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SELECTED WORKS KARA SCHIPPERS


MEET KARA SCHIPPERS 1


I am a fifth year M. Arch student at the University of Kansas seeking to bring some moxie and design enthusiasm to a full-time employment opportunity. With just the right mix of design instincts and business savvy, I look forward to joining an office who is searching for a team member who can bring an eclectic mix of skills and dexterity to multiple projects at various stages of completion. After seven months of working in a fast-paced, highly competitive, architectural office environment, I understand the importance of working quickly and efficiently to visually and verbally communicate the core ideas without sacrificing quality or a creative edge. The ongoing development of these skills in my final semester of school makes me a prepared and intentional candidate ready to jump into any role. Please contact me if you are interested in adding a flexible, confident, fresh, young designer to your office!

karajane@ku.edu 316-734-1622

1008 Alabama Apt. 1 Lawrence, KS 66044 CONTENTS: DESIGN

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WORK

23 43

BUILD DRAW/PAINT CAPTURE

49 53

TRAVEL

59 ONLINE PORTFOLIO: http://issuu.com/karaschippers


DESIGN

ROCK ISLAND CORRIDOR: PHASE

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power generation transmission

collection

Sun

retention

ďŹ ltration

distribution

community

Farming health

environment

The Kansas City Rock Island Corridor is a 30 mile stretch of abandoned rail between Kansas City, MO and Pleasant Hill, MO. Plans for a mass rapid transit line along the corridor challenge designers to revitalize adjacent communities while incorporating sustainable strategies. I explored the advantages of employing a network of interrelated systems that would work symbiotically to create an efďŹ cient, biomimetic, industrial organism. Versatility and modular construction allow the structure to be deployed in diverse environments and conditions. Situating in existing industrial sites facilitates an educational contrast between new and old, providing the framework for an updated, responsible way to generate electricity, grow food locally, and properly retain and repurpose storm water.

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DESIGN

ROCK ISLAND CORRIDOR: PHASE TWO

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s seed point

SEED POINTS

canopy

Delauney Tr

DELAUNAY rming pools ronoi Te

fa

Vo

VORONOI

STREAM

WALKING PATH

LAYERING

rivers

walking paths


DESIGN

The second phase combined our individual components from pha our three projects (infrastructure as public architecture, a canopy wi an infrastructural prototype composed of a solar and water collecti light rail stop. Inuenced by the inherent synergy present in the com canopy and a tensegrity structural system - further emphasizing tha 7


ase one into a holistic, group proposal for the development of the corridor. We took the essence from each of ith adaptable components, and patterning as a means for layered systems integration) and merged them into ing canopy, farming and water retention plots, an electric car charging parking lot, and a small station for the mbinant systems, we applied the voronoi tesselation as a generator of the geometry of both the plots and the at each constituent part is essential to the success of the whole.


DESIGN

9


DESIGN

LAWRENCE ARTS CENTER ADDITION 11


DESIGN

13


DESIGN

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56

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53 52 51

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47

48

DN

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DN

19,000 ft2

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41 A

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DN

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30 36 35

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47

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33

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19,250 ft2

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A

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19,250 ft2

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1. Black Box Theater 2. Theater Storage 3. Dressing Rooms 4. Set Shop 5. Storage 6. Gallery Prep Space 7. Mechanical Room 8. Existing Black Box 9. Art Classroom 10. Writing Classroom 11. Printmaking Classroom 12. Photography Classroom 13. Dark Room 14. Existing Dressing Rooms 15. Sculpture Gallery 16. Ticket Office 17. Reception Bar 18. Storage 19. Ceramics Classroom 20. Preschool Classroom 21. Preschool Administration Office 22. Preschool Art Display 23. Cafe 24. Kitchen 25. Gift Shop 26. Gift Shop Storage 27. Existing Gallery 28. Reception Desk 29. Administration Offices 30. Rentable Studio 31. Movie Projection Seating 32. Preschool Playground 33. Sculpture Garden 34. Gallery 35. Outdoor Dance Floor 36. Large Dance Studio 37. Dance Dressing Rooms 38. Small Dance Studio 39. Storage 40. Reception Desk 41. Administration Office 42. Conference Room 43. Break Room 44. Custodial Closet 45. Reading Room 46. Meeting Room 47. Sculpture Exhibit Space 48. Ceramics Studio 49. Ceramics Terrace 50. Drawing Studio 51. Studio 52. Storage 53. Jewelry Studio 54. Digital Lab 55. Community Room 56. Dressing Rooms Total: 0 2

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57,500 ft2 16

32

This 57,500 sq. ft. extension to the existing Lawrence Arts Center takes full adva users with a unique, yet intuitive, experience. The extrusion and pushing back o the shift of programmatic spaces to be displayed at the front of the new additi as in the original LAC. The orientations and heights of each wing of the buildi natural light while the long, narrow room shapes and operable glazing systems f sculpture courts and playground spaces. The addition contains both small, in galleries in addition to much-needed preschool classrooms, dance studios, and

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antage of passive strategies while providing of the existing circulation corridor allowed for ion rather than tucked behind the circulation ing were carefully considered to let in ample facilitate cross ventilation and views to outdoor ntimate gallery spaces as well as large, open d a black box theater.


DESIGN

POTTER’S FIELD, LONDON: CULTURAL CENTER 17


DESIGN

The primary goal with this project was to create a dynamic, spatial experience while respecting surrounding historic landmarks. This was achieved through the addition of a series of circulation ramps beneath the raised, artiďŹ cial berm. The glass ramps serve as prisms of light to illuminate the underside of the superstructure and the market below. An exercise in uninhibited creativity, this project brought about a better understanding of the balance between subtle and dramatic moves that work together to enhance the sequence of spatial progression. 19


A

c

B

b

C

a

D

MARKET

GALLERY

LOUNGE

CAFE

THEATER


DESIGN

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WORK

ELEVATE: THE BOILER ROOM 23


HDR participated in the ElevATE food festival hosted by Omaha’s Emerging Terrain. The invited exhibition partnered the design team at HDR with local chef Paul Kulik of the Boiler Room to construct a temporary pavilion in which to cook and serve small plates from a special menu. In keeping with Chef Kulik’s culinary expertise, the parametrically designed pop-up tent was complete with a central fire pit and chimney - evoking prehistoric themes of man’s primal relationship to food.


WORK

25


WORK

RESPONSIVE SKINS: FACADE STUDY

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The world is shrinking. The identity of every city, the world over, has begun to converge. An increased demand for consumer products has spawned a surfeit of buildings that look exactly the same whether they are in Boise or Bangladesh; we are awash in the glowing arches of McDonald’s and many others like it. And this is no surprise -- for a brand to be “recognizable,” its image must be consistent. It goes without saying that consistency lends itself to consumer recognition, as well as to cost effectiveness and ease of repetition. But this does not preclude variation. In reaction against the tendency to see buildings as “objects” and brands as “logos,” we have set out to create a system that will transcend these constraints, so that its identity may be known by its intangibles rather than by its form alone. Our approach was to establish a framework which would allow us to create endless variation, but one that was rigid enough to maintain a high level of specificity and cohesion between every iteration.


WORK

Taking on the traditional box form (efficient in both cost and utility) and wrapping it in a prefabricated system of off-the-shelf parts establishes a fresh take on building identity. A varied prototype, each building interjects itself into the broader context of the city by deviating from the standard brand applications of traditional, commercial architecture. Each iteration is a constituent part of the reformed system of commercial architecture - all unique, yet of the same DNA. As a result, the collective group is instantly recognizable as one brand. This cohesiveness coupled with the advent of new construction applications for typical mullion outriggers and steel Inox cables (most often seen in parking garage crash rails) work to redefine the notion of a “chain” of stores or businesses.

The facade is constructed with an elegant system of two interwoven planes of cables. Think of it as an elaborate game of connect the dots -- a single steel cable is woven from point 1, to point 2, to point 3, and so on. 29


WORK

FOCAL POINT: ST. ANTHONY HOSPITAL

31


The site for the new Focal Point campus and St. Anthony Hospital affords a supreme opportunity for change. Located in Southwest Chicago, it is one of the most vibrant, yet blighted, neighborhoods in the city. Acting as both an anchor and an agent for change, the hospital is envisioned as an urban campus that fosters a relationship between the hospital and its community. Hospital and community are intrinsically linked by a “circulatory system” – a band of food and retail markets, fitness centers, etc. that runs along the third floor of the building. This system serves as the interface between the world of healthcare and the world beyond, and it literally brings the two together – a new paradigm in the industry.


WORK

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The high school regulation soccer ďŹ eld and surrounding public green add to the extensive Chicago parks system and continue St. Anthony’s tradition of adjacency to green space - the original having been located across from Douglas Park.


WORK

35


An inverted version of Florence’s Ponte Vecchio, retailers inhabit the pedestrian walkway connecting the parking garage to the hospital towers, giving dual purpose to the conventional sky bridge. The complex vertical layering of program is a direct response to a constricted site and Chicago precedents like Lower Wacker Drive.

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WORK

REHABILITATION INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 37


A bold partnership between two architecture elites, HDR, Inc. and Gensler, resulted in a dynamic collaborative effort to raise the bar in rehabilitation care. Each office brought varied expertise to the table and combined to form a savvy design team with diverse skill sets and an eye for innovation. Designers, engineers, and planners from both parties worked together in a Gensler conference room deemed “the blue space” to ensure optimal efficiency, a cooperative working dynamic, and a cohesive design aesthetic.


WORK

Option three of our patient room iterations centered around the customization of a sculpted headwall system. In keeping with the themes of movement and momentum associated with the rehabilitation process, the paneled headwall is carved away with lines that suggest uid motion to reveal nooks for necessary programmatic functions such as the caregiver’s station, sink, and patient bedside table.

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WORK

a. floor layout b. zones c. accessibility design modifications

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a.

b.

c. FAMILY

FAMILY

PATIENT

PATIENT

STAFF

STAFF PATIENT

PATIENT


5

4

WOOD

BUILD

STUDY MODELS & DESIGN BUILD A

BOTTOM

B

A

C B

A

C

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6 1” Richlite Tabletop 3” Socket Cap Screw, counter- sunk 1 1/4” x 1 1/4” 11 ga. Tube Steel Rib 5/8” Hex Nut

3” x 5” 11 ga. Tube Steel Stapple Leg

3/4” Richlite Cavity Box 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Runner

1 1/4” Baltic Plywood or 1” Richlite Table Top 1” Round Shank Screw (Baltic Plywood) or 3/4” Round Shank Screw (Richlite) 1 1/2” x 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Mounting Tab 1 1/4” x 1 1/4” 11 ga. Tube Steel Rib

3” x 5” 11 ga. Tube Steel Stapple Leg

3/4” Baltic Plywood or Richlite Cavity Box 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Runner


BUILD

0’ -

1

3

STEEL

2

EL

WOOD

4

STEEL

Weld inside and outside corners, leaving the corner edges untouched. 2’- 2 1/4”

Grind smooth the outside welds on the two outer ribs where it will sit flush with the staple legs.

A

0’- 3 1/2” 3’- 5 1/2”

1’- 11 5/8”

C 0’- 3 1/2” B

1’- 11 5/8” 4’- 4” 0’- 1”

0’- 5 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

0’- 1”

0’- 3/8”

0’- 1”

9’- 6”

B

1’- 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

3’- 6 1/8”

0’- 1”

0’- 3/8”

2’- 0 3/4”

0’- 3/8” B

A

3’- 6 1/8”

3’- 5 1/2” C

2’- 3”

5/8” Countersunk Hole

1 1/4” x 1 1/4“ Rib is welded to the 1” x 3” Spine 1” x 3” Tube Steel Spine is welded to the 5” x 3” Staple Leg

1/8” Flat Steel Runner is welded to the underside of the 1 1/4” x 1 1/4” Rib

3

STEEL

2

STEEL

Weld inside and outside corners, leaving the corner edges untouched. 2’- 2 1/4”

Grind smooth the outside welds on the two outer ribs where it will sit flush with the staple legs.

A

0’- 3 1/2” 3’- 5 1/2”

1’- 11 5/8”

C 0’- 3 1/2” B

1’- 11 5/8” 4’- 4” 0’- 1”

0’- 5 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

1’- 1/2”

0’- 1”

0’- 3/8”

0’- 1”

9’- 6”

1’- 1/2”

3’- 6 1/8”

1’- 1/2”

0’- 1”

2’- 0 3/4”

45

0’- 3/8”

A

3’- 6 1/8”

0’- 3/8”


2’ - 10” 2’ - 10”

1”

1’ - 1/2”

1’ - 1/2”

0’ - 1”

5

COMPOSITE

6

WOOD

1” Richlite Tabletop 3” Socket Cap Screw, counter- sunk

A

1 1/4” x 1 1/4” 11 ga. Tube Steel Rib 5/8” Hex Nut BOTTOM

3” x 5” 11 ga. Tube Steel Stapple Leg

3/4” Richlite Cavity Box 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Runner

A

1 1/4” Baltic Plywood or 1” Richlite Table Top 1” Round Shank Screw (Baltic Plywood) or 3/4” Round Shank Screw (Richlite) 1 1/2” x 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Mounting Tab 1 1/4” x 1 1/4” 11 ga. Tube Steel Rib

C

1’ - 10 3/4”

0’- 11 3/8”

3” x 5” 11 ga. Tube Steel Stapple Leg

2’ - 3”

1’- 10 3/4” 3/4” Baltic Plywood or Richlite Cavity Box 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Runner

Steel

A Richlite

1”

1’- 1 1/2”

1’- 1 1/2”

1”

2’ - 9 1/4”

2’- 3”

1’ - 7”

Baltic Plywood

1’- 4 1/4”

2’- 3”

2’ - 10” 2’ - 10”

0’ - 1”

1’ - 1/2”

1’ - 1/2”

0’ - 1”

5

WOOD

4

COMPOSITE

6

WOOD

1” Richlite Tabletop 3” Socket Cap Screw, counter- sunk

A

1 1/4” x 1 1/4” 11 ga. Tube Steel Rib 5/8” Hex Nut BOTTOM

3” x 5” 11 ga. Tube Steel Stapple Leg

This group project centered around creating a master plan of the new classroom for the Studio 409 and 804 classes. Our class developed the floor plan for the space, designed a desk scheme, and built 60 workspaces. Several material options were explored (see the glass and steel version to the right) but the final construction was of tube steel and Baltic Birch plywood. I worked primarily on the design of the desk’s structure and on the steel fabrication and welding. 3/4” Richlite Cavity Box 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Runner

B

A

1 1/4” Baltic Plywood or 1” Richlite Table Top 1” Round Shank Screw (Baltic Plywood) or 3/4” Round Shank Screw (Richlite)

C

1 1/2” x 3” x 1/8” Flat Steel Mounting Tab 1 1/4” x 1 1/4” 11 ga. Tube Steel Rib

B

3” x 5” 11 ga. Tube Steel Stapple Leg


BUILD

Abstraction of the spine.

47


Study and ďŹ nal model for pavilions along the Bexil Sea coast.


DRAW/PAINT

DRAWING & PAINTING 49


DRAW/PAINT

51


CAPTURE

BLACK & WHITE FILM PHOTOGRAPHY 53


CAPTURE

55


CAPTURE

57


TRAVEL

STUDY ABROAD: FRANCE 59


TRAVEL

61


TRAVEL

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Kara Schippers Portfolio  

University of Kansas fifth-year M. Arch. student portfolio.

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