have heathier diets, and importantly, adapt to changes. They will, along with you, make plans to achieve your goals. For more information, call 800342-9647 to sign up for health and wellness coaching sessions with different session options: Phone, secure and real-time online chat, or secure and real-time video session. To learn about more services, connect with Military OneSource by phone – 800342-9647 – or by live chat on the Military OneSource website at www.militaryonesource.mil -

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Finding Family Through Family Medicine and How the Military Made a Difference by Josh Carlson Whether you love being around them or can’t stand them at all, most people would say that family plays an important role in their lives. Caring, supportive, and understanding might be a few adjectives that come to mind when thinking of that special family member. Some people do all of these things and then some for those important people in their lives. Dr. Ada Stewart is no exception. The only difference is, unlike most people, she isn’t related to anyone in her family. Dr. Stewart was able to find her family through the many impoverished people whom she has devoted her life to helping and advocating for. Growing up in a housing project outside of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Stewart described her childhood as “tough times”. Her father was out of the picture, and her mom was a single

mother trying to provide for three children. Despite her difficult circumstances, Dr. Stewart is a kind, intelligent, hardworking individual who knew she wanted to do something meaningful with her life. With very little guidance, she had a difficult time finding out what that something was. That is, until a high school chemistry teacher inspired her to enter the medical profession. Resonating with what her chemistry teacher had encouraged her to do, Dr. Stewart went a different direction than many of her friends who were studying engineering, and became a pharmacist, practicing for almost a decade. Dr. Stewart knew that the medical field was right for her, but she wanted to make a more personal impact on the emotional well-being of others. After her parents passed away, she knew firsthand the pain of losing loved ones. She thought to herself of a way to prevent others from having to go through the same type of suffering. As a doctor, she knew that her impact would be greater and more direct. While she set her sights on becoming a practicing doctor, Dr. Stewart had not the slightest clue as to which kind of doctor she wanted to become. That is until one day, she came across a medical article published by a family medicine doctor, which expressed the importance of caring for the spiritual, physical, and emotional family. Growing up with the emergency room acting as her primary physician, Dr. Stewart couldn’t help but be surprised by all of the amazing ways that family medicine doctors care for the whole family. These reasons

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prompted Dr. Stewart to go to medical school and become a family physician.

Dr. Stewart had thought about joining the military a few times, recognizing during residency, all of the ways that it could help lighten the burden of med school loans. However, It was after 9/11 2001 that she seriously considered joining the military. She had previously thought a few times before but found that in residency it was a way to not only serve her country but also help pay for medical school and further her education.

In 2002, she joined the United States Military, and never looked back. When talking with her, it was hard pressed to find a moment when she wasn’t talking about the amazing impact that the military has had on her life. This is a huge shift in spirit from a woman who said that she never intended to stay enlisted any longer than she was required to do so. But nonetheless, Dr. Stewart or should I say Colonel Stewart, is still in the military to this day.

been able to carry over into her career as a physician. When I asked Dr. Stewart to talk about the work that she does outside of the military, she said this. “I’m an advocate for the underprivileged…it wasn’t the most lucrative option, but it is lucrative in service.” In order to fulfill this desire for service and helping underprivileged individuals, Dr. Stewart works at a community health center in South Carolina, where she currently resides. The main reason why this is such an important cause for Dr. Stewart, is because she lived it. She knows firsthand the hardships that many underserved families are dealing with on a daily basis. The health center which she is a family physician at accepts individuals who are either under insured or uninsured. This allows her to work with families who otherwise would never have been able to receive care from a family medicine doctor. For more information on joining the military in the medical field, please visit. https://www.goarmy.com/amedd.html For more information on Family Medicine, please visit https://www.aafp.org

The most impactful part of the military to her, are the many lessons which she has learned. Friendship, leadership and determination are a few things that she has 17 | P a g e


communication techniques, and much more. Although, “when in doubt, let [The Vet Center] know and they will provide answers as every situation is different,” says Santilli.

The Vet Center

by Megan McCarthy

The Vet Center is an extremely unique program that benefits many. Not only can they provide therapy for veterans, but they can also provide therapy for family members. Paul Santilli, Army veteran, and outreach specialist for The Vet Center says, “any service provided by the Vet Center staff must have a direct correlation to the readjustment of the veteran.” This means they focus on what is best for the veteran and their family. For example, if a veteran’s child has a learning disability, they can refer them to a clinician in the community that can better help the child’s needs. However, if the veteran’s child is getting into fights, shows more aggression and anger due to a parent’s deployment or readjustment, then the Vet Center is more equip to provide services for that child. The ways The Vet Center provides therapy is in individual or group sessions. This can be held in many different ways, since the client is the one in charge of the session. For family members to be eligible for The Vet Center’s services, the veteran must call and give permission for those family members and loved ones to receive therapy or alternative therapy. Also, the Vet Center can provide education on topics that could be directly affecting their lives. For example, they can give veterans and family members information on PTSD, suicide, depression, anxiety, military culture,

When people think of therapy, they think of big couches, talking about their feelings, and looking into outer space. However, not all therapy can be defined like this and The Vet Center in Warwick, RI, prides themselves in providing alternative therapy for veterans and their families. This includes activities like air rifle shooting, guitar lessons, art, taking care of horses, kayaking, surfing, skiing, walking, zip lining, and much more. These alternative ways of therapy help veterans and their family members get out of the house and continue to do things they are interested in.The Vet Center is so accommodating that even if a veteran lost their leg, arm, or injured any part of their body, they have equipment to help compensate for the injury. For veterans to be eligible for services provided by the Vet Center, they must have one of three criteria. The first to have been a combat veteran. This can be identified by the DD214, which is a discharge paper, campaign metal, expeditionary metal, combat badge metal, etc. The second would be for the veteran to be a survivor of military sexual trauma or harassment. For this, the veteran does not need paperwork and they will have a clinician on staff who specializes in this important and sensitive topic. The third way to be eligible for the Vet Center’s services is if a family member of a currently serving military member has been killed in action, suicide, or an accident. For more information on a Vet Center near you, please visit https://www.vetcenter.va.gov/

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RESOURCE GUIDE Created by Dare to Dream Ranch, Inc.™ to help our service members, veterans and their families. Advocacy: Fleet & Family Support Centers (FFSC) Provides services for service members and their families. Domestic violence, spouse and child abuse and neglect are serious problems which may be experienced by individuals and families. The Navy’s Family Advocacy Program provides the following vital services to commands and individuals: clinical counseling resources, intervention and case management, domestic abuse prevention and awareness education, victim services. 1800-372-5463 or www.cnic.navy.mil/navylifema Benefits: VA Caregiver Support Program - To promote the health and well-being of family Caregivers who care for our nation’s Veterans, through education, resources, support, and services. Caregiver Support Coordinators can be found in all VA Medical Centers. The Program provides for benefit counseling, education and support opportunities for Caregivers of Veterans enrolled in VA healthcare. Caregivers of Line Of Duty injured Post 9/11 Veterans who meet additional criteria may be eligible for more comprehensive benefits. The VA Caregiver Program has a comprehensive website and a Caregiver Support Line. Caregivers of Veterans

receiving care at the Providence VA Medical Center may call the Caregiver Support Program at 401-273-7100 extension 3283 for further information. VA Caregiver Resource Website: http://www.caregiver.va.gov VA Caregiver Support Line (Toll-Free): 1855-260-3274 VA REGIONAL OFFICE: Disability Benefits Providence Regional Office Current as of 01/01/2016 380 Westminster Street Providence, RI 0242903 Walk-in hours: 08:30AM till 4:00PM no appointment needed. Phone: 1-800-827-1000 Web: www.va.gov Careers: Veteran Assembled Electronics VAeWe train and certify military veterans with a disability rating of 10% or greater for careers as electronics technicians, and we provide electronics modernization services STRAC™, a Skills Training And Certification program that includes tailored employment assistance, all designed to provide career path opportunities for military veterans throughout the electronics industry. There is NO COST TO VETERAN, funded through conditional benefit. Program admission determined by Vae and VA VRE counselor approval. Immersion program enabling veterans to acquire electronic technician skills and industrystandard certifications within 5 months. Intensive instruction, the STRAC™ program mirrors active duty training. By creating a training environment with 19 | P a g e


schedules, demands, and expectations that are familiar to the veteran, the STRAC™ model facilitates learning and reduces the risk of failure. For more information, please contact Julie Frisone, Veteran Advocate at 401-301-7665 or email Jfrisone@vaellc.com Veterans CountEmployment Counseling, Emergency Financial Assistance, Mental Health Support, Deployment Support, Substance Abuse Services. Our one-of-a-kind Care Coordination program provides, free, and confidential support designed to meet the unique needs of Veterans, Military Members and their families. Care Coordinators work with clients in a flexible and comfortable setting. They travel to the client and respond to the client’s needs and are not constrained by office hours or locations. For more information please go to http://vetscount.org/contact/ Veterans Inc - provides assistance with employment and training and we can also assist homeless and at-risk veterans with housing including but not limited to rental arrearages, first and security deposits, utility assistance and much more. Our Services include: Housing Programs, Case Management, Employment & Training, Outreach & Referral Health & Wellness, Supportive Services for Veterans & Their Families, Food Pantry, Women and children Services, Little Patriots Early Learning Center. We are New England’s Largest Provider of Support Services to Veterans and Their Families. CT - MA - ME - NH - RI – VT For more information please call (800) 482-2565 or visit www.veteransinc.org

Anne Crawford : Certified Career Transition Coach CTACC- I give clarity to men , women and the military to find careers that match their personal and business ethics. Through in-depth questioning I am able to clarify their vision of what they desire as far as a career that addresses my client’s highest standard of work skills and communication. It is extremely important that when it comes to developing a resume it reflects their true personality and skill sets. Their summary must touch all responsibilities, and use key words to guarantee the resume will go through the difficult screening process that corporations use. Bullet points must support stories that show HOW you communicated and achieved success. I prepare my clients for a strong interview by asking key questions and discussing the correct response to express their professional accountability when it comes to being an asset to their next employer. In the past years I have also broadened my profession to include working with military clients, which includes Veterans, and Active duty soldiers. Merging their experience from their military career, to working in the civilian world can be difficult. By changing the military language, and developing a strategic plan we work together to mesh their achievements and leadership roles to attract civilian employers. Many clients have issues with how to be a good leader. There is a difference between a leader verses a manager. Through coaching my clients discuss expectations, communication styles, what they themselves want to represent, and where they want to focus their career advancement in their leadership 20 | P a g e


role. This might include individual coaching or team coaching including upper management, and team building. Resume writing, How to network yourself to get what you want in life,Cover letter, Preparing clients for a strong interview, Leadership roles: How to achieve them, Stress management, What do I do next: Developing a career that focuses on your strengths and interests. ESGR RI Military OneSource- A Department of Defense funded program for active-duty, Guard and reserve (regardless of activation status) members, their immediate families, and veterans up to 365 days after separation from the military. Spouse Education and Career Opportunities program. Military spouses coaches are ready to assist you in all areas of career exploration, education and training, career readiness and career connections. They can help you identify skills, interests and aptitudes; coach you on networking; and direct you to training and education opportunities. Military OneSource is available 24/7/365 days a year. To see if you are eligible, please contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647 or live chat with us at www.militaryonesource.mil. Overseas calling options are available on the website. Counseling C. Duarte & Associates: Failth LaMunyon, LICSW Independent Clinical Social Worker 1130 Ten Rod Rad Building E, Suite 101,

Family Services- The Children’s Treatment and Recovery Center clinicians are trained by experts in the field who have extensive academic and clinical experience with military families. Helping families who may be struggling with the unique facets of their service member’s return back home. 401-519-2280 Fleet & Family Support Centers (FFSC) New challenges occur all the time. Things like new jobs, new babies, relationship problems, or stress at work. Counseling can help. It gives you a chance to develop new problem-solving skills to help reduce your stress-level and focus on solutions. Child Counseling, Education programs, Individual and Couples Counseling, Therapeutic Group Counseling. 1-800-372-5463 or www.cnic.navy.mil/navylifema Military OneSource- A Department of Defense funded program for active-duty, Guard and reserve (regardless of activation status) members, their immediate families, and veterans up to 365 days after separation from the military. Non-Medical Counseling Services. Our licensed clinicians can provide you with free in-person, live chat, video session or telephonic, nonmedical counseling sessions in your own community. For issues like dealing with deployment and return, adjusting to a new location, relationship concerns, parenting and family matters, and grief and loss. A persona gets 12 sessions, per issue, per calendar you. Online and telephone options are also available. Military OneSource is available 24/7/365 days a year. To see if you are eligible, please contact Military OneSource at 1800-342-9647 or live chat with us at 21 | P a g e


www.militaryonesource.mil. Overseas calling options are available on the website. Vet Center- Rochelle Fortin, LICSW, BCD, ACSW,Team Leader/Readjustment Therapist, Vet Center, 2038 Warwick Avenue, Warwick RI 02889, Tel. 401-739-0167 Deployment and Mobilization Support Fleet & Family Support Centers – FFSCs work very closely with deploying commands, their Ombudsman, and Family Readiness Groups to offer advice and assistance. Deployment Readiness Brief, Deployment Readiness for Parents, Inidivual Augmentee Support, Reserve Mobilization/Demobilization Assistance, Return and Reunion, Singles and Couples Pre-Deployment. DD214 DD-214s are NOW Online- The National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) has provided the following website for veterans to gain access to their DD-214s online: http://vetrecs.archives.gov/ or try http://www.archives.gov/veterans/militar y-service-records/ Education: Military OneSource- A Department of Defense funded program for active-duty, Guard and reserve (regardless of activation status) members, their immediate families, and veterans up to 365 days after separation from the military. Educational Consultants. Whether you are considering going back to school, your 5-year-old is starting kindergarten, or your 20-year-old is

heading back to college, an education consultant at Military OneSource can ease back-to-school transitions. Military OneSource is available 24/7/365 days a year. If interested, please contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647 or live chat with us at www.militaryonesource.mil. Overseas calling options are available on the website. Veterans Inc - provides assistance with employment and training and we can also assist homeless and at-risk veterans with housing including but not limited to rental arrearages, first and security deposits, utility assistance and much more. Our Services include: Housing Programs, Case Management, Employment & Training, Outreach & Referral Health & Wellness, Supportive Services for Veterans & Their Families, Food Pantry, Women and children Services, Little Patriots Early Learning Center. We are New England’s Largest Provider of Support Services to Veterans and Their Families. CT - MA - ME - NH - RI – VT For more information please call (800) 482-2565 or visit www.veteransinc.org Employment- Hiring Opportunities:

Our

Heroes

Fleet & Family Support CenterFamily Employment Readiness Program is a valuable resource to help military spouses and family members find employment. FFSC offers Employment and Career Workshops, Federal Employment Application Information, Individual Career Counseling, Local and National Employment Information, Resume Critiques. 1-800-372-5463 or www.cnic.navy.mil/navylifema 22 | P a g e


General Dynamicswww.GDEB.com/careers Anthony Paolino @ Apaolin1@gdeb.com Land Rover- http://www.jlrvets.com/ Melissa Ann Clamor @ melissaannclamor51284@outlook.com This program is to recruit military veterans, transitioning military service members, and currently serving members of the national guard and reserve. Who can apply: A verified Honorable Discharge from the military (proof in the form of a DD form 214 or Commander’s Certification Letter). Formal military or private sector vocational technical training (e.g., tank/automotive, aviation, electronics/electrical, marine systems). Veterans with vocational technical school training must provide substantiating transcripts (e.g., ASE/NATEF, Lincoln Tech, WyoTech, UTI, or similar accredited training institution). 3 years or more years of military, government, or private sector related technical maintenance and / or repair experience. Proof of possession of a valid motor vehicle operator’s permit / license and a clean driving record. Ability to pass the retailer’s basic pre-employment screening requirements, which vary from state-to-state and retailer or retailer group. Entrepreneurship:

The Rhode Island Commerce Corporation: The Rhode Island Commerce Corporation offers a host of programs and services for businesses who are starting, expanding or relocating to Rhode Island. Dedicated to stimulating economic growth in Rhode Island, the Commerce Corporation is a customer-service-focused agency that invests in Rhode Island’s businesses. By helping to navigate through the public sector, providing financing vehicles, deploying state incentives, and investing in networking opportunities, the Commerce Corporation is in the business of business. As the only state agency focused on revitalizing the economy and fostering job creation, the Commerce Corporation is dedicated to providing exceptional customer service and innovative programs to the Rhode Island business community. Two of these programs are the Business Navigation Center and the Statewide Action Team. Business Navigation Center: We know that the to-do list for a business can be long, but it does not have to be daunting. The team at the Commerce Corporation can help businesses walk through their ideas or challenges and make sure they are accessing all available resources at the right time. The recently launched Business Navigation Center, located at the Commerce Corporation, is your knowledge source for a range of business needs and opportunities. Staffed with a team of five economic development professionals who will meet one-on-one 23 | P a g e


with start-up and existing businesses, the Business Navigation Center is connected to a state network of governmental agencies and resource partners to help your business thrive in Rhode Island. Whether you are launching a new startup or looking to expand overseas, the team at the Business Navigation Center will act as your hands-on navigators walking you through these government services and partner programs. Rhode Island offers incentives and credits as well as grants that can aid businesses in a host of ways. To make sure that companies understand and take advantage of these incentives, the Commerce Corporation’s staff works one-on-one with clients to piece together the right approach. From the incentives that support the growth of companies in the state to the job training and development credits and grants that keep businesses staffed with highly qualified employees, the Commerce Corporation knows the lay of the land. We will work strategically to match clients with the appropriate tools to help them flourish. Business owners can connect to the Business Navigation Center at 401-2789100 or online using the Business Navigator Tool at www.commerceri.com. Statewide Action Team (STAT): Do you have an issue with a state agency that is impacting your business, and you need resolution to succeed? In July of 2015, the Commerce Corporation created STAT, which is a centralized statewide

concierge network comprised of 27 state agencies. STAT aims to help businesses access information, resources and programs through a single point of contact in a timely and efficient manner to promote business success. STAT seeks to: • Provide easy access to state agencies and their services; • Connect a business to the right state expertise and resources to make a project happen quickly and successfully; • Answer questions in a timely and accurate manner; • Provide a personalized approach for business in Rhode Island and; • Enhance agency to agency transparency and visibility. If you have a business challenge or are stuck in the regulatory process, contact STAT at 401-278-9100 and let us help you chart your course to success. Finances: ASFC, Financial Coach-We offer free financial counseling services to post 9/11 Veterans, Guardsmen, and Reservists. Veterans who are needing assistance with issues such as foreclosure, bankruptcies, collections, settlements, repair and/or establishing credit, budgeting savings and other money management tools. We offer unbiased, professional support and information to those ready to set and reach their financial goals. For more information please contact, Angela Salavarrieta, AFSC, Financial Coach, at Network RI, 1 Reservoir Ave., 24 | P a g e


Providence, RI 02907 or by calling 401462-8916. Fleet & Family Support Centers (FFSC) Resources for service members and their family to help manage your money. Command Financial Specialist Training and Support, Individual Financial Counseling, Personal Financial Management Workshops. Military OneSource : A Department of Defense funded program for active-duty, Guard and reserve (regardless of activation status) members, their immediate families, and veterans up to 365 days after separation from the military. Financial consultation. Whether you need advice for a specific debt problem or basic assistance with money management, a financial expert can help you analyze your situation and develop a debt-management plan. Available in-person, telephonically, live chat, or video session. Military OneSource is available 24/7/365 days a year. If interested, please contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647 or live chat with us at www.militaryonesource.mil. Overseas calling options are available on the website.

Veterans CountEmployment Counseling, Emergency Financial Assistance, Mental Health Support, Deployment Support, Substance Abuse Services. Our one-of-a-kind Care Coordination program provides, free, and confidential support designed to meet the unique needs of Veterans, Military

Members and their families. Care Coordinators work with clients in a flexible and comfortable setting. They travel to the client and respond to the client’s needs and are not constrained by office hours or locations. For more information please go to http://vetscount.org/contact/ VFW Unmet Needs Program: Established in 2004, the Unmet Needs program assists service members and military families experiencing financial hardship by providing financial assistance grants toward basic life necessities like rent, mortgage and utility payments. Grants of up to $5,000 are awarded, and to date, Unmet Needs has provided more than $7 million in aid to struggling service members, veterans and their families. Government Resources: Office of United States Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Helping ensure that federal government agencies are responsive to Rhode Islanders' needs is one of my most important jobs as your United States Senator. My staff and I can often help you answer questions, find resources, or resolve problems. We are proud to work on your behalf. If you are a resident of Rhode Island and you need help with a federal agency, we will be happy to work with you. Federal agencies include departments within the President's cabinet, such as the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and independent agencies, like the Social Security Administration (SSA) and the U.S. Postal Service. (Check USA.gov for a list of offices within the federal Executive Branch.). While we can't ask 25 | P a g e


an agency to circumvent its rules, force it to decide a question in your favor, or change a decision that is already final, we can make inquiries about the status of your situation and review steps taken thus far to make certain your case is being handled properly. If you have a question or problem with which we may assist you, I encourage you to talk with us and to be referred to one of the caseworkers on my staff. For more information please contact: Tyrone A. Smith (Veterans Affairs Coordinator) (Tyrone_Smith@whitehouse.senate.gov) , 170 Westminster Street, Suite 1100, Providence, RI 02903. Phone (401) 4535294 Fax: (401)453-5085 Website: www.whitehouse.senate.gov Health care: TRICARE Choices for National Guard and Reserve. To maintain medical readiness and optimal health. National Guard and Reserve members’ are encouraged to maintain continuous health and dental coverage, whether through TRICARE or other coverage they may be eligible to receive. TRICARE Choices for National Guard and Reserve: At a Glance provides an overview of TRICARE medical, pharmacy, and dental options in the United States. Virginia Hanke, Virginia.X.Hanke@healthnet.com 401742-4940 US Family Health Plan- is a TRICARE Prime option, funded by the Department of Defense, available to families of active-duty service members and to retired service members and their families. US Family Health Plan provides the full TRICARE Prime benefit,

including doctor visits, hospitalizations, emergency care, and prescription drugs. But we’re different from other TRICARE Prime options in some important ways. James.Souza@USFamilyHealth.org 508208-4781 Delta Dental is pleased to offer the Veterans Affairs Dental Insurance Program (VADIP) for Veterans enrolled in VA healthcare and individuals enrolled in the VA’s Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA). The Veterans Affairs Dental Insurance Program is offered through the Department of Veterans Affairs and is administered by Delta Dental’s Federal Government Programs division. This program began January 1, 2014. Delta Dental’s VADIP offers cost-effective dental coverage with three plan options designed to meet the various needs of VA beneficiaries. Enrollees in the VADIP are eligible for covered benefits within the service area that includes the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Delta Dental provides access to an expansive nationwide dentist network, allowing VADIP enrollees to experience maximum cost savings, optimum program value and the highest quality of dental care available. For more information about the VADIP eligibility, plan benefits and enrollment, please visit the website at deltadentalvadip.org. P.S. If you are retired from the military, please visit trdp.org for information on the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program. Housing:

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Veterans CountEmployment Counseling, Emergency Financial Assistance, Mental Health Support, Deployment Support, Substance Abuse Services. Our one-of-a-kind Care Coordination program provides, free, and confidential support designed to meet the unique needs of Veterans, Military Members and their families. Care Coordinators work with clients in a flexible and comfortable setting. They travel to the client and respond to the client’s needs and are not constrained by office hours or locations. For more information please go to http://vetscount.org/contact/ Veterans Inc - provides assistance with employment and training and we can also assist homeless and at-risk veterans with housing including but not limited to rental arrearages, first and security deposits, utility assistance and much more. Our Services include: Housing Programs, Case Management, Employment & Training, Outreach & Referral Health & Wellness, Supportive Services for Veterans & Their Families, Food Pantry, Women and children Services, Little Patriots Early Learning Center. We are New England’s Largest Provider of Support Services to Veterans and Their Families. CT - MA - ME - NH - RI – VT For more information please call (800) 482-2565 or visit www.veteransinc.org Legal Support Lt. Col Jon Shelburne, Esq. -(USMC Reserves) For Service Members: A litigation firm dedicated to providing exceptional legal services in the most challenging cases. Attorney Jon Shelburne is an experienced trial lawyer who has successfully litigated complex

cases across the country and around the world. As a trial lawyer, former prosecutor, professor and Marine Judge Advocate, Attorney Shelburne gained vast experience in complex litigation. He has the critical litigation skills and experience necessary to provide aggressive representation in your case. http://www.jonshelburnelaw.net/ Life Skills: Fleet & Family Support Centers: FFSC Life Skills Edcucation programs provide a varie=ty of valuable resources that can help service members and their families successfully manage the challenges of military life: Building Healthy Relationships, Family Violcence Prevention Education, Information and Referral, New Parent Support/Parenting Programs, Stress and Anger Management. 1-800-372-5463 www.cnic.navy.mil/navylifema Pet Care Dogs on Deployment- Support all military pets nationwide so our troops can serve with peace of mind.501(c)3 non profit which promotes responsible pet ownership and provides an online network for military members nationwide to search for volunteers and resources for your pet’s care and to attain financial assistance for emergency pet care, when needed, during their service commitments. Find Active Duty/Veteran/Wounded Warrior. www.dogsondeployment.org Amanda Beck, RI Coordinator, 631-335-4973, ri-events@dogsondeployment.org Real Estate: 27 | P a g e


Real Estate Counselor: Arthur Yatsko salisburysearch.com 401-781-6886 Relocation Assistance Program Fleet & Family Support Centers For service members arriving or departing. Individual Relocation Assistance, Lending Locker and Local Resources, Relocation Workshops, Welcome Aboard Information.1-800-372-5463 www.cnic.navy.mil/navylifema Transition Assistance: Fleet and Family Support CentersFFSC can help you become better prepared for your transition into the civilian sector by providing the civilian sector by providing Employment and Career Workshops, Individual Career Counseling, Internet Job Searching, Transition Assistance Services. 1800372-5463 www.cnic.navy.mil/navylifema Rhode Island National Guard Transition Assistance Advisor (RING TAA) - The TAA provides transitional assistance and support to all Veterans, service members, and their Families, regardless of service branch, or whether Guard, reserve, or active duty. The TAA also provides information and counsel to the RING Adjutant General and staff regarding Veteran benefits and services available through the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA), the military health system, federal and state Departments of Labor, and other service and benefit programs. The TAA matches the needs of Veterans, service members, military retirees, and their Families by:

• Providing information and assistance in understanding and obtaining services and benefits from the VA and TRICARE to meet their specific needs. • Coordinating with appropriate VA, TRICARE, Veterans Service Organizations, and other federal, state, and local community resources to provide critical information and assistance in obtaining services and benefits. • Participating in the mobilization and demobilization process to brief and advise them regarding all available benefits and services. • Assisting and participating in the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program • Researching and resolving issues associated with entitlements when they encounter problems. • Providing advice to the JFHQ, and coordinating with Family Support Specialists and Employer Support Groups, regarding benefits and services available through the VA, Departments of Labor (Federal and State), and other service and benefit programs. The RING TAA is Sergeant Major Chuck O'Connor, US Army (Retired). He is located at the Joint Force Headquarters, Command Readiness Center, 645 New London Avenue, Cranston, RI 02920-4198. You can 28 | P a g e


contact him at 401.275.4198, or via email at charles.b.oconnor.ctr@mail.mil. Website: http://ri.ng.mil/resources/vsb/SitePages/ Home.aspx Vehicle Storage and Transportation: Vehicles stored in safe, secure units, affordable packages and pricing, pick up and delivery services available, keep your vehicle in top condition, online vehicle monitoring 24/7. POV transport across the U.S. Open or enclosed transport available, always receive fair and honest pricing, no deposit fee required 1-866768-2929 ADKOS.com Wellness: Dare to Dream Ranch, Inc. – Non profit 501(c)3. We offer alternative therapy programs for service members, veterans and their families to help overcome emotional challenges from war like PTSD, anxiety, and depression. Some of our programs have also been found beneficial for Mild TBI, and MST as well. We offer equine therapy, yoga, horticulture therapy (the produce from the garden will go back to feed our homeless and at risk veterans), nutritional cooking (so they learn the food/ mood connection and how what you eat can either exasperate or reduce the symptoms of PTSD, anxiety or depression ), reflexology and massage are offered through volunteers, woodworking workshops, fly tying and fly fishing program, creative arts program, recreational therapy and career counseling. If veterans, or their immediate family members are looking for assistance in these areas, please contact Karen Dalton, founder &

Executive Vice President, at 401-9192059 or karendaltonhealthyliving@gmail.com. More information can also be found at www.daretodreamranch.org Military OneSource- Help - anytime, anywhere, that is free. Health and Wellness Coaching. Our specialty consultants provide personal coaching by telephone or online to help you change your health habits for the better. Weight management, nutrition and exercise, and stress reduction. With a special program just for teenagers. Military OneSource is available 24/7/365 days a year. If interested, please contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647 or live chat with us at www.militaryonesource.mil. Overseas calling options are available on the website. The Parkinson’s Place- Did your Agent Orange exposure cause Parkinsons disease? The Parkinson’s Place provides all therapies as well as maintenance to obtain and maintain a happy, healthy and active quality of life. TheParkinsonsPlace.com 401-728-2039 65 Blackstone Ave, Pawtucket, RI 02860 Team Red, White & Blue’s mission is to enrich the lives of America’s veterans by connecting them to their community through physical and social activity. Our free membership consists of both veterans and supporters, whose simple goal is to provide the camaraderie and a support system that many vets left behind when they separated from the military. Veterans get the red Team RWB shirt for free (less shipping and 29 | P a g e


handling). Our activities include weekly events such as yoga and run clubs, organized races, Crossfit, bike rides, movie nights, dinner’s out, concerts, and sporting events. Local chapters are strictly volunteer leaders and we try to hold events based on the interest and suggestions of our members. For more information or to join our team, please go to www.teamrwb.org. VetDogs- America’s VetDogs changes the lives of veterans and active duty service members, first responders, and others who have served our country honorably, by training assistance dogs to mitigate their disabilities. Our goal is to team eah individual with the dog that’s right for them to live without boundaries. For more information please visit VetDogs.org or call 1-866-838-3647 Veterans Angler Charters- Veteran Angler Charters is an all-volunteer, federally recognized 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to offer free charter fishing trips to injured and recovering veterans, providing recreational rehabilitation and therapeutic support. Based in West Haven, CT, VA Charters averages 30-40 fishing trips per year, aboard private charter boats, skippered by USCG licensed captains. Groups are small (4 - 6 participants) and qualified peer support counselors or health care providers provide support as needed. Current clients include the VA hospitals in CT., Ma., and RI.; local vet centers, various regional military support groups, university veteran support centers, and the patients and alumni of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. To help with these efforts,

or to inquire about taking a trip, please contact Director Capt. Kathy Granfield at kgranfield@veterananglercharters.org, or through our website at www.veterananglercharters.org. Veterans CountEmployment Counseling, Emergency Financial Assistance, Mental Health Support, Deployment Support, Substance Abuse Services. Our one-of-a-kind Care Coordination program provides, free, and confidential support designed to meet the unique needs of Veterans, Military Members and their families. Care Coordinators work with clients in a flexible and comfortable setting. They travel to the client and respond to the client’s needs and are not constrained by office hours or locations. For more information please go to http://vetscount.org/contact/ Veterans Inc - provides assistance with employment and training and we can also assist homeless and at-risk veterans with housing including but not limited to rental arrearages, first and security deposits, utility assistance and much more. Our Services include: Housing Programs, Case Management, Employment & Training, Outreach & Referral Health & Wellness, Supportive Services for Veterans & Their Families, Food Pantry, Women and children Services, Little Patriots Early Learning Center. We are New England’s Largest Provider of Support Services to Veterans and Their Families. CT - MA - ME - NH - RI – VT For more information please call (800) 482-2565 or visit www.veteransinc.org

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44 Albion Road Suite 103B Lincoln, RI 02865 Hours: Mon – Fri : 8:00am – 5:00pm Sat : By appointment only Sun : closed Phone: 401-726-1513

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594 Great Rd. #102A N. Smithfield, RI 02896

2 Wake Robin Rd, #106 Lincoln, RI 02865

#TogetherWeMakeADifference Dare to Dream Ranch, 12 Snagwood Road Foster, RI 02825 Contact: karendaltonhealthyliving@gmail.com or Cell: 401-919-2059

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Military RISE January 2019 Edition  

Inspiring stories of how veterans and civilians are coming together to support our service members, veterans and their families.

Military RISE January 2019 Edition  

Inspiring stories of how veterans and civilians are coming together to support our service members, veterans and their families.