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Recipe Redevelopment How to create more confidence in the kitchen? Kara Chin | DES 159 | Spring 2015


Table of Contents Introduction

2

Research

6

Quick Paper Prototypes

17

User Testing

24

Presentation Critique

31

Final Proposal

35

Conclusion

39


Introduction


It’s always about food. Being a food enthusiast, I have a tendency to choose projects that revolve around food, cooking, baking, and being in the kitchen. It’s just what attracts me. Naturally, my first idea for this project revolved around recipes as one of the gateways to creating new foods and learning how to cook. Even as a seasoned cook, some recipes still confuse me. So I can only imagine what it is like for people who have little experience in the kitchen. At first I was hesitant about pursuing this idea because a conversation with my sister and our mutual friend, both of whom know how to cook, bake, and read recipes revealed that they thought there was nothing wrong with recipes. I was still unconvinced.

If there was nothing wrong with recipes, why do I constantly feel like I need to re-read them over and over? Why do I know people who don’t use recipes or don’t know how to read recipes? Isn’t the main purpose of my food blog to connect people back into the kitchen? Isn’t a recipe a vital part to this? Granted, I know many people who know how to cook and bake but don’t use recipes. Or there is the argument that learning how to cook and bake is a tactile art. People just don’t cook and bake as much anymore because the act of passing down this tradition is lost. While I agree with all of this, recipes are still important and could definitely be improved to create a better connection between the kitchen and the food.

Ultimately, my final decision to tackle this project as best I could in five weeks stems from my philosophy that anybody can create great food as long as they believe in themselves. This is both from my own personal experience of being teased by my family for not knowing how to cook as a teenager and from observing both those have numerous years of experience to those who barely know how to hold a knife. My project boiled down to this question... How to redevelop recipes in a way that creates more confidence in the kitchen?

Recipe Redevelopement

3


The audience This project is targeted towards 16-30 year olds who are beginners in the kitchen or who don’t feel confident in their cooking ability. I chose this specific audience because I believe that cooking is lost for this age group. Either they are high schoolers whose parents cook for them, college students who never learned how to cook and don’t want to put the time and effort into learning or post-college graduates who still don’t know how to cook and think that it is too late. Although my primary audience is this specific niche, these recipes should also be accessible to people who are seasoned cooks and bakers and know how to read recipes but are still eager to make something in the kitchen.

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Recipe Redevelopement


IDEO Method Cards IDEO Method Cards helped focus and inspire my design process. I chose these three specific cards in my project because I felt that they would be most beneficial in determining how to go about my final proposal in the best way that I could.

Surveys & Questionnaires » Ask

Error Analysis » Learn

Paper Prototyping » Try

How: Ask a series of targeted questions in order to ascertain particular characteristics and perceptions of users

How: List all the things that can go wrong with using a product and determine the various possible causes.

How: Rapidly sketch, layout, and evaluate interaction design concepts for basic usability.

Why: This is a quick way to elicit answers from a large number of people.

Why: This is a good way to understand how design features mitigate or contribute to inevitable human errors and other failures.

Why: This is a good way to quickly organize, articulate, and visualize interaction design concepts.

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5


Research


Survey and Results I had my own suspicions as to the problems with recipes but I needed the opinion of others as well. A survey seemed to be the best option so I used Google forms to create a survey that I believed would result in the most rewarding answers for my project. With the help of my sister who has a knack for wording and language, I sent out this survey to family members, Facebook friends, DES 159 classmates and fellow trainees of my hapkido group. Here are the questions that I asked and some of my favorite results (for the fill in the blank questions).

12 questions 69 responses Recipe Redevelopement

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Survey and Results How confident do you feel as a cook?

How do you prefer to read recipes?

56.5% 31.9% 26.1% 20.3% 17.4% 10.1% 1.4% 0%

55.1% 44.9% 34.8% 34.8% 26.1% 5.8%

39 22 18 14 12 7 1 0

I have my repertoire but am always willing to try something new. I can throw anything into a pot and it will turn out okay. I cook for myself but the same five things. I only know a few basics like pasta and eggs. I’m inexperienced but would be open to learning new things. Does using the microwave count? I'm the lord of cooking. Bow down to me. I’ve never touched a kitchen utensil in my life.

Do you use recipes? 85.5% 14.5%

59 10

Yes No

What determines how you choose a recipe? 75.4% 72.5% 66.7% 63.8% 53.6% 39.1% 17.4% 11.6%

8

52 50 46 44 37 27 12 8

Type of Ingredients Time Photos Number of Ingredients Difficulty Level Number of Steps Other Serving Size

Recipe Redevelopement

38 31 24 24 18 4

Computer Cookbook Tablet Paper/Clippings Phone Other

What is the most confusing thing about recipes? 44.9% 43.5% 29% 27.5% 21.7% 14.5% 14.5%

31 30 20 19 15 10 10

Too Technical Too Wordy Measurements Too Long Other Formatting Order of Steps

Do you like reading about the background & story of a recipe? 40.6% 37.7% 21.7%

28 26 15

Sometimes Yes No


Survey and Results Do you find step by step photos helpful? How so? “Yes! Because I am a visual learner and it helps when things need to get done quickly. I feel like photos minimize the processing time it takes for me to understand a step.” “...It can also be annoying if I have to search between photos for the next step. The best recipes I’ve seen incorporate both: step-by-step with photos for the first read and then recipe-card style instructions at the bottom for when I am actually cooking the dish and need to access the next step quickly. Only if it’s a complicated process that I’ve never done. Otherwise, overkill.”

How many times do you have to read a recipe while making a dish? “Every time I add a new ingredient.” “I usually read the whole recipe then start back at the beginning and keep re-reading each step as I go several times.” “Several! I have to go back every time there is a step because I can never remember the measurements!” “Over and over because I can’t remember everything.”

“It can be for recipes steps where it is critical to be able to judge done-ness based on the appearance, like when cooking fudge, the recipe will have an image of what the fudge looks like when it ‘looses it’s gloss-y look’... Or when it is difficult to visualize what the instructions are saying by text alone.”

“So many times that I waste at least half my phone battery rechecking the recipe and directions.”

“A lot of times the instructions can be vague. The photos help clarify what is the step is telling you to do.”

“Continuously, working step by step.”

“Yes, they increase confidence step by step. When I see a picture I can cross reference the written directions with the image.” “They are more helpful in terms of baking recipes. In general, photos are useful for determining what the end product may look like or how a certain technique should be done. I think photos are more useful for beginners and can encourage cooks to use the recipe if the food in the photos actually looks good.”

“At every step, and multiple times while getting ingredients.”

“CONSTANTLY. Especially when baking, and everything needs to be exact. I will triple check my measurements before moving on.” “Before, just once, but now that I am a most “senior citizen “ it takes a few look back reminders on amounts.” “Many, many times. My kitchen is over there. My computer is over here.” “If the order of steps/ingredients makes sense, I usually just skim it once and read it as I go.” Recipe Redevelopement

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Survey and Results What is your most cherished recipe? “Eggrolls the way my Dad used to make them.” “My grandma’s sugar cookie recipe.” “The ones that have been handed down in our family cookbook.” “The ones that turn out great & are able to bring people together.” “My mom’s mashed potatoes recipe. It’s also the hardest because there’s a lot of guesstimation.” “My father’s recipe for Lion’s Head - not written down, no indication for the amount of each ingredient.” “I’ve only used maybe 3 recipes in my life and they’ve all been for pasta or chicken. My favorite was probably a one pot pasta recipe that I found online. It’s the only recipe I’ve used more than once.” “One that is passed down from family and I don’t need to follow on a piece of paper. It is in my head and in my heart.”

What is a recipe you no longer need to remember? “There are a bunch of things I can make without a recipe. Soup is easy, you can just throw in whatever.” “My most cherished recipe.” “There are lots! All family recipes and anything that I make on a regular basis.” “I make a spice mix of curry, tumeric, and salt (the proportions are very forgiving), place chicken pieces in a cast iron skillet, sprinkle the spice mix on top, brush some oil over that, and bake in a hot oven for 20-35 minutes (depending on the size of the pieces of chicken and whether or not they are bone-in).” “Lion’s Head above (Chinese meatballs). I never had a recipe, learned how to make it by watching my father.” “I don’t need a recipe for things like poaching fish, making crepes, stir fry, etc.. where there are few steps and few ingredients, or where one doesn’t have to be exact.” “I’ll often check a recipe as a reference, but in a pinch I can cook most common dishes from scratch by memory or intuition. It’s a passion, and as a result, occasional failures will make me turn my dish into something other than I originally intended. Omelets to scrambled eggs style thing.”

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Recipe Redevelopement


Survey and Results What recipe is too difficult to even attempt? Why?

How would cooking be more enjoyable for you?

“Anything where I don’t own an appliance.”

“Quick recipes using fresh ingredients that are easy to obtain.”

“Focaccia and biscotti. Too many steps that require precision and skill.”

“If I had access to more tips on how to prepare things different ways to perfection. There’s a way to perfect baking, frying, mixing, melting knowing these tips are KEY to being a good cook.”

“Ones with lots of gourmet ingredients. Anything from the French Laundry cookbook or...other chef cookbooks that have nothing to do with home cooking.” “Recipes that take over an hour, because I don’t have the time or energy.” “There isn’t anything that’s too difficult in my opinion, but if the ingredients are inconvenient to find then I’d be less inclined to go out of my way to try it.” “A lot of baking recipes that require numerous steps and ingredients. They take too long for the risk that it may not even turn out good.” “Any recipes that have too time consuming, too many ingredients and takes too long to make!”

“When I cook with friends! Or if I actually had the time during the day so I can prep rather than coming home famished and wanting something to eat immediately.” “I’m not a huge fan of needing to use a whole bunch of pots/pans/dishes/etc for a single dish. I’d rather spend time on other activities rather than spend all day in the kitchen or all day cleaning the kitchen.” “If recipes weren’t too wordy, and if they could provide alternative ingredients or measurements.” “Not having to find where I am on the recipe again.”

I’m not too sure if any recipe is too difficult to attempt. All you need is time and patience.” “Many of the baking recipes, too many steps involved, use terminology that I am not familiar with. For example: “fold the sugar in”, “whip until blended”...?!” “None. Not important to do, important to try!”

“It would be more enjoyable if there would be explanations on how to mix certain things. I get confused when technical terms come up, and the cook expects me to already know what the words mean. So access to a translation for people who don’t know how to cook would be nice.” “I hate getting many things dirty. I wish there were recipes designed around using bowls and appliances and utensils more efficiently.” Recipe Redevelopement

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What kind of recipes already exist? Recipes have been around since approximately 1600 BC and were found in both Akkadian tablet and Egyptian hieroglyphics. Other cultures such as the Greeks, Romans, Arabics, and English also began documenting their recipes as civilization developed. With the invention of the printing press in 1440, recipes began to be mass produced and distributed more widely in the form of cookbooks and pamphlets. Nowadays, recipes are still found in print form but also all across the internet and social media. Here is my analysis of the different forms recipes found today using pie crust as a recipe example.

The Twitter Recipe

Limited to 140 characters, Maureen Evans has created her own language and condensed recipes to adapt to the format of Twitter. These recipes typically serve 3-4 and are from all over the world. Pros: Users only have to read those 140 characters // Short & sweet // Recipes are less intimidating due to the reduced length // Recipes are already not complicated to begin with due to the length constraint Cons: Requires time to re-translate and unpackage the meaning behind some of the vocabulary // More room for error and risk since some directions are too vague // Users are forced to fill in the gaps and improvise for the more complicated and vocabulary dense recipes

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Recipe Redevelopement

The Traditional Format

This is the format that is most commonly found all over the internet, cookbooks and food magazines. Ingredients are located on the top. Instructions are located on the bottom. Pros: Users are most familiar with this format Cons: Users must constantly look between steps and ingredients to ensure they are following the correct directions


The Conversational Blog

The popularity of food blogs has modified the traditional format where bloggers begin with a story or anecdote related or sometimes not related to the recipe. They they will then break down each individual step and have a condensed traditional recipe format on the bottom. Pros: Allows a more personal conversational style between the blogger and their audience // Gives these recipes more personality // It’s a better way to share and talk about food // Individual steps help users to identify what they should be doing at what point in time Cons: Users are required to scroll a lot // Often times, there are too many photos

The Cooking Show

Food Network. The Cooking Channel. YouTube. PBS. Top Chef. Master Chef. America’s Test Kitchen. The list goes on of the abundance of TV shows and channels dedicated to food. Pros: Excellent for visual learners // The theatrical element or personality of many of these shows draws people in Cons: Difficult to follow a video while cooking or baking at the same time // Shows often create the impression of shortened time or shortened steps that are unrealistic to the actual process // Often viewed for pleasure rather than for actual usage

The Really Exact Recipe

In my experience, recipes developed in the last 20 years by well known figures and institutions such as Williams Sonoma, Martha Stewart, and Nigella Lawson tend to have instructions that are so precise and technical that they often go over the heads of both beginning and seasoned cooks. Pros: Give very specific instructions for what should be done at each moment // A challenge for those looking to master the art and technicality of cooking and baking Cons: Too technical and over-detailed // Requires multiple readings of the recipe // Too intimidating for users to dissect and understand Recipe Redevelopement

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Class ideas/contributions Class contributions were extremely helpful to gain perspective on my project and on where to focus. In particular, these comments were the most helpful: “How can you help people remember steps/amounts easier so they don’t have to constantly check?” “How to make recipes more memorable?” “Simple and quick steps with a nice finished picture to grab attention.” “Maybe have a summary of ingredients on top and have the amount for each so people don’t have to go back.” “Good hierarchy for vital steps.”

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Recipes as a checklist?

Other angles of interest

Upon reading The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande, Susan suggested I look into the idea of recipes as a checklist, particularly the difference between a Do-Confirm checklist and a Read-Do checklist.

I was slightly overwhelmed by the number of directions my project could go. I did more research talking with the people at the Davis Co-Op who have a 12 for $40 meal plan. How do they write their recipes to make them seem feasible and under a $40 budget?

Read-Do: People convey off tasks as they check them off. Do-Confirm: Team members confirm their jobs from memory and experience, often separately but then they stop. They pause to run the checklist and confirm that everything was supposed to be done. Other key points include: » Checklists cannot be lengthy and should be kept between 5 & 9 items » After 60-90 seconds, people start shortcutting and steps get missed » Focus on the “killer items” » Use simple and exact wording

I also talked to Roseanne who owns Farmer’s Kitchen Cafe, a gluten free catering and dine-in service located in downtown Davis. We had a brief discussion on the importance of home-cooking and teaching children how to cook at a young age. The act of teaching a child how to cook is done slowly and lovingly with care. Unfortunately, many recipes seem to lack that element which can lead to users becoming frustrated at the outcome of their dishes.

Most recipes are in the Read-Do style. What would they look like written as a Do-Confirm checklist?

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Research conclusion From my survey and primary and secondary research, I discovered that recipes could be improved in a multitude of different ways. I don’t have the power to change the way people were raised to learn how to cook or how not to cook but I can incorporate elements to make recipes seem less overwhelming than their current state. These are the following things that I discovered from my research and were helpful in moving forward for my prototypes:

Recipes are often confusing because they are too long, too technical or too wordy. The language should be more precise for clear instructions. Visuals are desired but only for key steps and to get an idea of what the finished product should look like. The current recipe format causes the eye to move back and forth too many times. This is why users continually struggle with reading a recipe over and over during the cooking or baking process. 16

Recipe Redevelopement


Quick Paper Prototypes


Recipe App My first prototype revolved around the idea of allowing users to focus on each individual step. In this app, users would be able to tap on each individual step while the rest of the steps and information fade away. Once users are done with that step, they can swipe to the right to close it and continue with another step.

All ingredients and steps together

Tap on Step 1. Everything fades out.

Swipe left to dismiss the step.

All ingredients and steps together

Tap on Step 2. Everything fades out.

Swipe left to dismiss the step.

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Recipe Redevelopement


3 Columns This organizational method of three columns allows users to see which ingredients and materials would be needed for each step. It would be sectioned off so each step and ingredient is clear. In addition, visuals would be located to the right so that as the eye moves across the page, those who don’t find visuals necessary aren’t forced to look at them.

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Timeline Most recipes don’t show how you can be doing multiple steps at one time as this is a more intuitive aspect of cooking and baking. Instead, they are written in a linear manner where every step happens right after another and not in conjunction with each other. While this linearity does happen, cooking and baking can be more efficient and less time-consuming if multitasking happens in the kitchen. Incorporating a timeline element allows users to keep track of where they are in a recipe and what they should be doing at approximately each step, especially the ones that overlap.

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Recipe Redevelopement


Timeline Studies

After realizing that the timeline is an important aspect in the recipe, I did more quick paper prototypes that solely focused on how to display time in recipes as an element that would provide the user with a brief overview of the recipe. Horizontal timeline indicating the time at the top and steps underneath.

Two different circular pie charts showing the overlap of steps and the overall time as a whole.

What is the best way to display time? “m� can get confused with meters, 00:30 can get confused with 30 seconds, and using fractions and decimals requires too much thinking.

Vertical time with direct labeling of the approximate time of each step and step heading to the right. Recipe Redevelopement

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Steps + Ingredients I developed this prototype with the idea in mind that all the ingredients can’t be completely separated into all the steps. However, they can be placed in a “Grocery List� at the top and sectioned off in the individual steps at the bottom to solve the issue of the user having to look back and forth between the ingredients and directions. As a more web friendly application, this solves the issue for users who get frustrated from constantly needing to scroll. It also allows users to focus on one step at a time with the ingredients in front of them.

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Findings These quick paper prototypes were extremely helpful both for visually jotting down as many ideas as I could and for getting the feedback I needed to move forward with digital mock-ups. Here are some things I found from quick speed critiques in class

Integrate a timeline so that you know where you are in the recipe. Have clearly defined steps to help understand what is needed to be done within each step. Visuals help draw people into making the recipe.

Recipe Redevelopement

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User Testing 24

Recipe Redevelopement


Timeline Studies

0 min. 2 1

1 Brown Beef

1 Brown Beef (45 min.)

0 min. 23

4 hrs.

3 hr.

2 Prep Vegetables (30 min.) 1 hr.

1

45 min.

2 Prep Vegetables

4 3 hr.

3

4 hrs.

1 hr.

2 hr.

30 min.

3 Add Liquids (15 min.) 1 Brown Beef (45 min.) 4 Simmer (3 hrs.) 2 Prep Vegetables (30 min.) 3 Add Liquids (15 min.) 4 Simmer (3 hrs.)

4

2 hr.

3 Add Liquids 15 min. 1

4 Simmer

1 Brown Beef (45 min.)

2

2 Prep Vegetables (30 min.)

4 hrs.

3 hrs.

total

4

4 hrs. total

This vertical style had too many elements for some people. For others they liked how the time was more direct and did not require any additional calculations.

3

1

4

3 Add Liquids (15 min.) 1 Brown Beef (45 min.) 4 Simmer (3 hrs.) 2 Prep Vegetables (30 min.)

2

3

When it came to digitally developing my idea for a new recipe format, I first started with vectorizing my timeline studies in a way that was effective yet friendly. I took care in trying to express time as both a total amount and broken down into individual chunks. I wanted to make sure to emphasize that certain steps could be done simultaneously and others in a linear fashion. It was also crucial to relate this timeline to the individual steps in the recipe as a whole. I then tested these on a variety of different people first by allowing them to review all of the options and then asking them which one made them feel the most calm and informed and for any additional feedback.

3 Add Liquids (15 min.) 4 Simmer (3 hrs.)

The circular timeline was the least liked for several reasons including that it was difficult to determine where to start and stop and the overall shape was overwhelming to look at.

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Timeline Studies 0 min.

15 min.

30 min.

45 min.

4 hrs.

1 hr.

........................

1 Braise Beef

1 2

2 Prep Vegetables 3

3 Add Liquids 4

0 min.

15 min.

30 min.

1 hr.......................4 hrs.

45 min.

1 Brown Beef

1 2

2 Prep Vegetables 3

3 Add Liquids 4

0 min.

15 min.

30 min.

45 min.

1 hr...................... 4 hrs.

1 Brown Beef 2 Prep Vegetables 3 Add Liquids 4 Simmer

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Recipe Redevelopement

4 Simmer

4 Simmer

Those who liked this version appreciated that it was easy to deterime how much time it took for each step. They also liked that the lines extended downward so it was easy for the eye to follow.

Many people liked this timeline because of the direct labeling of the steps. There were mixed feelings between the rounded edges because some didn’t like how it was difficult to determine what time was needed per step. My reasoning behind the rounded edges was to create a softer feel and also show that the steps don’t have to be completed in that exact amount of time.


Digital Prototype: Full Version “Can you include an image of the final product and also indicate the total time?”

For my first digital prototype, I decided to mock-up the format of a recipe found on a website or blog since I would ideally like to use these ideas and findings on my food blog.

Beef Stew Serves: 10-12

Grocery List:

“How can you correlate the ingredients with the timeline and steps?”

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

salt and pepper to taste Side: rice, pasta, or bread

0 min.

“Is there a color that is more inviting?”

15 min.

30 min.

45 min.

1 hr.......................4 hrs.

1 Brown Beef 2 Prep Vegetables 3 Add Liquids

I chose to begin with the ingredients which I called “Grocery List”. This would allow users to see all the ingredients they would need in this recipe. I then followed with the timeline and individual steps and specifics.

4 Simmer

1 Brown Beef

Ingredients: 3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled salt and pepper olive oil

Here are some comments and feedback that I found helpful.

Steps: 1. Pre-heat olive oil at medium-high heat in a large stock pot. 2. Cut beef into 1-11/2 inch cubes. Remove any large chunks of fat. 3. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper. 4. Brown 8-10 cubes at a time, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. 5. Continue in batches until all meat is browned.

“How can the time be reiterated?”

2 Prep Vegetables

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

“How many kitchen tools and materials does this recipe require?” “Should hairlines be added to distinguish individual steps?”

Ingredients:

Steps: 1. Mince garlic cloves. 2. Cut all the vegetables into approximately 1-11/2 inch chunks. Set aside.

3 Add Liquids

Ingredients: 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves Steps: 1. Add the balsamic vinegar and garlic to deglaze the pot and scrape away the brown bits. 2. Add all the vegetables, broth, wine, tomato paste, thyme and bay leaves. Stir and bring to a boil.

4 Simmer

Steps: 1. Cover and reduce to a simmer for about 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are soft. Stir occasionally. 2. Salt and pepper to taste. 3. Serve hot with rice, pasta, or bread.

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Digital Prototype: Quick Read Version I also developed what I call a “quick read” version of a recipe. This is a condensed version that gives a general overview of the recipe so that users are able to see everything at once. This is crucial because many times, beginning cooks and bakers are turned off by a recipe because it looks too long even if it actually isn’t.

Beef Stew Serves: 10-12

› Grocery List: 0 min.

15 min.

30 min.

45 min.

1 hr.......................4 hrs.

1 Brown Beef 2 Prep Vegetables 3 Add Liquids 4 Simmer

›1

28

Brown Beef

2 Prep Vegetables

3 Add Liquids

4 Simmer

Recipe Redevelopement

With this first version of a quick read format, I focused on the “Grocery List” and timeline as the first elements. I also had the idea of incorporating collapsible menus that could be opened and closed. However, I got feedback that the steps on the bottom were too repetitive. Other users also said that they preferred to have the recipe fully open because they would eventually open up all the steps in the end.


Digital Prototype: Printable Version Beef Stew

1 Brown Beef

Ingredients: 3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled salt and pepper olive oil

Serves: 10-12

Steps: 1. Pre-heat olive oil at medium-high heat in a large stock pot. 2. Cut beef into 1-11/2 inch cubes. Remove any large chunks of fat. 3. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper. 4. Brown 8-10 cubes at a time, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. 5. Continue in batches until all meat is browned.

Grocery List: 3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

2 Prep Vegetables

Ingredients: 7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

salt and pepper to taste Side: rice, pasta, or bread

Steps:

0 min.

15 min.

30 min.

45 min.

With this format, the quick read section would be located on the left and the more in-depth instructions on the right.

1. Mince garlic cloves. 2. Cut all the vegetables into approximately 1-11/2 inch chunks. Set aside.

1 hr.......................4 hrs.

1 Brown Beef

I chose to also design a printable PDF version of my recipe format to appeal to the part of my audience that prefers to read recipes on physical pieces of paper.

3 Add Liquids

Ingredients: 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

2 Prep Vegetables 3 Add Liquids 4 Simmer

During feedback, it was suggested that I use the space on the left better to get rid of any awkward white space.

Steps: 1. Add the balsamic vinegar and garlic to deglaze the pot and scrape away the brown bits. 2. Add all the vegetables, broth, wine, tomato paste, thyme and bay leaves. Stir and bring to a boil.

4 Simmer

Steps: 1. Cover and reduce to a simmer for about 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are soft. Stir occasionally. 2. Salt and pepper to taste. 3. Serve hot with rice, pasta, or bread.

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Feedback From these first digital versions, I got lots of feedback that was helpful in pushing forward to completing my final proposal. Here are some key points that stood out the most to me.

Include an image of the final product at the beginning. Create a correlation between the ingredients, timeline, and steps. Show what is needed to make the dish.

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Recipe Redevelopement


Presentation Critique


Final Presentation The final presentation for this project was an excellent way to talk about my process of this project and also gain any last minute feedback. It was fantastic to see how far I came in five weeks and share my discoveries in an eight minute presentation.

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Recipe Redevelopement


Final Presentation: Web Version Print PDF

Beef Stew

Serves: 10 -12

Total Time: 4 hrs.

It was also suggested to further show which steps were “active” and which steps were “inactive” to better gage if this recipe fits the user’s schedule.

Grocery List 1

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

3

2

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

4

salt and pepper to taste Side: rice, pasta, or bread

Large Stock Pot

0 min.

1

Cutting Board

Chef's Knife

15 min.

30 min.

Large Plate (2)

Tongs

45 min.

Sheet Pan

I got a lot of really useful feedback after my final presentation. It was suggested that I also have mini versions of the cooking tools within each step so that it’s not required to have to scroll to the top of the recipe to find out what those items are.

Wooden Spoon

1 hr......................4 hrs.

Brown Beef 2

Prep Vegetables 3

Add Liquids 4

1 Brown Beef (~45 min.)

Simmerr

Ingredients 3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled salt and pepper olive oil Steps 1. Pre-heat olive oil at medium-high heat in a large stock pot. 2. Cut beef into 1-11/2 inch cubes. Remove any large chunks of fat. 3. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper. 4. Brown 8-10 cubes at a time, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. 5. Continue in batches until all meat is browned.

2 Prep Vegetables (~30 min.)

Ingredients 7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms Steps 1. Mince garlic cloves. 2. Cut all the vegetables into approximately 1-11/2 inch chunks. Set aside.

3 Add Liquids (~15 min.)

Ingredients 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves Steps 1. Add the balsamic vinegar and garlic to deglaze the pot and scrape away the brown bits. 2. Add all the vegetables, broth, wine, tomato paste, thyme and bay leaves. Stir and bring to a boil.

4 Simmer (~3 hrs.)

Steps 1. Cover and reduce to a simmer for approximately 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are soft. Stir occasionally. 2. Salt and pepper to taste. 3. Serve hot with rice, pasta, or bread.

Recipe Redevelopement

33


Final Presentation: Print Version Beef Stew

Serves: 10 -12

Total Time: 4 hrs.

1 Brown Beef (~45 min.)

Ingredients 3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled salt and pepper olive oil Steps 1. Pre-heat olive oil at medium-high heat in a large stock pot. 2. Cut beef into 1-11/2 inch cubes. Remove any large chunks of fat. 3. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper. 4. Brown 8-10 cubes at a time, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. 5. Continue in batches until all meat is browned.

2 Prep Vegetables (~30 min.)

Ingredients 7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms Steps

Grocery List 1

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

2

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

3

4

1. Mince garlic cloves. 2. Cut all the vegetables into approximately 1-11/2 inch chunks. Set aside.

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

3 Add Liquids (~15 min.)

Ingredients 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

salt and pepper to taste Side: rice, pasta, or bread

Steps

Large Stock Pot

0 min.

1

Cutting Board

15 min.

Chef's Knife

30 min.

Large Plate (2)

Tongs

45 min.

Sheet Pan

1 hr......................4 hrs.

Prep Vegetables Add Liquids 4

Recipe Redevelopement

4 Simmer (~3 hrs.)

Steps 1. Cover and reduce to a simmer for approximately 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are soft. Stir occasionally. 2. Salt and pepper to taste. 3. Serve hot with rice, pasta, or bread.

3

34

Wooden Spoon

Brown Beef 2

1. Add the balsamic vinegar and garlic to deglaze the pot and scrape away the brown bits. 2. Add all the vegetables, broth, wine, tomato paste, thyme and bay leaves. Stir and bring to a boil.

Simmerr

With this refined print version, I filled the white space better and had a clear division between the “quick read� section and the individual steps.


Final Proposal


Print PDF

Beef Stew

Serves: 10 -12

Total Time: 4 hrs.

Grocery List 1

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

3

2

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

4

salt and pepper to taste Side: rice, pasta, or bread

Large Stock Pot

0 min.

1

Cutting Board

15 min.

Chef's Knife

30 min.

Large Plate (2)

Tongs

45 min.

Sheet Pan

Wooden Spoon

1 hr......................4 hrs.

Brown Beef 2

Prep Vegetables 3

Add Liquids 4

Simmerr


Print PDF

Beef Stew

Serves: 10 -12

Total Time: 4 hrs.

Grocery List 1

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

3

2

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

4

salt and pepper to taste Side: rice, pasta, or bread

Large Stock Pot

0 min.

1

Cutting Board

Chef's Knife

15 min.

30 min.

Large Plate (2)

Tongs

45 min.

Sheet Pan

Wooden Spoon

1 hr......................4 hrs.

Brown Beef 2

Prep Vegetables 3

Add Liquids 4

1 Brown Beef (~45 min.)

Simmerr

Ingredients 3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled salt and pepper olive oil Steps 1. Pre-heat olive oil at medium-high heat in a large stock pot. 2. Cut beef into 1-11/2 inch cubes. Remove any large chunks of fat. 3. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper. 4. Brown 8-10 cubes at a time, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. 5. Continue in batches until all meat is browned.

2 Prep Vegetables (~30 min.)

Ingredients 7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms Steps 1. Mince garlic cloves. 2. Cut all the vegetables into approximately 1-11/2 inch chunks. Set aside.

3 Add Liquids (~15 min.)

Ingredients 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves Steps 1. Add the balsamic vinegar and garlic to deglaze the pot and scrape away the brown bits. 2. Add all the vegetables, broth, wine, tomato paste, thyme and bay leaves. Stir and bring to a boil.

4 Simmer (~3 hrs.)

Steps 1. Cover and reduce to a simmer for approximately 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are soft. Stir occasionally. 2. Salt and pepper to taste. 3. Serve hot with rice, pasta, or bread.


Beef Stew

Serves: 10 -12

Total Time: 4 hrs.

1 Brown Beef (~45 min.)

Ingredients

Steps

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled salt and pepper olive oil

1. Pre-heat olive oil at medium-high heat in a large stock pot. 2. Cut beef into 1-11/2 inch cubes. Remove any large chunks of fat. 3. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper. 4. Brown 8-10 cubes at a time, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. 5. Continue in batches until all meat is browned.

2 Prep Vegetables (~30 min.)

Grocery List 1

3 lbs chuck beef, well marbled

3

2

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

4

salt and pepper to taste

0 min.

Cutting Board

15 min.

Chef's Knife

30 min.

Large Plate (2)

Tongs

45 min.

Sheet Pan

Steps

7 garlic cloves 2 yellow onions 8 celery stalks 6 carrots 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes 1 lb button mushrooms

1. Mince garlic cloves. 2. Cut all the vegetables into approximately 1-11/2 inch chunks. Set aside.

3 Add Liquids (~15 min.)

Side: rice, pasta, or bread

Large Stock Pot

Ingredients

Ingredients

Steps

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried thyme 3 bay leaves

1. Add the balsamic vinegar and garlic to deglaze the pot and scrape away the brown bits. 2. Add all the vegetables, broth, wine, tomato paste, thyme and bay leaves. Stir and bring to a boil.

Wooden Spoon

1 hr......................4 hrs.

4 Simmer (~3 hrs.) 1

Brown Beef 2

1. Cover and reduce to a simmer for approximately 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are soft. Stir occasionally. 2. Salt and pepper to taste. 3. Serve hot with rice, pasta, or bread.

Prep Vegetables 3

Steps

Add Liquids 4

Simmerr


Conclusion


If I had more time... No project is ever done and can always be improved. Here are some things I would do if I had an extra 10 weeks to work on redeveloping recipes.

More extensive user testing. I’d want to observe both beginning cooks and seasoned cooks using this recipe format and gain hands on knowledge that way. Make this format more interactive. For example, allow users to click on the steps in the timeline which would jump down to the more in-depth step on the page. Integrate this format on my food blog, kneadbakecook.com. 40

Recipe Redevelopement


Ending Remarks Overall, these past five weeks were incredibly rewarding. With my survey, it was exciting to discover how people felt about cooking and recipes. I especially loved going through everyone’s answers and laughing and mentally agreeing with their responses. Although I was initially intimidated with the direction I wanted to go with for this project, I found that doing research and asking myself questions helped narrow down my ideas and burn off my anxieties. I also found the value of user testing and feedback in this project. Everyone’s opinion is different but it’s helpful to know people’s thought process when looking at your prototypes and listen carefully to their recommendations and suggestions. I am pleased with how my final propsal turned out and I hope that it will bring more people back into the kitchen. I can’t change how people were brought up, but I can hopefully help them appreciate food, cooking, and baking more with this more friendly and informative recipe format.

Recipe Redevelopement

41


Sources “Basic Pie Dough.” Williams-Sonoma. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015. Dana. “Butter Flaky Pie Crust.” Allrecipes.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015. Downes, Lawrence. “Take 1 Recipe, Mince, Reduce, Serve.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 21 Apr. 2009. Web. 27 May 2015. “Five Tips For The Best All-Butter Pie Crust From Scratch.” Joy the Baker. N.p., 16 Nov. 2014. Web. 27 May 2015. Gawande, Atul. The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right. New York: Metropolitan, 2010. Print. “Recipe.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 2 May 2015.

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Recipe Redevelopement

Recipe Redevelopment  

This is a workbook showing my process of how recipes could be better written to show my confidence in the kitchen.

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