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Message

the PRINCIPAL Mr. O'CONNOR It occurred to me that this might be a good opportunity to share a few thoughts with you based on our school motto, "Esse Quam Videri". Younger members of the school have occasionally asked me what it means; older students may have forgotten its significance in their daily contact with it. Literally the motto means "It is better to be than to appear only to be." In other words, it sets up a standard for thought and action based not merely on external adherence to rules of truth, justice and beauty, but on an internal conviction of the highest ethical basis for action. It is a condemnation of the action of people who conform to acceptable standards merely to impress others—it is a condemnation of sharp business practice masquerading as honest dealing; of the motorist who1 obeys the rule of the road when under the eye of the law but is reckless of his own and others' lives when he feels he is not likely to be apprehended; of the man, woman or child who is everyone's friend outside but unbearable to live with at home; of any action cloaked with a facade of respectability but founded on unworthy or shameful motives. To live up to the motto is a challenge few of us could hope to achieve at all times and in all places. Human behaviour is extraordinarily complex. The word "personality" itself is a derivative of "persona" —an old Greek word for "mask", In the early Greek theatre, character delineation was simply a matter of putting on a mask which the audience immediately identified as the type of character being portrayed. Shakespeare exhorts us: "This above all—to thine "own self be true". He also knew, as we all do, how difficult it is to sort out ourselves—to know what our "own self" consists of. It is not made easier for us in that we all use types of "masks" or "persona" or "personalities" which we "put, on" to suit the occasion. You know yourselves that you are different personalities at home, at school, on the playing fields, WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL

at social functions and so on. But in spite of all these variations of personality we all have an in-built "direction finder" or conscience that points the way to correct action. If we move the pointer a few degrees, we usually rationalise our action as necessary in the circumstances, because of our need to be at peace with ourselves. Since, moreover, we are the product of our environment and all our experiences, we are often in conflict with ourselves when what we want "to be" is difficult in the face of distorted values of a permissive society or in conflict with the ideas of our peers. It is then a test of character whether we allow our "appearing to be" to dominate our "to be". The more often we stand on principle and refuse to let ourselves be swept along by human respect, the closer we are to moral self-realisation. There is an old legal tag which says that "justice must not only be done, but appear also1 to be done". We will have reached our full stature when we have happily resolved all conflict between internal conviction and external conformity to what is good and true and worthwhile. Page One


STAFF Front Row: Mrs, Gillett, Miss Borg, Miss Dunn, Miss Eaves, Mrs. Hughes, Miss Wham, Miss Hunter, Mr. O'Connor, Mr. Morris, Mrs. Wolter, Mrs. Hofmeister, Miss Ladlay, Mrs. Finney, Mrs. Robinson, Mrs. Woodroofe. Second Row: Mrs. Reznikov, Miss Dobson, Mrs. Teichmann, Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Lipsky, Mrs. Sheehan, Mrs. Altaian, Mrs. Parfitt, Miss Bade, Mrs. Grimes, Miss McTavish, Miss Foster, Miss Bowden, Mrs. Humphreys, Miss Ker, Mrs. Martin, Miss Triekey, Mrs. Schleicher, Mrs. Page, Miss Spry, Mrs. Jauncey. Third Row: Miss Westbrook, Mr. Adsett, Mr. Gredden, Mrt. McKenzie, Mr. Doherty, Mr. Stanger, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Sperring, Mr. Norr'ie, Mr. Duncan, Mr. Pacey, Mr. Green, Mr. Witt, Mr. McLucas, Miss Noonan. Back Row: Mr. Jones, Mr. Beard, MB. Spring, Mr. Campbell, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Mills, Mr. Alcorn, Mr. Price, Mr. Holding, Mr. Cullen, Mr. Carew-Reid, Mr. Smith, Mri. Carvolth, Mr. Purdy.

STAFF CHANGES As was expected, several of our Staff Members left us at the end of 1968. Of the Academic Staff, Miss M. Anderson was transferred to Trinity Bay, Mr. C. Enders to Inala; Miss B. D. Fisher, Mrs. J. R. Campbell and Mrs. C. A. Garden resigned. Changes in the Home Craft were Mrs. N. M. Haigh (resigned) and Mrs. W. Lulham (Camp Hill). Physical Education Staff transfers were Miss A. A. Rehtla (Pimlico) and Mr. D. Simmonds (Tablelands). At the commencement of 1969 we were joined by: (Academic) Mr. M. Alcorn, Miss C. Borg, Mr. I. Doherty, Mrs. R. Lipsky, Mr. D. Carew-Reid; (Commercial) Miss C. Sainty; (Home Craft) Miss C. Burstow, Mrs. L. Harrower; (Manual Training), Mr. L.

WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

Witt; (Physical Education) Mr. R. Boyd, Mrs. M. Humphreys, Mr. B. Roberts and Miss W. S. Berghofer. During the year a number of changes have been made. Departures included Miss K. Broughton (Pine Rivers), Mr. W. Wilcox and Mrs. G. Allman (resigned), Mr. Carew-Reid (Secondary Correspondence), Mrs. G. W. Armstrong, Miss Steiner, Mr. R. Jones (Resigned), Miss Sainty (Millmerran), Miss Burstow (Bundaberg), Mr. B. Roberts (Physical Education Dept), Miss W. Berghofer (transferred). Arrivals included Miss R. McTavish, Mrs. C. Gredden (transferred for a short period), Mrs. J. Bennett, Mrs. P. McGregor, Mrs. M. J. Bunney, Mrs. S. Grimes, Mr. K. Sprott (replacing Mr. G. Duncan on long service leave).

Page Three


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WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L


SCHOOL DIRECTORY PRINCIPAL: Mr. K. P. O'CONNOR, B.A., M.Ed. DEPUTY PRINCIPAL: Mr. B. N. MORRIS, B.A., A.E'd. SENIOR MISTRESS: Miss J. R. HUNTER, B.A., A.Ed. SUBJECT MASTERS AND MISTRESSES: English: Miss M. D. WHAM, B.A., Dip.Ed., A.T.C.L. Languages: Miss L. C. A. DOBSON, B.A., Dip.Soc.Stud. History: Mr. N. C. NORRIE, B.A., A.Ed. Geography: Mr. G. J. SPRING, B.A. Mathematics: Miss G. M. BADE, B.A. Science: Mr. K. S. G. McKENZIE, B.Sc. Commercial: Mr. C. G. MITCHELL, A.A.S.A. Home Science: Mrs. D. G. SCHLEICHER Manual Training: Mr. C. ADSETT ACADEMIC STAFF: Mr. M. J. ALCORN, A.E'd. Mr. P. G. BEARD Mrs. J. BENNETT Miss C. M. BORG, A.Mus.A., A.T.C.L. Mrs. M. J. BUNNEY Mr. R. G. CAMPBELL Mr. N. R. R. CARVOLTH Mr. J. E. CULLEN Mr. I. DOHERTY, B.Sc., Dip.Ed. Miss L. C. EAVES Mrs. D. G. PINNEY Mrs. M. H. GILLETT Mrs. C. A. GREDDEN Mr. G. N. GREDDEN Mr. S. C. HOLDING Mrs. D. I. HUGHES Miss E. W. KER Miss E. LADLAY Mrs. R. R. LIPSKY, B.A. Mrs. N. J. MARTIN Miss R. J. McTAVISH Mr. M. J. MILLS Mrs. J. NICOLSON, B.Sc. Miss P. M. NOONAN Mrs. E. PARFITT Mr. H. A. PRICE, A.Ed. Mrs. S. REZNIKOV, B.Sc.CHons.), Dip.Ed. Mrs. D. J. SHEEHAN Mr. N. E. SMITH Mr. H. K. SPERRING Mr. I. P. STANGER Mrs. R. J. TEICHMANN, B.A. Miss D. M. TRICKEY Mr. C. H. TUCKER Mrs. H. G. WOLTER, B.Sc. Mrs. P. M. WOODROOPE, A.Ed. COMMERCIAL STAFF: Miss M. G. H. DUNN, A.A.U.Q.CPr.), P.C.T. Mrs. S. M. GRIMES Mrs. G. J. ROBINSON WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

HOME SCIENCE STAFF: Mrs. L. N. HARROWER Mrs: B. HOFMEISTER Mrs. E. JAUNCEY

Mrs. P. MCGREGOR

Mrs. P. PAGE Miss S. M. SPRY MANUAL TRAINING STAFF: Mr. G. W. DUNCAN Mr. D. H. GREEN Mr. K. V. McGUIRE Mr. J. T. McLUCAS Mr. P. G. PACEY Mr. L. J. WITT PHYSICAL EDUCATION STAFF: Mr. R. L. BOYD Mrs. M. E. HUMPHREYS, Dip.Phys.Ed. Mr. C. C. PURDY, Dip.Phys.Ed. GUIDANCE STAFF: Mr. G. D. SAMWAYS, B.A., B.Ed. Miss L. PRINCE, B.A., Dip.Ed. SECRETARIAL STAFF: Miss J. BOWDEN Miss S. POSTER LABORATORY ASSISTANT: Miss L. G. WESTBROOK BUILDING AND GROUND STAFF: Mr. C. H. ARLOTT (Janitor) Mr. T. FELSCHOW (Groundsman) Mrs. N. BELL Mrs. E. BOONE Mr. E. HADWEN Mrs. J. HAM Mr. J. MARTIN Mrs. J. ORR Mrs. M. PERSHOUSE Mrs. J. SHARRY MAGAZINE COMMITTEE: Miss M. D. WHAM Miss G. M. BADE Mr. H. A. PRICE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS My gratitude goes to all persons who assisted in producing the Wavell Magazine for 1969. Special mention must be made of the work done by a reliable group of Sub-Senior girls, especially Elizabeth Bergman, Lyn Beard, Barbara Cowling, Diane Bowerman, Kristina Smith, Sandra Cook, and Julie Wagner. Again I wish to thank in particular Mrs. B. N. Morris for judging the entries in the Original Contribution Section and for making the selection of those contributions which appear in the magazine. On behalf of the Magazine Committee, I wish to convey their best wishes for the Christmas Season and for 1970 to all persons interested in Wavell. M. D. WHAM. Page Five


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Page Six

WAVEL1 HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L


Prefects9 The official induction ceremony for the prefects was carried out at the beginning of the year by Mr. C. E. Anstey, B.Com., A.Ed., A.A.S.A., Registrar at the Queensland Institute of Technology. This was the beginning of the prefects' official duties which have been carried out smoothly during the remainder of the year. Janet White and John Illingworth, as school captains, were asked to attend the garden party at Government House in conjunction with Commonwealth Youth Week. It was a great opportunity to meet the school captains from the various other High Schools. We were also fortunate to meet past students from Wavell who had won acclaim since they left school. Another opportunity was afforded us by our trip to Nambour S.H.S. New acquaintances were made and some old acquaintances renewed. The vice-captains this year were Ruth McDowell and Trevor Walz. The prefects attained a high standard in the field of sport this year; Brian Berry, Jim Franklin, Laurie White, Barry Pordham, Kent Smith, Bruce Staib (football); Trevor Walz, Michael Reilly (Weight Lifting, taking a number of Australian records); Alan Carse, Kent Smith (Cricket); John Illing-

Notes worth, Ken Lambert (Golf); Ken Lambert, Michael Reilly (Athletics); Robert Claybourne (Basketball); Pam King, Jan Walls, Beth Dunlop, Wendy Brooks, Jenny Stevens, Dianne Crofton, Dianne Coxon (Hockey); Pam King, Janet White (Softball); Janet White (Basketball); Jan Walls, Dianne Coxon (Swimming); Ruth McDowell (Golf); Dai McLean, Trudy Frampton, Janet Brown (Vigoro); Janet White (Athletics). Beside sporting achievements, practically all of the girl prefects and a few of the boys extended their cultural interests by taking part in the school production of "Calamity Jane", which we believe was a tremendous success. Janet White and Peter Deslandes took the main roles as Calamity Jane and Wild Bill Hickock respectively. The prefects were also represented in the school cadet units by John Illingworth and Bruce Staib (Army), and Pam King (Red Cross). In conclusion, we would like to thank Mr. O'Connor, Mr. Morris, Miss Hunter and the remainder of the teaching staff for their valuable help during the year, and we wish to extend our best wishes to all Junior students and fellow Senior students in the forthcoming examinations.

PREFECTS Back Row (left to right): G. Morton, M. Reilly, K. Smith, P. Deslandes, R. Claybourn, B. Staib, B. Kirk, A. Carse, K. Lambert, J. Gibb, N. Harvey, L. White. Centre: B. Fordham, J. Walls, B. Dunlop, S. Sims, D< McLean, C. Tacey, P. King, L. Bryant, D. Coxon, T. Frampton, J. Brown, M. Warburton, J. Stevens, D. Crofton, B. Berry. Front: W. Brooks, R, McDowell (vice-capt,), J. White (capt.), Miss Hunter, Mr. O'Connor, Mr. Morris, 3. lUingrworth (capt.), T. Walz (vice-capt.), J. Franklin. WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL

Page Seven


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Page Eight

WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


Parents and Citizens9 Association The 1969 Annual Meeting of the Association was held on 25th February and was attended by 35 people, including Mr. A. T. Dewar, Alderman Hill and Alderman Harvey. This number was not a very representative attendance of parents of the 1400 students at the school, and all are invited to show their interest in school activities by attending annual meetings which are held on the last Tuesday in each February.

winter. The final cost of the pool, after payment of retention money, etc., will be $57,114. ยง25,000 of this amount has been paid by the Education Department as subsidy, leaving a balance of $32,114 for the P. & C. Association, most of which has now been paid. This has been achieved without making use of a bank loan that had been tentatively arranged when the Engineer's estimates for the pool were prepared.

Officials and committee members elected for were: Chairman, Mr. C. E. May; Deputy Chairman, Mr. E. J. Rigby; Secretary, Mr. L. I. Hume; Treasurer, Mr. C. D. Norman (followed by Mr. E. J. Walmsley in September); Committee Members, Messrs Pryor, Beard, Hall, Anstey, Walmsley, Anderson, Folkes, Watson, Mitchell, Stockdale, Brand, Greensill and Mesdames Anstey, Asplin, Joyner, Harvey, Goodworth, Richards, Kenyon and Haynes.

The pool was officially opened by Mr. A. T. Dewar at an afternoon function on Saturday, llth October.

The Ladies' Auxiliary, with Mrs. Sillett as President, continued as an active and vital part of this Association, organising and participating in our fund raising and general activities. This financial and willing personal assistance are the significant factors in the effectiveness of the Parents & Citizens' Association at the school, and I appeal to all mothers who can give any assistance, to become associated with our Ladies' Auxiliary. The two major sources of income for the Association continue to be the Tuck Shop and the Book Store, and I offer the thanks of the Association to all people who have assisted with this work. The Ladies' Auxiliary is responsible for the Tuck Shop which is staffed by Mr. McCorley as Supervisor, and by the ladies who are rostered daily for Tuck Shop duty. The school Book Store is convened by Mrs. Anstey and to assist us financially, parents and students are requested to take advantage of this source, which enables them to purchase text books and general school requisites at the school, at city list prices. The runathons associated with the Annual Cross Country Races were repeated this year, and raised approximately S8QO. The "Card Contribution Scheme" was continued this year, and at the date of our meeting, 314 families of the 1100 families represented at the school had contributed. We are most grateful to the families who have contributed, and remind all that this scheme is designed to enable all families to contribute in even a small way to the work of this Association, which exists only to perform services which are considered to be of benefit to our school and to our children. At the end of March, the Swimming Pool was ready for use, and although this coincided with the end of the swimming season, the Education Department gave special approval for the pool to be used by the students for 2 weeks, before closing it down for the WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

A general meeting to form a School Swimming Club was held late in April, and subsequently much preparatory work was done by a small group of willing officials. Support from both parents and students was disappointing, but to provide club swimming for those who were interested, it was decided to commence club swimming on Friday night, 3rd October, with membership available to all students who can swim 25 metres or more in any stroke. To plan our expenditure, a "Works Programme" for 1969 was prepared at the beginning of the year involving a total expenditure of $5,300 (excluding swimming pool) approx. $3,600 to1 be provided by the P. & C. Association, and the balance as subsidies by the Education Department. At the date of this report, a movie projector, 5 large steel cabinets for the Book Store and 20 school ground seats have been provided and approximately 100 trees have been planted along the Edinburgh Castle Road and Colac Street boundaries, and within the grounds. Further beautification of the area is planned, involving more trees, and approximately 4000 mauve creeping lantana plants which are now in the Nursery, being prepared for planting on the banks of the sports ovals both to beautify and to retain the banks. The construction of 2 sealed men's basketball courts, and 3 concrete paths on the north side of the school buildings are also planned, but are at present awaiting Education Department site approval. Late in May, 4 members of the P. & C. Association and the School Principal inspected the school grounds with 5 officers from the Education and Works Departments to discuss proposals. These included: Sites for future Library, Assembly Hall, Class Room Block, Basketball Courts, etc.; effective surface drainage of stormwater to protect the sports oval; restoration of the oval surface; more bitumen sealing in heavy foot traffic areas; enclosing of the large open drain that crosses the grounds. Some useful site decisions have been made as a result of the meeting and we are hopeful of some action to carry out the requested works. At the request of the Education Department, property owners adjoining the north-east corner of the school grounds had previously been interviewed by this AssoPage Nine


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W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L


ciation to obtain their opinions on building proposals for this area of the school grounds. This year has seen the completion of the swimming pool and other works at the school, and this Association will continue each year with the provision of useful equipment and works in the school rooms and the school grounds. However, in conjunction with these continuing services, we have also set our sights on the construction of an Assembly Hall, as the next major long term project. We have advised the Education Department of this, and have asked to be listed

for financial assistance for this work when we have raised our share of the total funds required. The year that the Hall will become a reality will be decided by future Association committees, and will depend on the support given to the Association by parents during the next few years. To "get with it" you can support our activities, and/or join with us at our monthly meetings which are held in the School Library at 7.45 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month, excluding January. C. E. MAY, Chairman.

ft

Ladies* Auxiliary Report President: Mrs. R. SILLETT. Vice-President: Mrs. E. BIGBY. Secretary: Mrs. F. GREENSILL. Treasurer: Mrs. B. HUNTER. The Ladies' Auxiliary, in conjunction with the Parents and Citizens' Association, is striving to give the students of Wavell High School better facilities, and a more attractive school of which they can be proud. The finances of the P. & C. are raised almost solely by the Ladies' Auxiliary, the bulk of the money coming from the tuckshop and the bookstall. The primary object of the tuckshop is to provide good, health-giving food for the students, but in doing this, we raise a large sum of money each year. The bookstall in the first week of the school year also provides a two-fold service, by making easily available the necessary text books for the students, away from the crush 01 the city stores, and at the city prices. These stores, who supply the books to the stall, allow 10% on all sales. So by buying from the bookstall, you are helping the school financially.

Other profit-making activities have been several social functions, stalls on sports day, the sale of second-hand uniforms, and the run-a-thon organised in conjuction with the cross-country events. A small group of ladies has worked consistently each Wednesday assisting Miss Hunter and Miss Dobson to prepare new books for the library shelves. These books are the result of a Commonwealth grant, and the work promises to continue at least all next year. We sorely need more helpers. We also need more women to "man" the tuckshop, as we are often short of assistants. If any mothers are able to help, please ring Mr. McCorley, 59 5126, or Mrs. Sillett, 59 2437. The Auxiliary wishes to extend its most sincere thanks to Mr. O'Connor and his staff for their co-operation and courtesy; to Mr. McCorley, tuckshop convenor, for his courtesy and efficiency; to the students for their continuing support, and last, but by no means least, to all the mothers, who have given their valuable time for the good of the school. JOAN SILLETT, President. ft

Past Students* Association Again we see another year coming to a close. This year has not been a complete success for the Past Students, but much ground work for next year has been covered. In the past few years, our numbers have been declining and it is because of this that difficulties have been most evident in our attempts to organize functions for the students of the school. However, a remedy for this is in the hands of the students leaving school this year. We hope you will accept our invitation to join us in the Association. Throughout the year, dances have been held and, although these have not been great money-making ventures, we hope they have been popular with the students who attended. In addition, social functions such as bowling nights and trips to the coast have been organized and these have been very successful. W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

Because of the efforts of the Wavell Past Students a combined association for Past Students in the north zone is being formed, and through this we hope to hold larger social functions for our members. Next year, we are also going to combine our meeting night with a social night. Again this year our thanks must go to Mr. O'Connor and the school administration for the help we Rave received, but in particular we must thank Mr. Adsett for his guidance throughout the year. Our best wishes go to the students who are sitting for the Junior and Senior examinations, and we feel sure you will attain great heights in the coming examination. Finally, I would like to say that all past students are welcome to join our Association, and we would like to see you next year. These meetings are held on the second Wednesday of every month. L. J. ELIASON, Chairman. Page Eleven

I


CH NIGHT SUBJECT PRIZES

Dux of Senior School (A. T. Dewar Prize): PAMELA KING. Dux of Junior School (M. S. Duus Prize): LYN STAIB. Best Senior Pass 1968 (Dr. A. Crawford Prize): GLENDA LADLAY. Best Junior Pass 1968 (Aid. A. R. C. Hill Prize): PETA FRAMPTON. Alamein House Academic Leaders (C. Adsett Shield): LISBETH DUNLOP and ALAN CAUSE. Keren House Academic Leaders (C. W. Presneill Shield): HEATHER MoALPINE and RICHARD REDDAN. Tonruk House Academic Leaders (Rats of Tobruk Association Shield): JENNIFER. STEVENS and TREVOR WALZ. Burma House Academic Leaders (Myer Shield): PAMELA KING and PETER HUXTABLE.

Languages: BRUCE KIRK. Social Science: PAMELA KING. Commercial: GAIL BAILEY. Home Management: WENDY E ?.'"!<$. Mathematics: ALAN CARSE. Physical Science: ROBERT RAHMANN. Biological Science: JENNIFER STZYrxS. Art: LISBETH DUNLOP. Geometrical Drawing and Perspective: RICHARD REDDAN. German (donated by Consul-C-i-r:;. ::r Germany): BRUCE KIRK, SUSAN '.VISHT;:,- LYN STAIB, LORRAINE WALLIS, CK?.:57::~ ^ILDING.

PAMELA KING Senior Dux, Wavell High School (By courtesy of Anna Smith, Photographer, Chermside)

LYN STAIB Junior Dux. WaveU Hirh School (By courtesy of Ar.r.E So* ^vpber. Chermside)

Page Twelve

W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L


FORM PRIZES 12A1—Trevor Walz 12A2—Jennifer Stevens 12A3—Alan Carse 12A4—Pamela King 11A1—Peter Samson 11A2—Peta Frampton 11 A3—Trevor Campbell 11A4—Gillian Sillett 10A1—Lyn Staib 10A2—Jonathan Kehrer 10A3—Bruce Jackson 10B1—Paul Thompson 10B2—Stanley Fertjowski 10B3—Wayne Robinson 10B4—Gregg Jones 10C1—Barbara Prickett 10C2—Jeanette McDonald 10C3—-Robyn McAuslan 10C4—Ann Patterson 10D —Denise Phillips IDS —Kay Higgins 9A1—Darryl Wynne Leadership Awards: ILLINGWORTH.

Kedron-Wavell R.S.L. Bursary: Boys (J, M. W. O'Keeffe Memorial Prize), THOMAS TRUMAN; Girls, JULIE STEEL. Chermside Rotary Prize: CAROLYN TACEY. Sportsman of the Year: TREVOR WALZ. Sportswoman of the Year: CHRISTINE CHARLTON, Magazine Prize: ANTHONY BARTLETT. Library Prizes: WARREN BLEE, PETER BECKER, DENNIS RADECKI.

9A2—Stephen Moore 9A3—Lorraine Wallis 9B1—Ian Grose 9B2—Almon Gadd 9B3—Len Howarth 9B4—Graham Schulz 9C1—Elaine Dobson 9C2—Elizabeth Williams 9C3—Marion Hill 9C4—Coral Linford 9D —Annette Koch 9S —Robert Coleman 8A1—Jennifer Rees 8A2—Robyn Allen 8A3—Timothy Donovan 8A4—Leigh Lester 8A5—Susan Stevens 8A6—Narelle Wakeling 8A7—Susan Hall 8A8—Kerry Barker 8A9—Amy Van Blarcom 8AlQ-Susan Stanfield

JANET WHITE

and

CADET PRIZES SEA Most Efficient Cadet: Leading Seaman W. BLEE. ARMY Best Senior Cadet: Cpl. D. LONG. Outstanding Leadership: Acting C.U.O. P. THOMPSON. Camp and Bivouac Efficiency: L/Cpl. P. WOODS. Best Junior Cadet: Cdt. A. KOUTOUPIDIS. "Q" Efficiency: Staff/Sgt. E. MITCHELL (100% Stock Take). Leadership & Efficiency: Drum/Major J. WALKER. Bivouac & Range Efficiency: W.O. J. ILLINGWORTH. Excellent Shooting S.L.R. at Crow's Nest Range: Cdt. R. MALYON. Platoon Efficiency Shield: No. 2 PLATOON (representing the Platoon—Sgt. B. STAIB). RED CROSS Most Efficient Cadet: P. KING. Leadership & Efficiency." J. STRACHAN.

JOHN

Shell Prize: CHRISTINE KNIGHT. Mothercraft Prizes (Maternal & Child Welfare Association): First Prize, HEATHER HALL; Best Project Book, MERILYN RICHARDS.

_ _

M

COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS University (Awarded on 1968 Senior Public Examination) PETER BANCROFT GLENDA LADLAY WILLIAM BARTLETT GEOFFREY MAY SUSAN CLARK ALLAN MURRAY ROSSLYN CLAYTON ROBYN SWAIN LORELLE DICK RAYMOND TEDMAN LEONIE FLOYD JAMES TOOVEY SANDRA HUTCHINSON DAVID WRIGHT ANN JOHNSTON

Advanced Education (Awarded on 1968 Senior Public Examination)

RUTH COLLINS RALPH MAY KEN PEARCE EVAN KLATT STEPHEN MATTHEWS- MARK SNARTT FREDERICK GEOFFREY SNELL W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

Secondary (Awarded to Junior Candidates in 1968) CHRISTOPHER ALLEN ROSS JARROTT ROBYN AMOS JANICE JOYCE WARREN BLEE CHRISTINE MIZEN STUART CAMERON PETER SAMSON TREVOR CAMPBELL GILLIAN SILLETT PETA FRAMPTON KAREN TOVELL NEIL GYNTHER SUSAN WIGHTON ROBERT HOEY

Technical (Awarded to Junior Candidates in 1968) ANNE BARBER GRAHAM DAY DOUGLAS BELL GREGORY FLOYD ALLAN BOAL BARRY HETTRICK IAN BURROWS CHRISTOPHER HOLDEN WILLIAM COOKE SHARON SCHAFFERIUS JOHN DAY Page Thirteen


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W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L


Sports Awards SWIMMING Full Pocket: N. GYNTHER, A. MEDLAN. Half Pocket: D. COXON, A. ALDRIDGE.

SOCCER Half Pocket: D. STUBBS, P. BANCROFT, K. PIPERIDES, B. MUNRO.

CRICKET Full Pocket: G. WHYTE, G. THOMAS. Half Pocket: I. MATTHEWS, P. CUNNINGHAM, M. TOOVEY. MEN'S BASKETBALL Half Pocket: R. JARROTT. WEIGHT-LIFTING Full Pocket: M. REILLY, T. WALZ, M. IRWIN, P. FROSTICK, S. PERTJOWSKI. Half Pocket: G. DUNCAN, P. BANCROFT. GIRLS' BASKETBALL, Half Pocket: D. BOWERMAN, G. SILLETT, ASKEW, S. PEEK. SOFTBALL Full Pocket: C. CHARLTON. Half Pocket: J. MORRISON, J. BODEN.

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HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL

LIFE-SAVING Half Pocket: H. McALPINE, J. WAGNER, J. WALLS. AUSTRALIAN RULES Full Pocket: L. WHITE. Half Pocket: T. TRUMAN. RUGBY LEAGUE Full Pocket: G. THOMAS, G. WHYTE, G. HORNIBROOK. Half Pocket: P. HULL, J. EAPKINS, C. CRONIN, R. BROUGH, A. MEDLAN, J. FRANKLIN, B. BERRY, D. MULLINS, A. McSWEENEY, R. RIDEOUT, B. FORDHAM, G. HARRISON, P. GILLIES, R. JOLLY, R. MATTHEWS-FREDERICK, W. GALLAGHER. AGE CHAMPIONS Athletics BOYS' OPEN G. COLBORNE GIRLS' OPEN J. HARDING-SMITH BOYS' UNDER 16 G. MARTIN GIRLS' UNDER 16 .... .... G. SILLETT BOYS' UNDER 15 A. MEDLAN GIRLS' UNDER 15 J. JONES BOYS' UNDER 14 .... G. GATFIELD GIRLS' UNDER 14 J. WATSON Tennis BOYS' OPEN R. KEMPSTER BOYS' UNDER 15 I. ROTHMAN BOYS' OPEN DOUBLES— R. KEMPSTER, P. HERD GIRLS' OPEN P. FRAMPTON GIRLS' UNDER 15 R. BISSET GIRLS' OPEN DOUBLES— P. FRAMPTON, K. TOVELL Cross-Couiitry BOYS' OPEN S. COLBORNE BOYS' UNDER 15 .... R. PRYOR GIRLS' OPEN .... J. JONES Swimming BOYS' OPEN GIRLS' OPEN BOYS' UNDER 16 GIRLS' UNDER 16 BOYS' UNDER 15 GIRLS' UNDER 15 BOYS' UNDER 14 .... .... GIRLS' UNDER 14 BOYS' UNDER 13 GIRLS' UNDER 13 ....

B. BERRY D. COXON N. GYNTHER J. WAGNER A. MEDLAN S. POWELL G. LEE A. STEWART I. KENYON J. PAYNE Page Fifteen


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WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L


Squash BOYS' A GRADE BOYS' B GRADE

K. HIBBS R. KEMPSTER Cricket

FERGUSON MEMORIAL TROPHY .... G. WHYTE INTER-HOUSE SPORT ANSTEY SHIELD ALAMEIN BILL BROWN SHIELD (Swimming) ALAMEIN MAYNE HARRIERS SHIELD (Athletics) .... ALAMEIN WELLS SHIELD (Lifesaving) BURMA

ZONE AND METROPOLITAN PREMIERSHIPS North Zone Premiers (Runners-up Metropolitan Premiership — A Grade Cricket. North Zone and Metropolitan Premiers—B Grade Girls' Hockey. North Zone Premiers, Annual Knock-Out Champions, Runners-up Metropolitan Premiership — A Grade Rugby League. North Zone Premiers and Runners-up Metropolitan Premiership — B Grade Boys' Tennis. North Zone Premiers — B Grade Soccer. Annual Hillclimb, Mt. Gravatt — Winners of Open Boys' Teams, Winners of Open Girls' Teams, Winners of Under 15 Boys' Teams.

House Notes ALAMEIN HOUSE House Captains: ELIZABETH BROAD and BRIAN BERRY Vice-Captains: DIANNE CKOFTON and ROBERT BROUGH "To An Athlete Dying Young" (By Alamein Houseman (and Women)—with apologies to A. E. Housman.) The day you won your house the race We cheered you through that rabblous place; Students all stood cheering by, And home we dragged you high and dry. Today, the track all runners crawl Is clogged with mud so none may lall To bog you at your threshold down Wearing smiles and not a frown. Eyes that weary work has shut, Cannot see the record's cut,. As silence dies beneath the cheers, And "ALAMEIN" rings through the ears. Now Alamein won't swell the rout Of lads who wore their honour out. Swimmers who renown outswam Did only as the greatest can. Alamein's the greatest, Alamein's the best. Swimmers, athletes, students, All among the best. Before you start ascending those great hurdles to the sky Remember! Only our fame will never die. WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

On a more serious note now, 1969 was a victorious year for Alamein. Congratulations are in order to all those students who gave, as always, of their best to Alamein. The swimming carnival proved most successful with Dianne Coxon and Brian Berry taking out both open championships. Runners-up were Alison Aidridge and Tony Bartlett. Special merit must be given to Diane and Alison who acquitted themselves well in the Queensland State Secondary Schools' Swimming Association 1969 Swimming Championships. On the whole, Wavell came fifteenth out of thirty-five. During the Winter, Alamein dominated the athletics field. Once again Dianne Coxon excelled herself, as did Christine Charlton in the open division. Because of their fine performances this season, Rosemary Crosby, Carol Everett and Karen Patterson will prove to be tough competition in next year's open events. Helen Asplin and Cheryl Ahchee also did very well, in their division. Geoff Colborne won the boys' open championship, with Roy Beazley and Stephen Colborne doing particularly well in the Under 16's and Lindsay Colborne topping the Under 14's in fine Colborne fashion. The standard of competition was extremely high and we would like to thank the other Houses for their keen spirit of competition and good sportsmanship which they showed throughout the year. Our thanks to Mr. Purdy who has always worked so hard to organize, so successfully, these carnivals. On behalf of Alamein, we, as House Captains, would like to thank our House Teachers, Miss Bade and Mr. Adsett, for all the support and guidance which they so willingly gave us throughout the year. We hope that the next Alamein House Captains will have as rewarding a task next year as we have had this year. Page Seventeen


BURMA HOUSE Girl Captains: PAMELA KING and TRUDY PRAMPTON Boy Captains: JIM FRANKLIN and PETER HULL This was not the year of the Tigers but we put up some stiff opposition and we hope that next year some of the trophies will come Burma's way. Much of the credit for our effort must go to the Grade 8 and 9 students who put in not only their efforts but also their enthusiasm. The first major sporting event of the year was the annual inter-house swimming carnival. There was some strong competition between Alamein and Burma and it was eventually Alamein who won the Bill Brown Sports Trophy. Burma was an unlucky runner-up. In the girls' events the best swimmers were in the lower age groups. Our most outstanding swimmers were: Jan Growcott, Wendy Keeton, Susan Jones and Virginia Hill. In the upper age groups the best competitors were Leanne Haigh, Rosanne Hollingsworth and Jan and Sue Harding-Smith. . . „ , , , . , During the day some fine efforts were put up by the boys. Neil Gynther, our Australian swimming champion, took the U16 Championship and Ian Kenyon the U13. Other outstanding competitors were Ross Jarrott, Peter Hull, John Gibb and Robert James. T h e next inter-house , ,competition . . . , w,. a s t h e. crosscountry races for boys and girls. In both events many ' : . , . , , the ,, house. . T ,, valuable points were gained for In the , event , . Jennifer , . . Jones , ., winner once again. . girls was the 5, ' T . put, up a ,.fine effort ... , ,to finish ,. . , .in the ,, Robyn Jones also • /i.ten The rm. mosti creditable.effort j- t 1.1 « j. m i the ii. boys' -U . race first was the fifth place gained by Neil Gynther. In August the annual athletics carnival was held. Here Burma could manage only third place, even though we put up many fine efforts during the day. The most outstanding competitors were G. Gatfield, U14 championship, as well as Ross Jarrott, Neil Gynther, Bruce Kirk, Ross Jolly, Steven Groom, Noel Harte, J. Hoey, L. Jones and T. Hayes. In the girls' events we were more fortunate, especially with our champions, Jan Harding-Smith (Open), and Jennifer Jones (U15). Other efforts worthy of notice were given by Wendy Keeton, Susan Jacob! and Paulette Harry Our house was represented in many of the school teams. Several of the players in the A Grade Rugby League Team, which was the runner-up in the Metropolitan Premiership, were in our house. They were: Jim Franklin, P'eter Hull, Glen Hornibrook, Barry Fordham, and Ross Jolly, who was a reserve for many of the major games. Glen Hornibrook was selected for the Brisbane "A" team, and Ross Jolly was a member of the Brisbane 9st. 71b. team. Stan Fertjowski and Peter Frostick, members of the school's weight-lifting team, won many honours for themselves during the year. This included several championships, Page Eighteen

both Australian and Queensland. The girls were less prominent. Lesley Kerr gained selection in the Brisbane Schoolgirls' Softball Team and Jennifer Jones the Queensland U14 Athletics Team. In conclusion we would like :o thank all the teachers and particularly our house ~aster, Mr. Carvolth, and our house mistress, Miss Eaves, for their assistance during the year. \Ve -.vculd also like to thank all who either supported cur house or competed in events. Thanks for your eifcrts. We wish Seniors and Juniors the best of lurl-: ir. the forthcoming examinations. Last of all, -::s '.v;uld like to congratulate Alamein on their victory =r.i -.vish Burma the best of luck next year and -,ve hope :: is the year of the TIGER.

KEREN HOUSE House Captains: JOHN RAPKINS and HEATEEF. :.::AI?INE House Vice-Captain? ROSS RIDEOUT and MARIANNE M: : IHMICK Nineteen sixty-nine saw a great — :vement in Prowess but in sw_-_-:r.g we were not quite so successful. A <. 4.1, • * v, • • -r , At the inter-house swimmir.z :;—:vi. :r. March, „ , ,,. . • , Keren managed to gam third u.= :e : ~ . . ~ — ; r . 2 closely , ,. , _ & _, ,, , „ . . - \-" aol;» behind Burma. Even though Kerfr. ii: r.:t win, ° . ' it provided strong opposition to tr.e r t . t e : v.r-r nouses * . ° r* _ . . v^a with swimmers like Alan Mea.Er. .-.::..;::. Reddan,' .

Kerens athletlc

^ McAlpine> sjanney N^le> ar _ ; ;v r/ ::~ n ig possible to name them all. bu: ,.. --•-.-:.-ners in Grades 8 and 9 were extremely g::r.

no t

disappointment follower -.r.-. ~.i: in the Athletics. Excitement ::;, is the end of the carnival neared, but Keren l:s: :: . - . y - 3 points to Alamein. Geoff Martin, Alan Meili.N:-rla Lyell, Lynda Norman, Cheryl Malyor.. Krr. La ~.': err, Pia Beverman and Rowan Pryor perf:rr ^: -- -I-Vll! Great

reoent House

cross-country runs, Kerer. i.-.veil. The aggregate points in the gir.s :: ss-::ur.try resuited in a win. I think the b:> s ~_i--.i;ei third place In the

total

Individual efforts throughou: tl-.-s T - -:luded Michael Reilly breaking records •-. ~ State and National Weight-lifting Titles, Joa—.-r :: rr.s;r. gaining a place in the Brisbane schoolr--^ , : : , . : team, and Cheryl Malyon gaining a trocl'.- : - .::st promising A-reserve grade hockey r.i;r: - =^-^day afternoon hockey. We would like to take this :;; —.r_v t: congratulate Alamein House on its w:r.s : -_^ir_-: Burma and Tobruk for their good sportsr:::ir.r.-_: ir:i t: -.varn them to watch out for Keren next W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L

\NNUAL


TOBRUK HOUSE Captains: LAURIE WHITE and JANET WHITE. (Not related) "Rats"â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Isn't that what we said last year? It still holds true as once again Tobruk failed to exploit its potential. Miss Wham and Mr. Campbell had some frustrating moments, as Tobruk gained fourth (it sounds better than last) place in both the Athletics and Swimming Carnivals. Never mind, Tobrukians, one day . . . perhaps? At least our cheer squad was attractively decked out, many thanks to the Senior girls and Roxanne. However, this year, Tobruk has much to boast about as we had a great cross-section of Queensland representatives. Greg Thomas was chosen once again for the Queensland Football Team (it's becoming a habit). Also> in the football field, Tom Truman played in the Queensland Australian Rules Team. Graham Whyte (our star five-eight) distinguished himself by being in the Cricket Team, but when it comes to Baseball, Eddie Tyler plays a great game. Special congratulations go to Trevor Walz who broke many Queensland and Australian weight-lifting records. While in Sydney, Trevor, who captained the Queensland Team, gained first place in the Lightweight Division.

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In the inter-house sport, Tobruk was well represented and most students showed interest and good sportsmanship. Congratulations go to all competitors, in particular to those who were successful in their races. Our swimmers were Julie Wagner (U16 champion), Allison Stewart (U14 champion), Jan Walls, R. Velnagel, R. Sadlier, Kent Smith, Neil Watts and Ken Willmett. Our star Athletes were Gillian Sillett (U16 champion), Joanne Watson (U14 champion), Jan Walls and Lorraine Skuse, while the outstanding males were Kent Smith, Greg Thomas, Bruce Staib, Trevor Walz, Stuart Van Maarseven and Frank White. Also in the sporting field, Jan Walls, Julie Wagner and Allison Stewart are members of the school lifesaving team which gained second place in the Worfold Shield. One bright spot for Tobruk was the outstanding performance given by our popular house captain, Janet White, in the title role of "Calamity Jane". Another came with the selection of Trevor Walz as Sportsman of the Year. We wish to thank Miss Wham and Mr. Campbell for their interest and help throughout the year, and the help from the vice-captains, Jan Walls and Greg Thomas, was appreciated. Finally Tobruk wishes to thank all of the other houses for their keen competition and wishes the Seniors and Juniors good luck in their exams..

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WAVELL HIGH

SCHOOL ANNUAL


School Activities ARMY CADETS Cadet training is an essential part in the life of many young people as it helps instil into them a sense of loyalty, self-discipline, self-respect, and develops their qualities of leadership. It will always stand them in good stead, not only for becoming soldiers, but also when, later on in life, they take up a position as responsible members of the community. A Tuesday Afternoon in the life of a cadet:— 1510 hrs. (3.10 p.m.)—A mad race as cadets scramble out of classrooms down to the parade ground. A final poli sh of boots and brass then "on parade"! and roll call. 1515 hrs.—Company parade. Officers inspect their platoons. ("When was the last time you cleaned those boots? Sergeant, take this cadet's name and put him on Detention Parade!") 1530 hrs.—Platoons march off to respective training areas for the first lecture or lesson ("The Bren is a magazine fed, air-cooled, gas operated light machine gun. It has a rate of fire of . . ."). 1605 hrs.—End of first lecture. Five minutes break. 1610 hrs.—Begin second lecture. ("Cadet Bloggs, what is the drill when a section, out on patrol, is ambushed by the enemy?") 1645 hrs.—End of second lecture. Quarter of an hour's drill. ("Take care of that rifle, cadet! We can always get more cadets but we can't get more rifles.") 1700 hrs,—Company parade, then ("sigh!!") dismiss.

Unfortunately, this year's bivouac was washed out, but the camps made up for that. These camps are very essential because it is here that the cadet can put to practice the skills which he has been taught at school. They practise such arts as the use of camouflage, i.e. how to make themselves invisible to the enemy, how to walk through the jungle without making a sound, drills used on contact with the enemy, how to search prisoners, how to cook their own meals and erect their own shelters. The emphasis in this training is on realism, and all training is made as real to the actual situation as possible. However, some cadets do not think realism is such a good idea as they remember how very real it was, having to get up early in a freezing cold morning at 0630 hrs. (6.30 a.m.). First year cadets at the Greenbank Camp spent a day on the range where they fired .303 rifles and Bren machine guns while the older cadets at the Crow's Nest Camp, fired S.L.R.'s (rifle used by the Regular Army) and the O.M.C. sub machine gun. To show how realistic cadet training is made, they were not only using real bullets but they were also firing at human shaped targets. With the approach of the Passing Out Parade, Friday, 10th October (glamour night for the cadets), there were some frantic moments when drill was brushed-up and rehearsals carried out. When the big night came, however, everything went smoothly and after Colonel Petitt had inspected the cadets, speeches finished, march past completed, the cadet prizes were then awarded.

ARMY CADETS

WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

Page Twenty-One


The parade was ended with a general salute and a march-off. The official party was then escorted to one of the decorated rooms for supper and official introduction to the officers and other guests. In conclusion, I would like to thank Captain McLucas, Lt. Stanger, Lt. Spring, and Lt. Smith for all their help and guidance throughout the year. Best of luck to all those who are sitting for Junior and Senior exams. C.U.O. P. GILLIES.

SEA CADETS The numbers of the Wavell Division of Sea Cadets have dwindled considerably mainly because of the large number of cadets who left at the end of last year. There are a large number of vacancies in the division and any interested students should contact a cadet for further information about joining. Just a note to young students who will be fourteen years old next year and wish to join. Contact a cadet about going on the A.C.T. (Annual Continuous Training) over the Christmas Holidays as this will make you eligible for promotion to Ordinary Seaman (equal to LanceCorporal). The first of the activities of the year was the extremely successful A.C.T. on which cadets went, shooting on both .303 and .22 ranges, rowing, sailing and swimming, as well as a trip down the river on "H.M.A.S. Yarra". The T.S. Paluma Band at that time had just progressed from bugles to brass instruments and much time was spent in practising. Pour of the six Wavell cadets who1 were not already in the band have since joined. By the time this goes to print there will have been at least two week-end band camps at T.S. Paluma which all the cadets enjoyed. Just ask the cadets! If there were a few more cadets at Wavell, week-ends for Wavell cadets could easily be arranged as the two cadets v/ho organise the band camps are Wavell cadets. As well there are opportunities for cadets to take week-end trips down the Bay on Naval vessels, bus trips to Naval establishments in Sydney over the May and August vacations and the visits to ships in port of the R.A.N. and other world Navies. Wavell cadets also partook in the Navy Week celebrations, the main events of which were an "Open Day" at T.S. Paluma and a Swim Carnival and March at Southport on Saturday, 4th October. On Sunday, 5th, there was the Seafarer's Service and on Monday, 6th, Navy Day, there was a talk given at a number of schools. Cadets paraded at the Passing Out Parade on Friday, 10th October, and on Sunday, 12th, they paraded in the Sea Cadet Ceremonial. The procuring of training equipment for Cadets on a Tuesday afternoon was somewhat hampered by the small numbers so that training to quite a degree was theoretical but this may have accounted for the promotion of a number of cadets. All the cadets wish, gratefully, to thank Lieutenant McGuire and Petty Officer Instructor Norrie for the enthusiasm and interest which they have shown towards the Wavell Division of Sea Cadets.

Page Twenty-Two

A.T.C. These cadets from Queensland Squadron Air Training Corps attend parade at 7 p.m. every Friday night at the R.A.A.F. Headquarters. During the Exhibition, Sgt. Lane took part in an Honour Guard at the Blessing of the Plough Ceremony. Cpl. Holden, Sgt. Herd, and Sgt. Lane were all promoted after promotion courses at Christmas at Gatton Agriculural College. Cpl. Absolon also attended a Sergeants' course. L.A.C. White and Kavanagh attended a Corporals' course. On the week-end of September 20th, Cpl. Absolon attended a gliding week-end held at Kingaroy, and on the following Monday he and Sgt. Lane attended an interview for selection for Flying Scholarships for which Sgt. Herd also applied. Hopes are running high for selection in the Corporal, Sergeant and C.U.O. courses at the end of the year. Most of the cadets attended the annual camp during the August vacation at Amberley and a bivouac at Lake Manchester, where cadets enjoyed themselves. We are hoping that next year our numbers may grow and we may have the largest school group in the Headquarters' Section.

RED CROSS CADETS The Red Cross Cadets commenced activities at the beginning of the year with a membership of 20 girls. All looked forward to joining in the many activities of the unit. Several cadets were lost at the end of the last year's activities owing to the completion of Studies. The office bearers for 1969 were: President, Pamela King; Secretary, Janelle Strachan; Treasurer, Lyn Beard. Mrs. Hughes is the leader of the unit. The first activity for the year was the Red Cross Appeal Collection Day. The cadets raised over $40 for the day's effort. The Annual Fete at Peters Ice Cream Factory was held in July. The cadets worked on the Merry-goround, Afternoon Teas and Sweet Stall. This stall is run by the Juniors and also many of the cadets provided sweets for sale there. During the August Holidays there were many activities for the cadets, especially at the Exhibition. Some of the girls worked on the Lucky Envelopes Stall and also1 some marched in the parade at the Blessing of the Plough Ceremony. Some of the cadets also visited Headquarters on Open Day. Several cadets attended the Annual Junior Red Cross Cadets' Camp at Margate in June, and two were selected to attend the leadership camp at Margate. There were three of our membersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Pamela King, Janelle Strachan and Helen Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;selected along with other cadets to represent Junior Red Cross at Government House to meet the Governor-General on his official visit to Queensland. This was a high honour bestowed on the cadet unit. The cadets carry out their service work at St. Luke's Hospital, Chermside, and also Tufnell Home at Nundah. WAVELL

HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


RED CROSS CADETS Back Row (left to right): J. Watson, R. Weir, L. Beard, J. Strachan, K. Smith, J. Murray. Second Row: D. Harris, N. Turner, V. Geschke, J. Timms, C. Wallace, S. Woods, H. Anderson, H. Hall. Front Row: D. Lacey, L. Hartitigdon, K. Pigott, Mrs. Hughes, P. King, J. Bramwell, L. Grant. Many girls took part in the First Aid exams and five went on to do their Home Nursing exams. Teams were entered in the competition for Health Cups in both fields and the team for each exam scored very high results for the Metropolitan Area. Final results will be known in late September. Finally our last activity for the year is the Passing Out Parade in October. Lastly we would like to thank Mrs. Hughes for her help and co-operation and also we hope the unit continues to be very active next year.

PASSING OUT PARADE This year's glamour night was held on Friday, 10th October. The stage was set with visitors and parents of cadets providing a large audience. The parade commenced when the Parade Commander (C.U.O. P. Gillies) took up his position on the parade ground and gave the order to march on. Once the parade was halted, it was advanced (turned to the front) and stood at ease. When Mr. O'Connor had moved to the dais, the parade was brought to attention and the Parade ComW A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL

mander saluted. The parade was then stood at ease again to await the arrival of the reviewing officer, Colonel Pettit. When the Colonel arrived, he was introduced to some of the other guests while his wife was being escorted to her position on the verandah. Once the Colonel had moved to the dais, he was awarded a General Salute, and then invited to inspect the parade. After inspecting the Navy, Army and Red Cross cadets respectively, the Colonel then inspected the Band. With the inspection finished, the parade then marched past the dais and the salute was taken by Colonel Pettit. After the parade had marched back to the original position, all the cadets were halted and turned to the front. Then the Advance in Review Order was given and the whole parade marched seven paces forward. Another General Salute was given and the parade was then stood at ease. Following this were speeches by Mr. O'Connor and Colonel Pettit. The prizes were then awarded by Colonel Pettit.

SEA Most Efficient Cadet: Leading Seaman W. Blee. Page Twenty-Three


ARMY Best Senior Cadet: Cpl. D. Long. Outstanding Leadership: Acting C.TT.O. P. Thompson, Camp and Bivouac Efficiency: L/Cpl. P. Woods. Best Junior Cadet: Cdt. A. Koutoupidis. "Q" Efficiency: Staff/Sgt. E. Mitchell (100% Stocktake). Leadership and Efficiency: Drum/Major J. Walker. Bivouac and Kange Efficiency: W.O. J. Illingworth. Excellent Shooting S.L.R. at Crow's Nest Range: Cdt. R. Malyon. Platoon Efficiency Shield: No. 2 Platoon (representing the Platoonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Sgt. B. Staib). RED CROSS Most Efficient Cadet: P. King. Leadership and Efficiency: J. Strachan. After the prizes had been awarded, another General Salute was given and the Parade marched off. Cadet officers then went to the Home Science wing to join the official party for supper. As this is also' the last year of Cadet participation for Mr. McLucas, I would like, on behalf of all the cadets, to thank him for all the effort and support that he has given to the cadets during the past years. C.U.O'. P. GILLIES.

BAND Teacher-in-Charge: Mr. McLUCAS. Bandmasters: Mr. HARTINGDON and Mr. MOORE. Drum-major: JIM WALKER. This year most of the members were new, but their musical knowledge is of a high standard. They proved this by scoring only three points behind the winners at the Bundaberg Contest. The bandmaster, Mr. Hartingdon, an excellent musician in the Northern Command Band, spurred the band on. Mr. Moore, a Salvation Army musician, also helped the Cadet Band considerably. This year we have been very fortunate with instruments. We now have four new cornets, four trumpets, two tenor horns, three euphoniums, one new baritone, three basses and nine percussion. This year is the seventh year since the formation of the band, which has gradually progressed from a bugle and drum band to a brass band. Miss Hunter has now started a pipe band. This will consist of six pipers and the usual percussion. It must be realized that the band would not exist except for the help of the Parents and Citizens' Association. The band would also like to thank Mr. McLucas, Mr. Hartingdon and Mr. Mcore for their efforts with the band.

BRASS BAND Back Row: L. McDowell, G, Lester, R. Hancock, P. Dundas, J. Hoey. C. L.jwe. Middle: J. Walker, B. Greensill, L. Felchow, N. Day, D. Hayes, R. Tweedale. L. Coward, S. Hartingdon. Front: R. Smith, R. Caldwell, G. Anderson, G. Walmsley. S. Cook. K. Rado, P. Hall. Page Twenty-Four

W A V E I. L H I G H S C H 0 O L A N N U A L


SCHOOL CONCERT On 4, 5, 6 June our Annual Musical was held at Kedron High School Hall. This year's choice was that favourite of stage and screen, "Calamity Jane". The all-student cast was headed by Janet White in the title role and Peter Deslandes as Wild Bill, both of whom gave very fine performances. Anyone unfortunate enough to miss this production missed a splendid evening's entertainment. Much of the credit for the success of the show must go to that most accomplished pianist, Graeme Morton, and to the producers, Miss Bade and Miss Wham, together with Mrs. Page, who arranged the dance sequences. Special thanks must also go to the Art Department and the Manual Training Section for their invaluable assistance in making this a first-class performance. CAST: Calamity Jane, Janet White; Wild Bill Hickock, Peter Deslandes; Lt. Danny Gilmartin, Barry Sadleir; Katie Brown, Wendy Haynes; Henry Miller, Noel Harvey; Susan, Susan Sims; Francis Fryer, Paul Bancroft; Adelaide Adams, Marianne McCormick; Rattlesnake, John Illingworth; "Doe" Pierce, Warren Blee; Joe, Neil Watts; Hank and Pete, Tom Graham and John Gibb; Colonel Stark, Stephen Fraser. CHORUS: Rod Brown, Andrew McCracken, Tony Bartlett, Dennis Radecki, Ian Sargent, Ron Gregg, Susan Wighton, Carol Vieth, Ruth McDowell, Debbie Kehrer, Rosemary Crosby, Carolyn Tennant, Beth Birch, Kim Edwards, Barbara Bancroft, Wendy Brooks, Jenny Stevens, Beth Dunlop, Wendy Dick, Michelle Corrie, Carolyn Tacey, Sandra King, Sonia Hass, Janette Stockdale, Dai-Delores McLean, Carolyn Scarlett, Nicole Hunter, Jan Walls, Janet Brown, Dianne Coxon, Margaret Warburton, Sue Hinds, Lyn Beard, Jan Harding-Smith, Janelle Strachan, Pam King, Val Geschke, Leanne Haigh, Jan Brooks, Heather McAlpine, Janet Anderson.

BIOLOGY CLUB The Biology Club was initially started by a group of students who wished to do extra experiments in biology. This soon expanded into a group of students interested not only in biology but in all fields of science. Two clubs were formed: The Junior Biology Club and the Senior Biology Club, and officers were elected. The Chairman of the Senior Biology Club was Warren Blee and of the Junior Biology Club, John Hoey. These posts were rather informal and their jobs were mainly that of the co-ordination of efforts. In the Senior Biology Club there were a number of activities started. A large amount of work was done by Lloyd Lester on the relationships of microscopic organisms living in water. This proved a lot of fun. Another group of students headed by Cran McLean successfully grew some interesting bacteria. The rest of the club broke up into three main parts. One group, led by Stuart Cameron, was interested in colour blindness and carried out some extremely successful experiments and won prizes in both the Wavell State High School Science Contest and the Queensland W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

Scene from "Calamity Jane"

Scene from "Calamity Jane" Science Teachers' Association Science Contest. The second group, the core of which was Ross Faulkner and Stephen Jarvis, was interested in astronomy and carried on with a project titled "Astronomy As A Hobby", and also won prizes in both competitions. The third group became the Photography Club, which is practically independent but is still more or less affiliated with the main body. This has continued very successfully under the leadership of Ian Burrows and John Absolon. Since its beginning and initial organization the Senior Biology Club, unless specially requested by a member, has carried on with very few meetings. On the other hand the Junior Biology Club meets regularly every Wednesday afternoon. Some of the activities of this club have been films and also talks by some of the members on such topics as "Ant Colonies". They have as well gained experience in good microscope and laboratory technique. Some practical experiments have also been carried out such as the dissection of small animals, growing of plants and a mouse maze. This is frustrating not only for the mouse at times but also for the students. Page Twenty-Five


They have had a trip to the Museum and it is hoped that a trip to a rain forest such as the area around Binna Burra may be arranged for the end of the year. All the students wish to thank Mrs. Reznikov for her enthusiastic help and guidance throughout the year and also the other science teachers who readily gave up their time to help the students in their endeavours. Everyone connected with the Biology Club looks forward to next year and we hope for renewed interest after the lapse during the Christmas Vacation.

DEBATING SOCIETY The Debating Society swept into full swing in July with the highlight of the debating year—the JAYCEE "Youth Speaks for Australia" Competition. The Wavell team, consisting of Karen Tovell (1st speaker), Greg Malyon (2nd speaker), Janet HardingSmith (3rd speaker) and Susan Wighton (reserve), met Padua College in the first round, debating the topic "That There Is Nothing New Under The Sun". Despite the fact that the team members were novices at competitive debating and possessed little prior debating experience, Wavell, in the affirmative, was successful in defeating the Padua team 273-242 after an enjoyable and entertaining debate. In the second round, Wavell was defeated 214-211 by the more experienced Brisbane Boys' Grammar Team, after Wavell debated in the affirmative: "That Censorship is Necessary". The Society thanks Mrs, Lipsky and Mr. Doherty for their enthusiasm and help, and hopes that their interest, and the interest shown from all quarters of the school, will serve to promote this exciting, exacting and entertaining form of public speaking at the Wavell High School.

INTER SCHOOL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP The I.S.C.F. group has functioned again this year with a pleasing increase in the number of students attending meetings. Special interest was shown in the visits of various guest speakers during the year. A mothercraft sister and a policewoman from the Juvenile Aid Bureau addressed a large number of interested students. At the visit of Mrs. Pickersgill from the Women's Prison Aid Society there were more curious listeners than the room could accommodate. All the students who attended these meetings found them informative and thought-provoking. We would like to thank Miss Ladlay who has led the group again this year. We wish also1 to express our appreciation to Mr. O'Connor for his active support of the group. "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life." (John 3 : 16). Page Twenty-Six

QUOTA QUEST This year Wavell was represented in the Quota Quest by Janet White and Ruth McDowell, who spoke on "Australia Today" and "The Need For Specialization In Our World Today", respectively. The judging of the ten candidates from the North Brisbane Zone was held at the Kedron Assembly Hall late in May. Each girl was interviewed by a panel of judges on various topics in the afternoon, and also gave a talk that night. A senior student from The Gap High School was the winner in this division and, as a result, represented the zone at the finals held at Nambour. The overall winner, the school captain of Gympie High School, received a University Scholarship valued at S500. Many thanks are to be given to the Quota Club for their interest in youth and their generosity.

LIONS' CLUB YOUTH OF THE YEAR QUEST In April of this year, John Illingworth, Trevor Walz and Kent Smith represented Wavell High in a competition designed to test character and public speaking on a national basis. Prizes in past years have included trips to America, Asia and Antarctica. This year, Kent Smith was successful in winning the Chermside Club judging. The compe:i:ion was very well organised by combined clubs, and trie boys wish to thank officials of the Chermside Club for their encouragement to, and interest in, young people about to take their place as citizens in the community.

ARTISTS' WORKSHOP This year, we as the art student 5. nave met the challenge of many projects in crier tc broaden our understanding and deepen our approbation of art. The practical programme has included excursions to various city art galleries where trie v.-crks of contemporary painters and sculptors were reserved. Included in this was the exhibit: :n :: Srace^Age Art at the Queensland Gallery. This v.-e :";ur.d exciting and thought-provoking. During tries; visits v.-e are able to compare and contrast the a~: :: :ur ige with that of the early European masters -.vh;— ~~= study in the theoretical side of our course. Some students have under:;.-:er. =.Maturing from softstone-vermiculite, while rtiters n;ve :een involved in pottery and modelling in :.;In triis field of creativity as in all true art iniiviiuii --:\::ession and interpretation are stressed. Again this year, art stur.er.t- i ':.-. '..:'.'. ind other forms were engaged in trie irsivnin- :.:? Dinting of backdrops for our stage ; t r e ; e r . • . - . . : . .: Calamity Jane". As well, posters advertising -.-.- play were printed in the art worksr.tp All of the students have entered •! .. "petitions in the local area and several awards .-.. - >eer. won. In our course, v;e r.i:- .-..- . •-:-- :.i^:h work in the lithographic sphere wbere tins -r-rnnicue was applied to fabric printing >..-: : : - T ..-;r.i is also WAVELL H I G H SCHOOL \ \ N U A L


a part of our programme, as this can form a foundation for the animated painting, By finding a balance between the theoretical and the practical side of our course, we have found there exists a wider scope in artistic values.

SOCIAL COMMITTEE The members of the Social Committee have enjoyed participating in the various activities undertaken to raise funds for the school this year. Dancing classes were organised for first term, and in May we held two successful Record Hops. We feel in the future the response may be even more enthusiastic. The teachers probably do not agree with us, but we did hold a car wash during second term. As well as washing many cars, we managed to include ourselves, much to the amusement of our spectators. At the School's very successful production of "Calamity Jane", we organised a canteen and provided the audience with a supper at interval. At present we are busily engaged in the preparation for the Third Annual Dinner Dance, which we

hope will be the social highlight of the year for our Senior students. We should like to thank Miss Dunn and Mr. Adsett for their assistance in all ventures undertaken. Our year's effort has enabled us to donate one tape-recorder and one slide projector to the school.

LIBRARY This has been an exciting year for the library with a Commonwealth grant of ยง4,000 a year for the next three years at least and a new Commonwealth library building to look forward to early next year. This building which will be approximately eight squares in size and carpeted throughout will consist of a main library area, conference rooms, carrels for individual reading and a film room. This year then has consisted of a concerted effort to prepare book stock for the new library on the part of Miss Dobson, Miss Hunter and the subject masters and mistresses who have bought the books, and members of the P. & C. Association and pupils who have processed them.

SOCIAL COMMITTEE, 1969 Top Row (left to right): C. Greensill, R, Kempster, W. Blee, G, Martin, P, Dmtdas, N. Gynther, J. Hopkins, G. Swain. Middle Row: G. Malyon, E. Bergman, K. Webster, L. Beard, ,T. Strachan, N. Hunter, 3. Harding-Smith, A. Greigg, C. Scarlett, J. Bulow. Bottom row: S. King, S. Wighton, Miss Dunn, Mr. C. Adsett, P. Fletcher. C, Mizen, S. Patrick. W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

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J


At the moment Wavell has 4,000 books. The immediate aim is to increase this book stock to 6,000-7,000 in the nexxt 3 years. The ultimate aim is a book stock of about 13,000 or more volumes. One of the most interesting library events of the year was a school visit to' the Book Fair held in the City Hall from September 23rd to 26th. On exhibition was the finest collection of French books ever to be shown in Australia in addition to a magnificent selection of books from about thirty publishing houses. Another new feature this year has been the institution of library prizes for pupils whose work in the school library has been outstanding. Winners of this year's library prizes are: Warren Blee, Peter Becker and Dennis Radecki. The library wishes to extend particular thanks to members of the P. & C. Association who have given up their Wednesdays to library work, to the girls in 10C1 who have done extra typing and to the 9C2 class who have spent a great deal of spare time covering books.

GRADE 8 MUSIC COMPETITION This year, for the first time, an inter-class music competition was held for the grade eight forms. Students were able to1 compete in at least ten sections, giving the students a chance to display either their vocal or instrumental talents. The standards of their performances were, on the whole, high. Several winners were Jenny Sellars, 8A9 (Girls' Vocal Other Than Popular); Greg Richards, 8A7 (Instrumental Solo); Judy Cheesman, 8A8 (Girls' Vocal Popular), 8A1 Group Vocal. First place went to 8A1 and second to 8A7. Christine Howard, 8A1, was awarded first in the finals for her piano solo, "Sparklets". Janet Hauritz, 8A1, will be awarded for her efforts in gaining more points for her class than any other contestant. The finalists gave lunch-time performances, the money from which will be donated to the school to aid their contribution to the Freedom Prom Hunger Campaign. Congratulations to the performers and their supporters.

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Page Twenty-Eight

WAVELL

HIGH

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ANNUAL


WAVELL BUSHWALKING CLUB The idea of a school bushwalking club was first considered during the May vacation en route to the Carnarvons. Later, sixty students unanimously decided to form a bushwalking club. Regular meetings were held every Thursday at 1 p.m. and a committee was elected. This committee plans all proposed trips under the guidance of Mr. Duncan and Mrs. Woodroofe. The members comprise mainly 12th, llth and 10th form students. Parents have assisted with both of the trips by providing transport but in the future it is hoped that buses can be hired. The first trip of the club was to the Glass House Mountains area. Here the energetic walkers reached the summits of two of the peaks. The first mountain tackled was Beerwah. It was rather steep for the first two hundred feet but after the half-way mark was reached, it was reasonably easy walking to the top. Beerwah is the highest mountain of the group and the reward for the climber who reaches the top, is a panoramic view of the Queensland Coastline. Tibrogargan was the more difficult of the two to climb. The sides were steeper and more dangerous to climb.

There were no casualties, as safety was always of first importance. A month later was the proposed trip to the Lamington National Park. This outing took the bushwalkers seventy miles out of Brisbane through Tamborine Village and Canungra to O'Reilly's Guest House. Using this as the starting point, the bushwalkers set out on a six miles' hike to one of the look-outs. The chosen track went through rainforest and reached the border of New South Wales. This particular walk offered to the bushwalker three breath-taking views of the coastal ranges, Mt. Warning, and the ocean. During the August vacation several of the girls who take Home Science were busy making tents in preparation for an overnight trip to take place early in September. Minto Crags, at the foothills of the Great Dividing Range near Mt, Barney, was our destination. The club plans to hold about four trips per term and some trips to look forward to, are the "Wildflower Week-end" at Wyberba National Park, near Stanthorpe, in October; a day trip to the Cunningham's Gap area, and last but not least—our "Lazy" week-end at Noosa after "those" exams. L. L. BRYANT, Secretary, W.H.S.B.W.C. (Wavell High School Bushwalking Club).

Carnarvon Trip Report "A wonderful trip", "I had a really good time", "The good times we had all together are what I remember most", "More food next time—please!" "The teachers were our companions as much as the other students". Friday, 2nd May, 19691—and in the early hours of the morning lights were already burning and the excitement of last minute preparation was in the air. This was the mornnig of departure of the Wavell High School Carnarvon Party. Seven teachers, Miss Bade, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Woodroofe, Mr. Carvolth, Mr. Duncan, Mr. Mills, Mr. Stanger, and students met at the school and boarded the two Continental coaches that, it was hoped, would see them through the seven day journey. Some delay was encountered. However, this served to kindle among members of the expedition the spark of comradeship, which later was to become campfirebright, deep in the Carnarvon Gorge. The school was left behind under a drizzling sky, as, after a cheerful and noisy farewell, the coaches started on the first day's journey which would take them a few hundred miles to Injune; and as droughtstricken areas were passed through, it was significant to note the attitude of students, many of whom had never witnessed drought at first hand. They were concerned and had been made more aware of Australia's drought problem by actually seeing it—as later W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L

ANNUAL

they also were made aware of Australia's natural beauty and of the necessity for protecting it. That night, after coach trouble at Roma, a dash was made to Injune with ghost stories, etc., adding to the general atmosphere. Beneath the full moon and with ears keyed to the wailing of distant dingoes, the party laid out sleeping bags under the stars—a novel and satisfying experience. It was made more exciting by the fact that our first night was spent settled on the Injune cricket pitch! The first camp breakfast received campwide notoriety; however, not much acceptance! But some hours later we were able to feast our eyes on the beauty of the Arcadia. Valley. It was not only the group of geography students who found this crossing of the Great Dividing Range spectacular. Yet, even this was overshadowed by the magnificence of the Carnarvon Ranges when the coaches pulled into base camp at lunchtime. Previous plans were revised and it was decided the party would camp as a whole, the first camp being on an island three miles up the gorge. Three miles up the gorge, many creek crossings and a hasty dinner later, people fell into their sleeping bags! In the gorge itself the beauty is rugged and untouched, and in the four days-that followed every moment was alive with adventure and things to see. The aboriginal paintings at Cathedral Cave and The Page Twenty-Nine


Art Gallery were visited. Alter camp was moved back to an island closer to base camp we trekked up to Aljon Palls—the water that fell into the dim cavern must have been the coldest on Earth; and the bats, aroused at our coming, were certainly real—yet none of our company would have missed it. Nor missed the afternoon hike to the Amphitheatre —indeed it was strange to think that such a place existed and that if you hadn't come on the trip you might never have seen it. But you had come and that night around a roaring campfire you were there. The Carnarvon Campfire Court was convened, the Honourable Mr. Duncan presiding, and, in turn, everybody was charged. The charges were hilarious "but, then so were the punishments. Some particularly inspired "accusations" had the gorge ringing with the echoes of our laughter. In the Carnarvons, the sky at night is clear, yet the stars never rose more to the occasion than when we all sang "Waltzing Matilda" into the darkness outside the campfire. The following day was our last in the gorge and we hiked back to base camp, stopping en route to climb up to Hellhole. Most were forced to stop because of the dearth of good ropes, but some of our adventurers went on and reported later that the less intrepid had missed out on something. This seemed hard to believe for where we had stopped, ferns dripped from every rock in the loveliest hues of green, creating one of the most picturesque scenes we had come across in the gorge. At base camp that evening we rallied around the campfire with the Mount Gravatt Bushwalking Group; however, as "early to bag, early to rise" was our

motto of camplife, we adhered to it, and the following day were on board the coaches on our way to Gladstone. It seemed to1 most that the inspection of the Moura Coalfield that day was worthwhile as was the tour through the Gladstone Alumina Plant the following day. The previous night had been spent, thanks to the kind hospitality of the Gladstone High School Principal, in the recently opened Domestic Science wing of that school. It was late in the night on Thursday, 8th May, 1969, that the coaches, one load singing "The Carnarvon Song", pulled back into the Wavell High ground. In the last minutes everyone must have had his own thoughts. The trip was successful. Student reaction showed this. A useful and relaxing week had been spent in a rugged, beautiful place. Students found self-reliance and independence within themselves had been strengthened while having the opportunity -.0 er.-jy the warmth of companionship. The overwhelming reaction was: ""-.£- wonderful teachers". Students had found their teachers to be human beings with the faults of hurr.an beings but also the admirable qualities. There had grown a feeling of deep gratitude and respect towards the teachers who unselfishly took the brunt of work on their shoulders. This and the friendshirs termed will surely prove a boon in school. Every member of the week-;:.-.? tr:r has made memories and friends. I'm sure that there is more than one student who is thankfu: ::r rein 2 a member of the Wavell High School Carr.ar.tr. Expedition,

At First Hand It was not a sight to inspire confidence. You would not have thought that taking off a man's fingers would make such a mess. The casualty room at Warwick Hospital seemed scarred under the bright fluorescent tube by the red blotches which lay spattered over the sheets, the pillow and the tiled floor. A mass of old bandages, deep brown, caked, lay across the sink. There were several enamel bowls filled with instruments. These were also stained. "The doctor won't be back tonight. You had best bring him back for an x-ray in the morning." "What time?" "Between ten and eleven." We were a little relieved. We had come in from the Methodist hostel at Cunningham's Gap where we had stopped over night. Paul had hurt his back while playing French football after we had finished work about 5 p.m. that afternoon. After tea it had become painful and swollen so we drove the 30 miles into Warwick Hospital just to make sure. The Camp superintendent who drove said he was used to such trips. Page Thirty

Nevertheless we were not strr. -; leave-the hospital that night at eleven o'cl:-:V. ir.i re'/im to the hostel. We had already decided t: :r.ar.|e : _t plans. We had planned to return via Heiier rre-rl-i Ttriugh Gatton to Brisbane on this the second ;;:. :;' tur last field trip for 1968. We had read of the storm which bad devastated Killarney the night before. ">Ve de-ridec ::• continue with the first part of our £lar. f : r Friday—to climb Mt. Mitchell, then return via Kil.irr.r-. ~-.e Head of the Condamine and Boorish We rose early, and the bus took us shrouded in fog, to the start of the walking tr^.:> r.glit in the gap itself. Three miles and an hour later some ten of us stood at the summit of Mt M:t:r.ell \Ve joked about the marvellous vie-.'.- and i':•:_- :ur skill as mountaineers. Here -,ve -•'-:- .-. -;r r : ; t of S.E. Queensland. On a clear day we could see forever! But here at seven o'clock on the 2?-.h o* November we could see about ten yards ir. frtr.t :' us. However, as we walked down, the fog cleared and we could see, WAVELL H I G H SCHOOL A N N U A L


On The TraU

Killarney

three miles away across the 2,000 ft. deep gap which lay between us, Mt. Cordeaux, the fortress-like bulk with all but its summit bright in the clear early morning air below the cloud. To the west the valley of Glen Gallon Creek widened onto the undulating yellows and browns of the Darling Downs. Down, breakfast, good-bye, and we were on the way to Warwick. The country we passed through had freshened up after the rain of the two days before. There was a certain air of expectancy as we turned off the New England Highway towards Killarney. Three miles out and still no sign of the storm that had made news headlines the day before. Then a hundred yards off to the left a thousand gallon tank clung like an untidy bandage wrinkled and wrapped around the base of a gum tree. Then another tank. This one just off the road crumpled to the size of a ten gallon drum. Then the first housesplayed loosely on its stumpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;roof gone and furniture scattered over acres of ground. The hillsides behind the town in the distance lay littered with the grey matchstick branches of the ringbarked gum trees. We topped a rise and on the right the sight of a small school apparently untouched drew a wisecrack from the back of the bus. But most of us were looking to the left where the lines of parked oars and the small cemetery came into view as the bus stopped and the black hearse crossed our path and turned off to where the cars were waiting. We made no connection at the time but that night at home we read of the death the day before of a young girl injured in the storm. As I said, we did not connect it at the time because we were unprepared for what was to come. As we passed along the poplar drive which led into Killarney the scene had the outward appearance of a quiet country town. Yet as we began to enter the town it soon became apparent that not one house had escaped. Most of the houses we saw were in ruins. The sawmill was fantastic. The neat rows of stacked timber I had seen years before had exploded crazily

over the large timber-yard and its surrounds. Logs that man could not lift rested impossibly in random piles. We had planned to stop in the town to stretch our legs and give those who wished, a chance to buy things at the shops. This was plainly impossible as the town had ceased to function. People were picking through the ruins of houses and shops and clambering over the skeletons of roofs. There were no sightseers, and we felt that we could not stop and look and take photographs. These people were in too much trouble. The only thing we could have conceivably done was stop and help and this was not possible under the circumstances. So we drove on slowly through the town. Most were, like the town, shocked and amazed. We had expected damage, we had found devastation. Five miles later as we climbed up towards the high valley of The Head we could pick out the track of the storm that had struck so suddenly. From our high position the town and its surrounding jing of devastation sat tinily in the hundreds of square miles of untouched open farm and grazing land around it.

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How strange that the narrow track of the storm had chosen the town in preference to the vast spaces which lay to the west. How many other such storms had passed unnoticed in those green rainforests of the Great Divide which lay behind us and up which our bus now crawled. Morning tea, Queen Mary's Palls, and miles of tall eucalypts and bellbirds and then the high valley of The Head of the Condamine. A high green valley below the towering rainforested slopes of Mt. Wilson and Mt. Superbus. On one side was the highest mountain in Southern Queensland and a few yards away the mesh rabbit fence of the N.S.W. border holding back the rain forests. The landscape looked almost un-Australian as red and white Herefords grazed against the greenness of the lush Kikuyu grass below the line of the rainforest. The lowering hoop pines which had been left standing in the valley floor added to this impression. We stopped to photograph a giant Cumulus cloud which appeared to be following us and now soared incredibly white in the clear air behind Mt. Wilson. All day the cloud followed us. By the time we reached Boonah we photographed it now overhead and to the south, as the characteristic anvil head of ice cloud floated gossamer-like 40,000 feet up out of the massive woollen top of the now Cumulonimbus storm cloud. As we drove towards Ipswich the storm swung south ahead of us and at Peak Crossing we ran from the sunlight into the last of its tail and the bus was forced to crawl as we travelled for five miles through blinding rain. Ipswich and sunshine again. But we were not through yet and while we drove through Centenary Estates the storm was blocking our view of Mt. Gravatt. We arrived at school five minutes before it did. This was just one of thirteen trips we have had since last year. It was certainly the most eventful and will be long remembered by those who went on it because of the things we saw and experienced at first hand. Even so there will be few Grade 10's who will forget their two hours underground at Westfalen coalmine, the view from the water tower at Swanbank, or sitting among the Avocado trees at Alec Kidd's farm on Tamborine.

W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

All in all we visited eighteen farms, firms and research stations and we would now like to take this opportunity to thank them for their time, and the trouble that they took to make this year's field trips the enjoyable, concentrated educational experience that they were. THIS TEAK, WE VISITED Grade 8 1. The D.P.I. Research Station at Ormiston (land use). 2. Mr. M. E. Schweitzer (small crop farmer), Woodland Drive, Thornlands. 3. Mr. Gordon Wilson and Son (small crop farmers), South Park, Redland Bay. 4. Mr. K. Bergston (small crop farmer), Gordon Eoad, Redland Bay. 5. The Captains of Hayles Cruises ("Mirana" and "Mirimar"). Grade 9 1. Caboolture Butter Factory. 2. Woodford Cheese Factory. 3. Australian Paper Mills, Petrie. 4. The Northgate Cannery of C.O.D. 5. The Forest Research Station, Beerburrum. 6. Mr. Ken Gold (dairy farmer), "The Pines", Samsonvale. 7. The Township of Dayboro whose townspeople allowed us to map their town and who answered our many questions. Grade 10 1. Westfalen Colliery, Dinmore. (Our special thanks to the manager and his underground staff). 2. Swanbank Power House, Ipswich. (Particularly Mr. Tim Sullivan, Engineer). 3. Mr. Alec Kidd (orchardist and small crop farmer), North Tamborine. Grade 11 Con zinc Rio Tinto of Australia. (TAZI, Stradbroke Island). Consolidated Rutile Pty. Ltd. The R.Z.D.A. (for their assistance). Grade 12 The Research Staff of the Horticultural Research Station, Ormiston. (Particularly Mr. J. Erlich).

Page Thirty-Three


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W A V E L L H I G H > <; H 0 O L A N N U A L


Sports Notes ATHLETICS This year's athletics season commenced on a more healthy note than in previous years. After the annual inter-house sports carnival, Wavell was able to field quite a strong team for various interschool trials (against Sandgate, Redcliffe, Caboolture and Everton Park) leading up to the Zone Carnival, This particular meet, held at the Exhibition Grounds, is regarded as the heats for the State-wide Q.S.S.S.S.A. finals in September. At the zone carnival, although we did not win we were able to secure sixth place which is better than in previous years. Good performances were shown by all competitors, but those who qualified for the Q.S.S.S.S.A. semifinals with placings were: Joanne Watson, placed first in the zone TJ14 age group in 100 metres, 200 metres, long jump and shot put. Stephen Colborne, who won both 1500 metre and 800 metre races in the U16 age group.

Jan Harding-Smith, who, in the Open section, won the 80 metre hurdles and secured second in the Javelin and third in the 100 metres. Jennifer Jones, won the U15 long jump. Geoff Martin, won the U16 400 metre hurdles. Geoff Colborne, secured second in the Open 1500 metres. Lynda Norman, second in Open 400 metre sprint. Nola Lyell, who ran third in 1116 80 metre hurdles. Gary Birdie, who won his way into the semi-finals with a place in the TJ15 boys 100 metres. Our open girls relay consisting of Janet White, Lynda Norman, Cheryl Malyon and Jan Harding-Smith, secured third place to enter the semi-finals also. All these athletes competed in the knock-out semifinal at Lang Park on September 26th. All of the above reached the finals except Gary Birdie (Bad luck, Gary!) and the Open Girls' Relay. Wavell certainly was doing well! This was perhaps the biggest team the school had ever had com-

ATHLETICS Back Row (left to right): E. Browne, P. Timms, R, Jolly, 3. Pike, A. Median, R. Beazley^ D. Amiet, I. Naylor, J. Hoey, G. Crawford. Second Back Row: R. Jarrott, Gi, Martin, N. Gynther, A. McSweeney, K. Lambert, G. Thomas, S. Groome, G. Birdie, G. Colborne, S. Colbome. Third Back Row: S. Van Maarsaveen, P. Revermann, N. Lyell, C, Robinson, J. Murray, J. Watson, H. Asplin, L. Ward, J. Jones, G. Sillett, D. Clark, G, Bulow. Front Row: L. Colborne, R. Walls, L. Norman, M. Corrie, L. Outram, J. Harding-Smith, G. Sinnott, M. Eddows, R. Miller, G. Lowry, W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

Page Thirty-Five


peting in the finals. The carnival has competitors coming from as far away as Mt. Isa and Rockhampton, as well as all Metropolitan State High Schools. The finals (27th September) arrived and everyone (including competitors) had butterflies. The first event was the U16 400 metre hurdles and our representative, Geoff Martin, was placed fourth. As the events were run, barrackers cheered (ha! ha!) our athletes on to gain the most points ever receivedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;66 (27 for boys and 37 for girls). Outstanding performances were Stephen Colborne who won both IT16 1500 and 800 metres in record times. Congratulations Stephen! Our small U14, Joanne Watson won the long jump, second in the 100 metres and sixth in the 200 metres. Another performance worthy of mention was Jenny Jones who secured third place in the U15 long jump. Others who ran and secured minor placings (remember these are all creditable as they are regarded as fourth to eighth best in the State) were Jan HardingSmith, fifth in hurdles and sixth in Open Javelin; Nola Lyell, sixth in U16 hurdles; Geoff Colborne, sixth in Open 400 metres. These athletes showed great sportsmanship and have worn our colours well.

Let's hope that next year Wavell can do as wellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; if not BETTER!

BOYS' GOLF The team performed creditably throughout the season, losing only one match. After the loss of our first three players last year we were left in a considerably weakened position; however, the players improved considerably and with the help of the scoring system, we were able to win the remainder of the matches. The team was: Bruce Shackleford, John Illingworth (vice-capt.), Jim Hopkins, Tony Bartlett, Andrew McCracken, John Absolon, Ken Lambert (capt.). The scores were: Wavell defeated Aspley 17-12, Banyo 21-18, Clontarf 18-15, tied with Kedron 21-21, and lost to Sandgate 12-22. Sandgate was undefeated and therefore became automatic North Zone premiers. However, we did well enough to be zone "runners-up". We would like to thank our "coaches", Mr. McGuire and Mr. Tucker, for their assistance throughout the season.

A GRADE GOLF Back Row: C. Oberthur, B. Shackleford, T. Bartlett, J. Hopkins, J. Absolon, J. Illingworth, A. McCracken, K. Edwards, Front Row: D. Kehrer, J. Harding-Smith, Mr. Tucker, K. Lambert, H. McDowell. Page Thirty-Six

WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


GIRLS' GOLF Once again, this season our team enjoyed a good competitive term of golf. Our home course was Virginia, which was host to a few of our inter-school matches. Despite a marked reduction in the number of girls taking golf as a winter sport this year, we still managed to field a team of five players and two reserves. Unfortunately we did not manage to enter the Metropolitan Finals, being narrowly defeated by Clontarf 3-2 in the North Zone Finals. We were otherwise undefeated in the North Zone. This is creditable as throughout the term our team was constantly beset by injuries, ranging from dislocated knee-caps to pulled arm muscles to being hit on the head with a golf stick! Another good game was had by all when we played Nambour High on their home course earlier last term. Although the weather was not the best, spirits were high and we finally defeated Nambour 4-1. Players in the team included Jan Harding-Smith who led the team and went through the entire season undefeated. Congratulations, Jan! Ruth McDowell and Kim Edwards, second and third players respectively each lost only one game.

The remaining places were creditably filled by Christine Oberthur and Debbie Kehrer who also played well during the season. Our hopes for next .year are high. Several team members are currently playing in the Virginia Student Golf Club, which is run every Saturday morning on the new nine holes there. The club was organized by Mr. Huxham of Kedron High to enable student players to learn the rules of golf. On behalf of the girls' team we thank our teachers, Mr. McGuire and Mr. Tucker, for their patience and helpful advice throughout the term.

BOYS' TENNIS A GRADE

This season, Wavell again had two representative teams in boys' tennisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A and B. Our coach, Mr. Campbell, saw a great future for both teams which proved strong competition for all schools in the North Zone. The A grade, captained by Peter Herd and led to victory by the number one player, Rod Kempster, had a very stirring season, being narrowly defeated by Clontarf in the sub-zone finals.

1

TENNIS Top: G. Koch, L. Pox, J. Hewitt, R. Ferguson, N, Percy, M. Bell, S. Jarvis, D. Koch. Middle: J. Strachan, G. Beazley, K. Tovell, P. Pramptoii, W. Haynes, J. Wagner, L. Beard. Front: J. Joyce, P. Herd, Mr. Campbell, Miss Wham, Mr. Alcorn, R. Kempster, L. Skuse. WAVELL HIGH S C H O O L ANNUAL

Page Thirty-Seven


All players in the A grade—Peter Herd, Rod Kempster, Noel Percy, and Daryll Koch—played with winning combination which took them to the sub-zone finals. B GRADE The B Grade, captained by Robert Ferguson and consisting of Robert Ferguson, Garry Koch, Stephen Jarvis, and John Hewitt, also played winning tennis which took them to the Metropolitan Finals in which they were defeated by Yeronga by 13 games. Previous to this, Wavell had crushing victories in the North Zone and also in the Metropolitan SemiFinals where they were the victors over Kelvin Grove by 22 games. Both teams represented Wavell on the sporting excursion to Nambour where they upheld WavelFs sporting tradition. Thanks to1 the experience and stratagem of our coach, Mr. Campbell, and the interest shown by Mr. Alcorn, we were again able to represent Wavell with much success in Boys' Tennis. GRADES 8 & 9 A new arrangement for separate sports' days for Grades 8 (Tuesday) and 9 (Thursday) gave these younger players greater use of the school's facilities in tennis although these players were not eligible for inter-school competition, the competent guidance provided by Mr. Alcorn should prove that this "tennis nursery" will form the basis of strong Wavell teams in the next few years. Prominent youngsters here included Ian Rothman. SATURDAY FIXTURES Again this year, Wavell fielded eighteen teams in Saturday afternoon fixtures conducted by the Men's Metropolitan Tennis Association, contesting the A4, A6, A7, A8, A9, Bl, B2, B3 and C grades. It is felt that constant match play in these fixtures has given our players the necessary Singles and Doubles experience for inter-school tennis as well as providing a very satisfying means of recreation. CHAMPIONSHIPS In the School's Open Singles Championship, Rod Kempster played consistently to secure the M. Wilkinson Cup with a win over Daryll Koch in the final, whilst in the Under 15 Singles Championship the honours went to Ian. Rothman. The School's Doubles Championship went to Rod Kempster and Peter Herd. *

GIRLS' TENNIS A GRADE

In tennis this season, the Wavell A team has been quite successful. This year we have three new members, two from last year's B team, Lorraine Skuse and Glenda Beazley, and a girl new to school tennis fixtures, Karen Tovell. Karen proved a strong asset to the team all through the season. Out of our six or seven matches that we played, we lost only one, to Banyo; however, the game we enjoyed the most was the one against Kedron, mainly because Miss Hass, now Mrs. Hauff, a former teacher at Wavell, was in charge of the girls' tennis. Of course there was some friendly rivalry. Page Thirty-Eight

All the girls enjoyed the trip to Nambour, but understandably we were a bit disappointed that most of our games were washed out by the persistent rain. However, we were delighted that we gave Nambour a good fight in the first set and won 6-5, after our terrible defeat at the hands of the Nambour girls last year. Finally, the girls would like to thank all those who took an interest in the tennis fixtures all through the season. B GRADE Although not quite as successful as last year's victorious team, our Girls' B Grade Tennis Team this year played very well, winning all but two matches in the North Zone. The team members were Jar. Joyce, Janelle Strachan, Julie Wagner, Wendy Haynes and Lyn Beard. All members played at their ce=: =r_cl showed good sportsmanship throughout the ;ea;:.r.. Our keenly awaited trip tc Xarr.oDur turned out to be disappointing, weather.vise. ar- -re were unable to complete our matches. Hc-.vever Xambour's hospitality ensured that a mos: er. : :ya~:le day was had by all. We would like to cor.gra:::la:e :r.e members and coaches of the Girls' B Gra~e H:c-:ey -vho won the Metropolitan Final this year, al;: tl:e Boys' B Grade Tennis and A Grade Rugty Lear.;- -.'.-;-.; -.vere runners up in their "fields". We wish to thank Mis; ".Vr.arr. ;:r her continued support and enthusiasm regari:r.r :..: :eam and also Mr. Duncan for coaching s:rr.e :: :.:: :eam members. Thanks also go to Jan Jcy:e ::: he: riler.did umpiring. Finally we wish all ;:-::ev ; •'-•:• '--s-- of luck in their forthcoming exan::r.-=:::r.= ..r.t T5;?::ally Juniors and Seniors. Interesting thing ab:u: lu:l-: -r.e harder we work the luckier we seem tc ''.GIRLS' TENNIS Ca\>lPIONS Open Singles: Pe;a Frame- r. U15 Singles: Eliza ;e:l: B:s~Open Doubles: Pe:^ r r a ~ p - - ,.r.:.. Karen Tovell.

A GRADE CRICKET For the first time High, the A grade :r:: North Zone Premier;'.:: Wavell won twc ::::~:. innings, drew cr.e ar.i In the first game :: -.-.Wavell attack rented • ningham took si:-: '•'•': -: vigorous batting '•'•'-'•-. on the first day. Against Her.ar; ^ with Greg Thr:::;; : _ teen, and Ian M:~ ..T fortunately the _ : . . . r and eventual!-. ::. — for fifty-eight r.:t out.

:t:on of Wavell :n the coveted ::r.g the season : : on the first :e first innings. Aspley a strong /.::. Peter Cun: ur runs. With :;: innings win •-•as registered, •:e five for thir/.ree runs. Un•-5 rain-affeoted .am batted well

W A V E L L H I G H SCHOOL A N N U A L


A GRADE CRICKET Back Row (left to right): B. Shaekleford, K. Smith, R. Goldstlver, J. Gerrad, P. Cunningham, S. Hartingdon, P. Stigwood. Front Row: R. Rideout, G. Thomas (vice-capt.), Mr. McKenzie (coach), G. Whyte (capt.), M. Toovey, I. Matthews. Our only loss of the season was on the first innings to Kedron. Wavell was all out for eighty-five in reply to Kedron's mediocre one hundred and four. A do or die effort was needed from Wavell against Metropolitan Premiers Sandgate if we were to win the Premiership. After losing two wickets for seventy, Wavell crashed to be all out for eighty-one. With a sustained effort, Greg Thomas bowled Sandgate out for seventy-five, taking eight wickets. On the second day, Ian Matthews batted well for thirty-six quick runs in Wavell's second innings score of one hundred and thirty-eight (declared) for four wickets. Sandgate toppled in their second knock to be out for eighty, thus giving Wavell an outright win and the North Sub-Zone Premiership. We met the other sub-zone leader, Clontarf, at Harchant Park. Clontarf batted first and were out for eighty-four. Peter Cunningham bowled well, taking five wickets for twenty-four runs. After a middle order crash, Wavell secured a first innings win, helped by Stuart Hartingdon's rugged fourteen runs not out. Graham Whyte topped the batting averages with forty-one runs, followed by Peter Cunningham with thirty-one average and Ian Matthews twenty-two runs average. W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

Greg Thomas took twenty-four wickets for the season. Peter Cunningham secured thirteen wickets, while Graham Whyte took twenty-one wickets. Valuable contributions to the team as a whole were afforded by Bruce Shaekleford, Mark Toovey and Ross Rideout. Fielding at times was something to be desired, however, usually it was quite sound. The team would like to extend its thanks to coach Mr. McKenzie for his astute umpiring and for his support throughout the season.

B GRADE CRICKET During the season we were consistent in that we did not lose a single match; however, some were not without their tense moments. In our first match we were dismissed for 90 and fought back to a stronger position. However, rain beat play and the match was a draw. Only on a few occasions did the weather dash our hopes and because of our strong first innings wins and outrights, we were in a healthy position for the match of the season. Our rivals at Kedron found themselves under a strong attack both in the batting and bowling. They admitted defeat on the first innings, time having beaten play for the completion Page Thirty-Nine


of the match. At this point in the season we were an undefeated team and had therefore to play off with Sandgate (also undefeated) to decide the North Zone Premiers. Much enthusiasm was put into this match as we were out to recapture the title which our team had won for itself last year. However, despite a strong effort by our team in Ross Matthews, our opening bowler, and our opening bats, Graham Swain and Mick Pearce, we were unable to regain the Premiership and had to be content with being "runners up". Our tail-enders proved their worth in this match by decreasing Sandgate's win to only twenty runs in the first innings before being dismissed. The general condition of the team throughout the season could well be credited to the efforts of our coach, Mr. Spring, and on behalf of the team I would like to thank him for the time he spent with us.

BOYS' SWIMMING This year an attempt was made to make all houses iqual. This was in the form of allotting sections of the alphabet to each house. This proved highly successful in the Inter-house Swimming Carnival where

Burma was narrowly beaten by Alamein with Keren and Tobruk filling the minor places. Final points were: Alamein 495, Burma 451, Keren 405, Tobruk 392. Three records were broken, these being by Neil Gynther (one) and Alan Median (two). Winners of Individual Championships were: Under 13, Ian Kenyon; Under 14, G. Lee; Under 15, Alan Median; Under 16, Neil Gynther; Open, Brian Berry. Wavell participated in the North Zone Swimming Carnival. The result was in doubt until the points were announced. Aspley had beaten Wavell by the narrow margin of only a few points. Congratulations Aspley! Swimmers who deserve a mention for their effort include R. Crossley, R. Manley and G. Lee. The Zone Carnival served as heats for the State Secondary Schools Championships. Boys who reached the finals were N. Gynther, A. Median, L. Schneider, the Under 15 and Under 16 Belay teams, Neil broke the Open 100 metres Breaststroke record and two races later won his own age event. He also figured in four other finals. Alan gained a second, a third and a fifth, Lawrie a seventh, and the Under 16 Relay team came fourth. Wavell came fourth in the Boys' section with 67 points.

SWIMMING Top: R. Manley, P. Byrne, A. Median, N. Gynther, R. Jarrott, P, Bray-White, B. Berry, D. Blake. Middle: G, Lee, S. Powell, J. Allison, J. Wagner, R. Hollingsworth, A. Stewart, S. Jones, N. Lyall, J. Crowcott, L. Schneider. Front: L. Haigh, L. Alloni, D. Coxoni, Mr. Gredden, Mr. Purdy, S. Hinds, K. Casey. Page Forty

WAVELL HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L


From the State Championships, a Queensland Senior team was selected to compete in the Australian Championships at Perth. Neil Gynther was selected in the team and won the Australian Open 200m. Breaststroke Title. This is a magnificent effort considering Neil is still a Junior. We would like to thank Mr. Purdy, Mr. Gredden and Mr. Roberts for their time and effort at the Wavell State School Pool on those early Tuesday and Thursday mornings. We would also like to thank the Headmaster of the Wavell Heights State School, Mr. Stevenson, who let us train in the pool.

GIRLS' SWIMMING This season the House Carnival was a tremendous success as enthusiasm was high and this enthusiasm was repeated in the North Zone. But our hopes were deflated when Wavell was unseated from top position (held for three consecutive years) by a narrow, and by no means shameful, defeat by Aspley. In Q.S.S.S.S.A. Wavell scored a not insignificant placing of fifteenth in a total of 35 schools. Outstanding efforts in girls' swimming this year were by Judy Payne, Alison Stewart, Susan Powell,

Julie Wagner and Diane Coxon, who were the champions of their respective age groups at the house carnival. We wish to thank Mr. Purdy and Mr. Gredden for their valuable aid this year. Let's all hope Wavell will regain its status as top North Zone school with the possible advent of an active swimming club. *

A GRADE RUGBY LEAGUE For the third time in succession Wavell succeeded in reaching the final of the annual Knockout Carnival held at Cavendish Road High. After 3-0 victories over strong Camp Hill and Cavendish Road sides, Wavell ran out winners by 8-5 over an impressive Kedron side. Graham Whyte for the second year in succession won the Coca-Cola award for the most points scored during the carnival. Later in the season Wavell contested the intraState carnival at Kedron with teams from all over Queensland competing. A much injury-depleted Wavell side managed to chalk up a win, a draw and a loss. After our victory in the Knock-out, Wavell set its eyes on the metropolitan premiership. This year saw the advent of sub-zones. Wavell had easy victories

A GRADE RUGBY LEAGUE Back Row: B. Berry, P. Hull, G. Colborne, M. Jorgenson, T. Gerrad, A. McSweeney. Middle Row: B. Fordham, A. Median, J. Franklin, D. Mullins, P, Harrison, R. Brough, C. Cronin. Front Row: J. Rapkins, B, Rideout, G. Thomas (capt.), Mr. C. Purdy (coach), G. Hornibrook (vice-capt.), G. Whyte, M. Toovey. WAVELL HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

Page Forty-One


over Hendra and Sandgate, the scores being 45-0 and 31-2 respectively. Next came the Wavell-Banyo clash where after a spirited match Wavell emerged victors by 7-0. Following Banyo came Kedron. In typical Wavell-Kedron tradition the match proved to be one of the best of the season in which Wavell completely outclassed its arch-rivals by 15-0. After defeating Redcliffe by 23-0, Wavell emerged as zone premiers. Wavell now entered the quarter and semi-finals. Wavell won both games against Wynnum-North and Newmarket by 11-2 and 9-2 respectively. Wavell now entered the grand final to be played at Lang Park against Camp Hill. Here we suffered our first defeat cf the premiership competition where Camp Hill scored 10 points in the last 10 minutes to win by 10 points to 9. Congratulations to Camp Hill! Glen Hornibrook won the best back award while Greg Thomas won the best and fairest. Deserving special mention in the final were Robert Brough in the centres and Dave Mullins in the front row, both of whom had outstanding games, while Graham Whyte excelled in the kicking department. This year Wavell sent its various teams to Nambour for the annual meeting. The "A" grade won convincingly by 32-0 with John Rapkins having a good game. The team suffered a number of injuries during the season. Barry Fordham suffered a broken arm, Brian Berry a broken wrist and Craig Cronin a broken jaw. Jim Franklin returned from injury to add a tower of strength to the side. A number of the team represented various Brisbane sides during the season. These were Greg Thomas (captain), Glen Hornibrook, Dave Mullins, John Rapkins, Peter Hull, Jim Garrod, Mark Toovey and Alan Median. Greg Thomas was selected in the Queensland side to tour N.S.W. Deserving special mention is our coach Mr. Purdy. He managed to mould a somewhat raw side into grand-finalists. Not only is he the coach of Wavell but he has the honour of being the coach of the Brisbane and Queensland "A" grade secondary sides. This year Wavell was fortunate enough to have its own masseur, Mr. Franklin. Without his expert service we would have been unable to field an efficient ream on many occasions. To Mrs. Mac. we give our sincere thanks; and finally thanks to all those supporters whO' followed us through the season—your encouragement was greatly appreciated.

We lost our first game 10-5 againstBanyo. The next game our team picked up by having two hours practice on the Monday and that We co-.esday the team won by 23-0, a magnificent victcry which was to become the only one. We played Kedron and lest but r_: : v.-irhout putting in a good game—a feat which •"== :i'^.~e remarkable to bystanders. The B grade must be granted one thing and that is, we were beater, :y cnly one try each time, which proves v.-e ::uli r.ct be beaten easily. The back line worked -.veil - t:\~ ball ever got out) and proved to be g::d tr. :e;er. :e. It consisted of John O'Malley (half ba:l-: :.-:; r:hlencker (fiveeighth), Paul Bray-White ter.tre ~--r. Richardson (centre), Tom Graham -.vir.i _ i - e Smith (captain and wing), and Graham 5" -ir_ ::„ : In the Nambour Same : — --..-. -i:ked players so the deficiency was made -t :; L h::key player and in the second half ii-e: :r. ir.-=-s f : eight-seven players, one of whom 5::re: . —- :r_I; -.r;. the scores being 6-3 to Nambour. The forwards in the - ; : : . . .. - -: : vsry successful season and seemed • _ _- :- -..; :r:~ of scrums for us. The forwards : : : . ; . - - : —. C-:bb (prop), Roy Beazley (seecr.d r: ?- •-.: - -:•• second hooker), Rod Crossley pr:r 3... V _-; h: :ker), Mark Baker (lock). The::: .:. - -. / ::r :he scrums and put up a g::: :::-:.The team had r::: -.-.-_ '--.i character as they were able :: The tearr. givei ; -; '.- '. rrie for trying, and for shovrir.j he • . -- h: was good enough to take :/.-.-..- tt sbov 1=3- merest.

9st. 71b. R U G B Y LEAGUE This yes: ;: Wavell's 5 st:-e at the pre- = ei; - : ally imprrve; ir.i quarter-fir.il; . r_ who wer.:

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B GRADE RUGBY LEAGUE Our team worked well considering that we had no real practice sessions and when we did, a record was set by an attendance of five members. We had no one for coach, but Mr. Norrie saved us by volunteering. The games were cut short because of the estimated early arrival of the bus but, four times out of five, it did not arrive so we had plenty of walking practice. Ian Richardson scored the most tries for the tearr.. Bill Young helped us gain points through his dropkicking and he also proved to be a good hooker. Page Forty-Two

-

•-

-

k*C -OHC -me •-_--• :

;

: .~_res started. - . - -.-e 25-10, and - I-Iedron. We Beat Kedron 1- E T-::iting game r;wer Colin ~ : -he game. ::r.e. and had - -her sub-zone. ' . _ - - -.:'--. to defeat - - r. ::r placings . -rims. Again T:e beaten 6-0. -"

• - ; _sr:er finals,

• •- Paul Gillies, -: -relessly in OK Ar iHkk. Boss Jolly must » I t M SCHOOL A N N U A L


RUGBY LEAGUE (9st. 71b.) Back Row: R. Ellis, R. Hancock, K. Lepraik, C. Cassidy. Centre Row: T. Kiely, R. King, N. Hart, P. Cunningham, P. St'igwood, J. Youngu Front Row: R. Zelow, R, Jolly, B. Matthews-Frederick (capt.), Mr. Duncan, P. Gillies (vice-capt.), R. Fritz, W. Gallagher.

deserve a special mention for in the season of 10 games Ross scored 14 tries. The team played two social matches, one against Nambour whom we defeated 11-3, and the other against Padua Under 15's, whom we also defeated, 16-3. Three of our team members represented the Brisbane 9 stone 1 team during the season. They were Paul Gillies, Ross Jolly and Ross Matthews-Frederick. Finally we would like to thank our coach, Mr. Duncan, for the time and effort he put into our training during the season.

mystified refs, not being able to find a rule to account for these "rather unusual" tactics, had no choice but to award the game to the opponents. It was a cute idea,Deniseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but it really wouldn't catch on. The team, comprising Marilyn Born, Sue Kainu, Stephanie Scott, Joyce Schukraft, Denise Phillips, Chris Jones, and reserve Virginia Doubleday, submit this report to be recorded in the annals of Wavell High. We are pleased to make our contributioin to^ the long tradition of Volleyball failures. To posterity we leave a standard not hard to beat. Thanks, Miss Eavesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it wasn't your fault!

A GRADE VOLLEYBALL Well known to all Volleyball fans is the principle that the losing team of each game serves first in the following match. With the exception of three games, during the past season, your A grade Volleyball team managed to chalk up a record of first serves. The greatest advantage to the team was our big, tough champ, Denise, who insisted on serving the ball with such force that she terrorized the opposition to the extent that their best efforts were of no avail. The W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

B GRADE VOLLEYBALL Our original B grade team consisted of Christine Jones, Karen Patterson, Katherine Webster, Lee Adams, Sue Kainu and Carol Everett. After some alterations to the team by our coach, Miss Eaves, Christine and Sue were put into the A grade team and Sandra. King and Nicole Hunter replaced them. Out of six games we won three. Our best players were Lee and Katherine. Page Forty-Three


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W A V E L L H I G H SCHOOL A N N U A L -


LIFE-SAVING Back Row (left to right): L. Haigh, K. Graydon, J. Wagner, H. McAlpine, A. Stewart, K. Edwards, S. Hinds, G. Cane, L. Allom. Front Row: J. Goldsworthy, E. Williams, Mrs. Humphreys, Miss Eaves, K, Amies, J. Walls.

GIRLS' LIFE-SAVING Our life-saving team entered the Worfold Shield Competition this year and managed to gain second place. Six other schools competed and we were beaten by the very small margin of three points by All Hallows' School. We gained places in the following events: Resuscitation, 1st; Skills, 5th; Pairs Relay, 3rd; Individual, 5th; All Strokes Relay, 5th; All Tows Relay, 3rd; Rescues and Releases, 1st. We appreciate the help of Miss Evans and Mrs. Humphreys during first term and would like to take this opportunity to thank Nundah State School for allowing us to use their pool every Thursday afternoon. Next year, with our own pool to train in, we should do even better. *

GIRLS' A GRADE HOCKEY Captain: CHERYL MALYON. Vice-Captain:.. DIANNE CROFTON The team this year had three wins and three losses, which is an improvement on last year's performance. The team consisted of Dianne Netheroote, Heather McAlpine, Cheryl Malyon, Susan Morrison, Jan Walls, Dianne Shorney, Dianne Crofton, Robyn Amos, Dianne W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L

.

Coxon, Jennifer Brewer, Cheryl Riding and Juleen Cavanaugh. Best players this season were Dianne Nethercote, Cheryl Malyon, Robyn Amos and Dianne Shorney. Our two wings, Jan Walls and Dianne Nethercote, were able to carry the ball down the field successfully. Our goalie, Cheryl Riding, kept up her strong defence. The opposition also played a good strong game which kept the team moving and enabled us to lose gracefully or win gallantly. The members of the team would like to thank Miss Ladlay for coaching us. We would also like to congratulate the girls' B grade hockey team on winning the Metropolitan Premiership.

GIRLS' B GRADE HOCKEY Well the end of season came and for the first time ever, we, a Wavell girls' hockey team, have won the Brisbane Metropolitan Premiership (B Grade) and obtained a trophy. From the beginning we had a very strong team which was bettered by our many hours of hard practice. We played ten matches altogether, losing only one. Our total goal score was 39 for and only 5 against, greatly helped by our high-kicking goalie, Cheryl Page Forty-Five


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ANNUAL


Biding. (N.B.: She is reserved for the hockey team next year and not for footballâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mr. Purdy). In our first match we played Hendra and won convincingly 15-0. Our next three matches against Sandgate, Banyo and Aspley were all wins, 3-0, 7-2 and 4-0 respectively. Then came our only defeat, when we played Kedron and went down 2-0. Our next match was very close, the final score nil-all, but on penalties, 6-4, Wavell defeated Caboolture (on a cow paddock?). Again we played Kedron; this time for North Zone Premiership, and this time we won 3-1. The visit to Nambour was enjoyable with the game ending in Wavell's favour, 3-0. Wavell then played the Corinda Team (South Zone) in the semi-final, and we won 3-1. The next match was our hardest yet, against any team. This was the Grand Final against Mt. Gravatt, and at full time it was 0-0. In order to decide the winners another ten minutes' time was played each way. In the first five minutes, Wavell netted two goals and later Mt. Gravatt netted one. Eventually we came out on top, 2-1. Our team for the season was Cheryl Ahchee, Janet Allison, Wendy Brooks, Sandra Cook, Barbara Cowling (capt.), Lisbeth Dunlop, Bobyn Magowan, Elaine Miles, Kay

Pigott, Barbara Prickett, Cheryl Riding, Linda Sarafov, Jenny Stevens and Yvonne Wilcox. Finally, and most important of all, we would like to thank sincerely Mrs. Humphreys, and particularly Miss Ladlay for coaching and encouragement (in a loud voice) from the side line. This really stirred us and we hope next year's team will be as fortunate as we were.

BOYS' A GRADE HOCKEY Coach: Mr. McKENZIE. Captain: DEREK RIDEOUT Vice-Captain: GREG THORNE. Wavell's team this year, while not doing as well as last year's team, still performed creditably and, by the end of the season we had won 3 and lost 2 of our 5 games. Our first game was played against Sandgate at Sandgate and in a slow scrappy match we deserved to be defeated 5 to 1. The following game was played against Banyo at Shaw Park and we played superior hockey to win 3 to 0. We then played Aspley on their home ground and we defeated our opponents 9 to 0.

A GRADE HOCKEY Back Row: P. Thome, R. McAlpine, G. Horder, D. Shelldrake, K. McBryde, P. Smith, R. Malyois. Middle Row: J. Cavanaugh, J. Brewer, H. McAlpine, P. King, D. Coxon, S. Morrison, D. Nethercote, J. Walls, N. Rayner. Front Row: D. Crofton, C. Malyon, Miss Ladlay, Mr. McKenzie, D. Rideout, G. Thorne. W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL

Page Forty-Seven


Our next game was played against Kedron to decide who would oppose Clontarf for the North Zone Premiership. In a hard, fast game we were defeated 1-0. The Kedron-Clontarf game was won by Clontarf who went on to win the Metropolitan Premiership for the second year in succession. Then came the trip to Nambour and in bad playing conditions we beat our opponents 15 to 0. Derek Rideout, by being a member of the Brisbane Under 16 Team, was the only Brisbane representative in the side. There were many other Brisbane and State representatives in Grades 8 and 9 but they could not play in our team. Lastly we would like to thank Mr. McKenzie for the time and effort he has put into our coaching and for umpiring our games throughout the season.

A GRADE VIGORO This year the Vigoro team is considerably better owing to the increased interest shown by the team members in the practices arranged by them during

each week c: the s e t s t . - A l t h t U i h tur rortunes were mixed, the A Grar.e V:;:r: -.-_-,;•:. played enthusiastically and garnet; r.tuth er. :v~e-t •:--_ — the matches. The tea:~ :v. McLean (capt.), Brenda Bcehrr Brown, Trudy Framptor.. Che trtsc-n, Beverley Sperrlng. Peta ^ es. Janice Joyce, Janelle Stracha: .tie the reserves are Barbara C: • .an. Sue Patrick, and Susar. \V:g Cur success mi is attributed to Brenda Boe e -.vhile Wendy Haynes ar.ci 7: -t:. greatly when called upon :: attended to the wicket-keepir.i team members assisted extreme he "."aveil Vigoro team becarr.e = With the toe . ;y ~ne younger girls, we are -•:: e;r; the A grade Vigoro team "" Finally we tttr coach, Mrs. Woodrccfe. ::r she has giver, us th

VIGORO Back Row: S. Kernovske, P. Kernovske, G. Masyln. R. Wilson S. Jorgensen. M. Prentice. M. Metassa, L. Skuse, C. Archee, M. Yuill, D. Smith, P, Chadwick, Middle Row; G. Franklin, S. Partrick, D. Stevens, W. Harries, P. Frampton. J, strachan. T. Frampton, J. Brown, B. Sperring. Front Row: C. Malyon, B. Boehin. D. Maclean. Mrs. \Vooclroofe, C. Sinnott, S, Morrison. J. Joyce. Page Forty-Eight

W AV E L L H I G H S C H O O L A N N U A L


BASKETBALL Back How (left to right): M. Prentis, B. Knott, E. Tanzer, P. Crist. Middle Row: S. Kernovske, J. Youngson, C. Charlton, S. Askew, G. Sinnott, G. Franklin, R. Scarlett. Front Row: A. Brown, D. Bowerman, J. White, Mrs. Humphreys S. Peek, G. Sillett, S. Jorgensen.

GIRLS' A GRADE BASKETBALL It appears that this year things (games) have not gone so well for our A grade basketball; however, don't get the idea this is because the team is not good, quite the contraryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we think we are the greatest!! (we are also very modest and wish people could share our opinions as well). Nevertheless it is my opinion that we played very well and the other teams were excellent, especially Kedron, which eventually won the Brisbane finals. The Banyo team was particularly good also; however they were unfortunate to lose to us (one of the games we won). The match against Nambour was the most stimulating as we tied. The main obstacle to our winning was height differences. Such players as Gillian Sillett and Diane Bowerman who are about 5 feet 2 inches in height had great difficulty in grabbing a ball from a great 5 feet 9 inches player of the opposition. Even though the height differences were great, these two players, along with Christine Charlton, did especially well. The two taller players, Carolyn Sinnott and Sue Askew, played well also, with Sue goaling fantastically all season. WAVELL HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

I would like to say a special thank you to the teachers who tried so hard to improve us during the season. At least we all enjoyed ourselves tremendously and accepted defeat gracefully. I would like to give my sympathy to next year's basketball team and hope they do a little better than we have in the last two years. *

A GRADE SOCCER This year the A grade soccer team was seeking its third North Zone Premiership and, with no fewer than seven players from the 1967 Premiership winning team, our confidence was fairly high. We won our first game against Kedron the easy wayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a forfeit. Our pre-season confidence was deflated somewhat when we lost our second game, against Hendra, 3-2. This loss cost us the Premiership as we did not get a rematch, and Hendra entered the semi-finals. The real heart-breaker occurred on the day of the semis when Hendra did not even show up to contest. However, this was to be our only defeat as we won our remaining matches without difficulty. Our Page Forty-Nine


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W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


A GRADE SOCCER Back Row (left to right): W. Paterson, K. Smith, B. Staib, R. Goldstiver, N. Trotter, P. Bancroft, Front Row: N. Watts, D. Stubbs (capt.), Mr. Doherty (coach), N. Webb, R. Harrison. Absent: A. Beaumanis,

third game was against Clontarf. Coming from 2-1 down we eventually ran out comfortable winners to the tune of 5-2. This was a vast improvement on our first performance and newcomers Kent Smith, Andris Beaumanis and Alan Carse showed they were learning quickly and played like veterans. Premiership fixtures came to an end with a game against Sandgate. We completely overran the Sandgate defence, putting the ball past their goalkeeper five times to run out convincing victors. Premiership games over, we arranged a "friendly" game against Kelvin Grove, and for the first time in the history of Wavell Soccer we defeated a team from another zone. With Neil Webb seeing the game from the other side of the white line owing to injury, we acquired the services of Rules player, Geoff Martin, to fill the right-wing position. Producing the best soccer ever by a Wavell side we completely overran Kelvin Grove in the second half to add two more goals to our margin of one-nil at half-time to run out winners 3-0 With Bon Harrison wearing the "keeper's" shirt, Bruce Staib was able to make his debut as a field player. W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

Neil Webb and Paul Bancroft were the leading goal-scorers for the team, scoring three goals each. The team's goal aggregate for the season was fifteen goals, with five against them. Last, but not least, the team would like to thank Mr. Doherty for his coaching and interest throughout the season.

UNDER 16 SOCCER During the past season our B grade Soccer team has been successful in keeping on top, and with solid training organised by Mr. Doherty every Monday afternoon, we became the North Zone premiers. Up until then we were undefeated. We played our inter-zone finals very well but were unable to win. Goal Keeper, K. Piperides (capt.); Centre Forward, B. Munro; Inside Left, R. Page; Inside Right, R. Fisher; Left Wing, J. Piperides; Right Wing, R. Pascoe; Left Half, G. Papoutsis; Centre Half, T. Green; Right Half, R. Caldwell; Left Full Back, R. Walmsley; Right Full Back, G. Nicholls. Page Fifty-One


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W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


A GRADE BASKETBALL Back Row (left to right: C. Cronin, M. Jorgenson, R. Brown, P. Hull, G. Hornibrook. Front Row: R. Oaybourn, B. Kirk, MB: Smith, P. Huxtable, R. Jarrott.

MEN'S BASKETBALL The men's basketball team did not have one of their best years in as far as winning games goes, but we were successful on a number of occasions against Banyo. Our most glorious victory was that against the "Teachers" team, when we defeated them 26-10 at the Rode Road courts. We have not had the same team during the whole year so that it has been difficult to organize a stable team. We hope that when we get courts at school, more all year interest will be shown in basketball. The A grade consisted of R. Brown, P. Huxtable, R. Claybourn, B. Kirk and B. Jarrott during second term. First term there were also P. Hull, M. Jorgenson, G. Hornibrook. The B grade consisted of I. Matthews, R. Batchelor, A. Linklater and D. Taylor during second term with W. Young and D. Stubbs during first term.

JUDO Judo is a sport to be studied and mastered according to its rules and ceremonies. It develops not only the body but also the mind, which is just as important. Once a person has acquired the art of judo It is curious to note how he now strives for competition, WAVELL

HIGH SCHOOL, A N N U A L

perhaps because a judo competition is between two players and he is the only person who benefits from his own training. This year, although judo was not carried on as a sport, Wavell sent a team of six players to Nambour for some competition. Although we lost, the team did very well for themselves as we lost by two points only and had only one practice beforehand. The team consisted of Paul Thompson, Paul Fletcher, Peter Becker, Kim McGrath, Robert Manley and Peter Byrne. *

AUSTRALIAN RULES This year, Australian Rules at Wavell improved greatly. The A Grade won two games but suffered from a lack of opposition as there are only four teams playing Rules in the North Zone. Sandgate, the top team of the North Zone, won the premiership and congratulations go to them. After starting the season rather badly, the team became more organized owing to the coaching of Mr. Jones and Mr. Baptist. Players to play well were Laurie White (capt), Paul Martin, John Gregg, Jeff Martin, Gary Birdie, Robin Nuss and Tom Truman. Laurie White was selected in an open schoolboys' side to play Townsville and Cairns, and Paul Martin, Tom Page Fifty-Three


AUSTRALIAN RULES Back Bow (left to right): G. Ward, G. Martin, S. Jantz, G, Holdsworth. J. Gibb. T. Truman. W. Yuill, D, Robinson. Second Row: P. Martin, P. Brown, G. Birdie. N. Thompson. G. McArthy, J. Gregg-, L, Lester, G. Hollywood, Front Row: R. Bachelor. B. Anderson. L. White, Mr, Jones, G. Jones, M. James, R. Fenley, Truman and Robin Nuss were selected to play in the Queensland under 15 team. The B Grade team also suffered from a lack of opposition and although defeated by the other two teams in B Grade they showed promise of doing better next season. The team's thanks go to Mr. Jones, Mr. Spring and Mr. Baptist for helping them throughout the year.

In previous years weight-lifting was a relatively unkown sport among high schools. As recently as last year Wavell Pligh was probably the only school in Queensland that carried out weight-lifting as a sport. It is surprising to note that this year a total of four high schools are taking up this sport seriously. These include Wavell, Nambour, Hendra and Kelvin Grove. The "Wavell Lifters" have more or less re-written the State and Australian record books. It was this time last year we mentioned in the School Magazine that Stan Pertjowski was only a hundred, or so workPage Fifty-Pour

outs away from three Aus'r :ris. Now he has well over a dczer S'arf _>-r3.hari records. A Promising lifter. Ge::: r r. = already broken : :ake out the one of Stan's reccrr.; :r: : = rest of his f o r ::"e ~'S-~^~'-''- '--•' Peter Frosr;:.>. -_.::- •_-_•-_ ;r -^. :.:;:hae: Eeilly and Trevor Waiz h=~e all .:.;:'. : ; v::e?-;v.l ; e=53n in that they have broker. 5:;:; :.-:" _ - _ _ ; - : : . : : - r r . r r d s . Michael Reilly was fcrrur.a:; :r. ?_.r.;r.g :::;- ::l=;es in the Australian sub-;ur.::r ;-; ur.::: ;.":v.:::: :iiles, while Trevor Walz ;:"'r 5 V. : ' d ~ '-" Au£:ralian sub" junior featr.er-.ve:;T.- I ; . : . r, Trecat should also^go :c :>Ir. rz.:r :-\: :..': r .•_-.::- ^ -.-v.c sacrificed much °^ : f- el - =::--; "---•'•_- '-'*•'- '-- -'----'-'-- :p urge us on m f.0"1^.;^'!^ "e '"" -: ::r: =~ 5r -' 5 Gymnasium at ' ne '•==-' r ---TrJs :;ir.e l;s: yeay -.: -.vas n-.er.::;r.ed that membership vrss :;:er. ::r ; ;:•: :::.;-;; :/.;':. In that short time memcer?;-.:: /.is gr..-.vr. :: ~-ver.. Membership " ~:e" """: :a" i:C:::rnl & ltft °£ 3°° ir.t; :l~e scene for .-ere carried out with W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L


I

WEIGHT-LIFTING Back Row (left to right): Mr. Duncan, Mr. Pacey, S. Fertjowski, N. McGuire, E, Bavies, A. Elliott, J. Lamas, Mr. Adsett. Front Row: P. Bancroft, M. Irwin, P. Frostick, M. Reilly, T. Walz, G. Duncan. the prime objective of showing the lads from the visiting schools the correct techniques involved in Olympic and Power Lifting. To our surprise these boys showed great potential and it is inevitable that they will represent a threat to us in the near future. A Queensland Junior team was selected to represent Queensland against the New South Wales Police Boys' Clubs in Sydney over the August vacation and

out of Queensland's representative team of seven boys, four were selected from Wavell. These were Peter Frostick, Malcolm Irwin, Michael Reilly and Trevor Walz. Mai, Mick and Trevor brought home trophies for first place for their respective weight division, while Peter notched up a total that any lifter would envy. Such trips as these are to be planned for the near future.

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Page Fifty-Six

W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL A N N U A L


SOFTBALL Top Row (left to right): L. Ken, D. Bowerman, J. Brewer, G. Sillett, Y. Wilcox. Second, Row: R. Van Blarcom, E. Ivory, B. Prickett, S. Askew, J. Morrison, T. Tanzer, V. Crank, Mrs. Humphreys, Front Row: J. Gavenaugh, R. Topp, C. Charlton (C.), P. King, G. Roden (C.), V,. Geschke, J. White. The large number of boys who train at the gym on sports days and lunch hours are in debt to Mr. Pacey and Mr. Duncan who have been so generous in constructing instruments of torture for us such as: Squat racks, abdominal boards, calf machines and bench press racks. They have put in much time to improve the facilities of the gym. Weight-lifting is a hard sport which requires much concentration and determination. Anyone taking up this sport seriously must be prepared to devote his spare time to training if he wants to succeed. If it were not for the encouragement offered by Mr. Pacey and Mr. Duncan we would not have climbed to such heights; so to Mr. Pacey and Mr. Duncan we all offer our thanks.

A GRADE SOFTBALL Coach: Mrs. HUMPHREYS. Captain: CHRIS CHARLTON. Throughout the season the A team has been quite successful in winning most of its games. The hardest games we played were against Kedron, where we went down to be beaten by a narrow margin, Nobody WAVELL HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

will ever forget when we played at Banyo (the worst playing field we ever played on), where we came home with wasp bites and many different types of injuries. Congratulations go to Joanne Morrison and Chris Charlton who represented Queensland early this year. The team should be credited for the good sportsmanship and team work, after all we did come second in our zone. Finally, we would like to thank Mrs. Humphreys for the good advice and fine coaching.

B GRADE SOFTBALL The team's performance during the past softtaall season has been very good. We won the finals for the zone (very close with Kedron) and were narrowly defeated by Nashville in the inter-zone finals. The positions are: G. Roden (capt.), catcher; Y. Wilcox (vice-capt), pitcher; J. Brewer, 1st base; G. Sillett, 2nd base; E. Tanzer, 3rd base; D. Bowerman, short stop; S. Askew, left field; V. Crank, centre field; J. Wilson, right field; with O, Geschke and R. Van Blarcom reserves. Y. Wilcox, G. Roden and V. Crank were selected in the Brisbane Schoolgirls' Team. Page Fifty-Seven


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Page Fifty-Eight

W A V E L L HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


Original Contributions PRIZEWINNING CONTRIBUTION (Selected by Mrs. B. N. Morris)

CONGRESS OF SOULS The earth sheds her grasses and foliage To the warm, soft embrace of the sea; As he faces his love and surrounds her With his warmth, and his tears, and his glee. Untouched in enraptured seclusion; Warm fringes exploring her shores; A green earth delightfully renders Her love with no lies and no flaws. As the ocean's instincts are invited For the body sprawled warm in the sun, Rays of light filter down from the heavens— The creation of life has begun. Waves ripple on beaches and inlets, Arousing the sweet-scented land: And warm currents surrender their secrets; Fondling earth with a sensitive hand. Softly falling, the rain ends the congress, Earth is swollen and full—with no strife; Peace and love have been brought by the ocean, Who has given his lover his life. TONY BABTIJETT, 12A2.

"INDIVIDUALITY—A MEANS TO A GREATER END" You who are reading this are unique. There never was anyone exactly like you, with your particular capabilities and talents, your strengths and weaknesses, and there never will be. You have a place to fill in society, you have a job to do, and if you do not do it, it will forever remain undone, for no-one else can fill your place and do the job you have neglected. Be honest! How many of us playing our parts in the drama of life are acting out roles to which we are r_:t fitted and for which we were not meant. Most people feel an urge to' be one of the crowd, to be ss everyone else is, to go along with what the majority thir.ks. This is a dangerous habit to fall into. The ultimate value or ideal is truth and the ultimate responsibility which we owe to ourselves is to be true. This is the only way to gain the respect of others, and, what is more important, our own selfrespect. To be true you must never, for the sake of peace and quiet deny your own convictions. You will risk censure and derision but will gain personal peace and satisfaction from the knowledge that you acted on your belief. To me, the realisation that every person has an intrinsic value as a living being, and has a specific W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L A N N U A L

place to fill in society, is an exciting and challenging proposition, for it is the individual's task first to find himself and then to find his place. If you dare to be different, to be yourself, you will find it a hard, unfamiliar and sometimes bitter road. There will be times when you will wish you had never started—you will wish you could go back to coasting along in the easy undemanding way, but once you take the first step you can never go back, because you can never again be satisfied with half truths and part-time living. But there are rewards which compensate for all suffering. You will have moments of great certainty that what you are doing is right—that because you are being as you must, your life has some meaning, some greater purpose than mere existence—and this surety and peace of mind the cool "in people" can never know. You will find yourself able to do things you never dreamed possible—and you can, because you have a belief, a faith in your own value and worth as a human being. But what I am trying to say, another has said so much better— "The names of those who in their hearts fought for life Who wore at their hearts the fire's centre. Born of the sun they travelled a short while toward the sun, And left the vivid air signed with their honour." JILL TAYLOR, 12A1.

"SELF" I sit, I hear the sound, of rain falling on the ground, And my own tears seem not to make a sound. My sorrows hid by greater trials Of people all forsaking smiles And thoughts of them pass through my mind, But pity is so hard to find— For someone else. On self my contemplations rise, My "self" grows till it meets the skies. But once more the rain rings in my ears, I stop, and ponder through my tears, I smile and my "self" grows quite small And those that now seem so tallAre other selves. JENNY STEVENS, 12A2.

RACISM Today, we live in a world where people are starting to face up to reality and are questioning basic attitudes and principles. They can see a world of prejudice, racism, war, degradation, insecurity and hatred. Page Fifty-Nine


The Negro inherited the American dream of an earthly Utopia with Lincoln's Emancipation, Proclamation. Now he is disillusioned at society's failure to give him his long overdue and "inalienable" rights—and with these, his self-respect. His rebellion against "Whitey" is because of his newfound pride in Ms African identity. He has to reconstruct his own past and he must do this before he is psychologically free to meet the white man on an equal level, therefore whites cannot adopt a paternal attitude. In America, white is an attitude, mainly of apathy, and black is a condition. By its refusal to help establish the Negro economically, socially and psychologically, White America traps the Negro in a cycle of prejudice and poverty that denies his humanity and destroys his dignity. The U.S.A. condemns South Africa for its apartheid policy, yet is not America the same with its ghettos and rejection by the white man in jobs, housing and education? Racial discrimination denies the common fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man. To qu Dte Bob Dylan—"How many times can a man turn his head pretending he just doesn't see?" JANET ALLISON, 11A4.

DEVOTION Just beyond the mountain I :•=- see :/.e r;:n;3-.v's path, There live the platypuses in :L-.e:r river ':?:;-.. But the fiery brumbies are rv.~r.i"; "'i'.:, For the playful sun is r.vir_kl:r.j :r. v.eir eyes. I must have been blind for : That the sun is smiling =r.r. And the ocean is green Like And the birds are all goLder. The ghost gums look a;-.vr. L:L-:e : ir.er.: y. my side, As I walked for miles ar.r. rr.iLes :..-.:" .-.ever rrev.- tired. This is my country, Hcrne :: E-err.;". 1: e I shall never ever leave her . e -en -.vL-.er. ~ die. :.-.:-T7 ANDZHSGN, 9C3.

*

THE DINGO PACKS A drover sits quietly under a tree After a day's hard work with the flock, And as the day draws near to a close He's resting his head on a rock. A dingo, howl disturbs the peace, He site up quickly and grabs his gun, The dingoes are out to get some meat, After the setting of the sun. The drover gets upon his horse He spurs it to go faster, He's out to warn the blokes at the station, And tell his ageing master. For the dingoes will come to slaughter the flock. For the meat they have wanted for days, And the sheep are running in frenzied groups At the sound of the dingo bays. Two hundred and fifty were in the flock Before the dingoes came; But they ran amok among the sheep And that night one hundred were slain. Are these the beasts that God willed, Or did they come from Satan? This animal, that for pleasure killed—Not all they killed were eaten. A dingo howl disturbs the peace, On some other Outback station, Another murder of helpless fleece; This seems to be their fashion. MAL. FLOYD, 8A1. Page Sixty

"Los* Man"

Linda Stern, 11A2. A V E L L H I G H SCHOOL ANNUAL,


SPRING The stark white trunks of the tall gums bedaubed with green foliage blended superbly, as only Nature can, with the pure blue canopy above. Not even a soft, wispy cloud spoiled this illusion of perfection. On the land, although drought conditions prevailed, the golden wattle had blossomed in full glory of this day. It swayed in a gentle breeze, whilst the male cicadas, seeking refuge in its boughs, chirped. These creatures could not be duped as to the coming summer, and, as if to warn of its threats, charred branches swore witness to such. Heavy silence brooded. Even the garrulous cicadas were not to be heard, as overhead the mighty bird of

preyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the golden eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;soared. It was a tense moment as, with a regal tilt of the head, its shrewd, black eyes surveyed its surroundings and nervous subjects. It was an evil moment . . . The eagle had gone and for once had left no> blood trail behind. Long, sinister shadows were forming, and towards the west the great charioteer of the sky could scarcely control his magnificent beasts that homeward plunge behind the mountains. Full blood red rays extended high into the heavens. With the stabling of the beasts, the last of the glorious spring days was over. Tomorrow a new day would dawn. Summer would be here with new hope for the future. E. DOBSON, 9C.

Gail James, 11A4. W A V E L L HIGH S C H O O L ANNUAL

Page Sixty-One


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w \ \ E L L HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL


FORGIVE ME! Living, but caring to die. Dying but caring to live. On and on, mile upon mile, around and around and . . . The thirst is flaming now, leaping into the depths of every living cell. While the sun pours down incessantly "circling" above like a black crow waiting, waiting. The end is near. I trailed on and on, not caring about the achievement that was to have been, only wondering how much longer my parched soul would tread these grey, gritty, hissing sands. There is a tree up ahead! Life! Water! Yard by yard, hour by hour—no1 tree—no water, just a mirage like all the past miles of the last living days. Who am I? What am I doing? Where am I going? I just cannot tell, I feel like a madman walking upon a hot conveyor belt, slipping under me. The crow is circling lower now. My wife, my little boy, please remember me, I can't make it to see you this year. Next year maybe, I ... I will get to see you. John, please look after Mary and tell her I will see her soon. May God forgive me for breaking my promise to you . . . it's flamin' hot out here . . . If I had a knife I ... I think that I have been walking in. circles, the fatigue is gripping me, thousands of arms are stretching out to grab me. Foot by foot—I can't go on, I will sit down just for a little while. Peace, Peace. Everything is quiet, the hot breeze whispers the Service into my ears, the sand is hot. The thirst has eased now. Oh! Mary give my love to Mum. The sun is in my eyes. Tell . . er . . Dad I tried — it's blinkin' hot out here like a fire in Hell. Forgive me Lord! Silence, hot, yet cold silence. One human body in a haze of heat. Maybe they will find me, sometime, someday;; shaking their heads together over my white bones, murmuring, "One hundred yards from a waterhole!" SANDRA KING, 11A4.

MOON LANDING . . . AND THEN? What a climax to months of mental and physical stress and strain! What an accomplishment! What pride and excitement would have tingled through the veins of every last American! The world saw and knew that three men had now become pioneers of Outer Space by no less a task than walking on another heavenly body. But perhaps they did not know that for the eight days that these men were in "space" the expenditure on Earth was as high as four million a minute. Perhaps they did not remember, in the heat of that moment of triumph, that even closer to them than the moon, people were dying. Yes! dying; lying dead in the streets; and nobody cared. Biafra, India, Asia, and even Australia and America held people who are born and raised in the dirt and ::l:h of the time, and who die back into eternal :~::vion well before they should. U A Y E L L H I G H SCHOOL A N N U A L

We cannot escape the fact that every expedition into Outer Space is paid for with human lives. Lives which might have been saved and have brought some warmth into a cold world; but which were heedlessly cut short and thrown aside. Certainly we send food to such peoples, but this will not keep away those stabbing pains of hunger and want forever. White man's ways have proved more than often, helpful, to these people. Training is the basic step. Why not use this "moon money" and take a few more steps? Is this so difficult? But why stop now when we have just jumped the first leap into opening up the rest of the universe? But what good can come from it? Yes, we shall learn to colonize other planets but this will take many decades and in the meantime our most immediate neighbours are dying at an ever increasing rate. Is it planets or people we want? I fear this question will soon lie in our hands. SONJA HASS, 11A2.

WAITING The glare from the midday sun that shone in through the uncurtained windows reflected on the bare white walls and for a while it dazzled me. I glanced at my companions. An old man was asleep, oblivious of his surroundings. He looked so haggard and drawn none of us wanted to wake him to the harsh reality of the life that existed outside the dreamworld he was in. A small girl aged about four years old sat on the edge of the seat—excitement and anticipation on her small round face. I felt sorry for her, blissfully ignorant of what waited behind the closed door. A young woman was nervously clasping and unclasping her hands. I felt a mutual bond of sympathy with her. A young man with a rather forced grin on his face sat opposite me, trying to look brave and failing utterly. It was the waiting that made me nervous, just waiting and waiting and not knowing what new forms of torture they would inflict upon us. A piercing scream was heard from the room beyond. I felt a sudden anger surge up within me. Why us? We had done nothing wrong. We were just ordinary people, victims of the sadists inside. Suddenly heavy footsteps echoed in the corridor. There was deathly silence as we all instinctively looked towards the door. Whose turn was it? Who would endure the inhuman acts of cruelty next? The door opened and I was informed by a grim old woman that it was my turn. Half-frozen with fear, I remained glued to the seat for a second, then slowly I stood up, giving myself time to calm down. On legs that had become strangely wooden, I walked into the room, with the air of one sentenced to death in the electric chair. As if in a trance, I sat down, sick with fear. A door opening behind me made me start. "Ah yes, I remember you. Well, well, well, how are you this morning?" said the familiar, hearty voice. Then I turned and settled back in the chair, bidding good morning to the dentist as I did so. MARGARET ALLISON, 8A10.

Page Sixty-Three


REALLY! After all that time, George Sandby was positive he had perfected it. If his computations were correct, this discovery could revolutionize the world's starvation problem. For the dimacromolecule (DMM for short) was an extremely rich food, so much so that one ounce of it could satisfy the food requirements of a hundred people for days. Testifying to this, was the fact that George had been forced to send three of his best assistants home during testing with either severe indigestion or just excess weight. The beauty of it all was that DMM was available to any person who owned an ordinary, everyday boy's chemistry set and for this reason it was released to the world before George felt he had completed testing. Because of this, George did not touch any DMM until testing was completed. As he expected, the DMM took the world by storm and the inevitable cases of overdose and obesity were encountered. G. Sandby and the DMM were hailed as the century's greatest discoveries as the once-starving people of the world soon became rather plump. Earth would NEVER be the same! George received nearly every honour known to mankind including several coveted Nobel Prizes and a knighthood before he tore himself away and back to testing. What a shock! Despite DMM's many good sides it had one extremely bad oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;being a macromolecule it was extremely unstable. The whole world was

literally a walking bomb except for one George Sandby, "public hero number one", who was now hurriedly packing his things and heading for the Himalayas. As George bedded down for the night, somewhere else in the world a particle of dust floated in an open window and someone sneezed. ALAN KENYON, 10A1.

OUR CHERISHED LAND Beauty is so clearly visible, In this, our cherished land. Why ruin a country of creation With one small flick of the hand? Australia is a wealthy land And we are the wealthy people. From the deepest of our mines, To our highest church steeple. Our golden shores and luscious pastures, When shall they all be free? Free from the flood, fire and other destructions, Which strike from nature's decree. Tall trees, blue skies, cool, clear watersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Surround us from every direction. So let us hold them within our grasp, And ensure our own protection. By GABRIE GIBSON, 10A1.

-NEGLECT" Stephanie Scott. 11A4.

Page Sixty-Four

WAV ELL HIGH

SCHOOL ANNUAL


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Wavell Yearbook 1969  

Contents of Wavell 1969 Yearbook. Front cover says 1971 but should read 1969. This is a rough copy and will be replaced with a higher standa...

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