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HORI Z ON S LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESERVATION, RESTOR ATION , EDUCATION AN D RECRE ATION

QUARTERLY

spring 2013

VOLUME 22, ISSUE 2


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On the cover: ruby-throated hummingbird more than

30,000 acres are

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

protected

by the lake county forest preserves .

A MESSAGE from

BOARD of COMMISSIONERS

ANN B. MAINE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESIDENT

Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire VICE PRESIDENT

Linda Pedersen, Antioch

Reflecting on the past two years, I am impressed by how much we have accomplished, and honored to have been chosen by my fellow Commissioners to continue to lead the Lake County Forest Preserves. Looking forward, I will continue to focus my efforts on completing and extending popular multi-use trail systems, restoring wetlands, prairies and forests and opening new preserves throughout the county. I’m happy to report that 2013 is already a strong year for preservation, and exciting things are happening with regional trails. As part of a long-range effort, an addition to Pine Dunes in northern Lake County will help connect seven neighboring preserves, creating a network of natural lands and regional trail systems. The new land creates the opportunity for extensive public access improvements and wetland restoration efforts, and was selected to receive wetland mitigation funds by the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority. Of greatest note is the potential for a connection between the Millennium Trail and the 31-mile Des Plaines River Trail (DPRT), which runs almost the complete length of the county from just south of the Illinois-Wisconsin border to Deerfield. As this issue’s feature on page eight outlines, improvements to the Millennium Trail have been proceeding swiftly throughout the county, including trail extensions and several new underpasses, allowing safe travel across major roads. Regional trail corridors and associated greenways such as the Millennium Trail and the DPRT provide uninterrupted wildlife habitat, natural flood protection, improved regional transit and places for outdoor recreation. Ultimately, they help create future livable communities, contributing to the health and welfare of our region and its residents. I invite you to come sample the results of our work this spring. In addition, check out the leading story in this issue for help in planning outdoor adventures for your child this summer. Summer Camp programs are sprinkled throughout the county, so you’re sure to find something nearby. Amidst all this activity, we say goodbye to our Executive Director, Tom Hahn, Finance Director, Bonnie McLeod, and Development Director, Mike Fenelon, each retiring this spring. Together they represent 60 years of experience working alongside the Board, Forest Preserve employees and Lake County residents to further our mission, protecting invaluable resources and providing a strong balance between conservation and recreation in preserves throughout the county. I hope you will join me in wishing them well as they embark on new horizons.

TREASURER

S. Michael Rummel, Lake Forest ASSISTANT TREASURER

Carol Calabresa, Libertyville Pat Carey, Grayslake Steve Carlson, Gurnee Bonnie Thomson Carter, Ingleside Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Bill Durkin, Waukegan Sandra Hart, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Aaron Lawlor, Vernon Hills Steven W. Mandel, Highland Park Audrey H. Nixon, North Chicago Diana O’Kelly, Mundelein Brent Paxton, Zion Nick Sauer, Lake Barrington David B. Stolman, Buffalo Grove Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Tom Weber, Lake Villa Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Tom Hahn

HORIZONS VOLUME 22, ISSUE 2

Spring 2013

EDITOR

Kara Martin kmartin@LCFPD.org CONTRIBUTING

Allison Frederick PHOTOGRAPHY

Kim Karpeles, Chip Williams Subscription services hotline: 847–968–3335

Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.


connecting campers to lake county’s cultural and natural resources

Summer is right around the corner, and more than 10 million children in the United States are preparing for the experience of a lifetime—summer camp. Sneak some learning into your child’s summer adventures. Our Summer Camps meet the summer wishes of kids and parents alike, offering a wide variety of topics, from art to the ecology of fishing. Our highly trained education staff is experienced in supervision, safety techniques, and activity development. Research has demonstrated that time spent in nature fosters the healthy development of children. Most of our camps are held completely outdoors,

and those that aren’t have components outside. Outdoor play helps children manage stress and become resilient. Natural spaces stimulate children’s limitless imaginations and foster creativity. Children who connect with nature may be more inventive and better problem-solvers due to the hands-on learning that local nature provides. Camp provides children with a safe, positive environment, which helps children grow.

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Four new camps We are offering four new camps this summer based on camper suggestions, featuring campers’ favorite activities as well as some new ones. From tug-of-war with invasive species to tracking wildlife, each camp is an exciting adventure! Explore and Restore—Campers will discover secrets of Lake County’s three major habitats—woodlands, wetlands and prairies. See what happens when nature is out of balance. Learn and practice restoration techniques and identify invasive plants. Campers will become stewards of the earth by helping to return these special places to healthier habitats. Discovering Dinosaurs—Dig into Lake County’s prehistoric history. Discover how big dinosaurs were (or how small!), what they ate and how they lived. Learn about the scientists who study them and what museums do with all those bones. We’ll do a mock dig for real fossils, create a fossil cast to take home and much more. Family Camp—This camp is for all those caregivers who want to do what the kids get to do. Join us for insect netting, hiking, paddling and exploration outdoors. Resident sandhill cranes, bald eagles and beautiful patches of savanna make Fox River Forest Preserve an exciting location to explore. Create lifelong memories at this special camp created for families. Skulls, Scat and Tracks—It’s not always easy to view wildlife in action. However, signs of animal activity are everywhere if you know how to look. This camp helps young explorers hone observation skills while interpreting signs that wildlife leaves behind.

Unleash the artist within Our art camps go beyond painting and drawing. In addition to common artistic mediums, art campers will explore mediums such as Japanese origami, weaving and dyeing with natural materials, impromptu theatre, art history and more.

History comes alive Don’t overlook our history camps—they’re not your average lessons. Obsessed with dinosaurs? Try our new Discovering Dinosaurs camp where you’ll dig for real fossils. Don’t dig dinos? Become a History Detective! Examine documents and investigate facts to piece together clues from Lake County’s historical mysteries. Younger campers can become Pint-sized Farmers. We’ll look at magnificent machinery, plant crops and even meet a farm animal or two along the way. Looking for a full-day camp? Return to the 1830s and experience life as an early settler in Lake County at Heritage Camp. Don’t miss out; our Heritage Camp rotates annually between Lake County Pioneers, Native Americans and French Voyageurs, and Prehistoric Lake County. The next chance to step into the shoes of an early settler won’t be until 2016.

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fresh topics for years of fun Our camp topics vary each year, so your camper may attend camps from ages 4 through 15 without repeating a subject. For each camp season, however, the topic for each camp remains the same no matter the location. Therefore, we encourage you to register your child for one camp session per topic, per season only, to allow for greater service to the community.

Adventures in nature Younger generations spend more time with their cell phones and earbuds than listening for the sounds of birdcalls and frog croaks. Through insect netting, exploration, nature-based crafts and exciting games, our nature camps stimulate children’s limitless imaginations and foster creativity. Rediscover nature through your child’s eyes on a wildlife safari with Knee-high Naturalists. Uncover mysteries of the green world as Young Naturalists. Explore in the water, above ground and underground as an Eco Adventurer. Our full-day nature camps pair natural science concepts with outdoor recreation activities to make learning fun. Adventures in Nature campers learn outdoor skills, such as paddling, biking and wilderness survival. Fishing campers explore the watery world fish inhabit and learn the skills, techniques and lures needed to catch them.

Weather-safe facilities It’s rare, but due to the outdoor setting of many camps and the unpredictability of Mother Nature, some sessions may be canceled when inclement weather strikes. Bonner Heritage Farm, Greenbelt Cultural Center, Lake County Discovery Museum, Lakewood Forest Preserve and Ryerson Woods all have indoor facilities. Camps held at these locations are less likely to be canceled due to the weather. Among these locations, we’d like to highlight a lesser-known gem: Greenbelt Cultural Center, a multi-purpose facility designed with help from the public. The Cultural Center’s mission is to provide a place for the community to gather and learn about the relationship between culture and the natural world. This mission comes to life during Summer Camp season. A surprising array of birds, wildflowers and landscapes are found in this island of green in Lake County’s most urban area, and the amenities are clean, safe and well designed. If you haven’t already, check it out!

Learn more We hope to see you this summer! Register online at LCFPD/camps or by calling us at 847968-3321. Partial scholarships are available in the case of financial hardship. To apply, complete the form online or visit our General Offices in Libertyville or the Welcome Center at Ryerson Conservation Area. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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PRESERVENEWS forest preserve executive director retires

Tom Hahn has made a career of acquiring and preserving land to protect nature and provide open space for people to enjoy. For 14 years he has worked with the Forest Preserve Board, staff and Lake County residents to overwhelmingly pass several majority bond referendums, helping shape the Lake County landscape by adding approximately 10,000 acres of land and creating 15 new preserves. Hahn joined the District in 1999 as head of Land Preservation, and was promoted to Executive Director in 2005. He will retire in March 2013. “Not many people can say their career work has had such a positive effect on so many aspects of life in Lake County,” stated Hahn. “The Forest Preserve land holdings have a value that is incalculable—I know that Lake County residents and the Board share my views on the importance of these holdings and will continue to be excellent stewards of this incredible resource.” spring burn season

volunteers preserve and restore diversity

Did you know there are more endangered species in Lake County than in all other counties in the state? Preserving our rich diversity means more than simply acquiring land—we must reduce the inevitable impact that accompanies development, such as invasion of non-native species and loss of cleansing fires. You can help by joining a volunteer workday this spring. Workdays happen on weekends and typically involve pulling invasive garlic mustard or spreading native seed. For details, call 847-968-3324 or visit LCFPD.org/volunteer. expanded parking at fort sheridan

In response to increased preserve use, parking at Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve (Highland Park) will increase to 100 spaces by June 2013. The lakefront, accessed by Gilgare Lane, will have an additional 40 gravel parking spaces, and 20 spaces will be added to the Fort Sheridan Cemetery lot accessed by Sheridan Road. Automated solar-powered gates will also be installed at both entrances. 6 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

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March and April will be busy months for our burn crew, as they conduct controlled fires to revive natural areas. Before Illinois was settled, wildfires were critical to the survival of some plant communities. The need still exists, but wildfires that swept the countryside have been replaced with controlled burns managed by staff professionals. By mid-April, the program ends in order to protect wildlife such as birds beginning to nest and snakes emerging from hibernation. For current information about controlled burns, visit our website at LCFPD.org/ burninfo or call 847-968-3293.

nature photography

Let the beauty of the natural world inspire your creativity. Share your nature photos with us at Flickr.com/groups/LCFPD.


water connects lake county

Lake County is aptly named—besides bordering Lake Michigan to the east, it is home to over 170 lakes and rivers, 400 miles of streams and thousands of acres of wetlands. Discover the importance of freshwater and the need for sustainable management of this precious resource—join us this year as we celebrate water with educational and recreational programs on the theme. Explore water ecosystems, join a paddling class and learn how you can help address water quality. See calendar for details.

pelicans in lake county

Typically rare in Lake County, American white pelicans have been seen for the past several years at Lake Marie Forest Preserve (Antioch) and other nearby lakes as they move through the area early in the season. One of the world’s largest birds, the white pelican’s wingspan reaches 9 feet or more—the largest of all North American birds. spring trail alerts

Although spring brings warmer trailgoing weather, it also brings increased rainfall and snow melt, putting trails at greater risk for flooding. After submerged sections dry, maintenance crews are quick to regrade and repair any water damage. For the latest trail closings, see LCFPD.org or follow us on Facebook.com/LCFPD.

trout season opens

Lakewood Forest Preserve in Wauconda opens for rainbow trout fishing on Saturday, April 6, following the release of roughly 600 pounds of fish. Trout season is a biannual event conducted in partnership with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. To participate, anglers ages 16 and over must have an Illinois fishing license and inland trout stamp. Proceeds from stamp sales help fund the stocking program. Looking forward to fishing this summer? Be sure to get your hands on our free Fishing Guide full of fantastic angling spots. More than one dozen lakes and ponds are profiled with directions, detailed bottom maps and illustrations of the fish to seek: LCFPD.org/fishing. almond marsh rookery observation

Welcome herons, cormorants and hooded mergansers back to Lake County this spring at Almond Marsh heron rookery (Grayslake). Almond Marsh is open Saturdays, April–June, 8 am–noon (except Memorial Day weekend) for observation. Lake County Audubon will be on hand Saturday, April 6, with bird books, binoculars to lend and refreshments while supplies last. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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native plant, rain barrel & compost bin sale

Prepare your wish list of native plants and visit our 16th annual Native Plant Sale this Mother’s Day weekend at Independence Grove, May 11–12. Native plants require less watering, less fertilizer and are guaranteed to thrive in local gardens. Native flowering species also provide an abundance of nectar and attract wildlife, such as butterflies and songbirds. Choose from more than 60 varieties of flowers and grasses. Plants are restocked on Sunday morning. Proceeds from the sale benefit our environmental education programs. Rain barrels and compost bins will be available for purchase—one day only, Saturday, May 11 from 9 am–3 pm. The sale is sponsored by SWALCO and the Stormwater Management Commission. These practices benefit your backyard, community and beyond. Rain barrels reuse stormwater from rooftops and divert water from storm drains, decreasing the impact of runoff to streams and minimizing sewer overflows during heavy rainfall. In addition to creating nutrient rich soil for yards and gardens, composting at home means you’ll dispose of less material, diverting a large percentage of waste from our landfills. Compost can also reduce the amount of water needed and helps improve resistance to both plant diseases and insect pests. Visit LCFPD.org/plantsale for a complete plant list and details regarding the barrels and bins.

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deer exclosures help assess habitat health

Deer are an important part of Lake County’s natural areas. But in some preserves, deer are so numerous that habitats have become unbalanced. To help measure the impact deer have on habitat, our wildlife biologists have installed “deer exclosures” at several preserves. Deer can’t get into these fenced-off areas, but squirrels, woodchucks and other plant eaters can. In nearby areas, deer roam free. We compare plants in both areas to assess how deer affect the number and variety of plants. To see an exclosure, visit Ryerson Woods (Riverwoods). Plan your visit for the spring, when differences are most apparent. For help identifying plants in and around the exclosure, download our mobile app and check out the spring ID it! section, which features wildflowers. Available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Play Store—search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.” drought and maple syrup

The sustained drought in our region will impact the annual Maple Syrup Hikes at Ryerson Woods this spring, as sugar maple trees produce less sap. Severe drought causes stunted growth, leading to smaller leaves that turn color and drop earlier than usual in the fall. The tree’s food, sap, is produced in the leaves. With smaller leaves and a shorter sap production season, there will be less sap in our buckets, resulting in less maple syrup. Hikes will continue, but to ensure tree health, we will be tapping fewer trees.


flower power

Color is one method flowers use to attract insects and other pollinators—visit our Native Plant Sale this Mother’s Day weekend to find native plants in hues to boost your butterflies, harbor more hummingbirds or bring in the beneficial bees (see facing, left for details, or visit LCFPD.org/plantsale). golf instructional programs

special events at greenbelt cultural center

Develop and expand your golf skills with instructional programs taught by our PGA and LPGA staff. Group, individual and junior lessons are available throughout the season for all skill levels at Countryside Golf Club and ThunderHawk Golf Club. Call 847-968-3100, or visit LCFPD.org.

Nested in harmony with nature and surrounded by 597 acres of wetlands, prairies and oak groves, this expansive facility offers a spectacular setting for your special event with panoramic views of Greenbelt Forest Preserve. Our modern indoor facility and outdoor spaces provide picturesque settings for rehearsal dinners, wedding ceremonies and receptions, quinceañeras, anniversary parties, reunions, bar/bat mitzvahs, birthday parties and more. Visit LCFPD.org/specialevents or call 847-968-3477. great golf outings at thunderhawk

Our exceptional golf facilities and professional staff combine to make each outing a success. We offer packages for groups as small as 20, as large as 250, and at prices to fit any budget. Tailor the event to your needs and tastes with a wide assortment of food, beverages and appetizers to choose from—you name it. Outings include premium golf with cart, bag drop service, complimentary driving range use, 30-minute group golf clinic, event setup and scoring, and experienced assistance from start to finish. Call our event staff at 847-968-3100 or email Alex Eichman: aeichman@LCFPD.org.

green gifts create a lasting legacy

Honor a loved one, mark an anniversary, or welcome a child or grandchild into the world while helping protect and preserve open space in your Forest Preserves. Donate a tree or bench through the Preservation Foundation’s Green Gifts program, and your tax-deductible gift will create a lasting legacy for your family and for all of Lake County. To learn more about Green Gifts, contact Katherine Hart, Resource Development Manager, at khart@LCFPD.org or 847-968-3438. Learn more at ThePreservationFoundation.org. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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Featured Preserve

Millennium trail & Greenway

The planned 35-mile Millennium Trail is a vital trail corridor designed to connect central, western and northern Lake County. When tied with neighboring Lake County trails, like the Fort Hill Trail, North Shore Bike Path, Des Plaines River Trail (DPRT) and the McClory Trail, it becomes part of a spectacular system linking residential areas to parks, forest preserves, schools and business districts. Today, more than 20 miles of the Millennium Trail are open to the delight of hikers, bicyclists and cross-country skiers. A 9.25-mile section from Lakewood north to Singing Hills is open to equestrians too. The trail winds through nine different preserves comprising thousands of scenic acres.

Trail users are benefiting from a major Lake County Division of Transportation (LCDOT) road improvement project in Wauconda. As part of the project, two new tunnels and paved sections of the Millennium Trail are now open at Lakewood, connecting the Millennium Trail to Lakewood and the Fort Hill Trail and carrying the trail under Route 176 on either side of Fairfield Road. These tunnels provide safe crossing for

trail users while clearing the way for road widening and intersection improvements. Road construction will continue through 2014. An underpass at Grand Avenue just west of Route 45 (near Lindenhurst) will be complete this summer. The underpass is part of the trail extension to provide safe access from Fourth Lake to Bonner Heritage Farm and McDonald Woods. The underpass is 80% funded by a grant from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT). A $200,000 grant was received from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources for the Marl Flat to Wilson Road section of the Millennium Trail, with construction planned for this summer. Together with a tunnel planned for Wilson Road, this will complete the trail from Mundelein to Round Lake. Elsewhere, lands have been purchased to build the route through northern Lake County, linking to the DPRT in Wadsworth. A major addition to Pine Dunes near the Wisconsin border was approved by the Board last fall. An easement would allow future preserve trails to extend to Old U.S. Highway 41 and link to a planned IDOT trail along Russell Road. This addition would eventually help connect seven neighboring preserves and two regional trails. Such a complex network of connected open spaces would provide vital and diverse habitat for a variety of plants and animals, and a rare opportunity to create a regional trail system that offers miles of continuous trail travel through the county.

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For trail maps and construction updates, visit LCFPD.org.

forest preserve

Des Plaines River Trail Planned section

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M cclory Trail / North Shore Path (L.C. Division of Transportation)

Middlefork Greenway Planned

Millennium trail Planned section Fort Hill Trail Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

Grand Illinois Trail Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)


SPRING CALENDAR Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

march Water Connects Lake County Join us this year as we celebrate water with educational and recreational programs on the theme. Explore water ecosystems, join a paddling class, and learn how you can help address water quality. Discover the importance of freshwater and the need for conservation and sustainable management of this precious resource. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Forest Fitness Fast-paced weekly hikes provide one hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere. 2–3, 9–10, 16–17 Maple Syrup Hikes Learn how trees work and about the sweet sap of sugar maples. Everyone gets a taste. Program is also available as a school or scout field trip, call 847-968-3321 for details.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for weekly locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required. First three weekends in March. Hikes every half-hour from 12:30–2:30 pm. Ryerson Woods. All ages. $6. Children 3 and under, FREE.

2 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Raven Glen (West). Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

3 Young Artists—Picasso and Cubism Explore works by Pablo Picasso and try your hand at Cubism.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents/$7 nonresidents.

4 Scout Monday—Wildlife Conservation Join us to fulfill the Wildlife Conservation Belt Loop or Academics Pin requirements on this day off school.

Belt Loop: 10–11 am; Academics Pin: 11:30 am–12:30 Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Cub Scouts. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

6 Small Discoveries—Woolly Mammoths & Mighty Mastodons Explore the mysterious megafauna (giant animals) of the Ice Age—many of which lived right here in Lake County.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child.

8 Turtle Tales Join us for a storytime with movement, songs and surprises.

Friday, 10–10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

s 12 Hikin’ Tykes—Water Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Independence Grove­—Visitors Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

13 Ryerson Reads—1493: Uncovering the New World Discuss Charles Mann’s book about the biological and technological exchange between Europe and the New World.

Wednesday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $15, $10 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members.

14 For the Love of Nature...& Healthy Children Experience how multi-sensory nature connections help young children develop healthy, happy brains and bodies.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Preschoolers, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A “Leave No Child Inside” initiative.

17 Young Artists—Dali and Surrealism Explore Salvador Dali and create your own masterpiece.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents/$7 nonresidents.

s 19 A Rainbow Pot O’ Gold The mystery of rainbows is solved through kid-friendly experiments and a craft. Hike the farm to find nature’s pot o’ gold.

Tuesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 3 and up, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

20 Small Discoveries—Paint Me a Picture Learn about primary colors and how to mix paints to make different hues. Then, make a colorful work of art.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child.

pm,

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

march (continued) 20 Homeschool Companion—Rocks & Minerals Learn the difference between rocks and minerals, how they are formed, and hike to see which we have in Lake County.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Visitors Center. Children ages 4–15. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

21 Emerald Ash Borer 101 Join The Morton Arboretum for coffee, snacks and the latest scientific information on EAB management for your home.

Thursday, 7–8:30 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. FREE. No registration required.

21 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Potawatomi Play Make a canoe and explore Potawatomi food, clothing and shelter.

Thursday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

24 Outdoor Skills­—Knots Know how to tie the right knot for the right situation.

Sunday, 10 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Visitors Center. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

24 Look, Learn, Create—Mucha and Art Nouveau Learn about the art of Alphonse Mucha (featured in our temporary exhibit) and make your own Art Nouveau piece.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

24 Little Hikers­—Eggs Discover the diversity of eggs while exploring outdoors.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Ryerson Woods. Children ages 5–7, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

25–28 Spring Break Fun Stop by the Lake County Discovery Museum during spring break for an afternoon of special activities and crafts.

Monday–Thursday, 12–2 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 3–12, with an adult. Activities included with Museum admission. No registration required.

26 Playdate with Nature Unstructured play in nature has been proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages. Fun for adults, too!

Tuesday, 2:15 pm, Lakewood—Shelter C. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A “Leave No Child Inside” initiative.

s 30 Lake County’s Big Bird—Sandhill Cranes Join us to learn more about these majestic birds, their habitat needs, breeding patterns and personality traits.

Saturday, 7:30–9 am, Rollins Savanna—Drury Lane Lot. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

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4 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Hop into Spring Join us for stories and activities that celebrate the arrival of spring.

Thursday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

6, 13, 20, 27 Forest Fitness One hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

6 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Lyons Woods. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

6, 9 Emerald Ash Borer 101 Join The Morton Arboretum for coffee, snacks and the latest scientific information on EAB management for your home.

6: 9:30–11 am, Ryerson Woods­—Welcome Center. 9: 2–3:30 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. FREE. No registration required.

7 Kingbird Highway: A Year in the Life of an Extreme Birder Discuss Kenn Kaufman's memoir with historian Joel Greenberg. Chronicles Kaufman’s "big year."

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Ryerson Woods­—Brushwood. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $10, $8 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members.

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Watch for garlic mustard emerging in early spring. This species is one of the most aggressive invasive plants in Lake County. The speed at which is grows in spring is worth observing—it’s one of the reasons this species is so successful in out-competing native plants. Join a restoration workday to learn this plant and help save the wildflowers by removing it root and all.

april (continued)

Earth Week A week of free nature programs in honor of Earth Day (April 22). Celebrate spring, learn about ecology, join a nature walk or lend a hand to help save the planet by joining a special volunteer workday. All programs are FREE. All ages. No registration required. SAT 20 Volunteer Workday Help restore native habitat and allow native wildflowers to flourish by removing invasive garlic mustard. Bring work gloves. 9

am–12 pm,

Ryerson Woods Welcome Center.

MON 22 Rainwater: Flushing for the Future From harvesting rainwater for toilet flushing to the water permeable parking lot, get inspired by the water saving features at the Ryerson Woods Welcome Center.

WED 24 Dragonfly Discovery Learn about the life cycle of dragonflies and then scoop the pond to study these critters up close. 4–5 pm, Wright Woods.

4–5 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. SUN 21 Watershed Cleanup Benefits All Everywhere you walk is a watershed. Keeping watersheds litter-free benefits all living things. Find out more—drop in to clean the lakes’ shores at Lakewood. Bring work gloves. 10

am–12 pm,

Lakewood—Shelter C.

SUN 21 Spring Celebration Celebrate spring with nature walks, crafts, games and sheep shearing and herding demonstrations. 1–4 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center.

TUE 23 Beaver Cove Exploration What’s their tail used for? How do they see underwater? Learn how beavers survive by hiking to a beaver den and making a craft. 4–5

pm,

Independence Grove—North Bay.

WED 24 Buckthorn Busters Grab your work gloves and lend a hand in maintaining the health of Independence Grove. Individuals as well as school and scout groups encouraged. 10 am–2 pm, Independence Grove­—North Bay.

s 9 Hikin’ Tykes—Frogs & Toads

THU 25 Water Play & Pond Scooping Play with water while creating art. Scoop for pond critters and see what you catch. Experience the wonders of water. 4–5

pm,

Greenbelt Cultural Center.

FRI 26 A Fishy Scavenger Hunt Celebrate Earth Week with a free scavenger hunt adventure. You will learn about our amazing fishy friends and what we can do to help them. 4–5 pm, Nippersink—Shelter A.

Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

10 Habitat Walk for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10:30 am, Rollins Savanna—Washington Street lot. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

10 Small Discoveries—Digging for Dinosaurs Become a paleontologist as you dig for fossils, make fossil casts, create a dinosaur mask and more.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child.

11 For the Love of Nature...& Healthy Children Experience how multi-sensory nature connections help young children develop healthy, happy brains and bodies.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Preschoolers, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A “Leave No Child Inside” initiative.

s 13 Aquatic Mammals

Saturday, 10–11:30 am, Van Patten Woods—Shelter A. All ages. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

Discover the amazing adaptations of four mammals living in the waters of Lake County. Wear shoes that can get wet. 14 Look, Learn, Create—Picasso and Cubism Explore works by Pablo Picasso and try your hand at Cubism.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

14 Woodcock Walk Join us for a peek at the odd courtship flight and call of the male American Woodcock, a fascinating bird of Lake County.

Sunday, 7–8:30 pm, Cuba Marsh. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

april (continued) 17 Homeschool Companion—Modern Masters Join other homeschoolers to take a closer look at our temporary exhibit Modern Masters and learn about modern art through hands-on activities.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 5–12. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents, includes child’s Museum admission. No program fee for chaperones.

17 Families Exploring­—Nature’s Wonders Trek two miles through various habitats to discover the wonders of nature.

Wednesday, 6:30–8 pm, McDonald’s Woods. All ages. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

18, 23 The Midwestern Native Garden Author Charlotte Adelman presents native alternatives to common nonnative plants. Discover the perfect plants for your yard, as well as butterflies and hummingbirds.

18: 7–8 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center, or 23: 7–8 pm, Independence Grove. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

18 The Art of Chagall: Paintings, Mosaics, Stained Glass Art historian and professor Dr. Michelle Paluch-Mishur examines the distinctive style and themes of Marc Chagall.

Thursday, 6–7 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. CPDUs available. $9 residents, $11 nonresidents. Teachers: Stay an extra hour for a related teacher training.

s 20 Helping our Frog Friends Why do our local frogs need protection? Learn about threats to frog populations and take an active role in conservation.

Saturday, 6:30–8 pm, Grant Woods­—Monaville Road entrance, Shelter A. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

20 Free Access Cart Tours—Signs of Spring Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Saturday, 9:30–11:30 am, Lakewood—Winter Sports Area. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

21, 24 Free Bird Walks Join an Audubon Society-led walk. Bring binoculars.

21: 8 am, Fort Sheridan; 24: 7:30 All ages. Follow the signs.

24 Small Discoveries—Printmaking Explore the art of printmaking with a variety of fun techniques.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child.

s 25 Full Moon Paddle Watch the sunset and moonrise from your canoe or kayak.

Thursday, 7–9 pm, Van Patten Woods. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

s 27 Paddle with a Naturalist Join an environmental educator for a two-hour paddle where you’ll explore what nature reveals. Experience required.

Saturday, 9–11 am, Independence Grove—Des Plaines River. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $13 residents, $18 nonresidents. Includes equipment rental.

27 Walk on the Wildflower Side Uncover the secrets of wildflowers. Learn the folklore and healing powers they hold.

Saturday, 10–11:30 am, Wright Woods. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

27 Phenology & Photography Outdoor workshop combines a staff naturalist’s insight with technical tips from a professional photographer.

Saturday, 1–4 pm, Ethel’s Woods. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

28 Look, Learn, Create—Duchamp and Dadaism Discover Dadaism, Marcel Duchamp, and why a pipe is not a pipe.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

s 28 Frog Walk

Sunday, 6:30–8 pm, Sedge Meadow—Des Plaines River Trail, Wadsworth Road. Families, children ages 6 and up. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

Learn the lifestyle of these vocal amphibians and their role as environmental indicators. Wear shoes that can get wet.

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am,

Middlefork Savanna.


Spring peepers were once very common, but are now rare in Lake County. Listen for their highpitched “peep-peeper” call in southern woodlands and on rainy nights, which sounds like sleigh bells when many peepers chorus at once.

may (continued) 4, 11, 18 Forest Fitness One hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

4 Bilingual (Spanish/English) Nature Hike One-hour guided bilingual nature hike.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Lyons Woods. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

4 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Half Day—Shelter A. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

4, 5, 8, 11, 12, 18, 19, 22 Free Bird Walks May is the month for songbirds. Join us for staff and Audubon Society-led walks. All ages. Bring binoculars. Follow the signs.

4: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 5: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 8: 7:30 am, Fort Sheridan; 11: 7 am, Oak Spring Road Canoe Launch; 12: 7 am, Old School; 18: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 19: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 22: 7 am, Cuba Marsh & 7:30 am, McDonald Woods.

4 Voyageurs of Little Fort Paddle the lake in our giant canoe and learn about Lake County’s fur trade in 1740 and the lives of the Voyageurs.

Saturday, 1–2:30 pm, Van Patten Woods—Canoe Launch. Adults, families with children ages 4 and up. $7 residents, $10 nonresidents.

5 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Sunday, 11 am–12 pm, 1–2 pm & 2:30–3:30 pm. Adlai E. Stevenson Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

7 Mommy Kiss My Hand Celebrate Mother’s Day with a story, hike for raccoon tracks, and make a craft for mom.

Tuesday, 10–11 am, Nippersink. Children ages 3–6, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

8 Small Discoveries—Springtime Stories Celebrate the arrival of spring with stories, crafts and more.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult, $2.50 child.

9 For the Love of Nature...& Healthy Children Experience how multi-sensory nature connections help young children develop healthy, happy brains and bodies.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Preschoolers, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A “Leave No Child Inside” initiative.

11 Scout Saturday—Boy Scouts Learn about and observe the birds that live in and migrate through Lake County as you earn your Merit Badge.

Saturday, 8 am–12 pm, Ryerson Woods—Cabins. Boy Scouts. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

s 11 Quickstart Canoe

Saturday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Marina. Adults, children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

Intro to paddling in a tandem canoe on flatwater. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety, and efficient strokes.

s 11–12 Native Plant, Rain Barrel and Compost Bin Sale Planting native species, using rain barrels and practicing composting are eco-friendly practices that benefit your home, community and pocketbook.

Saturday, 9 am–3 pm or Sunday 10 am–3 pm. Please note: Rain barrels and compost bins available Saturday only. Independence Grove—North Bay Pavilion

12 Look, Learn, Create—Dali and Surrealism Explore works by Salvador Dali and create your own masterpiece.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

s 14 Hikin’ Tykes—Canoe

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Independence Grove­—Marina. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

Join the Skokie Valley Astronomers at Ryerson Woods on select Fridays. Learn about topics in astronomy and stargaze with members’ telescopes, weather permitting. For dates and topics, visit LCFPD.org/astronomy.

May (continued) 15 Habitat Walk for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10:30 am, Ryerson Woods­­—Welcome Center. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

17 Barrelhouse Chuck and Friends Blues Concert Barrelhouse Chuck and friends in concert.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. $7 adult/$5 child residents, $9 adult/$7 child nonresidents.

s 18 Quickstart Kayak Intro to paddling an open-cockpit recreational kayak. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety and paddling skills.

Saturday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove­­—Marina. Adults, families with children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

18 Free Access Cart Tours—Spring Bird Songs Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Saturday, 9:30–11:30 am, Wright Woods. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

18 Smith Nature Symposium: Spring Migration Internationally renowned birder, conservationist and author Kenn Kaufman will share perspectives on tiny bird migrants.

s 19 Introduction to Canoeing

16

Saturday, 5:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $175 includes reception and dinner. $90 students & young philanthropists (30 and under with ID).

Learn to canoe in this expanded version of our popular Quickstart Canoe program.

Sunday, 9 am–3:30 pm, Independence Grove. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $54 residents, $76 nonresidents.

21 Playdate with Nature Unstructured play in nature has been proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages. Fun for adults, too!

Tuesday, 10:30 am, Fox River—Large Pavilion. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A “Leave No Child Inside” initiative.

22 Homeschool Companion—Stewardship in Spring Join other homeschoolers to discover spring plants, how exotics can throw nature off-balance, and how we can help.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Greenbelt—Dugdale Road entrance. Children ages 5–15. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

25 Walk on the Wildflower Side Uncover the secrets of wildflowers. Learn the folklore and healing powers they hold.

Saturday, 10–11:30 am, Lyons Woods. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

s 25 Flatwater Kayak Safety and Rescues Practice safety and rescue techniques, including reentry after capsizing. Must have paddling experience.

Saturday, 1:30–4 pm, Independence Grove—Marina. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

26 Evening Exploration Explore a forest preserve after hours with a naturalist. Get tips for observing nature in the dark. Leave your flashlight at home.

Sunday, 8–9:15 pm, Heron Creek—Shelter B. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

26 Look, Learn, Create—Kandinsky and Abstract Expressionism Explore the art of Wassily Kandinsky, an Abstract Expressionist.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 7–10. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

s 29 Paddle with a Naturalist Join an environmental educator for a two-hour paddle where you’ll explore what nature reveals. Experience required.

Wednesday, 7–9 pm, Independence Grove—North Bay. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $13 residents, $18 nonresidents. Includes equipment rental.

31 Community Campfire Friday Nights Gather with family and friends, roast marshmallows and experience nature at night. Bring an instrument or story to share.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. Bring a blanket or chair. FREE. No registration required.

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SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

April 6–August 25

Modern Masters Modern artists including Marc Chagall, Joan Miró, Alexander Calder, Salvador Dali and others evidence the experimentation and symbolism widely recognized as hallmarks of modern art post World War I. These artists sought to break with accepted artistic traditions, test the boundaries of content and expression, and show the world something entirely new. Is it art? Is it not? You be the judge. Major movements included in this exhibition are Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Dadaism and Cubism. Modern Masters is a national touring exhibition organized by the Pauly Friedman Gallery at Misericordia University in Dallas, Pennsylvania. It is dedicated to artists, art educators and creative individuals everywhere who have taken the leap of imagination and turned it into tangible works of art for all to contemplate, study and interpret. Lake County Discovery Museum

Through May 2013

March 3–April 30

View a piece of music history with this collection of original playbills from blues clubs featuring some of the biggest names in Chicago blues music. From the private collection of internationally known Chicago blues pianist “Barrelhouse” Chuck Goering.

This exhibition displays the latest works of the ReedTurner Woodland Botanical Artists’ Circle, a Midwestern group affiliated with the American Society of Botanical Artists. Members return to Brushwood for a second show with a new collection of original botanical art. Artists seek to further the interests of conservation science, botany and horticulture, and to represent the beauty of plants in our lives.

The Blues: From the Heart & Soul

Greenbelt Cultural Center

Through April 2013

Drawn to Nature II

January 26–August 25

Mucha: Expanding Art Nouveau

This stunning collection of infrared photographs looks into a beautiful and often eerie world invisible to the naked eye. Using a modified digital camera, photographer Rob Kuehnle challenges viewers to see familiar subjects in new ways.

Alphonse Mucha brought the elegance of the Art Nouveau movement to everyday and commercial objects through his designs for posters, magazines, jewelry and much more. Featuring objects from the Museum’s John High Collection, one of the world’s leading collections of Mucha postcards.

Independence Grove Visitors Center

Lake County Discovery Museum

The Hidden World of Infrared

Artist Reception March 3, 1–3 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

May 18–June 30

Migration: Watercolors by Peggy Macnamara Macnamara visually depicts the story of migration. A magical and mysterious journey—a bird’s elegant, dangerous and exhausting travel between summer and winter homes—provides the subject of these works. Migration reflects Macnamara’s collaboration with Field Museum scientists studying bird migration patterns. With a philosophy that art and science go hand-in-hand, she illustrates complicated natural phenomena through exquisite compositions. Artist Reception at Smith Nature Symposium, May 18, 5:30–7 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

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Special Facilities Directory General Offices

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048 847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

911 emergency 847–549–5200 non-emergency public safety issues

LCFPD.org 8 am –4:30 pm, Monday–Friday

OUTDOOR RECREATION

EDUCATION & CULTURE

GOLF

Independence Grove

RYERSON Conservation Area

ThunderHawk Golf Club

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015

A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course

847–968–3499 Main 847–247–1111 Banquets, Meetings

847–968–3320

39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099

IndependenceGrove.org

LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours

Visitors Center Hours 9 AM–4:30 PM, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees visit our website. Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $5 per car Monday–Thursday $10 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without stopping to verify residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center.

9 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Saturday 11 AM–4 PM, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays

10 AM–2 PM, Tuesday–Friday 1–3 PM Sundays Greenbelt Cultural Center 1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064

847–381–0669

CountrysideGolfClub.org

AM–5 PM,

Tuesday–Friday

Lake County Discovery Museum

Boat Launch & Marina Hours

27277 North Forest Preserve Road Wauconda, Illinois 60084 847–968–3400 Main 847–968–3381 Archives, Research LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.org Museum Gallery Hours 10 AM–4:30 PM, Monday–Saturday 1–4:30 PM, Sunday Adults $6, Youth 4–17 $2.50, 3 years and under FREE Discount Tuesdays: Adults $3, Youth 17 and under FREE

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Prairie & Traditional Courses 20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060

847–968–3477

FoxRiverMarina.org

HORI ZON S QUARTERLY

Countryside Golf Club

GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

Lake County History Archives Curt Teich Postcard Archives

7 AM–sunset, daily, in season

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org

847–968–3100 Tee Times 847–968–3441 Golf Gift Cards 847–489–1931 Golf Outings

11

26034 Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

Brushwood Hours

Gallery & Office Hours Fox River Marina

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–968–3450

Brae Loch Golf Club 33600 North US Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030 847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–247–1119

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

BraeLochGolfClub.org


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

lcfpd.org

forest preserve Entrance/Parking FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS

More than 30,000 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves.

(L.C.Division of Transportation)

Dog Area

Friday, January 18, 2013

Fort Hill Trail Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

Middlefork Greenway Planned section

Canoe Launch

Map current as of

Grand Illinois Trail Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

M cclory Trail / North Shore Path

state land (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

Most preserves are open 6:30 am –sunset, daily.

Millennium trail Planned section

Des Plaines River Trail Planned section

(L.C.Division of Transportation)

CASEY TRAIL Planned section

general offices

operations facility

PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL

community garden

Red Wing Slough State Natural Area

GANDER MOUNTAIN

Beach Grove Rd

RAVEN GLEN

ETHEL'S WOODS

SUN LAKE

BLUEBIRD MEADOW

OAK-HICKORY

Hunt Club Rd

Chain O'Lakes State Park

PINE DUNES

PRAIRIE STREAM

SEQUOIT CREEK

LAKE MARIE

SPRING BLUFF

VAN PATTEN WOODS

DUTCH GAP

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

WADSWORTH SAVANNA

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

HASTINGS LAKE Gelden Rd

MCDONALD WOODS

Cedar Lake State Bog

Milburn Rd

WAUKEGAN SAVANNA DOG SLED AREA

DUCK FARM GRANT WOODS

Cedar Lake Rd

BONNER HERITAGE FARM

MILL CREEK

TANAGER KAMES

SEDGE MEADOW

Stear ns Schoo l Rd

FOURTH LAKE

LYONS WOODS

ROLLINS SAVANNA

Volo Bog State Natural Area

Washington St

LAKE CARINA BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

NIPPERSINK

GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

ALMOND MARSH

MARL FLAT KETTLE GROVE

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

SINGING HILLS

Waukegan Rd

KESTREL RIDGE

GREENBELT

Lake Michigan

VISITORS CENTER

BLACK CROWN

Winchester Road

WILMOT WOODS

RAY LAKE

ATKINSON STORMWATER FACILITY

Bonner Road

OLD SCHOOL Milw Ave

ORIOLE GROVE

aukee

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

Gi

Middlefork Dr

er

lm

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

Rd

LAKEWOOD ld

rfie Rd

n Rd

Milto

MIDDLEFORK SAVANNA

MACARTHUR WOODS

Fai

FOX RIVER

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

MARINA Rand Rd

ADLAI E. STEVENSON HISTORIC HOME

FORT SHERIDAN

CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

HALF DAY GRASSY LAKE

PRAIRIE WOLF

Half Day Rd

EGRET MARSH

ry

EDWARD L. RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

DUFFY STORMWATER BERKELEY FACILITY PRAIRIE

WELCOME CENTER

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

Saunders Rd

Rd

BUFFALO CREEK

en

Rd

cH M

nd

Arlington Hts Rd

Ra

CUBA MARSH

HERON CREEK

SKOKIE RIVER WOODS


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

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TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

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THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 62 MATURE TREES, 19,910 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES, 7,659 LBS SOLID WASTE

illinois invasive species Month May is Invasive Species Awareness Month in Illinois, promoting resources and opportunities to help stop the spread of invasive species. Invasive species are plants and animals that spread aggressively. These are often non-native species that overtake habitats, crowding out native species and harming the natural heritage of our wetlands, prairies, forests, lakes and rivers. This happens because natural enemies such as predators, disease or competitors that

Native plant, rain barrel and compost bin sale Using rain barrels, practicing backyard composting and planting native species are sustainable practices that benefit your pocketbook, home, community and beyond. Visit our sale May 11–12: see inside or LCFPD.org/plantsale.

control populations are left behind in native lands. You can help combat the spread of invasive species by joining a restoration workday (see inside or LCFPD.org/volunteer). Learn how to identify and eradicate local invaders by visiting the Midwest Invasive Plant Network online at MIPN.org.

picnic season Picnic permits provide exclusive access to a secluded shelter with ample parking, water, grills and more: LCFPD.org/permits.

FLICKR PICK Turtles are on the move during May and June, as females search for a spot to lay their eggs, and later as hatchlings migrate back to aquatic habitats. Be alert when driving near ponds, lakes or wetlands. Photo posted by Sunnyf16 via Flickr. Connect with us! Find us on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, or YouTube @LCFPD. Download our mobile app in the Apple App Store or Android Play Store—search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.”

Horizons Quarterly, Spring 2013  

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