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Located on a slag heap within Frick Park, this performance park facilitates the staged work of performance artists. The design of this fabricated landscape encourages private and public interaction between the audience and performers by creating different levels of enclosure or exposure. The landscape, composed of wood, concrete, and plant material, simultaneously acts as seating, enclosure, and sequence. Material choices respond to occupant activities as well: concrete designates walking paths, and wood designates seating areas.

FRICK PARK, PITTSBURGH | FALL 2008

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Entrance sequence [previous page]

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Model studies

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Site section

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Building section

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Main performance area

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FRICK PARK, PITTSBURGH | FALL 2008


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COMPONENT SECTION LABELS

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TOP LEVEL

SEAT LEVEL

SEAT BACK LEVEL

BOTTOM LEVEL

Utilizing the idea of horizontal screening, this layered bench installation creates a variety of different social seating sections to activate the void space within a stairwell. Horizontal pieces were created using a CNC mill machine and were secured with threaded metal rods and bolts. Milling operations were established to create five distinctive pieces that were profiled and engraved to clearly designate individual placement during the bench installation. Created in collaboration with: Silvia Park Arlie Schrantz Kevin Wong

BENCH INSTALLATION | FALL 2009


thesis question: how do forms of representation and working methodology influence the design of architecture? The design process has a primary role in the architectural product, but the working methodology of the architect rarely receives the same scrutiny as the final design itself. This thesis became a conscious investigation into how process can be crafted to create better architecture.

COLOR + LIGHT INITIAL MODEL STUDIES

The site for the thesis exploration sits in the remote farmland of New Effington, South Dakota. The program is a small monastery, a building typology that must function as a living, study, and worship space. The experiential factors of the site and building program include time, light, scale, movement, and ritual. Exploration of these factors in the landscape led to the sectioning of the land, a series of massing model studies, and the decision to unify the experience of moving through the site and the monastery to create a comprehensive, holistic focus the infinite landscape of the plains.

IMMEDIATE CONTEXT | LOT 5

COLOR + LIGHT INITIAL MODEL STUDIES

EXTENDED CONTEXT | NEW EFFINGTON, SOUTH DAKOTA SECTIONING MODEL STUDIES

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EAST | WEST BUILDING SECTION

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PRAIRIE MONASTERY | SPRING 2011


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INDIVIDUAL MONK CELL, 7:30 AM

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CORRIDOR, 7:40 AM

PUBLIC COURTYARD, 7:45 AM

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Worship unit

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Living unit

Sanctuary sequence excerpt Final overlay booklet

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PIVOT JOINT PLAN

OPERATIONAL DIAGRAM

To highlight the movement of the occupant through both the site and the building, the design of the monastery was explored through a series of iterative overlay drawings that divided the building and landscape into sectional “frames” of experience. This allowed the design to be explored with the understanding of how monks and visitors alike would perceive the site and building through a sequence of time. Aspects of monastic ritual were also important to understanding how the building would be occupied over time.

OPERABLE WHEEL ELEVATION

SANCTUARY DOOR MECHANISM

By designing a specific method of architectural process and drawing, aspects of conceptual decision-making and building/site design were unified to enhance the final product. 1

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PRAIRIE MONASTERY | SPRING 2011

Architecture Work Sample  

Undergraduate design work