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A HEALTHY BODY IN A HEALTHY CITY The Master Programme at dpt. 3 Fall 2010

SCOPE THE STUDY THE PROJECT Programme Concept Project Production Exhibition THE COURSES Rhino/Maxwell Handling Architecture Project-related Communication Common Courses LEARNING OUTCOME


SCOPE

How is a healthy city done? What does it take to build and maintain a city that remembers and carries the marks of its history and yet is able to reach towards its future? That is able to both preserve and let go, that is faithful to what it is and open towards what it might become? What does it take to do a living city? What are the secrets of the spaces of a city that – in the words of Italo Calvino – can respond to the deep questions that you have inside? What kinds of architecture does it take to regain and nourish our senses - to re-enchant the spaces we share? How are programmes of the city and its architecture carried out in order to re-engages our bodies in the physical activity that our lifestyle has deprived us of?

Teatro de Los Sentidos ’El Hilo de Ariadne’ 2009

How do we create an architecture that increases the density of the city, and at the same time is flexible, heterogeneous, in balance and alive? An architecture that allows the city to live and to breathe in its atmosphere in a free flow without constraints and coughing, an architecture that sustains and enhances all of the city’s innumerable relations, an architecture that insists on the integrity and specificity of the city in all of the scales? To pose these questions and pursue their answers are the first steps in a quest for ways of planning and kinds of architecture that both understands end embrace the credo of Finn Selmer: ‘Ask not, what your context can do for you, but what you can do for your context!’ These are the objectives of the research and project-development in the autumn-semester at dpt. 3.

Welcome!

Katrine Lotz August 2010

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THE STUDY As pivot for the development of the individual programmes and projects, an area in the neighbourhood of ‘Ydre Nørrebro’ (‘Outer Northern Bridge’) in Copenhagen provides a wide range of urban problems and architectural potentials. Through analysis, research and sketching-studies, a shared space of experience of, and research into the area and the programme will be established. The individual project develops in a close dialogue with this shared ‘body of research’. A general introduction to the Master Programme at dpt. 3 can be found in the little folder www.karch.dk/afd3/STUDIEAFDELING+3/Kandidatuddannelsen

THE PROJECT The development of your individual project is the backbone of the studies. The semester is arranged in resemblance to a classical understanding of architectural project-development, namely the four phases: Programme, Concept, Project and Production. As we all well know, processes of architecture are not linear. But this quit stable professional understanding of the development of an architectural project serves us well as the basic rhythm of the semester.

Programme The first four weeks are – in contrast to the rest of the semester – quite densely planned. In this period, you will • be acquainted with the city of Copenhagen, the neighbourhood of Ydre Nørrebro and the problem of decreased physical activity through lectures, assignments and excursions • develop knowledge of and experience with methods of mapping and analysis • participate in a rare, truly original and evocative experience of opening your senses towards the city • have a study-trip to Venice with a guide that will provide us with inside knowledge to the Biennale-exhibition in the Danish Pavilion • get knowledge of, and experience with the use of methods of project-development and programming • at the end of the programme-phase have formulated, researched investigated, sketched and presented a full and obliging programme for the development of your project. Your participation and full attention in these weeks is seminal to your final results. We ask you kindly to prioritize your full participation. Jytte Rex ’Kvinden på Balkonen’ 1999

The programme-phase is an independent course (PGD) that equals 6 ECTS-points.

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At September 29th, a printed draft of the final programme is presented at a crit. On the basis of the comments, the programme is revised, and handed in in the final version at October 11th.

Finn Selmer ’Arkitektfaglige Håndteringsformer’ 2009

The programme is assessed with a grade. The assessment will be done under equal regard to • precision in the formulation of the scope of the programme • the quality of the analysis and research, that sustains the formulation of the scope, and • the quality, relevance and coherence of the written and visual communication • the ability of the visual material – diagrams, references, photos, sketches and models - to communicate the spatial and architectural potentials of the site and the functional programme. • the ability of the programme to turn over and enhance the content of the lectures, intros, excursions and the outcome of assignments, etc. presented in the period • the ability of programme to enable a direct continuation to the development of the architectural project • the continuous development of the programme over the period Immediately after the programme-phase you will be affiliated with a tutor that will follow your project for the rest of the semester. Normally, all students gets their 1. or 2. Priority.

Concept In the period following the programme-phase, the actual project period starts. Until the crit at 28th and 29th of October, you will work out an architectural concept in a continuous dialogue and exchange with your programme. Further notice will be given in due time. Project At the crit 26th of November, you will present a fully developed project, that responds to your programme. All of the material that is necessary in order to understand your project fully should be present here. Further notice will be given in due time. Production At the final crit 10th-11th of January, your final project is presented in a preliminary print. At this crit, a special feature of the project is pointed to, and through the next week you will take this element to the maximum performance. Exhibition At the exhibition at January 21st all of the projects are exhibited in their final form. Per Bak Jensen De Gådefulde Byer 1988

The phases ‘Concept, Project, Production and Exhibition’ together is called ‘Project’ and merits 15 ECTS-points. All of the crits in the project-period are mandatory. The project is assessed with a grade.

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The assessment will be done under equal regard to the extent to which your project demonstrates, that you have achieved the overall learning-targets of the semester through • the continuous development of the project from crit to crit • the projects coherence with the programme • your achievements in the courses & • the architectural qualities of the final result

THE COURSES Three independent courses supplements the project-development, and makes it up for what is called ‘Project-related Common Disciplines’. They are all integrated in the project-period in order to make a tight coherence between the development of the projects and the content of the courses. The already described programme-period in September is the first of these courses. Mike Martin is in charge of the course.

Peter Bertram Catalogue 2009

During the ‘concept’-period, we have arranged for a one-week course in Rhino and the Maxwell extension that gives access to the laser-cutters in the workshop of the School. It is not mandatory, meaning you are not granted any ECTS-points for it. It is however a recommendable course if you whish to enhance your skills in 3D modelling. ‘Handling Architecture’ introduces to relevant theories of, and concrete ways to handle architecture, in order to give access to reflected choices of work-methods. It is scheduled in the ‘project’-phase. The course establishes experience in the reflected choice of relevant ways of developing an architectural project – both in relation to the individual project, and to the work of others. The course is mandatory; it merits 2 ECTS, and is assessed passed/not passed. Katrine Lotz is in charge of the course ‘Project-related ways of communication’ is an introduction to relevant ways of communicating an architectural project, and how to ‘think’ the project through diagrams and visualizations. It is scheduled in the ‘production-phase’. The course is mandatory; it merits 2 ECTS, and is assessed with a grade on the basis of the final project. Arne Cermak is in charge of the course.

Henri Cartier-Bresson 1932

‘Common Courses’ or ‘FGD’s are common, mandatory courses at the Master Study at the School of Architecture. All students should follow an FGD equalling 5 ECTS each semester. All FGD´s are accessible in English.

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Henri Cartier-Bresson, Place de l’Eourope 1932

LEARNING OUTCOME • The ability to formulate an architectural programme, and in exchange herewith produce and develop proposals for design and spatial organisation. • Advanced experience in and knowledge of architectural methods of work, generation of form and the making of architectural proposals • Further experience in documenting and communicating research and architectural proposals orally, written and visually, in graphics and models. • Knowledge and understanding of and critical reflections on the interplay between the city, its ecology, its architecture and its inhabitants. • Ability to assess and choose the relevant methods to arrange space in, and give form to a building in concordance with an explicated and well-argued perception of its context

STAFF Anne Mette Frandsen Bianca Hermansen Claus Bjarrum Finn Selmer Flemming Overgaard Jan Christiansen Mike Martin

Architect maa, teacher Architect maa, phd-student Architect maa, associate Professor, Owner of Claus Bjarrum Architects Architect maa, head of dpt. 3 Architect maa, teacher Owner of Keinicke Overgaard Architects Architect maa, teacher, former Municipality Architect in Copenhagen Architect AIA, RIBA, professor at UCLA Berkeley, dpt. of Architecture

Steen Høyer ’The Global Garden 2006

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THE MATERIALS OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARCHITECTURE OF MATERIALS The Master Programme at dpt. 3 Spring 2011

SCOPE STUDY-PRACTICE THE PROJECT Concept Sketch-project Production Documentation Exhibition THE COURSES ‘Program’ ‘Imaginary Space’ ‘Component’ Project-related Communication Common Courses LEARNING OUTCOME


SCOPE

Materials are to architecture, what sound is to music. Without material, structure, surface or colour – no architecture. The description of the development of our culture is tightly connected to materiality. Think of the Stone-, Bronze- or Iron Age, where the presence of materials and the obtainment, use and distribution of them drove the development of cultures forth. Contemporary cultures can hardly be described in a similar simple way. The amount of different materials is multiple and continuously increasing. Through manufacturing, combination with other materials and extensions of supplementary properties, materials today are not only something to design with – they are also subject to design themselves. The contemporary research in materials is applied to meet specific properties and applications. And on a technological/scientific level, this development is moving very fast forward. But what kinds of impacts do these new designed materials have on the architectural grammar? How will the expression of the architecture of buildings and –components develop, with starting point in the inherent properties of the material? This is the theme and focus of the studies in the spring-semester at the Masters Program at dpt. 3, spring 2011. It is to reveal the architectural consequences of the use of a particular material. What does the immanent forces of a material call for? What is the inherent use of the material – is it structural – can it act as a load bearing construction – is it in-fill and surface – how is its texture, lustre and colour – or what restraints in terms of production, logistics and industrial is attached the material and the fashioning of it. Focus is on the new materials; the development of design and the possible application of them also have implications to the questions raised in order to get to a more sustainable building industry – questions on lifetime, decomposition and reuse. Minimal-constructions based on materials with low weight and high strength. Products with the abilities to produce, accumulate and provide energy is important to the development of a green building industry. However, the study of the potentialities of ‘new’ materials – combined with new ways of production – seem to open up for the re-thinking of more well known materials as well. As the linchpins of the assignment, we have identified a number of materials and products. Some are clarified in technological terms, but have not yet found a permanent architectural expression. Some of them have been about for a longer time, but new ways of production seems to call for a re-thinking of these materials. They are all materials that call for a

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design-related work which also includes analysis and assessment of where and how the material can be used - to which programmatic purposes and under what external conditions - production and assembly location and climate. Through analysis, research and sketching-studies, a shared space of experience of, and research into the materials will be established. The individual project develops in a close dialogue with this shared ‘body of research’.

Welcome!

Halli Sigurdsson Claus Bjarrum Anne Mette Frandsen & Katrine Lotz

Holmen, January 2011

PS: A general introduction to the Master Programme at dpt. 3 can be found in the little folder www.karch.dk/afd3/STUDIEAFDELING+3/Kandidatuddannelsen

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STUDY PRACTICE - is a combination of individual immersion and collective discourse The academic content is communicated • at the tables as individual tutoring • as group-work with a number of students and one or more teachers • at informal reviews and debates – so called ‘round-tables’ • through workshops and lectures • at the mandatory crits In addition, students are supposed to arrange field trips on their own to selected businesses and construction sites. The teachers teach individually or in groups – it depends of the stage of the studies and the architectural conditions that are to be disseminated to the students.

THE PROJECT – is arranged in phases The development of your individual project is the backbone of the studies. The semester is arranged in resemblance to a classical understanding of architectural project-development, in the four phases: Concept, Sketch-project, Production and Communication. As we all well know, processes of architecture are not linear. But this quit stable professional understanding of the development of an architectural project serves us well as the basic rhythm of the semester. Concept – directly to the core of giving form The first four weeks are quite densely planned. Your participation and full attention in these weeks is seminal to your final results. We ask you kindly to prioritize your full participation. The introduction includes the formation of study groups, each working on design in relation to a given material: • • • • • • • •

Composite Polycarbonate Expanded metal mesh Textile Laminated wood Clay/brick Glass and Aluminium.

Students are arranged in groups of not more then three, anchored in relation to one of these materials, and are followed by a faculty member. During the first three weeks, the groups will prepare a conceptual project for a "construction" which can accommodate one person, sitting, lying, standing - at rest or in motion. The construct can be maximum 3x3x3 m, and should be represented in scales 1:5 and 1:1. These "structures" will discuss how we design with a very strict focus on the relation between material and body. Development and design of the construct must be done using only the selected material may be supplemented by one additional material, as the study group chooses. The results are presented at the final crit of this first phase at February 28th. Immediately hereafter, you will be affiliated with a tutor that will

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follow your project for the rest of the semester. Normally, all students gets their 1. or 2. Priority. Sketch-project – shows that the material, context/climate and program are preconditions of each other In this period, a project is developed on the basis of the experiences made and the knowledge gained through the initial work with the ‘construct’. The sketch-project will discuss which program and what context and climate that is asked for by the materiality. The sketch-project is thus a synthesis of materiality, form, program and location. Thus, at the crit 24th and 25th of March, you will present a sketchproject, that responds to and accounts for the studies you have been through, for your choice of context and for your development of an appropriate thematic program. All of the material that is necessary in order to understand your project fully should be present here. Further notice will be given in due time. Production – in depth The sketch-project is further elaborated in terms of its architecture, its content and its scales. Specific aspects of it are studied in depth. The extent of the final hand-in is arranged and agreed upon. The project is challenged in terms of production, technology and realisation. During the Production-period, you will follow the course ‘Component’. The final crit of the period is May 6th. Communication - documentation The production-project is carried through in relation to program, architectural concepts and the elaborations made. The project will account for views on production, distribution and realization. During the period, you will follow the course ‘Project-related communication. At the crit 7th-8th of June, your final project is presented in a preliminary print. On this occasion, a special feature of the project is pointed to, and through the next two week you will take this element to the maximum performance. It can be a specific drawing, a model or a special feature of the project. Exhibition At the exhibition at June 22nd, all of the projects are exhibited in their final form. The phases ‘Concept’, ‘Sketch-project’, ‘Production’, ‘Communication’ and ‘Exhibition’ together is called ‘Project’ and equals 15 ECTS-points. All of the main crits (marked in the calendar) in the project-period are mandatory. The project is assessed with a grade after the exhibition. The assessment will be done under equal regard to the extent to which your project demonstrates, that you have achieved the overall learningtargets of the semester through • the continuous development of the project from crit to crit

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• • & •

the overall coherence between the final project and the investigations and developments you have made through rigorous studies and sketching in the medias relevant to the project. the tangible and readable impact of the courses in your project-work the level to which you have pursued the learning objectives of the semester, stated on next page the architectural qualities of the final result

THE COURSES Three courses supplements the project-development, and makes it up for what is called ‘Project-related Common Disciplines’. They are all integrated in the project-period in order to make a tight coherence between the development of the projects and the content of the courses. All FGD´s are accessible in English. 1. course: ‘Program’, 6 ECTS A detailed program for the first four weeks will be presented at the Semesterstart. These weeks together forms a mandatory course. It is assessed with a grade on the basis of the work presented at the crit at February 28th. Halli Sigurdsson is in charge of the course. ‘Road-trip Europe 2011’ Dpt. 3 arranges the study-trip to Germany, Switzerland and Italy, and it is highly recommended to participate. Sign up ASAP with our department secretary, Ulla Agger. ‘Traces of Imaginary Spaces’ For those students who do not participate in the department's study tour, a workshop is arranged in which individuals and groups are working concretely and abstract with design, with the generation of form and of spatial performances. The workshop deals with imaginary space and design in the scale ratio of 1:1. As opposed to the studio work with its emphasis on representations of form and materiality, the workshop deals with the actual. Rather than ‘drawing form’ (in Danish: ‘tegne form’) the students will ‘form signs’. (in Danish: ‘forme tegn’) The workshop is mandatory for students who do not participate in the study-trip. It is arranged by Claus Bjarrum. 2. course: ‘Component, 2 ECTS In cooperation with CINARK, the Center for Industrialized Architecture at KA/inst. 2, the course imparts knowledge on the industrial production of buildings parts and how it challenges perception of architecture. The course is directly linked to the development of the individual projects. It is assessed passed/not passed on the basis of work presented at the crit at May 6th. Claus Bjarrum is in charge of the course. 3. course: ‘Project-related ways of communication’, 2 ECTS The course is an introduction to relevant ways of communicating an architectural project, and how to ‘think’ the project through diagrams and visualizations. It is scheduled in the ‘production-phase’.

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The course is assessed with a grade on the basis of the final project as it is handed in at the final crits and for the exhibition at June 22nd. Arne Cermak is in charge of the course. ‘Common Courses’ or ‘FGD’s are common, mandatory courses at the Master Study at the School of Architecture. All students enrolled at the KA should follow an FGD equalling 5 ECTS each semester. In the spring of 2011, the offered course has the title ‘Theory and Method 2’. Exchange students are not obliged to follow the common courses, but are however encouraged to follow the course.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES – knowledge on the meaning of materials in relation to the architectural statement • Ability to identify, explore and communicate the architectural consequences implied by the use of a specific material • Insight in, experience with and knowledge of the properties of a specific material in terms of structural capacities, lustre, texture and colour • Knowledge on the manufacturing and production of the raw material into building components • Knowledge and understanding of and critical reflections on the interplay between the use of materials, its properties and how the circumstances of production, logistics and production influences the use in relation to construction • Advanced experience in and knowledge of architectural methods of work, generation of form and the making of architectural proposals • Ability to assess and choose the relevant methods to fashion a building/parts in concordance with an overall architectural expression on the basis of in-depth studies of specific materials • Further experience in how to documenting and communicating research and architectural proposals orally, written and visually, in graphics and models

SUPPLEMENTS Program the first four weeks Calendar for the first four weeks Calendar for the semester

STAFF/Spring 2011 Halli Sigurdsson Architect, maa, teacher Partner in Andersen & Sigurdsson Architects Anne Mette Frandsen Architect maa, teacher Employed at DOMUS architects Claus Bjarrum Architect maa, Associate Professor, Owner of Claus Bjarrum Architects Katrine Lotz Architect maa, Assistant Professor Responsible for the Master program at Dpt. 3 Questions concerning this program should be directed to katrine.lotz@karch.dk

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KA3 semester descriptions  

KA3 semester descriptions

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