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Elena Kapompasopoulou [architect _ urban designer]


[M.O.D] Market Oriented Development _ Accra 2011 Kapompasopoulou Elena

Award: Lucille Smyser Lowenfish Memorial Prize for Best Design Project (to be published) MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN: Spring Studio Faculty: Michael Conard, Alberto Foyo, Petra Kempf, Geeta Mehta, Richard Plunz, Shue Tshen In collaboration with Marta D’ Alessandro _ HyunTae Kim _ Kate Cho

[M.O.D] Market Oriented Development is a community revitalization strategy which utilizes a network of existing food markets to regenerate the local socio-economic landscape. The design intervention utilizes three marketplace of Gamashies’ neighborhood as a focal point of commercial and social mecca, underutilized open spaces between the neighborhood and street network currently lacking hierarchical applications of landscape. The process is divided in three steps. First by modernization of the existing structures and insertion of specialized food processing areas, the market triggers more active commercial and local interaction. Second, the creation of pedestrian oriented street network for the hybrid commercial activities, stemming from the marketplace and residential around. Finally, the insertion of community capacity building programs supported both by corporation firms and government will leverage individuals’ economical ability and sustainable living condition.


Kapompasopoulou Elena


METHODOLOGY: LAYERS

METHODOLOGY: LAYERS

Revitalized Markets Market Specialization Salaga Market London Market MEAT

work

et New N

MEAT FISH

GRAIN

FISH GRAIN

Proposed New Fish Market MEAT

FISH

GRAIN

C.E.P. (Community Empowerment) Node Community Capacity Building Job Opportunity Education Community Service Market

C.E.P

Hybrid Commercial Enhancing Commercial Activity Current

Hybrid Commercial

Commercial

Pedestrian Oriented Promenade Pedestrian Oriented New Street Typology P.W.E LIVE

+

WORK

Pleasant Walking Environment

Scalar Connection

Public & Community Space Railroad and Station Waste Collection Route

3 min 5 min

Toilet and Waste Bin Location & Walking Boundary


DESIGN PROCESS PROCESS DESIGN

Kapompasopoulou Elena

Facade Preservation

Circulation Connection

Spatial Organization

LONDON MARKET CROSS SECTION, DAY/NIGHT DIAGRAM

9am

12pm

3pm

6pm Flexible Modular Vendor System

150 1500

150

0

0

FLEXIBLE MODULAR SYSTEM

Flexible Modular Vendor System 30 00

3300

Flexible Modular Vendor System Sales Unit Construction

Street Vendor Modules & Restaurant

1500 1500

1500

1 500 1 500

Sales Unit

Street Vendor Module Construction

Street Vendor Module

9pm


SUSTAINABLE ROOF SYSTEM SUSTAINABLE ROOF

SYSTEM

Sun Light

Sun Light

Wind

Reusable Solar Energy

m

Water Collection

Operable Shade and Ventilation

12am

60 00 60 00 60 00 6000 6000

60 00

Street Archade

Vegetation

Public Toilets

Waste Collection


MARKET’S SECTION Kapompasopoulou Elena

Health center Daycare Center Educational Center Pray house Info desk Public Toilets

Computer Lab

Public Activity Space

Public Toilet

Commercial

Service & Kitchen

Community Educational

pedestrian only

pedestrian friendly mixed use commercial use

STREETS & OPEN SPACES

arcade street


MARKET’S SYSTEM DIAGRAM Composting plant HUMAN WASTE

150 - 200 m radius

3 - 5 min walk

“Accra Urban Farms”

Corporation

Corporation

$ London Market

$ Profit Return and Reinvestement

Research Center

Internet Cafe

Youth Center

Job Training

Technical School

Library

Community Center

REVITALIZED MARKET


Eat - Sh*t _ New York 2010 Kapompasopoulou Elena

Presented at the Major’s Office (as a selected project from UD Program’s Fall Semester) MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN: Fall Studio Faculty: Moji Baratloo, Sandro Marpillero, Justin Moore, Frank Ruchala, Angela Soong In collaboration with Helen Cheuk _ Gerardo Garcia _ Shiu Tang

To improve the rural-urban nutrient cycling of food and sludge produced in New York State and NYC, the concept of EAT/SH*T aims to strengthen the regional agricultural and waste management networks between country and city, Through 4 untertwining strategies we intend to amplify the supply of agricultural products and biosolids (of eating and sh*ting). The deeply-seated relationships between the processes of agriculture and food-waste are integral to the supply of one another. The exchange of bio-solids for agricultural products reexamines the implicit relationships between country and city and magnifies the potential of “waste” to be a vital economic, social and ecological catalyst.


Kapompasopoulou Elena Phase 1: Infrastructure

Phase 2: Remediation

- rebuilt Kosciusko bridge - built rail infrastructure - barge network on creek

- bio-remediation on sites - build central terminal of wholesale market - bring in meat and produce markets


Phase 3: Post-remediation

Phase 4: Expansion & Growth

- first phase of Food Business Zone - fish markets introduced when creek is cleaned by Superfund

- second phase of Food Business Zone - expansion into food processing and manufacturing

NEWTOWN CREEK Local food Wholesale Terminal


Kapompasopoulou Elena

NEWTOWN CREEK Local food Wholesale Terminal

3. Waste to Resource Bio - solid from Hunts Point are sent all over the U.S., especially for citrus groves in Florida

Most of the world’s phosphate mined in Florida and Morocco is lost via soil erosion and inadequate recycling. There are no substitutes!

NYC Waste SHED: 1.5 billion gallons per day NYOFco Biosolid Factory in Hunts Point Plant closed in 2010 due to Synagro’s discontinued interest in NYC

with dewatering facility without dewatering facility proposed location for Red Hook Biosolid Factory Vessel Route to Hunts Point Bio-solid plant Dewatering Sludge Vessel Routes

4. Research / Remediation

contaminated sites approved brownfields potential brownfield sites superfund site

Remediation efforts on industrial zones can be designed as brownfield opportunity areas and Superfund.

Newtown Creek

Red Hook


NYS Agricultural SHED: 7.1 million acres

1. Localizing Food Supply

Proposed Agricultural SHED: 1.5 million acres

only 2% of NYC’s food supply is from NYS

2. Decentralize Food Distribution

food in the US travels an average of 1.500 miles. 96% travels via trucks, only 2% via rail. 1% via water and 1% via air.

RED HOOK Biosolid Manufacturing Facility


(de)limit _ Caracas 2010 Kapompasopoulou Elena

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN: Urban Prefigurations Faculty: Michael Conard In collaboration with Marta ‘D Alessandro

Caracas is characterized by the compresence of two different cities physically and socially divided: the planned city and the barrios, the informal city. The barrios’ inhabitants are spectators of a city that persistently denies the right to socio-economic opportunities and political participation. (de)limit aims to control the new barrios development through two different strategies. First, to connect barrios to the formal city, to give them access to the city’s resources. Secondly, to delimit barriors of expansion; to reinforce squatters identity and to create a sense of belonging to an identified community. A new street network will provide specific zones for new barrios development and connection to the formal city. A water colllection / cleaning / distribution system will provide independency to the barrios. Throughout the phasing, different actors will be engaged in the project implementation: the city, the squatters’ community and the singular households.


Caracas _ Venezuela


Kapompasopoulou Elena

Caracas _ Venezuela


In the past years, while the public housing promotion directly produced 700,000 units, settlers produced 2,4 million units in non - controlled developments.

Estimates suggest some 60 - 70% of households live in informal neighborhoods (barrios)


CARACAS: HOUSING POLICIES Kapompasopoulou Elena

WHY WEREN’T THEY EFFECTIVE? Because they aimed to keep control over the barrios

50’s SUBSTITUTION

60’s - 80’s “MAKE UP”

WHICH ARE THE CONSEQUENCES?

1

?

lack of access to urban basic services + infrastructure

2

physical vulnerability

3

mine?

insecure property rights + ambig


os population

CONTROL / DEPENDENCY - ISOLATION

90’s UPGRADING

5

mbiguous citizenship

4

00’s BACK TO “MAKE UP”

high crime rates

NO

$

unemployment + underemployment

6

vo t

e

powerlessness in their decision


Kapompasopoulou Elena

Caracas _ methodology & phasing

barrios

formal city

current condition MOBILITY / connection to the city resources

proposed WATER / independence

01. invert housing process

02. define infrastructure


phase 03

phase 02

phase 01

03. implement infrastructure

04. phasing


St. George INsertion _ NY 2010 Kapompasopoulou Elena

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN: Summer Studio Faculty: Kaja Kühl, Skye Duncan, Earl Jackson, Tricia Martin, Evan Rose In collaboration with Marta ‘D Alessandro _ Jeremy Welsh

The “St. George INsertion” proposal aims to pull the Ferry Terminal inward, closer to Staten Island Burough Hall, creating a direct connection between this transportation hub and the rest of St. George. With the shift of the Ferry and the construction of a pedestrian piazza at the closed Bay Street create a (new) “downtown” for St. George, activated by restaurants, shops, offices, and residential units. This concentration of activity will lead development to investigate the large portion of under-used lands in the existing fabric of St. George, pulling the energy created on the waterfront closer to the community. Using existing framework as a guide, a new system of axes lead Residents, Commuters, and Visitors throughout the site and the newly constructed landscape to the waterfront and mass transportation, surmounting the existing barriers. Buildings and program weave among one another, creating new vistas and connections to what was once simply a parking lot.


Kapompasopoulou Elena

Questions: What keeps people from staying in St. George? What prevents redevelopment? physical barriers visual barriers emotional barriers lack of activities

What resources does St. George have to offer? views proximity to water 55,000 commuters + 10,000 visitors / day 25min from Manhattan (by boat) available land

Answer:

Activate a “New� Center Create more access to the waterfront Provide Development Parsels


proposed transportation system

the design _ activate a new center Kapompasopoulou Elena

the new ferry terminal the new plaza

ferry tram bus car bike / pedestrians

SECTION A - A’

bus terminal

retail building

ferry terminal 1


the landscape

Borough Hall

ferry terminal 2

the new waterfront park

parking lot

Yankee’s Stadium


Piraeus Light Tower _ Athens 2010 Kapompasopoulou Elena

COMPETITION PIRAEUS TOWER 2010: “CHANGE THE FACE/FACADES REFORMATION” A’ MENTION & PUBLISHED Professional Experience: “UArchitects”, Eindhoven _ The Netherlands


Kapompasopoulou Elena

wind generator

rain water harvesting electric fan

photovoltaic panels

terrace insulation

reinforced concrete metallic grid

ceiling 3,00m

warm air

2,30m

water insulation

floor cooling system

ground level

underground water harvesting


spot light

d

water

metallic frame photovoltaic glass

soil

screws

detail of additional facade


Dock Enhancement _ Pylos 2009 Kapompasopoulou Elena

PROFESSIONAL B. ARCH: Final Thesis Faculty: Georgios A. Panetsos In collaboration with Achilleas Kakkavas

Pylos is a small traditional town with long history and rich heritage. Among the most important landmarks one could include the “Trion Navarchon� Square, the Newcastle, the residence of the Olympic Champion Konstantinos Tsiklitiras (1912) and the aqueduct with the old cemetery. The dock enhancement project targets on creating a new landmark for the city, The proposal expands on two levels, that of the pedestrians walk (main) and that of the boat services (secondary).The paths and ramps are wide enough so to subserve both functions.


the City Hall

Trion Nauarchon Square the Newcastle

the Aqueduct


diagrams _ design concept Kapompasopoulou Elena 01. city and dock axes

02. axes and paths

05. configuration of urban tissue II

0

10m

03. expansion of urban tissue

06. finalizing dock paths

25m

50m

07. pedestrian ramp development

04. configuration of urban tissue I

10. dock_ final design


ground plan view _ +2.00m ground plan view +2.00m

public sculpture

relaxation area

slope dock square pedestrian ramp public toilets amphitheatre ticket office

refreshments stand refreshments stands open air area

bench

organised planting

City Hall square City Hall

0

10m

25m

50m

N


Papagos_ 81 Bungalow Typologies _ 2008 Kapompasopoulou Elena

PROFESSIONAL B’ ARCH: Research Thesis Faculty: Georgios A. Panetsos In collaboration with withTassos Govatsos

After World War II a large amount of people moved towards the city of Athens, Greece to seek for work and better living conditions than in the countryside. This led to the construction of diverse residencies and the development of a sophisticated housing policy. For my research thesis in 2008, I analyzed the American bungalow as a housing typology. I investigated how the bungalow became the principle typology for the American suburbia and how it affected morphologically the Greek residence. Through personal observation in the city of Athens, Greece, and more particular in the Papagos area I noticed that some residencies were influenced from the typical American bungalow style. Interviews with various owners delivered material about these residencies for more thorough research. An organization named A.O.C.O (Autonomous Officers Construction Organization) was responsible for the implementation of a residential development program in Papagos area for post-war officers (1946 and there after). After studying the A.O.C.O archives for several months, drawings, blueprints, and agreements completed in the 1950’s and 1960’s were gathered. A total of 81 bungalow typologies were presented demonstrating the variability in the Greek contemporary architecture.


P81bT


Kapompasopoulou Elena image 01_ Papagos Area

Aim of this systematic investigation was to specify the bungalow as a modern type of residency in countries around the world, but also in Greece. The study starts with the analysis of the Indian housing typology, as India is bungalow’s native country. It then extends and searches parallels to the Greek housing development in the 20th century, and in particular after 1946, where post-War Greece was facing severe financial and residential problems. The word “bungalow” derives from the Indian word “bangla”, which means, “It belongs to Bengal”. Bungalows were small traditional single story houses with rectangular plan, thatched roof and wide terrace. The particular housing typology further developed by the English and is encountered in their

colonial housing styles and was later adopted by the Americans. In Greece a large amount of urban immigrants searched for better future in the cities after World War II had left them with destroyed properties. Therefore, people with limited income and wealth had to be rehabilitated. The rare and unpublished material collected in this study showed that Greece, with a small delay due to political and financial instability, was affected from the bungalow movement. Greek architects adopted and modified the typology, in order to cover people’s needs in terms of space and finances. A large district called Papagos became the ground where bungalows with very divers, innovative and sophisticated architectures were constructed.


The fast and efficient construction of these buildings was assigned to the Autonomous Officer Construction Organization. This organization was founded by the commander of the Armed Forces, Alexander Papagos, during the government of Sophocles Venizelos. Members of the organization were people highly interested in Greek politics. However, their social and educational background did not allow them to be nominated for election. Most of them had no education and were unmarried. The A.O.C.O gave its members loans with low interests in order for the owners to finance the construction of their house. The resulting low rents and interests allowed A.O.C.O members to repay the loans and that resulted to a successful housing policy. This approach seems to rely on principles of other countries, where local governments or municipalities and not individuals, were proposing housing policy-programs in order to improve the living conditions. The chosen region, Papagos, to realize the settlement was bounded from Mesogeion and Katexaki Avenue and Imittos Regional Street (image 01). This area was a military property that was not yet developed as it had been used as a firing range for military exercises. The main architect of the entire building program and of the housing typologies was Achilleas Spanoudis. He was an important figure of A.O.C.O from 1950 until 1982. Achileas Spanoudis designed most of the

houses that were built and he also planned the urban programs of the settlement, which gradually became part of the city plan. The residential development of the area, was held out through 11 programs that occurred from 1952 to 1980. During this period 1.395 houses were built and 1.024 plots were given for self-help housing.

4 core commercial centers at Papagou district

Diagram of Uses The growth of Papagou area had a residential character, however, an evolution of commercial spots was provided. This trend was based on American Standards, where commercial centers were developed in large residential areas to serve the tenants. The expansion of these centers was based on the rental of 62 stores that A.O.C.O offered at lower prices than in the free market. Eventually, four core commercial centers were developed and apart from shops they included banks, post office, petrol station, bars and an open theatre.


market

playground open theatre church - park school market plaza market - plaza

school

church - plaza market - plaza market - playground

plaza


[1]

The development of the Papagos area and the Greek housing typology The residencies were distributed randomly to the owners, as this provided uniform allocation to the area and concealed grouping of high-level officers in specific areas. The method, in which the architect engaged the public with the private sector of residence, in order to create the sense of community, verifies the intense demand for social establishment between the members of the district. As mentioned above, the design principles of the residencies were based on modernism (image 02), a movement that was directly related with middle-class lifestyle. The low living standards of most officers, integrated with the lack of cultural perception resulted in traditional decorative elements on the building faรงade. Most of the residents implemented rustique components in the design, aiming a more familiar way of living. Even though, most of the above residencies were given for granting, and were replaced with multi-storey houses with lacking architectural style. An essential fact is that today most of the remaining residencies represent pure examples of modernism. The following might explain the later observation; the non-altered bungalows with the simple modern volumes and consequently their owners became poles of attraction for highly educated and wealthy future wives.


When occasionally a wedding occurred which resulted in the formation of a family the house passed from one generation to another. Since there was no longer financial need in the families, the house was kept as own property. This resulted to well-maintained bungalows. Some bungalows were designed from the architect A.Kalligas and represent the straightforward design of the modern movement (image 03). In the Papagos case, the design of the settlement is based on the aesthetics and construction quality of the modern movement. The design innovation is present in the small housing scale but also in the city scale. The novel residential development, proposed by A.O.C.O, was based on a master plan that obeyed standard quality principles that have already been applied to other countries around the world. The housing typologies in Papagos and more specifically, their interior design, but also their placement in the plot of land have parallels with the American bungalow typology of the 19th century. The floor of the American bungalow raises from 30 cm up to 60 cm (image 04), above the ground, an attribute that appears also in the Papagos housing typologies. All of them are founded on a platform ranging from 30 cm to 1 m height. Further similarities of the American bungalow and the Papagos bungalow are the simple interior and the functional and spacious interior plan;


A big room in the core of the house was constructed with local materials and functions as a main gathering space (image 05). Further the bungalows could potentially enclose a living room, three to four bedrooms, a kitchen, a bathroom, closets and space for a potential fridge. In contrast with the traditional greek residences, the housing typologies in Papagou proposed a new way of habitation to the postwar Greece, where the living principles were sub-standard. These housing typologies could establish a novel perception in the international terminology of architecture, defining the “Greek bungalow�.

the foundation of the bungalow

the lobby _ main gathering space

02

03

02

03

04

02

03

05

images _ location map


Mobility Craters / In-Between Metropolis _ Venice 2006 Kapompasopoulou Elena

PUBLISHED : F. Garofalo (ed.), Milan, Postmedia books, 2008, pp.138-147. 10th BIENNALE OF ARCHITECTURE IN VENICE: Learning from Cities

The underground IN-BETWEEN METROPOLIS is a downward expansion and a densification in the place of horizontal sprawl in order to prevent mobility and transportation growth issues of contemporary cities and metropolises. It is applied in three different cities: Mexico City, Berlin and Tokyo that identify three very distinct versions of city structure and urban growth in reference to the issue of mobility and transportation. The vertical mega-structure involves: a ground surface that has DEPTH, a thick ground surface, a three dimensional crust of public spaces that will fill-in the gap, (the solid [under]ground between the surface and the underground transport infrastructure), a porous permeable ground, permeable by light, sounds and smells, where temperature will remain more or less stable all year round, where rain will no longer be a burden. The in-between metropolis has a maximum horizontal dimension that can be walked within a reasonable amount of time. It can welcome the passengers of all transport means, including the private car or bike. It minimizes energy losses, thermal insulation needs and gas emissions. Waste of all kinds is treated locally or recycled. Particularities of location, climate, culture, soil conditions, underground water, available energy sources etc. will define the exact form of the in-between metropolis.


bik es

bikes

bus

taxi

cars

cars

cars

o metr

bus

taxi

metro

bikes

cars

metro

s

bu

es bik

s

metro

bus

car

Berlin

Mexico City

Tokyo

[conceptual proposal at Alexanderplatz] [conceptual proposal at Zocalo Square] [conceptual proposal at Shinjuku]


Section [metro, car parking, bicycle rent, catwalks, luggage room, mediKapompasopoulou Elena

cal center, church, office buildings, cinema, school, university, athletic center, spa, retail, recteation area, cemetery, logistics, supermarket, storage]

central mobility crater breathing tubes _ voids of smaller dimensions and variable section, the breathing tubes can be used for ventilation according to natural principles.

m

m

m

m


Berlin metropolis

mobility crater _ accessible light-wells and points that will allow sunlight to reach as deep as required for lighting and ventilation based on temperature differences. Natural light will be further diffused through optic fibres and possibly also mirror devices.

the transmarks _ vertical voids, will accommodate vertical (or almost vertical) circulation for fast access to the points desired. Through their distinctive form they will become landmarks of mobility on the city surface.


Kapompasopoulou Elena


car s

In - Between Berlin metropolis

s

car

routes

0

0

50

50

100

100

200

200

500

500

“breathing tubes”

craters “transmarks”

level 0m

ground

level -3m

level -25m

0

50

100

spaces

level -15m

500

200

level -60m 0

50

100

200

500

level -100m 0

50

100

200

500


The New Ground _ IT 2006 Kapompasopoulou Elena

PUBLISHED : Semestral Newsletter: a2610, n.03, 2007 - 2008, p.06 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP : Transforming the Landscape; Towards the Area Plan of the Tordino Valley In collaboration with Ivi Diamantopoulou_ Achilleas Kakkavas_ Vasileios Sokalis

The linear structure of the Adriatic City needs to aquire points of centrality - or increased density and diversity - that will provide for its future growth and meaningful development. This further leads to a reconsideration and at least partial redefinitionof the Adriatic’s City topography as well. A “New Ground” is being proposed towards this end. Suspended above the real ground it will be the sub-stratum of a complementary urban landscape and landscaped urbanity. The “New Gound” creates a new building site and a new parkland that evolve through punching, fragmenting and deforming. Decentralization nowdays can be vertical.


0m

500m


vertical connections

urban plazas network

the New Ground

New Ground + Voids

transportation basic axes network + logistics

existing footprints + new buildings

natural ground elements

main project principles

inverted traditional city buildings surrounding the “walled� industrial precinct

footpring x height = constant

from the vertical building to the vertical city: layered groundS

New Ground - new roof - a viewing platform

artificial nature VS natural nature

overcoming infrastructure directly connecting new ground and riverbed

developing centrality the precedent of ancient Athens

a city for pedestrians the precedent of Venice

a non residetial terminal city the precedent of Las Vegas

creating centrality the precedent of Manhattan [inverted]

the New Ground as a typology Mosciano San Angelo’s case

LN

LN

3&5"*/'00513*/5 &-&7"5& )*()5 /&8#-%T

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3&VTF#-%T BMUFSOBUFQSPHSBNT QSFTFSWF "--

program distribution

new ground level

old ground level

old ground level

new ground level

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treatment of the existing circumstances

QSFTFSWF "--

old ground level

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QSFTFSWF "--

setting areas

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QSFTFSWF "--

LN

QSFTFSWF "--

Kapompasopoulou Elena

m

artificial nature

new ground level


PLAN the New Ground level

type S

type L multiplex

city hall

section a

central station

void

vertical connections

imax theater plaza

multi program building void

shopping mall

sculpture garden mono rail gymnasium station void void

the new and the old ground

renderings

aerial view

parking entrance

metallic tree garden

city hall plaza university

opera & museum entrance

view from the multi program building


Elena Kapompasopoulou 709 Dekalb Avenue, Apt. 16 Brooklyn I 11216 I NY +1 347 367 5613 kapanel@gmail.com I ek2658@columbia.edu

Portfolio 2011

Portfolio _ Elena Kapompasopoulou  

selected projects representing my work since 2006

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