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KANSAS CREW NEWSLETTER SPRING 2019

Spring Schedule

Athlete Spotlight

Athlete Spotlight

Spring 2018 Roster

Alex King Brendan Fowler

Strength & Speed

Athlete Spotlight

Athlete Spotlight

How We Train Today Alex Kastrul Jackson Whitcup


Spring 2018 Newsletter for Kansas Crew

Editor’s Letter For most of my life before coming to KU, rowing was not something that I considered trying out, nor was it on my radar of sports to try. And yet, here I am three years later, editing the Spring 2019 newsletter. Rowing has become such a big part of my life here at KU and I cannot imagine what it would be like without Kansas Crew. Last three years have flown by and I am writing this letter to say goodbye to my fellow teammates, alumni members, and family and friends of Kansas Crew. Of course, I thought about quitting once or twice like most people. It’s no secret that juggling rowing and your academic career is tough. Looking back, I can halfjokingly say that going through a design school for my undergraduate degrees then studying architecture at KU has taught me how to persevere and survive with sleep deprivation. It might sound a bit cliché, but the three things that kept me going were my teammates, head coach Rider, and of course, the parents and alumni members. Struggling with and overcoming the same set of challenges as my teammates brought us together and helped us to grow as a team. It allowed me to build cherished friendships that I had not expected to acquire. Coach Rider’s enthusiasm, trust, and support for the team got us through some the hardest of times and we saw the team grow in numbers and succeed in the last few years. Seeing the parents, friends, and alumni members at regattas showing their love and support for the team enhanced the rowing experience. Without all of them, the last three years would not have been the same. Looking back, I think I successfully put in the much-needed love into the team’s website, newsletter, and the team social media presence during my two years as the Public Relations Chair and Alumni Ambassador, and I think I am leaving the next officer who will take over my position at a good place to continue on. Kansas Crew will always remain as one of the best parts of my academic career, and the friendships I’ve built will continue to be cherished and kept close to my heart for many years. Until we meet again, I wish the best to Kansas Crew and its future rowers. Bumsoo Shane Kim, PR and Alumni Ambassador


Table of Contents

“Yesterday

is not ours to recover, but Tomorrow is ours to Win or Lose.� - Lyndon B. Johnson


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SPRING REGATTA SCHEDULE

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STRENGTH & SPEED: HOW WE TRAIN TODAY

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ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT: ALEX KING

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ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT: ALEX KASTRUL

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ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT: BRENDAN FOWLER

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ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT: JACKSON WHITCUP

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SPRING 2019 ROSTER

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Spring Regatta Schedule

Home Duel Saturday April 6, 2019 Lawrence, KS

Mid-America Collegiate Rowing Association Championship Sunday

April 28, 2019

Grand Rapids, MI

Plains Regional Championship Sunday May 5, 2019 Wichita, KS

American Collegiate Rowing Association Championship Friday-Sunday

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May 24-26, 2019

Gainseville, GA


Your support is a crucial part of our team’s success.

Please visit www.kanascrew.com/donate for more information. 02


ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Stats

Side: Port Year: Senior Hometown: Wichita, KS Height: 5’ 11”

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ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Alex King

“He may not be an actual king, but he sure is a heck of a leader ” Alex is one of the rowers who confidently took on various leadership roles without hesitation throughout his rowing career. With his infectious enthusiasm, novice rowers often see him as a trustworthy teammate and a friend. An anonymous rower on the team commented upon hearing about King’s interview that “‘he is as trustworthy as his big quads doing squats.’ ” Another commented that King helps to put things into perspective when things get tough as a collegiate rower. Even in his last year at the University of Kansas and searching for a graduate school perfect for him, King is tirelessly working to create a good team environment as the Men’s Captain. In order to share his experience and inspire younger teammates to take up leadership roles in the future, I have challenged him to sum up his four years into four short answers. What was the start of your rowing career? My rowing career started right here at Kansas Crew. I joined my freshman year and haven’t looked back since. What made you stay on the team? I’m from Wichita and know the Wichita State rowing coach. He knew Jeremy, who was the coach at the time, and said that he was a good guy and that I should give it a try. Once I

was on the team, I fell in love with the sport and wanted to keep rowing with everyone on the team. Seeing my parents eagerly support my rowing career, show up to every regatta they could and cheer us on to row our hardest, and - perhaps the most important way of supporting us - providing food and snacks for the team was perhaps what made the experience so much better. My teammates appreciating and loving my parents and their support made me proud to be a part of the team as well. Can you share some of your favorite races with the readers? My favorite regatta was at SIRAs (Southern Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championship). I was stroking the Men’s Novice 4+ with Ryan Gallagher, Sam Davis, and Jackson Whitcup and Annie DePenaloza coxing. It was the first spring regatta where I saw a real race course, good officiating, and really fast teams. In the Grand Finals, Virginia easily walked away but the second place was up for grabs. We charged from the back to squeak out second place to everyone’s surprise. All the other boats competing for second must have finished within a second of each other. I vividly remember the burning I felt in my muscles after the race. That day, I felt like we were more than the sum of our parts.

Do you have any last thoughts or advice for future rowers? I do regret not training harder during summer months and during winter break training. Those are the toughest times to stay focused, but they are also when it is the easiest to either slip and lose what you’ve accomplished that year or improve exponentially and become a faster and stronger rower. Something that I want to share with all future rowers... I think it’s important to know that the journey is the reward, not the destination. Racing and placing well is great, but I’ll remember cracking dumb jokes early in the morning in the boat, goofing around in the minivans on regatta trips, and Alex Kastrul dancing in between 500-meter sprint pieces the most. Cherish and make the most out of those moments, they don’t last as long as you think. Alex is in the process of applying to and selecting graduate schools on the east coast to continue on his education in political science.

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ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Brendan Fowler

A passionate and driven teammate, friend, and a leader of our team Ever since he joined Kansas Crew 4 years ago, Brendan has been a teammate and a leader who encourages everyone on the team to try their best and go the extra mile. Brendan successfully met his ambitious academic and pre-career goals during his years at the University of Kansas, and his goals for Kansas Crew was no exception. After his freshman year on the team, he had served the team as the men’s captain during the sophomore year, then as the team president for the last two years helping to strengthen the team’s relationship with the KU club sports department and with other men’s crew teams in the region. As we get close to the end of his last year, I wanted to get a closer look at his time at Kansas Crew. The first question is what I ask every single rower. How did you find out about Kansas Crew? My rowing career started when my sister, Mary Colleen told me about Kansas Crew to coax me in going to KU. I picked up a flyer at Hawk Week and dragged my roommates to the Open Boathouse and started going to practices. What made you stay on the team? I stuck around for the people aspect, but also because I loved the competitive nature of the sport and the chance to do something extraordinary with each day.

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Can you share some of your favorite races with the readers?

Do you have any last thoughts or advice for future rowers?

The first would be at SIRAs in 2016. I raced in the Men’s Varsity 4s as a novice and beating out a majority of the Varsity 4s was an amazing feeling. Beating UCLA 3 times and placing in the top of the C final for the Varsity 8 at ACRAs in 2017, especially after having broken my foot 2 months prior was great too. At Head of the Hooch last year, I raced in the Men’s Double with Grant Gollier even though we never rowed it together before. That was quite fun. Lastly, the most recent one would be at Shocker Sprints this year when I finally got my hammer in the Men’s 2,000m event.

The best advice I can give a future rower is threefold. First, work your butt off, it’s worth it and you will thank yourself for it. Second, really take time to know and understand the people you have on your team and form fun memories with them; they will be your greatest friends. Third, finish what you start.

What about favorite regattas? Jayhawk Jamboree is always fantastic, having the constant support of the parents and the home field advantage. The most memorable regatta would have to be MACRAs in 2018. Doing what was necessary to get into the Grand Finals alongside big teams like Michigan and Notre Dame was a blast of pain and relief all at once. Even with the success and fun that you’ve had while your time on this team, you must have some regrets? The main regret would be not knowing the balance between training smart and training hard. I’m sure everyone can agree that finding the work-life balance is hard.

After graduation, Brendan will be working at the Federal Reserve in Kansas City.


ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Stats

Side: Bisweptual (Port & Starboard), Scull Year: Senior Hometown: Overland Park, KS Height: 6’ 0”

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Spring 2019 Roster 2018-2019 VARSITY Brendan Fowler

Senior

Acctounting, Business Analytics, French

Alex Kastrul

Senior

Economics, Political Science, Psychology

Alex King

Senior

Political Science, History

President

Vice President Men’s Captain

Rae Schwarting

Sophomore

Human Biology

Carolyn Hassett

Sophomore

Business Analytics, Information Systems Tech.

Chris Hardin

Sophomore

Computer Science

Grant Gollier

Sophomore

Computer Science

Bumsoo Kim

Graduate

Women’s Captain Treasurer

Secretary

Recruitment Chair PR/Alumni Ambassador

Brent Linneman

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Sophomore

Architecture Geography, Political Science

Carson Taylor

Senior

History, Political Science

Jackson Whitcup

Senior

Accounting

Ryan Gallagher

Senior

Applied Behavioral Science

Seth Harper

Sophomore

Undeclared

Zach Hardin

Junior

Accounting


Spring 2019 Roster 2018-2019 NOVICE Alexander Valler

Freshman

Computer Science

Alex Fortune

Freshman

Undecided

Ashton Baker

Freshman

Undecided

Brendan Halls

Freshman

Supply Chain Management

Erin Sturd

Freshman

vChemical Engineering

Gabrielle Garcia

Freshman

Pre-Nursing

Grant Hamilton Ryan Bauer Sean Kulig Tatym Nobreg

Freshman Freshman Junior Freshman

Physics, Engineering Information Systems Technology Geography Biology

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Strength & Speed:

How We Train Today Written by Shane Kim

Rowing used to be somewhat reserved for either collegiate or professional rowers. Nowadays, thanks in part to CrossFit, rowing and rowing is becoming a more popular exercise regiment among non-rowers. Boutique rowing studios are popping up everywhere, and rowing machines can be easily found in most gyms. Every CrossFit box has rows and rows of Concept2 ergs, and rowing competitions are becoming more popular as well.

daily training is highly important for any serious rowers. Kansas Crew also started to look at the importance of strength training and implement weight lifting to the training mix. Focusing on core and leg strength, this pushes our muscular endurance and improving maximal strength to improve peak power. This is especially important because it decreases the amount of effort required per stroke while increasing meters per stroke.

The benefit of rowing is that it’s a total-body workout, burning fat while increasing muscle endurance and pushing your cardiovascular limit to the next level. Compared to other full-body cardio sports such as cross-country skiing and swimming, you are able to build more strength and power while rowing according to Eric Von Frohlich, CrossFit Level 1 certified trainer.

The main strength exercises typically include squats and deadlifts for legs, bodyweight or weighted pull-ups and overhead presses for upper body, and of course various core exercises Aside from these main exercises, support exercises include front squats, Romanian deadlifts, split squats, lunges, dumbbell presses and more to improve overall muscle strength, size, and performance.

A good stroke full of power is similar to executing a kettlebell swing or a deadlift, engaging your core to transfer explosive power from your legs to the handle. At its most basic nature rowing is a strength movement, and as such strength training in conjunction with

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The supporting exercise movements are as important as the main exercise movements for two reasons. The first is that the supporting movements are close variances of the main movements that help to


improve rowing specific strength and performance. The second reason is that they help reduce the risk of injury. Rowers who skip out on strength training are very likely to develop movement and muscular imbalances. Common rowing imbalances from sweep and scull rowing include quadricep-dominance, gluteus muscle weakness, hip flexor tightness, thoracic kyphosis - or more commonly known as rounded upper back - internally rotated shoulders, and restricted movement and underdevelopment of their non-stroke side.

split times and dampened performance, as well as a variety of short- and longterm pains and increased risk of injury. This is why targeting strength exercises to assist with movements and muscles (typically the gluteus muscles, thoracic extensors, shoulder stabilizers, external rotators, and upper body pressing muscles) that rowing fails to develop with the supporting movements is implemented and encouraged more to all the rowers of Kansas Crew.

These imbalances reduce movement efficiency leading to slower

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ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Alex Kastrul A fine balance between dedication and lightheartedness Alex Kastrul has two qualities that are beneficial to any competitive athlete: dedication and lightheartedness. He is one of the more dedicated rowers on the team, always showing up for practice and giving his best effort each day. When things get tough, he faces any and all challenges with resiliency and lightheartedness that keep him from being bogged down and moves on. Everyone can agree that a good athlete should have a short-term memory and lighthearted enthusiasm (not to be confused with being careless or reckless) so that if they have a bad day, or a bad stroke or two in Alex’s case, they can brush it off and move on. And those qualities make Alex a pleasant and inspiring teammate to be around.

Stats

Side: Starboardl Year: Senior Hometown: Denver, CO Height: 5’ 10”

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How and where did you start rowing? I started rowing right here at KU. I saw the team tabling at a recruitment event during Hawk Week and thought it looked fun. And it didn’t take me long to realize I was right. What were some of the best moments for you? Early mornings rowing on flat water are always the best. Spring break training and the annual were pretty fun too. Spring break can get tough since we practice twice a day and we’re getting used to rowing on water after being on


ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

land over the winter months, but it is the best time to get even closer with everyone and build comradery. The annual (Kansas Crew’s own little tradition similar to the Olympics; events include the fish game championship on the erg, relay races, and indoor soccer) is a fantastic way to take a break from rowing during spring break and I love it. Anything you wish you had done differently? Not buying pogies my freshman year. That’s about it!

in the south of the UK. Their team was differentthey had a smaller boathouse and a smaller river, but a bigger team. It was weird adjusting to their different calls in the boat and slightly different terminology, but a really cool experience overall. Lastly, any word of advice for future rowers? Buy pogies! Set multiple alarms to make sure you wake up in the morning, wear sunscreen to avoid getting sunburned and most importantly weird tan lines. On a more serious note, give it your all, you won’t regret it.

Now, a unique experience you had was rowing while you were studying abroad. What was that like?

I studied abroad at the University of Exeter

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ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Stats

Side: Bisweptual (Port & Starboard), Scull Year: Senior Hometown: Vienna, VA; born in Orange County, CA Height: 5’ 11” (6’ 0” on a good day)

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ATHELETE SPOTLIGHT

Jackson Whitcup An Experienced Rower and a Good Friend

Jackson is one of the few highly experienced and knowledgeable rowers on the team. With his rowing experience high school, he is someone that the less experienced teammates can rely on for rowing advice. Aside from his extensive rowing experience, everyone on the team can also rely on Jackson for making fun memories on a daily basis and while on regatta trips. Here’s a short interview with Whitcup to see what his collegiate rowing career was like. How did you start rowing in high school? I started rowing in November of 2011 at James Madison High School in Vienna, VA. I started because my older sister’s boyfriend rowed there and then for the University of Delaware lightweights. He was jacked, whereas I was an out-of-shape doughy boy who never left his room, so I decided to try rowing to change that. How did you end up joining Kansas Crew? I did an official visit to the University of Kansas in January of my senior year in high school and emailed the recruiting chair at the time Molly Bybee and came for a winter training practice in the morning and proceeded to smoke Jasper and Ryan Lutzkanin at 500’s (two of the fastest guys on the team at the time). I ended up coming to KU, so joining the team was an obvious decision for me at that point.

Championship) last year, and all of our races at ACRA (American Collegiate Rowing Association Championship) in 2017. What were some of the challenges you faced? The hardest time for me was when I got really sick my junior year and all of the complications that came with it. That was a pretty difficult time for me. Do you have any wisdom to share with both the current and future rowers? Overtraining is a real problem that can sneak up on you. Training smart is very important, listening to what your body is telling you. It is important to push yourself, in rowing or in school, but just know when you need to take a break. Stay on the team all 4 years if you are lucky enough to join your freshman year. I cannot emphasize this enough. If not, stay on the team as long as you possibly can. The people who stay with you will be more trustworthy than just about anyone else in your life.

Here’s a question I ask everyone- what were your favorite moments? I want to say stealing Texas’ flag at ACRA my sophomore year- but we’ll keep that a secret between us and the readers of this newsletter. My official answer would have to be when we almost won SIRA (Southern Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championship) in the Men’s Novice 4+, crushing the University of Chicago at MACRA (Mid-America Collegiate Rowing Association

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Profile for Kansas Crew

Spring 2019 Newsletter  

Kansas Crew Spring 2019 Newsletter

Spring 2019 Newsletter  

Kansas Crew Spring 2019 Newsletter

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