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CHIEFS VS. BENGALS OCTOBER 21, 2018

Chiefs

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REGULAR SEASON GAME 7

Chiefs COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Contact Information Ted Crews Brad Gee Luke Shanno Cydney Ricker Jordan Trgovac

Vice President of Communications Director of Football Communications Corporate Communications Manager Manager of Football Comm. & Admin. Communications Assistant

(816) 920-4359 (816) 920-4349 (816) 920-4351 (816) 920-4352 (816) 920-4353

tcrews@chiefs.nfl.com bgee@chiefs.nfl.com lshanno@chiefs.nfl.com cricker@chiefs.nfl.com jtrgovac@chiefs.nfl.com

CHIEFS FACE BENGALS ON NBC’S SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL

vs. The Chiefs return to Kansas City this week to face the Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday Night Football. Kickoff at Arrowhead Stadium is slated for 7:20 p.m. CT. The Chiefs host home games three of the next four weeks. Kansas City enters the contest 5-1 after falling 43-40 to the New England Patriots last Sunday night in Foxborough. The Chiefs have scored 40+ points in each of the last three regular season meetings against New England. The Chiefs rank first in the NFL in scoring this season with 215 points over six games (35.8 ppg). KC is 23-9 (.719) in AFC West play since 2013 (18-2 since 2015) and has won 37 of its last 48 regular season contests (.771). Chiefs QB Patrick Mahomes’ 18 touchdown passes and 23 throws of 25plus yards lead the league through six weeks of play. He owns a leaguebest TD/INT ratio +14. TE Travis Kelce ranks third among all NFL tight ends in yards after catch (261). He has caught a pass in 69 consecutive games and has three 100-yard receiving games this season (15 career). WR Tyreek Hill ranks first in the NFL with nine catches of 25+ yards. WR Sammy Watkins has 272 yards on 22 catches and a TD. RB Kareem Hunt leads the club with 103 rushes for 456 yards and four touchdowns. He has two receiving TDs and currently owns the NFL’s longest streak of touches without a fumble (437 touches). His only career fumble was his first-ever NFL snap from scrimmage against the Patriots in last year’s season opener. KC has forced nine turnovers this season (six INTs, three fumble recoveries) and allowed only five takeaways (four INTs, one fumble), the second-best mark in the league. The club has a +4 turnover differential. DL Allen Bailey and LB Dee Ford lead the team with 4.0 sacks. Reid is in his sixth season with the club, recording 58 wins with the Chiefs, marking the highest combined win total of any head coach in franchise history in that time frame. The Chiefs have made the playoffs four out of the past five years under Reid and earned back-to-back AFC West Championships in 2016 and 2017. Reid ranks ninth on the all-time wins chart with 199 victories (regular and postseason combined). In 2017, the Chiefs finished with a 10-6 regular season record and earned the fourth seed in the AFC Playoffs. Rookie RB Kareem Hunt earned the NFL’s rushing title last season with 272 carries for 1,327 yards (4.9 avg.) with eight rushing TDs and three receiving touchdowns. WR Tyreek Hill led all KC pass catchers with 75 receptions for 1,183 yards (15.8 avg.) with seven TDs. TE Travis Kelce had 83 catches for 1,038 yards (12.5 avg.) with eight touchdowns. Defensively, the Chiefs had 31.0 team sacks. LB Justin Houston led the club with 9.5 sacks and DL Chris Jones had 6.5. The Chiefs owned a +15 turnover differential last season with 26 takeaways and 11 giveaways. The 2018 Chiefs feature several new faces. Chiefs GM Brett Veach added WR Sammy Watkins, LB Anthony Hitchens, CB Kendall Fuller and DT Xavier Williams among others this offseason to boost the roster. Next week the Chiefs take on the Broncos (10/28) at Arrowhead Stadium at 12 p.m. CT.

Chiefs

Kansas City Chiefs (5-1) vs. Cincinnati Bengals (4-2) Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018 • 7:20 p.m. CT • NBC Arrowhead Stadium • Kansas City, Missouri THIS WEEK’S MEDIA AVAILABILITY Date Tuesday, Oct. 16 Wednesday, Oct. 17 Thursday, Oct. 18 Friday, Oct. 19 Saturday, Oct. 20 Sunday, Oct. 21

Practice Coach Media No Media Availability 1:20 p.m. Reid 11:45 a.m. 1:20 p.m. Coords. 11:45 a.m. 11:45 a.m. Reid 1:00 p.m. No Media Availability Chiefs vs. Bengals - 7:20 p.m. CT

Players 11:45 a.m. 11:45 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

* All times are approximate and subject to change with little or no notice. OC Bieniemy, DC Sutton and ST Toub will speak to the media Thursday. • Cincinnati Bengals Head Coach Marvin Lewis will call Kansas City’s Media Work Room at approximately 11:15 a.m. CT on Wednesday.

BROADCAST INFORMATION TV Coverage NBC (KSHB Local)

Chiefs FOX Football Radio Network KCFX (101.1 FM)

Play-by-Play: Al Michaels Analyst: Cris Collinsworth Reporter: Michele Tafoya

Play-by-Play: Mitch Holthus Color: Kendall Gammon Sideline: Dani Welniak

Tico Sports (Kansas City) La Mega 1160 AM / 100.5 FM Spanish Radio Broadcast Play-by-Play: Enrique Morales Color: Oscar Monterroso Sideline: Leo Prieto

Chiefs Pregame & Postgame Show KCFX (101.1 FM) Hosts: Art Hains, Dan Israel and Len Dawson Chiefs Twitter Accounts: @Chiefs @ChiefsReporter @ChiefsPR

CHIEFS MEDIA WEBSITE INFORMATION The Kansas City Chiefs 2018 Media Guide is available on the Chiefs media information website, NFLOMG.com. In 2015, the club introduced an improved interactive online media guide that features an in-game statistics monitoring platform, in addition to the weekly press materials such as transcripts, weekly releases, bios, additional stats and more. The club’s guide is updated weekly throughout the season to reflect the most up-todate information. Media members can also access the Chiefs credential application through the site. To login, the username is chiefsmedia and the password is chiefs.

DID YOU KNOW? The Chiefs have called heads in each of their four away games and won the coin toss. During the club’s two home games, the opponent called tails and lost the toss. The Chiefs have deferred each time and started on defense. KC’s defense has held opponents to only three points all season on opening drives. KC’s offense leads the NFL, scoring on every first possession this season (34 points).

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CHIEFS VS. BENGALS TEAM COMPARISON Chiefs Bengals Record .................................................. 5-1 ...........................................4-2 Division Standing ................................ 1st (AFCW) .................1st (AFCN) Turnover Margin (NFL Rank) .............. +4 (T-4th) ...................... 0 (T-16th) Offense (NFL Rank) Net Yards Per Game ............................ 418.5 (5th) ................ 352.2 (23rd) Yards Per Play...................................... 6.77 (4th) .................... 5.80 (12th) Points Per Game .................................. 35.8 (2nd) ..................... 29.0 (6th) Possession Average............................ 29:10 (25th) .............. 28:34 (29th) Net Rushing Yards Per Game ............. 112.0 (13th)................. 89.8 (25th) Net Passing Yards Per Game ............. 306.5 (7th) ................ 262.3 (17th) Had Intercepted/Yards......................... 4/44........................................7/70 Sacks Allowed/Yards ........................... 6/-26 (1st) ................ 12/-100 (T-12th) Fumbles/Lost ....................................... 6/1 ............................................3/1 Third Down Pct. ................................... 44.4% (6th) ...............42.4% (11th) Red Zone TD Pct. ................................. 69.2% (6th) ................ 75.0% (1st) Giveaways ............................................ 5 (T-2nd) ....................... 8 (T-12th) Defense (NFL Rank) Net Yards Per Game ............................ 468.2 (32nd) ............. 409.2 (29th) Yards Per Play...................................... 6.56 (30th) ...................5.89 (21st) Points Per Game .................................. 28.7 (27th) .................. 26.3 (23rd) Net Rushing Yds Per Game ................ 127.8 (27th) ...............117.2 (20th) Net Passing Yards Per Game ............. 340.3 (31st) .............. 292.0 (28th) Intercepted By/Yards ........................... 6/69........................................5/46 Sacks For/Yards................................... 17/-100 (T-10th) ...... 13/-66 (T-20th) Opponent Fumbles/Lost ..................... 9/3 ............................................6/3 Third Down Pct. ................................... 33.8% (6th) .............. 53.4% (31st) Red Zone TD Pct. ................................. 65.2% (23rd) ......... 66.7% (T-24th) Takeaways ............................................ 9 (T-12th) ...................... 8 (T-16th) Special Teams (NFL Rank) Punts-Average Yards (Gross) ............. 48.6 (2nd) ................... 41.0 (30th) Punts-Average Yards (Net) ................. 45.5 (1st) .................... 36.3 (30th) Punt Returns-Average Per .................. 26.7 (1st) ...................... 8.8 (13th) Punt Returns-Average Per Allowed ... 1.7 (1st) ...................... 13.6 (30th) Kickoff Returns-Average Per .............. 28.8 (4th) ...................... 30.2 (3rd) Kickoff Returns-Avg. Per Allowed ..... 18.8 (5th) .................... 26.5 (29th) Field Goals Made/Attempted .............. 11/11 (T-1st) ...................7/9 (21st) Penalties (NFL Rank) Penalties Against/Yards............... ............... 50/430 (31st) ............. 39/354 (T-14th) Opp. Penalties Against/Yds ................ 41/352 (T-13th) .......... 45/408 (9th)

CHIEFS VS. BENGALS IND. COMPARISON Chiefs

Bengals PASSING YARDS Mahomes ............................1,865 Dalton ................................... 1,674 RUSHING YARDS Hunt ....................................456 Mixon....................................... 336 Mahomes ............................75 Bernard ................................... 155 Watkins ...............................50 Dalton ........................................ 31 RECEIVING YARDS Hill.......................................567 Green ...................................... 494 Kelce...................................468 Boyd ........................................ 455 Watkins ...............................272 Eifert ........................................ 179 POINTS SCORED Butker .................................59 Bullock....................................... 42 Hill.......................................42 Green ........................................ 30 Hunt ....................................36 Boyd .......................................... 24 INTERCEPTIONS Parker .................................1 Bates III ....................................... 2 Murray ................................1 Johnson ...................................... 1 Lucas ..................................1 Brown .......................................... 1 Jones ..................................1 Williams ....................................... 1 Scandrick ............................1 Nelson ................................1

Ford ....................................4.0 Bailey ..................................4.0 Houston ..............................3.0

SACKS Atkins ....................................... 6.0 Dunlap ...................................... 4.0 Three Tied ................................ 1.0

DEFENSIVE TACKLES Hitchens..............................60 Vigil ........................................... 51 Parker .................................36 Bates III ..................................... 41 Fuller...................................35 Dennard .................................... 28 KICKOFF RETURNS (AVG.) Smith ..................................4 (45.0) Erickson ............................ 8 (34.6) Bernard ............................. 2 (12.5) PUNT RETURNS (AVG.) Hill.......................................6 (23.2) Erickson .............................. 6 (7.7) Phillips ............................... 2 (12.0) FIELD GOALS Butker .................... 11/11 (100.0%) Bullock.........................7/9 (77.8%) PUNTS (GROSS/NET AVG.) Colquitt .................. 16 (48.6/45.5) Huber ...................... 22 (42.9/36.3)

CHIEFS CHIEFS VS. VS. BUCCANEERS BENGALS SERIES SERIES HISTORY HISTORY • The Chiefs and Bengals have played each other 28 times, but only three times in the last 10 seasons. The series between the two franchises is very close, with Cincinnati holding a 15-13 lead. • The last five times the Bengals have visted Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City is 3-2 in those matchups. • This will be the first ever night game played between the two franchises after being flexed into NBC’s Sunday Night Football. • Kansas City has played on Sunday Night Football at home 10 times, going 7-3. This is the first time the Chiefs have ever played back-to-back Sunday Night games in a season.

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CHIEFS VS. BENGALS SERIES HISTORY, LAST 10 GAMES Date 10/1/89* 10/10/93* 11/16/03 1/1/06* 9/10/06* 10/14/07* 12/28/08 12/27/09 11/18/12* 10/4/15

Result L, 17-21 W, 17-15 L, 19-24 W, 37-3 L, 10-23 W, 27-20 L, 6-16 L, 10-17 L, 6-28 L, 21-36

Of Note CIN: White: 22-yard fumble return TD. KC: Lowery: 37-yd. GW FG. CIN: Warrick: 201 total yards, 2 TDs. KC: Johnson: 201 rush yards, 3 TDs. CIN: defense: 7.0 sacks. KC: Gonzalez: 102 rec. yards, 2 TDs. CIN: Benson: 111 rush yards, TD CIN: Johnson: GW TD rec. CIN: Dalton: Two pass TDs, rush TD. CIN: Tate 55-yard TD rec.

*at Arrowhead Stadium

Chiefs


CHIEFS HEAD COACH ANDY REID

BENGALS HEAD COACH MARVIN LEWIS

Reid is in his 27th NFL season, 20th as a head coach and sixth with the Chiefs. In six seasons with the club he’s tallied 58 wins, more victories than any other head coach in franchise history in that timeframe. Under Reid, the Chiefs have made the playoffs four of his first five seasons. The club earned back-to-back AFC West Titles in 2016 and ‘17 for the first time in franchise history. In 2016, Kansas City went 12-4 and won the AFC West, earning a first-round bye in the playoffs. In 2015, the Chiefs won their first playoff game since 1994, defeating the Texans 30-0. The team finished 11-5 after a 1-5 start in 2015. It was the greatest turnaround in a single-season in NFL history. In 2013, Reid led the Chiefs to an 11-5 record marking the greatest singleseason turnaround in franchise history after the team finished 2-14 in 2012. Reid boasts a career record of 188-121-1 (.608) in the regular season. He also owns an 11-13 postseason record. Prior to joining the Chiefs, Reid led the Eagles to a 130-93-1 (.583) regular season record during his 14 seasons as head coach. He led the Eagles franchise to one Super Bowl appearance. When you include his time as an NFL assistant coach, his teams have made the playoffs 19 times (20-17 record), and he has coached in three Super Bowls and eight NFC Championships. Reid spent seven seasons as an assistant coach with the Green Bay Packers under Head Coach Mike Holmgren. Prior to joining the NFL ranks, Reid’s final collegiate stop was the University of Missouri (1989-91). Prior to his stint with the Tigers, Reid spent two years working with the offensive line at the University of Texas – El Paso, and before that, he held the same position with Northern Arizona. In 1983, Reid took the position of offensive coordinator and offensive line coach at San Francisco State (1983-85). A tackle/guard at Brigham Young University from 1979-81, Reid entered the coaching ranks as a graduate assistant at BYU in 1982.

NFL Head Coach: 20th Year NFL Coach Overall: 27th Year NFL Overall: 199-134-1 (.597) Reg. Season: 188-121-1 (.608) Postseason: 11-13 (.458)

Record w/ KC: 58-28 (.674) Record w/ PHI: 130-93-1 (.583) Record vs. CIN: 1-3-1 (.300) College: BYU (’81) Hometown: Los Angeles

Marvin Lewis extends his Bengals-record head coaching tenure to 16 years in 2018. Named the ninth head coach in Bengals history on Jan. 14, 2003, Lewis quickly made a name for himself finishing the ‘03 season 8-8, six games better than the team’s record in ‘02. Lewis has led the Bengals to the postseason seven times in his tenure, including a five-year run from 2011-15. The total number of playoff trips and the five-year streak of consecutive postseason appearances are Bengals records. The Bengals were one of only four NFL teams to reach the playoffs every year from 2011-15. The Bengals are off to a 4-2 start this season. Lewis opened the 2018 season with 125 career victories, the most in Bengals history. He ranks second among NFL coaches in longest current tenure with one team, trailing only Bill Belichick. He was named NFL Coach of the Year in 2009, when the Bengals won the AFC North Division while sweeping all six division games. He came to the Bengals after one season as the Washington Redskins assistant head coach and defensive coordinator, where he led the team to a No. 5 NFL defensive ranking. Prior to his stint with the Redskins, Lewis spent six seasons as the Baltimore Ravens defensive coordinator. His time with the Ravens included a Super Bowl victory in 2000, when his defense set the NFL record for fewest points allowed in a 16-game campaign (165). Lewis gained his first NFL experience with the Pittsburgh Steelers as their linebackers coach from 1992-95. Lewis worked his way up through the college coaching ranks with stints at Long Beach State, University of New Mexico and University of Pittsburgh. Lewis began his coaching career at his alma mater, Idaho State as the linebackers coach after playing linebacker, quarterback and safety from 1978-80. During his time at ISU he earned AllBig Sky honors for three consecutive years. Lewis was inducted into Idaho State’s Hall of Fame in 2001.

NFL Head Coach: 16th Year NFL Coach Overall: 27th Year NFL Overall: 129-121-3 (.518) Regular Season: 129-114-3 (.534) Postseason: 0-7 (.000)

ANDY REID’S CAREER PATH 1979-82 1983-85 1986 1987-88 1989-91 1992-98 1999-2012 2013-18

MARVIN LEWIS’ CAREER PATH

BYU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tackle/Guard (‘79-81) Graduate Assistant (‘82) San Francisco State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Offensive Coordinator/ Offensive Line Northern Arizona. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Offensive Line Texas-El Paso. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Offensive Line Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Offensive Line Green Bay Packers. . . . . . Tight Ends / Offensive Line (‘92-96) Quarterbacks (‘97-98) Philadelphia Eagles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Coach (‘99-00) HC/Exec. V.P. Football Ops (‘01-12) Kansas City Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Coach

ANDY REID’S HARDWARE 96

97

96 Super Bowls

Chiefs

1978-84 1985-86 1987-89 1990-91 1992-95 1996-2001 2002 2003-18

Idaho State......................................... LB, QB & Saftey (’78-80) Linebackers (’81-84) Long Beach State ...................................................Linebackers New Mexico ............................................................Linebackers University of Pittsburgh ...........................................Linebackers Pittsburgh Steelers..................................................Linebackers Baltimore Ravens................................... Defensive Coordinator Washington Redskins .........Asst. Head Coach/Def.Coordinator Cincinnati Bengals ................................................. Head Coach

MARVIN LEWIS’ HARDWARE 95

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Conference Titles

95

96

97

01

02

03

04

06

10

16

Division Titles

Record w/ CIN: 129-121-3 (.518) Record vs. KC: 6-2 (.750) College: Idaho State (‘80) Hometown: McDonald, Pa.

00

Conference Titles

17

00 Super Bowls

92

94

95

09

13

15

Division Titles

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2018 AFC WEST STANDINGS

2018 CHIEFS TEAM STATS & RANKINGS CATEGORY

TOTAL

Total Offense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418.5 Rush Offense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112.0 Pass Offense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .306.5 Total Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .468.2 Rush Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127.8 Pass Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .340.3 Points/Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.8 Opp. Pts./Game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.7

1st 6th 2nd 16th 13th 16th 1st 14th

5th 13th 7th 32nd 27th 31st 2nd 27th

2018 CHIEFS INDIVIDUAL STATS & RANKINGS CATEGORY

PLAYER

Scoring (NK) Rushing Yards QB Rating Receptions Rec. Yards Interceptions Punting Avg. Punt Ret. Avg. KO Ret. Avg. Sacks

Hill Hunt Mahomes Hill Hill 6 Tied Colquitt Hill --Bailey, Ford

TOTAL 42 456 112.2 34 567 1 48.6 23.2 --4.0

3rd 2nd 2nd 8th 2nd T-14th 1st 1st --T-10th

4th 4th 5th T-18th 4th T-27th 2nd 1st --T-20th

Team Kansas City Chiefs Los Angeles Chargers Denver Broncos Oakland Raiders

W 5 4 2 1

L 1 2 4 5

Pct. .833 .667 .333 .167

PF 215 175 120 110

PA 172 144 154 176

Streak Lost 1 Won 3 Lost 4 Lost 2

CHIEFS 2018 SCHEDULE PRESEASON Date Aug. 9 Aug. 17 Aug. 25 Aug. 30

Opponent Houston at Atlanta at Chicago Green Bay

REGULAR SEASON Date Opponent Sept. 9 at L.A. Chargers Sept. 16 at Pittsburgh Sept. 23 San Francisco Oct. 1 at Denver Oct. 7 Jacksonville* Oct. 14 at New England* Oct. 21 Cincinnati* Oct. 28 Denver* Nov. 4 at Cleveland* Nov. 11 Arizona* Nov. 19 at L.A. Rams (Mexico) Nov. 25 BYE WEEK Dec. 2 at Oakland* Dec. 9 Baltimore* Dec. 13 L.A. Chargers Dec. 23 at Seattle* Dec. 30 Oakland*

Time 7:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Noon 7:30 p.m.

Results L, 10-17 W, 28-14 L, 20-27 W, 33-21

Time 3:05 p.m. Noon Noon 7:15 p.m. Noon 7:20 p.m. 7:20 p.m. Noon Noon Noon 7:15 p.m. ---3:05 p.m. Noon 7:20 p.m. 7:20 p.m. Noon

Results W, 38-28 W, 42-37 W, 38-27 W, 27-23 W, 30-14 L, 40-43 NBC CBS CBS FOX ESPN ---CBS CBS FOX/NFLN NBC CBS

Home games in bold; all kickoffs are Central Time. * Subject to Flexible Scheduling

MCCULLOUGH’S AMAZING STORY Kansas City Chiefs Running Backs Coach Deland McCullough was featured on ESPN’s E:60, highlighting his inspirational journey to discovering his birth parents. The feature, which aired on Sunday, Sept. 2, documents the life of McCullough, who was adopted at birth, and his search for his biological parents that spanned more than 40 years. That alone makes for a powerful story, but as it turns out, McCullough was already plenty familiar with his biological father – a man he had known since he was a kid, a man that was a mentor and father-figure who goes by the name of Sherman Smith. It’s a story that defies the odds as his father was unaware that he had a son, but still served as an instrumental figure throughout McCullough’s life.

CHIEFS ALL-TIME VS. AFC WEST OPPONENTS Team Denver Oakland LA Chargers

OVERALL (REG. SEASON) Record Pct. Longest Win Streak 62-54-0 .534 11 (1964-1969) 61-52-2 .539 9 (2003-2007) 61-54-1 .530 9 (2014-Current )

Team Denver Oakland LA Chargers

AT HOME (REG. SEASON) Record Pct. Longest Win Streak 38-19-0 .667 14 (1960-1973) 33-24-1 .578 10 (1989-1998) 35-23-0 .603 7 (1997-2003)

Team Denver Oakland LA Chargers

ON THE ROAD (REG. SEASON) Record Pct. Longest Win Streak 24-35-0 .407 5 (1965-1969) 28-28-1 .500 7 (2003-2009) 26-31-1 .457 6 (1972-1977)

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“If you would have told me to pick who my father was, there’s no way I would have picked him because I might have thought I wasn’t worthy for him to be my father,” McCullough said. “I felt like my blessings came full circle because I’d always wanted to be somebody like him.”

Chiefs


THE BEST IN CHIEFS HISTORY

CHIEFS ASSISTANT COACHES

In his first six seasons as head coach of the Chiefs, Andy Reid coached his team to a 58-28 record in the first 86 games. His 67.4 winning percentage is the top mark in franchise history for any coach in his first six seasons leading the club. Marty Schottenheimer is second on that list, leading his Chiefs teams to a 53-32-1 (61.6%) record. Most Regular Season Wins, First 6 Years with Team Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Name Reid Schottenheimer Vermeil Stram Levy

Yr. 1 11-5 8-7-1 6-10 8-6 4-12

Yr. 2 9-7 11-5 8-8 6-8 7-9

Yr. 3 11-5 10-6 13-3 11-3 8-8

Yr. 4 12-4 10-6 7-9 5-7-2 9-7

Yr. 5 10-6 11-5 10-6 7-7 3-6

Yr. 6 5-1 3-3 -3-2-1 --

Tot. Rec. 58-28 53-32-1 44-36 39-34-3 31-42

In Reid’s 86 total games with the Chiefs, he registered a 31-11 (73.8%) record at home and a 27-17 (61.4%) record on the road.

OFFENSIVE STAFF Eric Bieniemy Offensive Coordinator

Joe Bleymaier Pass Game Analyst/Assistant Quarterbacks Andy Heck Offensive Line Mike Kafka Quarterbacks Greg Lewis Wide Receivers Corey Matthaei Assistant Offensive Line Deland McCullough Running Backs Tom Melvin Tight Ends David Girardi Offensive Quality Control

DEFENSIVE STAFF Bob Sutton Defensive Coordinator Terry Bradden Defensive Assistant

HE WINS AT HOME AND ON THE ROAD No matter where his team is playing, home or away, Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid is consistent. Through 20 seasons and 310 games, Coach Reid has a similar record on the road as he does at home. Home Record 96-58 (.623)

Road Record 92-63-1 (.593)

Total 188-122-1 (.608)

2018 CHIEFS PRO BOWL PLAYERS The National Football League announced on Dec. 19, 2017 that three members of the Kansas City Chiefs had been selected to participate in the 2018 NFL Pro Bowl. The below players earned a spot on the AFC’s Pro Bowl roster: Tyreek Hill (Returner) – 2nd Nomination Kareem Hunt (Running Back) – 1st Nomination Travis Kelce (Tight End) – 3rd Nomination The 2018 Pro Bowl returned to Camping World Stadium in Orlando, Florida, and was televised on ESPN and ESPN Deportes and simulcast on ABC. Last year’s game marked the first time the Pro Bowl aired on both broadcast and cable networks, as well as being streamed live on the ESPN app. The NFL is the only sports league that combines voting by fans, coaches and players to determine its all-star teams. The Chiefs had five alternates including current players P Dustin Colquitt, K Harrison Butker and LB Justin Houston.

Mark DeLeone Inside Linebackers Al Harris Secondary/Cornerbacks Britt Reid Defensive Line Mike Smith Outside Linebackers Emmitt Thomas Defensive Backs Jay Valai Defensive Quality Control Alex Whittingham Defensive Assistant

SPECIAL TEAMS STAFF

Dave Toub Assistant Head Coach/Special Teams Coordinator Rod Wilson Assistant Special Teams

MISCELLANEOUS

Barry Rubin Head Strength and Conditioning Travis Crittenden Assistant Strength and Conditioning Ryan Reynolds Assistant Strength and Conditioning Devin Woodhouse Assistant Strength and Conditioning Mike Frazier Statistical Analysis Coordinator Porter Ellett Senior Assistant to Head Coach

Chiefs

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MISC. NOTES 2018 CHIEFS DEFENSIVE RANKINGS

2018 CHIEFS OFFENSIVE RANKINGS Category NFL Rank 10-Play Drives T-6th Avg. Yards on 1st Down 7th 2nd Down Conversion Pct. 1st 3 and Out Drive Pct. 5th 3rd Down Conversion Pct. 6th 3rd and Long (>6 Yds) Conversion Pct. 4th 3rd and Medium (4-6 Yds) Conv. Pct. 5th 4th Down Conversion Pct. T-1st 4th and 1 Conversion Pct. T-1t 4th and Short (<4 Yds) Conversion Pct. T-1st Avg. Yards to Go on 2nd Down 7th Avg. Starting Position after Kickoffs 3rd 5-Minute Drives T-4th Passer Rating in Blitz Situations 6th Points on 1st Off. Poss. 1st Points on 1st Off. Poss. of 2nd Half T-2nd Completions of 20+ Yards 2nd Field Goal Percentage T-1st Field Position - Away 1st First Downs Made 5th Fumbles Lost T-2nd Total Giveaways T-2nd Goal-to-Go Drives T-3rd Goal-to-Go Giveaways T-1st Touchdown Efficiency Inside the 30 2nd Kickoff Return Average 4th Miscellaneous Touchdown Scored T-3rd Net Passing Yards per Game 7th Offensive Points Scored 1st Offensive Scoring Efficiency 2nd Opp. Fumble Returns of 20+ Yards T-1st Opp. INT Returns of 20+ Yards T-7th Opp. Total Takeaways T-2nd Overall Passer Rating 4th Overall Yards per Game 5th Yards After Catch 10th Passer Rating on Atts. of 21+ Air Yards 6th Plays of 20+ Yards T-1st Punt Return Average 1st Punt Returns of 20+ Yards T-1st Punting Gross Average 2nd Points on Drives of 4 or Fewer Plays T-3rd Turnover Pct. in 4 or Fewer Plays T-3rd Red Zone 3rd Down Conversions 6th Red Zone Drives T-2nd Red Zone Giveaways T-10th Red Zone Touchdown Efficiency 6th Red Zone Successful Play Pct. 3rd Avg. Rushing Yards on 2nd Down 4th Rushing Plays of 20+ Yards T-2nd Total Points Scored 1st Scoring Differential T-3rd Scoring Outside the Red Zone T-7th Points at End of Half 10th Offensive Touchdowns 1st Drives Starting Inside Opp. 20-Yard Line T-4th Successful Play Percentage 3rd Times Sacked 1st Points Per Game 2nd Touchdown Drives 1st Turnover Differential T-4th Yards per Game 5th Yards per Play 4th Yards per Play in Red Zone 8th

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Value 12 drives 6.57 yards 42.4% 14.1% 44.4% 33.3% 55.6% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 7.64 yards 27.8 yard line 11 drives 114.90 rating 34 points 24 points 29 completions 100.0% 32.5 yard line 140 first downs 1 fumble lost 5 giveaways 16 drives 0 giveaways 62.5% 28.8 yards 2 touchdowns 306.5 yards 201 points 54.7% 0 fumble returns 1 INT return 5 takeaways 112.2 rating 418.5 yards 751 yards 123.7 rating 36 plays 26.7 yards 3 returns 48.6 yards 35 points 3.1% 46.2% 26 drives 1 giveaway 69.2% 57.4% 5.23 yards 7 rushes 215 points +43 54 points 27 points 24 touchdowns 3 drives 53.7% 6 sacks 35.8 points 24 TD drives +4 418.5 yards 6.77 yards 3.33 yards

Category

NFL Rank

Value

Avg. Margin of Defeat

2nd

3.00 points

Avg. Opp. Starting Position After Kickoff 5th

23.5 yard line

Points on Opp. First Offensive Poss.

T-2nd

3 points

Goal-to-Go Takeaways

T-7th

1 takeaway

Opp. Passer Rating Inside the 30

4th

79.3 rating

INT Returns of 20+ Yards

T-6th

2 INT returns

Miscellaneous Touchdowns Allowed

T-1st

0 touchdowns

Opp. Avg. Starting Field Position

1st

24.8 yard line

Opp. Avg. Starting Field Position - Away 3rd

24.3 yard line

Opp. Avg. Starting Field Position - Home 8th

26.0 yard line

Opp. Kickoff Return Pct. of 20+ Yards

50.0%

T-6th

Opp. Punt Returns of 20+ Yards

T-1st

0 returns

Opp. 3rd Down Conversion Pct.

6th

33.8%

Opp. 3rd and 10+ Conversion Pct.

6th

10.0%

Opp. 3rd and Long (>6) Conv. Pct.

1st

13.9%

Opp. 3rd and Medium (4-6) Conv. Pct.

T-10th

36.4%

Opp. Rushing Plays of 50+ Yards

T-1st

0 rushes

Opp. Kickoff Return Average

5th

18.8%

Opp. Punt Return Average

1st

1.7 yards

Opp. Gross Punting Average

4th

41.6 yards

Opp. Points in 4 or Fewer Plays

T-5th

7 points

Passing Defense on Second Down

10th

89.7 rating

Points Allowed on 1st Off. Poss.

T-2nd

3 points

Red Zone Takeaways

T-5th

2 takeaways

Sacks

T-10th

17 sacks

Opp. Drives Starting Inside KC’s 20

T-5th

1 drive

Opp. Drives Starting Inside KC’s 50

2nd

2 drives

Takeaways

T-8th

31 points

Points Allowed in Two-Minute Defense

T-6th

3 points

Chiefs


CHIEFS VS. BENGALS CONNECTIONS Professional • Bengals Offensive Coordinator Bill Lazor (2014-15) spent time at the Dolphins with Chiefs Football Operations Counsel and Personnel Executive Chris Shea (2008-15). Lazor was the offensive coordinator and Shea was the asst. director of pro personnel. • Kansas City Personnel Executive Michael Davis (2013-16) served as the Midwest area scout and personnel executive for the Philadelphia Eagles while Bengals Offensive Coordinator Bill Lazor (2013) served in the same role. • Chiefs Defensive Backs Coach Emmitt Thomas (2002-03) served as the secondary coach for the Falcons while Bengals Offensive Coordinator Coach Bill Lazor served as the offensive quality control coach for the 2003 season. • Cincinnati DE Michael Johnson and Kansas City Quarterbacks Coach Mike Kafka were both on the Buccaneers roster for the 2014 season. Kafka was listed as a quarterback. • Cincinnati Asst. Strength & Conditioning Coach Jeff Friday (1999-2007) served as the head strength & conditioning coach for the Ravens while Kansas City Outside Linebackers Coach Mike Smith (2005-08) was on the roster as a linebacker. • Kansas City Area Scout David Hinson (2005-08) served in the same role for the Saints while Cincinnati Linebackers Coach Jim Haslett (2000-05) was the head coach for the 2005 season. • Chiefs Head Athletic Trainer Rick Burkholder (1994-98) served as the asst. athletic trainer for the Steelers while Bengals Tight Ends Coach Jonathan Hayes (1994-96) was listed on the roster as a tight end. • Newly acquired Kansas City LB Nate Orchard (2015-17) played with Bengals TE Matt Lengel (2017) for a year with the Cleveland Browns. • Kansas City WR Sammy Watkins (2014-16) and LB Reggie Ragland (2016) played for the Buffalo Bills with Bengals LB Preston Brown (201417), T Cordy Glenn (2012-17) and DT Adolphus Washington (2016-18). Former Bengals • Kansas City Chiefs S Josh Shaw (2015-17) spent time on the Cincinnati Bengals roster. Former Chiefs • Bengals Tight Ends Coach Jonathan Hayes (1985-93) was the Chiefs second-round draft pick in 1985 and was on the Chiefs roster with Kansas City Area Scout Willie Davis (1990-95). Hayes served as the Chiefs tight end, while Davis was a wide receiver. • Bengals Wide Receivers Coach Bob Bicknell got his NFL coaching start with the Kansas City Chiefs, where he initially served as assistant offensive line coach before being promoted to offensive line coach (2008) and then moving to coach tight ends coach (2009). College • Bengals CB Dre Kirkpatrick (2009-11) and Chiefs LB Reggie Ragland (2012-15) both played at Alabama. • Kansas City LB Dee Ford (2009-13) played one season with Cincinnati DE Carl Lawson (2013-16) and three seasons with TE C.J. Uzomah (2011-14) at Auburn. • Kansas City Inside Linebackers Coach Mark DeLeone was a quality control coach at Florida while Bengals Defensive Coordinator Teryl Austin was the defensive coordinator for the 2010 season.

• Bengals DE Carlos Dunlap (2007-09) and Chiefs WR Demarcus Robinson (2013-15) both attended Florida. • Kansas City Asst. Strength and Conditioning Coach Ryan Reynolds (201215) and Cincinnati Personnel Executive Steven Radicevic spent the 2012 season together at UCLA. Radicevic served as the Director of Football Operations, while Reynolds held the same role. Reynolds also spent the 2013-15 seasons with the Bruins with Cincinnati G Alex Redmond. • Chiefs LB Terrance Smith (2011-14), OL Cam Erving (2010-14) and DT Derrick Nnadi (2014-17) were all teammates with Bengals OT Bobby Hart (2011-14) for at least one season at Florida State. • Kansas City Wide Receivers Coach Greg Lewis served as Cincinnati WR Tyler Boyd’s (2013-15) position coach at the University of Pittsburgh during the 2014 season. • Cincinnati DE Michael Johnson (2005-08) and Kansas City K Harrison Butker (2013-16) both played at Georgia Tech. • Chiefs DL Allen Bailey (2007-10) and Bengals HB Mark Walton (2015-17) both attended Miami (Fla.). • Bengals WR Cody Core (2012-15) was teammates with Chiefs LB Breeland Speaks (2014-17) at Mississippi for two seasons. • Kansas City LB Justin Houston (2008-10), Cincinnati DT Geno Atkins (2007-09), G Clint Boling (2007-10), WR A.J. Green (2008-10), OT Cordy Glenn (2008-11) and S Shawn Williams (2009-12) were all on the 2009 Georgia Bulldogs football team. • Chiefs LS James Winchester (2010-11), RB Damien Williams (201213), Bengals LB Jordan Evans (2013-16) and RB Joe Mixon (2014-16) all played at the University of Oklahoma. • Bengals WR Josh Malone (2014-16) and Chiefs OL Kahlil McKenzie (2015-17) spent two seasons together at Tennessee. • Kansas City TE Travis Kelce (2008-12) and Cincinnati P Kevin Huber (2005-08) played at the University of Cincinnati together for one season. Hometown • Kansas City RB Spencer Ware and Cincinnati P Kevin Huber and Asst. Special Teams/Offensive Quality Control Coach Brayden Coombs are all natives of Cincinnati, Ohio. • Cincinnati DE Jordan Willis is from Kansas City, Missouri, and attended Rockhurst High School. Willis played collegiately at Kansas State in Manhattan, Kansas. • Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid, CB Orlando Scandrick, LB Nate Orchard, Bengals LB Vontaze Burfict, DT Josh Tupou and WR John Ross all grew up in the Greater Los Angeles area. • Cincinnati Personnel Executive Bill Tobin was listed on Missouri’s roster as a running back from 1960-62. • Bengals Special Teams Coordinator Darrin Simmons is a native of Elkhart, Kansas, and was on the roster at Kansas as the punter from 1993-95. • Chiefs TE Travis Kelce is from Cleveland Heights, Ohio. • Bengals LB Jordan Evans grew up in Norman, Oklahoma, which is where Chiefs LS James Winchester attended college and 45 minutes from where Winchester grew up in Washington, Oklahoma.

• Bengals Head Coach Marvin Lewis (1990-91) and Chiefs Vice President of Sports Medicine and Performance Rick Burkholder (1991-93) spent one season together at the University of Pittsburgh in 1991. Lewis served as the linebackers coach and Burkholder served as an asst. athletic trainer.

Chiefs

7


HEAD COACH ANDY REID NOTES REID VIA THE NFL DRAFT - HIS 1ST ROUND PICKS Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid has had 16 first-round selections as a head coach in the NFL. Prior to 2013, Reid’s team selected as high as second overall (1999) and as late as 31st overall (2005) in the first round.

REID CAREER HIGHLIGHTS • Career record of 188-121-1 in the regular season, as well as an 11-13 postseason record. Reid’s 199 combined wins rank ninth in NFL history. Reid ranks second among active coaches in regular season and postseason wins. He has defeated all 32 NFL teams as a head coach. • His 58 regular season wins in his first six seasons with Kansas City are more than any other head coach in franchise history in their initial six seasons. The Chiefs won back-to-back AFC West titles in 2016 and 2017 for the first time in franchise history. • The Chiefs finished 12-4 in 2016, earning the number two seed and a first-round bye in the playoffs. Reid guided Kansas City to it’s first playoff win in 22 years in 2015. The club finished 11-5 after a 1-5 start, the greatest turnaround in a single season. • The 2013 Chiefs, led by Head Coach Andy Reid, orchestrated the greatest single-season turnaround in franchise history after an 11-5 finish. In 2012, the team finished 2-14, a +9 turnaround in his first season with the club. • During Reid’s 14 seasons in Philadelphia, his teams made the postseason nine times, which ranked third in the NFL behind Indianapolis’ 12 and New England’s 10. • Including his time as an assistant coach, Reid’s teams have now made 19 playoff appearances, as well as three Super Bowl appearances after playing in a combined eight NFC Championships. Reid owns a .608 regular season winning percentage. • Has three career Super Bowl appearances and won Super Bowl XXXI as an assistant in Green Bay. Reid owns three NFC titles and 11 division titles in his career dating back to his days as an assistant. • Mentored Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre while with the Packers along with QB Donovan McNabb with the Eagles.

Yr. No. (Overall) 1999 2 2000 6 2001 25 2002 26 2003 15 2004 16 2005 31 2006 14 2007 -2008 -2009 19 2010 13 2011 21 2012 12 2013 (KC) 1 2014 23 2015 18 2016 -2017 10 2018 --

Selection (School) QB Donovan McNabb (Syracuse) DT Corey Simon (Florida State) WR Freddie Mitchell (UCLA) CB Lito Sheppard (Florida) DE Jerome McDougle (Miami) T Shawn Andrews (Arkansas) DT Mike Patterson (Southern California) DT Brodrick Bunkley (Florida State) No First-Round Selection No First-Round Selection WR Jeremy Maclin (Missouri) DE Brandon Graham (Michigan) G Danny Watkins (Baylor) DT Fletcher Cox (Mississippi State) T Eric Fisher (Central Michigan) LB Dee Ford (Auburn) CB Marcus Peters (Washington) No First-Round Selection QB Patrick Mahomes (Texas Tech) No First-Round Selection

REID’S COACHING TREE Throughout his time in the NFL, Andy Reid has constructed quality coaching staffs to assist him. A number of those assistants have since gone on to coordinator or head coaching responsibilities for other NFL franchises. Below is a list of notable coaches who have come from Andy Reid’s Philadelphia or Kansas City staffs. Coach John Harbaugh Ron Rivera Leslie Frazier Pat Shurmur Brad Childress Steve Spagnuolo Todd Bowles Doug Pederson Sean McDermott Matt Nagy

Team BAL CAR BUF NYG AAF* N/A NYJ PHI BUF CHI

Years 2008-present 2011-present 2018-present Hired in 2018 2013-2017 2009-2011 2015-present 2016-present 2017-present Hired in 2018

Position/Former Position Head Coach Head Coach Former MIN HC Head Coach/Former CLE Former MIN HC Former STL HC Head Coach Head Coach Head Coach Head Coach

ANDY REID’S HEAD COACHING RECORD Year 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 TOTALS

8

Reg. Season 5-11 11-5 11-5 12-4 12-4 13-3 6-10 10-6 8-8 9-6-1 11-5 10-6 8-8 4-12 11-5 9-7 11-5 12-4 10-6 5-1 188-121-1

Pct. .313 .688 .688 .750 .750 .813 .375 .625 .500 .594 .688 .625 .500 .250 .688 .563 .688 .750 .625 .833 .608

Postseason 0-0 1-1 2-1 1-1 1-1 2-1 0-0 1-1 0-0 2-1 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-0 11-13

Overall 5-11 12-6 13-6 13-5 13-5 15-4 6-10 11-7 8-8 11-7-1 11-6 10-7 8-8 4-12 11-6 9-7 12-6 12-5 10-7 5-1 199-134-1

Result 5th in NFC East 2nd in NFC East; reached divisional playoffs 1st in NFC East; reached NFC Championship Game 1st in NFC East; reached NFC Championship Game 1st in NFC East; reached NFC Championship Game 1st in NFC East; reached Super Bowl XXXIX 4th in NFC East 1st in NFC East; reached divisional playoffs 4th in NFC East 2nd in NFC East; reached NFC Championship Game 2nd in NFC East; reached wild card round 1st in NFC East; reached wild card round 2nd in NFC East 4th in NFC East 2nd in AFC West; reached wild card round 2nd in AFC West 2nd in AFC West; reached divisional playoffs 1st in AFC West; reached divisional playoffs 1st in AFC West; reached wild card round TBD 13 Playoff Berths, 8 Div. Titles, 1 NFC Title

Chiefs


REID AS A HEAD COACH VS. THE NFL

MOST OVERALL WINS; ACTIVE NFL HEAD COACHES

Below is Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid’s record against the NFL as a head coach. He is 188-121-1 in the regular season, as well as 11-13 in the postseason. Reid has 199 total career wins as a head coach.

Andy Reid is one of six active NFL head coaches with over 120 victories. He has 199 overall wins and is one of three active coaches with 10 or more postseason victories.

Opponent Reg. Season vs. Denver Broncos 6-6 vs. Kansas City Chiefs 3-0 vs. Oakland Raiders 9-4 vs. Los Angeles Chargers 11-3 vs. AFC West 29-13

Postseason 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Total 6-6 3-0 9-4 11-3 29-13

vs. Baltimore Ravens vs. Cincinnati Bengals vs. Cleveland Browns vs. Pittsburgh Steelers vs. AFC North

3-1 1-3-1 6-0 4-5 14-9-1

0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

3-1 1-3-1 6-0 4-6 14-10-1

vs. Houston Texans vs. Indianapolis Colts vs. Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Tennessee Titans vs. AFC South

6-1 2-4 4-2 1-6 13-13

1-0 0-1 0-0 0-1 1-2

7-1 2-5 4-2 1-7 14-15

vs. Buffalo Bills vs. Miami Dolphins vs. New England Patriots vs. New York Jets vs. AFC East

5-3 5-1 3-4 5-1 18-9

0-0 0-0 0-2 0-0 0-2

5-3 5-1 3-6 5-1 18-11

vs. Dallas Cowboys vs. New York Giants vs. Washington Redskins vs. Philadelphia Eagles vs. NFC East

18-12 16-14 19-11 2-0 55-37

0-1 2-1 0-0 0-0 2-2

18-13 18-15 19-11 2-0 57-39

vs. Arizona Cardinals vs. San Francisco 49ers vs. Seattle Seahawks vs. Los Angeles Rams vs. NFC West

5-7 7-4 4-3 6-2 22-16

0-1 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-2

5-8 7-4 4-3 6-3 22-18

vs. Atlanta Falcons vs. Carolina Panthers vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs. New Orleans Saints vs. NFC South

7-3 5-2 4-4 4-3 20-12

2-0 0-1 2-1 0-1 4-3

9-3 5-3 6-5 4-4 24-15

vs. Chicago Bears vs. Detroit Lions vs. Green Bay Packers vs. Minnesota Vikings vs. NFC North

5-5 4-1 4-4 3-2 16-12

1-0 0-0 1-1 2-0 4-1

6-5 4-1 5-5 5-2 20-13

Rk, 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Coach Bill Belichick, NE/CLE Andy Reid, KC/PHI Mike McCarthy, GB Marvin Lewis, CIN Mike Tomlin, PIT Pete Carroll, SEA

Reg. 254 188 123 129 120 115

Post 28 11 10 0 8 10

Total 282 199 133 129 128 125

Reid defeated the Tennessee Titans in 2013, giving him wins against all 32 NFL teams. He became only the sixth head coach in NFL history to accomplish that feat. Below is a look at all the coaches who have done it. Bill Belichick (NE) Tony Dungy (Retired) Mike Shanahan (Retired)

Bill Parcells (Retired) Andy Reid (KC) John Fox (Retired)

MOST NFL WINS AS HEAD COACH Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13t. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Head Coach Don Shula George Halas Bill Belichick Tom Landry Curly Lambeau Chuck Noll Marty Schottenheimer Dan Reeves Andy Reid Chuck Knox Bill Parcells Tom Coughlin Jeff Fisher Mike Shanahan Mike Holmgren Joe Gibbs Paul Brown Bud Grant Bill Cowher Marv Levy Steve Owen Tony Dungy John Fox Hank Stram Weeb Ewbank

Win Total 347 324 282 270 229 209 205 201 199 193 183 182 178 178 174 171 170 168 161 154 153 148 141 136 134

- Playoffs Included * Bold Denotes Active NFL Coaches

REID’S HEAD COACHING CAREER WHEN... • Scoring on opening drive: 87-26 • Scoring first: 120-38 • Leading at half: 150-29 • Leading after three quarters: 149-28 • Winning time of possession: 118-34-1 • Winning turnover battle: 117-24 • Out-rushing opponent: 114-46-1 • Out-passing opponent: 111-50-1 • Out-gaining opponent: 124-43-1 • 40%+ 3rd down conversions: 96-36 • 50%+ 3rd down conversions: 54-12 • Not throwing an INT: 103-41 • Having a 300-yard passer: 39-19-1

Chiefs

• Having a 100+ yard rusher: 56-18 • Having a 100+ yard receiver: 67-27 • Having two 100+ yard receivers: 9-2 • Having no turnovers: 57-20 • Scoring 20+ points: 156-44 • Scoring 30+ points: 80-8 • Rushing for 150+ yards: 58-15 • Having 20+ first downs: 108-43 • Not allowing a sack: 18-10 • Allowing two or fewer sacks: 117-56-1 • Recording 2+ INTs: 73-17 • Recording 3+ turnovers: 73-12 • Opp. less than 40% on 3rd down: 140-51-1

• Opp. less than 30% on 3rd down: 92-17-1 • Scoring a defensive TD: 46-9 • Recording 3+ sacks: 106-29-1 • Recording 5+ sacks: 43-5-1 • Allowing 17 or fewer points: 127-24-1 • Not allowing a 100-yard rusher: 153-85-1 • Not allowing a 100-yard receiver: 128-82 • Not allowing a 300-yard passer: 165-91-1 • Not allowing a rushing TD: 126-43-1 • Not allowing a passing TD: 56-18 • Not allowing an offensive TD: 32-3 • Having a KR or PR TD: 17-5

9


CHIEFS GENERAL MANAGER BRETT VEACH VEACH IN THE NFL DRAFT AS PERSONNEL MAN Since entering the NFL, Chiefs GM Brett Veach has been a part of personnel staffs that have drafted the below first-round picks. Yr. No. (Overall) 2007 (PHI) -2008 -2009 19 2010 13 2011 21 2012 12 2013 (KC) 1 2014 23 2015 18 2016 -2017 10 2018 --

Selection (School) No First-Round Selection No First-Round Selection WR Jeremy Maclin (Missouri) DE Brandon Graham (Michigan) G Danny Watkins (Baylor) DT Fletcher Cox (Mississippi State) T Eric Fisher (Central Michigan) LB Dee Ford (Auburn) CB Marcus Peters (Washington) No First-Round Selection QB Patrick Mahomes (Texas Tech) No First-Round Selection

QUICK FACTS ON CHIEFS GM BRETT VEACH

MAKING MOVES

• Brett Veach was named the seventh general manager in Kansas City Chiefs history on July 10, 2017. Veach is in his second season as an NFL general manager and his 12th year in the National Football League.

After being named the new GM of the Chiefs on July 10, 2017, Brett Veach immediately started making moves. In his short time as a GM, Veach has made a number of significant trades and signed multiple notable free agents that have contributed to the success of the team.

• Prior to being elevated, he previously served as the Chiefs Co-Director of Player Personnel. • Veach reports directly to Chiefs Chairman & CEO Clark Hunt, who had this to say upon hiring him; “Brett has a sharp football mind, a tremendous work ethic and a keen eye for finding talent. Over the last four seasons he’s played a critical role in building our football team.” • He is in his sixth season with the Chiefs after originally joining the club in 2013. He was promoted to Co-Director of Player Personnel prior to the 2015 season after serving two seasons as the club’s Pro and College Personnel Analyst (2013-14). • The Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania, native, served as a Southeast Regional Scout for the Philadelphia Eagles (2011-12) after originally joining Philadelphia’s Player Personnel Department as a Pro and College Scout in 2010. • Prior to entering the scouting department, Veach was the Assistant to Head Coach Andy Reid for three seasons in Philadelphia (2007-09). • Before joining the Eagles, Veach was the Supervisor of Intercollegiate Athletic Events at his alma mater, the University of Delaware (2005-06). He was a four-year letterman as a wide receiver for the Blue Hens, catching 99 passes for 1,470 yards (14.8 avg.). He left Delaware as the school’s all-time leader in kickoff return yards with 1,558 yards.

Name LB Reggie Ragland OL Cam Erving K Harrison Butker CB Kendall Fuller WR Sammy Watkins LB Anthony Hitchens DT Xavier Williams

Date 8/28/17 8/30/17 9/26/17 3/14/18 3/15/18 3/15/18 3/21/18

How Acquired TR (BUF) TR (CLE) FA - 17 TR (WAS) FA - 18 FA - 18 FA - 18

VEACH’S FIRST DRAFT CLASS The 2018 NFL Draft marked GM Brett Veach’s first draft as a general manager in the NFL. Posed with the challenge of going into his first draft without a first round pick, Veach produced a noteworthy draft class with the potential to contribute to the Chiefs in the 2018 season. Rd, 2 3 3 4 6 6

No. (Overall) 46 75 100 124 196 198

Selection (School) LB Breeland Speaks (Ole Miss) DT Derrick Nnadi (Florida State) LB Dorian O’Daniel (Clemson) S Armani Watts (Texas A&M) CB Tremon Smith (Central Arkansas) G Kahlil McKenzie (Tennessee)

• He was a standout running back for Mount Carmel High School. • Wife - Alison; Children - twin sons, Elijah and Wylan, and a daughter, Ella.

VEACH’S NFL RECORD Year 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 TOTALS

10

Reg. Season 8-8 9-6-1 11-5 10-6 8-8 4-12 11-5 9-7 11-5 12-4 10-6 5-1 108-73-1

Pct. .500 .594 .688 .625 .500 .250 .688 .563 .688 .750 .625 .833 .596

Playoffs 0-0 2-1 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-0 3-7

Overall 8-8 11-7-1 11-6 10-7 8-8 4-12 11-6 9-7 12-6 12-5 10-7 5-1 111-80-1

Result 4th in NFC East 2nd in NFC East; reached NFC Championship Game 2nd in NFC East; reached Wild Card Playoffs 1st in NFC East; reached Wild Card Playoffs 2nd in NFC East 4th in NFC East 2nd in AFC West; Reached Wild Card Playoffs 2nd in AFC West 2nd in AFC West; Reached Divisional Playoffs 1st in AFC West; Reached Divisional Playoffs 1st in AFC West; Reached Wild Card Playoffs TBD 7 Playoff Appearances, 3 Div. Titles

Chiefs


CHIEFS QUARTERBACK PATRICK MAHOMES MAHOMES OFF TO HOT START According to ESPN Stats & Info, Chiefs QB Patrick Mahomes became the youngest NFL player to throw six+ touchdown passes in a single game in league history. Below is a look at other QBs and the age in which they had their first six+ TD performances. AGE OF QB WITH SIX+ TD PERFORMANCE Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Name Patrick Mahomes Mitchell Trubisky Nick Foles Aaron Rodgers Tom Brady Drew Brees Ryan Fitzpatrick Eli Manning

Team KC CHI PHI GB NE NO HOU NYG

TDS 6 6 7 6 6 6 6 6

Age 22 24 24 28 30 30 32 34

Through the first three games of an NFL season, Mahomes is the only quarterback in league history to throw 13 TD passes. (ESPN Stats & Info)

MAHOMES AMONG LEAGUE PASSING LEADERS Through six weeks of the NFL season, Chiefs QB Patrick Mahomes ranks among the top of the league in several categories. Below is a look at where Mahomes sits on the passing leaderboard. 2018 TOUCHDOWN-TO-INTERCEPTION RATIO Rk. Name 1. Patrick Mahomes 2t. Philip Rivers Matt Ryan 4t. Drew Brees Aaron Rodgers

Team KC LAC ATL NO GB

TDS 18 15 14 11 12

INTS 4 3 2 0 1

Name Drew Brees Philip Rivers Ryan Fitzpatrick Matt Ryan Patrick Mahomes

Team NO LAC TB ATL KC

Rating 122.3 115.1 114.4 113.6 112.2

2018 YARDS PER ATTEMPT Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Name Ryan Fitzpatrick Jared Goff Patrick Mahomes Philip Rivers Matt Ryan

Team TB LAR KC LAC ATL

Y/A 10.51 9.94 8.80 8.77 8.73

2018 PASS PLAYS OF 25+ YARDS Rk. Name 1. Patrick Mahomes 2. Ben Roethlisberger 3t. Jared Goff Aaron Rodgers Matt Ryan

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4t.

Name Peyton Manning Tom Brady Brett Favre Patrick Mahomes Daunte Culpepper

Team DEN NE GB KC MIN

TDS 22 21 20 18 18

Year 2013 2007 1996 2018 2004

MAHOMES IN CHIEFS RECORD BOOK Chiefs QB Patrick Mahomes has already cracked into the Chiefs record books with only seven games under his belt. Below is a look at different categories where Mahomes cemented his name in Chiefs history. CHIEFS RECORD FOR MOST TD PASSES IN SINGLE GAME

2018 PASSER RATING Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Diff. +14 +12 +12 +11 +11

MOST TD PASSES THROUGH FIRST SIX NFL WEEKS

Team KC PIT LAR GB ATL

25+ Yard Passes 23 19 16 16 16

Team TB KC SEA LAC CHI

TD % 8.5 8.5 7.9 7.7 6.8

Rk. Name 1t. Patrick Mahomes Len Dawson

TDS 6 6

Opp. at PIT DEN

Date Sept. 16, 2018 Nov. 1, 1964

CHIEFS RECORD FOR TD PASSES THROUGH WEEK 5 Rk. Name 1. Patrick Mahomes 2. Trent Green 3t. Len Dawson Len Dawson Len Dawson

Year 2018 2002 1962 1963 1966

Comp. 63.7% 64.1% 60.0% 59.4% 54.3%

Yds. 1,865 1,484 1,140 1,132 775

TD 18 15 13 13 13

CHIEFS RECORD FOR HIGHEST PASSER RATING IN SINGLE GAME Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Name Alex Smith Steve Bono Patrick Mahomes Trent Green Alex Smith

Rtg. 158.3 156.6 154.8 154.3 148.6

Opp. at OAK at SEA at PIT at WAS at NE

Date Dec. 15, 2013 Sept. 3, 1995 Sept. 16, 2018 Sept. 30, 2001 Sept. 7, 2017

2018 TD PERCENTAGE Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Name Ryan Fitzpatrick Patrick Mahomes Russell Wilson Philip Rivers Mitchell Trubisky

Chiefs

11


BY THE NUMBERS - PATRICK MAHOMES VS. THE NFL Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes is entering his second season in the NFL and his first as the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s starter. Mahomes has led the Chiefs to a 5-1 record in 2018, the top mark in the AFC. Mahomes now has 1,865 yards through the air in the 2018 season, the most for a quarterback through the first six games in franchise history and his 18 passing touchdowns lead the NFL. AFC West Team Broncos Chargers Chiefs Raiders Total

G 2 1 0 0 3

Att. 80 27 0 0 107

Comp. 50 15 0 0 65

Yds. 588 256 0 0 844

TD 1 4 0 0 5

Int. 1 0 0 0 1

Pct. 62.5 55.6 0 0 60.7

Rtg. 83.8 127.5 0 0 97.3

AFC East Team Bills Dolphins Jets Patriots Total

G 0 0 0 1 1

Att. 0 0 0 36 36

Comp. 0 0 0 23 23

Yds. 0 0 0 352 352

TD 0 0 0 4 4

Int. 0 0 0 2 2

Pct. 0 0 0 63.9 63.9

Rtg. 0 0 0 110.0 110.0

AFC North Team Bengals Browns Ravens Steelers Total

G 0 0 0 1 1

Att. 0 0 0 28 28

Comp. 0 0 0 23 23

Yds. 0 0 0 326 326

TD 0 0 0 6 6

Int. 0 0 0 0 0

Pct. 0 0 0 82.1 82.1

Rtg. 0 0 0 154.8 154.8

AFC South Team Colts Jaguars Texans Titans Total

G 0 1 0 0 1

Att. 0 38 0 0 38

Comp. 0 22 0 0 22

Yds. 0 313 0 0 313

TD 0 0 0 0 0

Int. 0 2 0 0 2

Pct. 0 57.9 0 0 57.9

Rtg. 0 62.7 0 0 62.7

AFC Total

G 6

Att. 209

Comp. 133

Yds. 1,835

TD 15

Int. 5

Pct. 63.6

Rtg. 105.7

NFC East Team Cowboys Eagles Giants Redskins Total

G 0 0 0 0 0

Att. 0 0 0 0 0

Comp. 0 0 0 0 0

Yds. 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

Int. 0 0 0 0 0

Pct. 0 0 0 0 0

Rtg. 0 0 0 0 0

NFC North Team Bears Lions Packers Vikings Total

G 0 0 0 0 0

Att. 0 0 0 0 0

Comp. 0 0 0 0 0

Yds. 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

Int. 0 0 0 0 0

Pct. 0 0 0 0 0

Rtg. 0 0 0 0 0

NFC South Team Buccaneers Falcons Panthers Saints Total

G 0 0 0 0 0

Att. 0 0 0 0 0

Comp. 0 0 0 0 0

Yds. 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

Int. 0 0 0 0 0

Pct. 0 0 0 0 0

Rtg. 0 0 0 0 0

NFC West Team 49ers Cardinals Rams Seahawks Total

G 1 0 0 0 1

Att. 38 0 0 0 38

Comp. 24 0 0 0 24

Yds. 314 0 0 0 314

TD 3 0 0 0 3

Int. 0 0 0 0 0

Pct. 63.2 0 0 0 63.2

Rtg. 115.5 0 0 0 115.5

NFC Total

G 1

Att. 38

Comp. 24

Yds. 314

TD 3

Int. 0

Pct. 63.2

Rtg. 115.5

12

Chiefs


MISC. OFFENSIVE NOTES KAREEM HUNT EARN’S NFL’S RUSHING TITLE

KELCE JOINS THE 4,000 CLUB - REC. STREAK

Last season as a rookie, RB Kareem Hunt ranked first in the NFL in rushing yards. He ranked second among all backs in 10+ yard carries (35). Hunt ranked third in the league in yards from scrimmage (1,782).

With 109 receiving yards in Kansas City’s Week 2 game against Pittsburgh (9/16/18), TE Travis Kelce became just the second tight end in franchise history to cross the 4,000-yard plateau for their career, now owning 4,368 career receiving yards. He has three 100-yard receiving games in 2018.

Hunt scored 11 touchdowns in his rookie season and had a 50+-yard run in his first three games, two of which went for TDs. He averaged 111.4 yards per game in scrimmage yards. With 116 rushing yards in the game against Oakland (12/10), Hunt became just the second rookie in franchise history to rush for over 1,000 yards. Hunt had a 53-yard rushing touchdown in the win over Philadelphia and a 69-yard rushing TD vs. LA Chargers. Combined with his 78-yard touchdown reception in Week 1 of 2017, Hunt became the first player in NFL history to record a 50+ yard scrimmage touchdown in each of his first three games. 2017 NFL Leaders - Rushing Yards Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Player Kareem Hunt Todd Gurley Le’Veon Bell LeSean McCoy Mark Ingram

Team KC LAR PIT BUF NO

Att. 272 279 321 287 230

Yards 1,327 1,305 1,291 1,138 1,124

Avg. 4.88 4.68 4.02 3.97 4.89

TDs 8 13 9 6 12

2017 NFL Leaders - 10+ Yard Carries (Running Backs) Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4t 6.

Player Todd Gurley Kareem Hunt Melvin Gordon Le’Veon Bell LeSean McCoy Jordan Howard

Team LAR KC LAC PIT BUF CHI

10+ Yard Carries 39 35 34 33 33 32

Player Mark Ingram Kareem Hunt Todd Gurley C.J. Anderson Jordan Howard

Team NO KC LAR DEN CHI

Att. 230 272 279 245 276

Player Todd Gurley Le’Veon Bell Kareem Hunt LeSean McCoy Melvin Gordon

Team LAR PIT KC BUF LAC

Att. 343 406 325 346 342

Player Tony Gonzalez Travis Kelce Fred Arbanas Walter White Jonathan Hayes

Seasons 1997-08 2013-18 1962-70 1975-79 1985-93

TE Travis Kelce has recorded at least one pass reception in 69 consecutive games from Week 1 of the 2014 season (Sept. 7, 2014) through Week 6 of the 2018 season, which is good enough for the third longest streak in franchise history. His seven receptions in the MNF game against Denver (10/30/17) moved him past former Chiefs WR Eddie Kennison (55) for third place. Chiefs Record Book - Consecutive Games with Reception Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Yards/Carry 4.89 4.88 4.68 4.11 4.07

Yards 2,093 1,946 1,782 1,586 1,581

Yards 10,940 4,368 3,101 2,396 1,541

Games 131 83 69 55 48

Player Tony Gonzalez Stephone Paige Travis Kelce Eddie Kennison Priest Holmes

Years Dec. 4, 2000 – Dec. 28, 2008 Nov. 17, 1985 – Sept. 29, 1991 Sept. 7, 2014 – Present Dec. 9, 2001 – Oct. 2, 2005 Sept. 9, 2001 – Sept. 19, 2004

Since entering the NFL in 2013, Chiefs TE Travis Kelce ranks first among all tight ends in yards after catch.

2017 NFL Leaders - Scrimmage Yards Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

KELCE YARDS AFTER CATCH

2017 NFL Leaders - Yards Per Carry (225+ Attempts) Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Chiefs Record Book - Most Rec. Yards by a TE, Career

Per Gm. 139.5 129.7 111.4 99.1 98.8

TDs 19 11 11 8 12

Pos. TE TE TE TE TE

Name Travis Kelce Rob Gronkowski Martellus Bennett Jimmy Graham Greg Olsen

Rec. 340 313 293 368 337

Yards 4,368 4,921 3,101 4,501 4,273

YAC 2,347 1,968 1,687 1,594 1,536

TE Travis Kelce has 4,368 receiving yards with 53.73% of those yards (2,347) coming after the catch in the 70 games he’s played in his career. Below is a list of elite NFL tight ends and where each ranks in percetage of total receiving yards coming after the catch through their first 70 games played. Tight End Travis Kelce Rob Gronkowski Tony Gonzalez Jason Witten Antonio Gates Shannon Sharpe

Yards 4,368 4,804 3,561 3,378 4,053 2,501

YAC 2,347 2,072 1,133 1,179 1,461 835

Pct. 53.73 43.13 31.82 34.90 36.05 33.39

KELCE OFF THE CHARTS Chiefs TE Travis Kelce ranks first among all tight ends in receiving yards since Week One of the 2016 season and 9th among all players. Kelce’s stretch is highlighted by 1,125 yards on 85 recptions in 2016. NFL Leaders (Since Week 1 - 2016) Receiving Yards Since Week One Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Chiefs

Pos. TE TE TE TE TE

Name Travis Kelce Zach Ertz Rob Gronkowski Jimmy Graham Delanie Walker

Rec. 201 200 120 149 143

Yards 2,631 2,120 2,029 1,792 1,659

Avg. 13.1 10.6 16.9 12.0 11.6

13


MISC. OFFENSIVE NOTES PUT IT ON THE BOARD

MITCHELL SCHWARTZ ON A STREAK

Through Week 6 of the 2018 regular season, the Chiefs rank second in the NFL in points scored per game (35.8). The club also ranks first in the NFL in first quarter points scored (65), 17 points higher than the next team.

Chiefs T Mitchell Schwartz ranks first among offensive tackles with 102 consecutive games started in his career. He has not missed a snap since entering the league. According to NFLGSIS, Schwartz has a streak of 6,742 consecutive snaps, highest current streak number in the NFL.

NFL Leaders - Points Per Game (2018) Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Team NO KC LAR NE LAC

Points Per Game 36.0 35.8 32.7 29.3 29.2

Team KC BAL CIN LAC LAR

Player

Team

102

Mitchell Schwartz

CLE/KC

ANTHONY SHERMAN ON A STREAK

NFL Leaders - 1st Quarter Pts Scored (2018) Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Games

1st Quarter Pts 65 48 45 42 41

Chiefs FB Anthony Sherman has been one of the most consistent players in the NFL. Sherman ranks first among fullbacks in the NFL for consecutive games played. NFL Leaders, Consecutive Games Played, Fullbacks Rk. Games 1. 86

Player Anthony Sherman

Team Chiefs

2.

Patrick DiMarco

Bills

84

NET YARDS PER PLAY LEADERS 1,000 YARD RB, WR, TE During the 2017 season the Chiefs became only the fifth team in NFL history to feature a 1,000 yard running back, tight end and wide receiver. The Chiefs are the first team in 10 years to accomplish this feat following the 2007 Cleveland Browns. RB Kareem Hunt rushed for 1,327 yards, TE Travis Kelce had 1,038 yards receiving and WR Tyreek Hill finished the season with 1,183 receiving yards. Previous teams with 1,000 yard RB, WR & TE: 2017 Chiefs: K. Hunt (1,327), T. Kelce (1,038), T. Hill (1,183) 2007 Browns: J. Lewis (1,304), K. Winslow Jr. (1,106), B.Edwards (1,289) 1997 Broncos: T.Davis (1,750), S.Sharpe (1,107), R.Smith (1,180) 1981 Chargers: C.Muncie (1,144), K.Winslow Sr. (1,075), C.Joiner (1,188) 1981 Vikings: T.Brown (1,063), J.Senser (1,004), S.White (1,001)

PROTECTING THE FOOTBALL UNDER REID Dating back to Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid’s arrival in 2013, the Kansas City offense has remained among the NFL’s top-five teams when it comes to protecting the football. The Chiefs have just 83 turnovers in that span, trailing only New England (80). Rk. 1. 2 3 4. 5t.

Team NE KC SEA GB BUF MIN

G 86 86 86 86 86 86

TOs 80 83 90 105 108 108

RACKING UP THE POINTS Since Andy Reid was named Head Coach in 2013, the Chiefs have had at least four games each season where they’ve scored 30 or more points. In 2017, KC scored over 30 five times. In 2018, the club has already scored over 30 points five times in its first six games.

Through Week 6 of the 2018 season, the Chiefs rank fourth in the NFL in yards per play. NFL Leaders - Net Yards Per Play (2018) Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Team TB LAR LAC KC NO

Net Yards Per Play 7.19 7.16 6.78 6.77 6.48

CHIEFS EMBRACING NEW HELMET TECHNOLOGY The Kansas City Chiefs were among the league-leaders when it came to the number of orders placed for the new Vicis ZERO1 helmet, according to Chiefs Director of Equipment Allen Wright. The helmet consists of technology that’s new to the industry. The “ZERO1” features a soft outer shell and an underlying layer of columns designed to mitigate collisions from multiple directions. It’s the first helmet that’s made of a flexible polymer on the outside that deforms upon impact, much like that of a bumper on a car. It reduces the overall impact to the head, and it’s being used by many players around the league and the Chiefs. Kansas City currently has 40 players in Vicis helmets including: QB Patrick Mahomes, WR Sammy Watkins, S Eric Berry, and C Mitch Morse, among others. In collaboration with the NFL and the NFLPA, the 2017 helmet laboratory testing performance results chart, which is posted in locker rooms across the NFL, has the ZERO1 ranked as the best helmet on the market to reduce head impact severity.

Most 30-Point Games, Season Rk. Games Seasons 1. 8 1966, 2002, 2004 2. 7 1999, 2003 3. 6 1960, 1967, 2010 4. 5 1962, 1965, 1968, 1983, 1994, 2005, 2006, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 5. 4 1961, 1963, 1969, 1980, 1984, 1985, 1990, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2014

14

Chiefs


MISC. OFFENSIVE NOTES HILL FINDING THE ENDZONE

HILL’S 50+ PRODUCTION

Chiefs WR Tyreek Hill ranks tied for second among all NFL receivers in overall touchdowns since the start of the 2016 season. Hill has scored six receiving and one return touchdown in 2018.

WR Tyreek Hill owns 16 plays of at least 50-yards with all but two resulting in a touchdown, including five return TDs (4 PR, 1 KR), seven receiving TDs and two rushing TDs. Below is a list of his 50+ yard plays. He owns three such plays this season, all resulting in a TD.

NFL Leaders (2016-18) Overall Touchdowns by a WR Rk. Name Touchdowns 1. Davante Adams 28 2t. Tyreek Hill 27 Antonio Brown 27 4. Jordy Nelson 23 5t. Mike Evans 20 DeAndre Hopkins 20

HILL’S 25+ YARD CATCHES WR Tyreek Hill has recorded 34 catches for 567 yards this season, including nine catches of 25-yards or more, which ranks first in the NFL. Teammate TE Travis Kelce ranks tied for fourth on the list with six catches of 25+ yards. Rk. Name 1. Tyreek Hill 2t. DeSean Jackson Julio Jones 4t. Travis Kelce John Brown DeAndre Hopkins

Rec. 34 21 44 33 21 44

Yards 567 501 707 468 424 657

TD 6 3 0 3 3 3

25+ 9 7 7 6 6 6

Date Jan. 1, 2017 Sept. 9, 2018 Nov. 27, 2016 Oct. 8, 2017 Dec. 3, 2017 Dec. 8, 2016 Oct. 14, 2018 Sept. 7, 2017 Dec. 25, 2016 Dec. 18, 2016 Oct. 19, 2017 Dec. 16, 2017 Sept. 9, 2018 Nov. 5, 2017 Dec. 24, 2017 Oct. 16, 2016

Opp. @ SD @ LAC @ DEN @ HOU @ NYJ OAK @ NE @ NE DEN TEN @ OAK LAC @ LAC @ DAL MIA @ OAK

50+ Yard Play 95-yard PR TD 91-yard PR TD 86-yard KR TD 82-yard PR TD 79-yard TD reception 78-yard PR TD 75-yard TD reception 75-yard TD reception 70-yard TD rush 68-yard TD rush 64-yard TD reception 64-yard TD reception 58-yard TD reception 56-yard TD reception 52-yard reception 50-yard PR

• The Chiefs are 10-5 in games that Hill records a play of 50+ yards. • He’s recorded a play of 50+ yards in 40.5 percent (15 of the 37) of the games he’s played in.

HILL’S ROOKIE SEASON

• Hill has had one game with two plays of 50+ yards both resulting in touchdowns. In the club’s 2018 season opener at Los Angeles, Hill recorded a 91-yard punt return and a 58-yard TD reception. Hill joined Pro Football Hall of Famer Bob Hayes (December 8, 1968 vs. Pittsburgh) and Tavon Austin (November 10, 2013 at Indianapolis) as the only players in NFL history to record a 50+ yard touchdown catch and a 90+ yard punt-return touchdown in a single game. (Credit NFL Stats)

Rookie WR Tyreek Hill had six receiving touchdowns in 16 games ranking him tied for first in franchise history for most receiving touchdowns by a rookie. Below is a look at the Chiefs rookie record book for receiving TDs.

• His 95- and 91-yard punt returns rank first and fourth, respectively, in franchise history. Hill’s four career punt return TDs (all were 50+ yards) rank tied for second place in franchise history.

Rk. Player 1t. Tyreek Hill Fred Arbanas Stephone Paige 4t. Chris Burford Otis Taylor Bill Jones Tim Barnett Dwayne Bowe

TD 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5

Season 2016 1962 1983 1960 1965 1990 1991 2007

SAMMY WATKINS RECEIVING AVG. Since entering the NFL in 2014, WR Sammy Watkins has the fifth most yards per catch among all active pass catchers with 200+ receptions.

Hill found a knack for returning punts early in his career. Through 16 games, the newcomer led the NFL in punt return yards with 592 total yards. Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Player Tyreek Hill Tavon Austin Jamison Crowder Jalen Richard Brandon Tate

Team KC LA WAS OAK BUF

Ret. 39 44 27 34 26

Yards 592 364 328 306 301

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Name DeSean Jackson T.Y. Hilton Rob Gronkowski Kenny Stills Sammy Watkins

Rec. 213 320 274 205 214

Yards 3,871 5,177 4,329 3,220 3,324

Avg 18.2 16.2 15.8 15.7 15.5

Avg. 15.2 8.3 12.1 9.0 11.6

• According to ESPN Stats & Info, Hill became the first player with a rushing TD, receiving TD and kick return TD in a single game since Gale Sayers (1965 Bears against Vikings) with his performance against the Denver Broncos on Nov. 27, 2016. • According to the National Football League, during Hill’s kickoff return touchdown vs. Denver on Nov. 27, Hill reached a maximum speed of 22.77 miles per hour on his TD run, the fastest by a ball carrier in the NFL in 2016. Hill was clocked at 23.24 MPH in a kickoff return against Houston on Sept. 18, 2016, but the play was nulified by penalty.

Chiefs

15


CHIEFS DEFENSIVE NOTES CHIEFS TAKEAWAYS UNDER REID Dating back to 2013 when Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid and Defensive Coordinator Bob Sutton arrived in Kansas City, the Chiefs defense ranks first in the AFC and tied for fourth in the NFL when it comes to forcing opponent turnovers, tallying 147 total takeaways. Rk. 1. 2t. 4. 5.

Team CAR PHI ARI KC SEA

G 85 86 86 86 86

Takeaways 152 148 148 147 143

INTS SINCE 2013 The Chiefs rank third in the AFC and tied for fifth in the NFL with 89 interceptions since 2013. Rk. 1t. 3. 4. 5t.

INTs 94 94 92 91 89 89

Team Cincinnati Bengals Buffalo Bills Carolina Panthers Arizona Cardinals Kansas City Chiefs Seattle Seahawks

POINTS PER GAME ALLOWED

FEWEST YARDS PER PASS ATTEMPT ALLOWED Since 2013, the Chiefs have allowed just under seven yards per pass attempt. They rank fifth in the AFC and seventh in the NFL over that span.

Dating back to 2013, Kansas City’s defense ranks third in the NFL in allowing opposing teams to score just 19.7 points per game.

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

YPA 6.49 6.52 6.78 6.93 6.96

Team Denver Broncos Cincinnati Bengals Buffalo Bills Baltimore Ravens Kansas City Chiefs

Team Seattle Seahawks New England Patriots Kansas City Chiefs Cincinnati Bengals Baltimore Ravens

PPG 17.5 19.3 19.7 20.3 20.4

PASSES DEFENSED Going back to 2013, the club ranks first in the NFL for most passes defensed with 478 passes defensed. Rk. 1. 2. 3.

Team Kansas City Chiefs Cincinnati Bengals Philadelphia Eagles

PD 478 471 466

RUSHING TOUCHDOWNS ALLOWED Since 2013, the Chiefs have allowed only 54 rushing touchdowns, which is sixth in the NFL and fourth in the AFC. Rk. 1. 2. 3t. 5. 6.

Team New England Patriots Baltimore Ravens New York Jets Carolina Panthers Minnesota Vikings Kansas City Chiefs

Rushing TDs Allowed 38 49 51 51 53 54

GET YOUR HANDS DIRTY

OPPONENT COMPLETION PERCENTAGE Dating back to 2013, Kansas City’s pass defense is allowing opposing quarterbacks to complete just 58.0 percent of passes, ranking first in the NFL. Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Comp. % 58.0 59.4 60.0 60.5 60.6

Team Kansas City Chiefs Denver Broncos Buffalo Bills New England Patriots New York Jets

Getting after the opposing quarterback has been a point of pride for the Kansas City Chiefs. The Chiefs totaled 47.0 team sacks in 2015, 28.0 sacks in 2016 by 11 different players and had 31.0 in 2017 by 13 different players. The club has 17.0 sacks through six games in 2018 by eight players. LB Dee Ford DL Allen Bailey LB Justin Houston DL Chris Jones

4.0 4.0 3.0 2.0

DT Xavier Williams LB Terrance Smith LB Breeland Speaks S Armani Watts

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

OPPONENT PASSER RATING Since 2013, the Chiefs are holding opposing teams to an 81.2 passer rating, placing them third in the AFC and fourth in the NFL. Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

16

Passer Rtg 77.4 80.0 80.1 81.2 82.1

Team Seattle Seahawks Cincinnati Bengals Buffalo Bills Kansas City Chiefs Denver Broncos

Chiefs


CHIEFS DEFENSIVE NOTES JUSTIN HOUSTON BY THE NUMBERS

HOUSTON ON A ROLL LB Justin Houston has 21 career multi-sack games, including a career-high six such performances in 2014. CHIEFS RECORD BOOK MOST MULTI-SACK GAMES, CAREER 1. 27 Derrick Thomas 1989-99 2. 21 Justin Houston 2011-18 3. 20 Tamba Hali 2006-17 4. 19 Neil Smith 1988-96 5. 13 Jared Allen 2004-07 Since 2011 (Houston’s first NFL season), he ranks tied for fourth in the NFL and fourth in the AFC in sacks.

Houston Sacks by QB Quarterback Sacks Michael Vick 6.5 Philip Rivers 6.0 Peyton Manning 5.0 Trevor Siemian 5.0 Tom Brady 3.0 Drew Brees 3.0 Caleb Hanie 3.0 Blaine Gabbert 3.0 Austin Davis 3.0 Derek Carr 3.0 Jimmy Garoppolo 3.0 Joe Flacco 2.0 Jake Locker 2.0 Drew Stanton 2.0 Ben Roethlisberger 2.0 Matt Ryan 2.0 Brock Osweiler 2.0 Tim Tebow 1.5 Matthew Stafford 1.5 Deshaun Watson 1.5 Case Keenum 1.5 Carson Wentz 1.0 Mark Sanchez 1.0 Cam Newton 1.0 Ryan Fitzpatrick 1.0 Terrelle Pryor 1.0 Jason Campbell 1.0 Ryan Tannehill 1.0 Colin Kaepernick 1.0 Brian Hoyer 1.0 Teddy Bridgewater 1.0 Tyrod Taylor 1.0

Houston Sacks by Team Team Sacks Denver 14.5 LA Chargers 6.0 Philadelphia 5.5 New England 4.0 Oakland 4.0 San Francisco 3.0 Tennessee 3.0 Chicago 3.0 New Orleans 3.0 Jacksonville 3.0 St. Louis 3.0 N.Y. Jets 3.0 Baltimore 2.0 Arizona 2.0 Pittsburgh 2.0 Atlanta 2.0 Houston 3.0 Detroit 1.5 Buffalo 1.0 Carolina 1.0 Cleveland 1.0 Miami 1.0 Minnesota 1.0

LB Justin Houston owns seven 3.0-plus sack games in his career. Houston has recorded 72.5 sacks in 94 career games played, averaging over a half sack per game (0.77).

Chiefs

Opposing QB Caleb Hanie Drew Brees Blaine Gabbert Michael Vick Austin Davis Philip Rivers Trevor Siemian

HOUSTON IN NFL RECORD BOOK Justin Houston’s franchise record 22.0 sacks in 2014 was just 0.5 sack shy of Michael Strahan’s NFL record 22.5 set in 2001. Houston’s 22.0 sacks tie him with four other players, including Pro Football Hall of Famers Reggie White and Chris Doleman. Rk. Player 1. Michael Strahan* 2t. Justin Houston Jared Allen Chris Doleman* Reggie White* Mark Gastineau

Result W, 10-3 W, 27-24 OT W, 28-2 W, 26-16 W 34-7 W 19-7 W, 30-27 OT

Year 2001 2014 2011 1989 1987 1984

Sacks 22.5 22.0 22.0 22.0 22.0 22.0

*Pro Football Hall of Famer

WHERE HE RANKS IN CHIEFS HISTORY In 2014, Justin Houston broke the Chiefs franchise record for sacks in a single season with 22.0. Houston’s 22.0 sacks were two more than Pro Football Hall of Famer Derrick Thomas’ 20.0 more than two decades prior in 1990. Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5t.

HOUSTON WE HAVE A PROBLEM

Date Opponent 12/4/11 @ Chicago 9/23/12 @ New Orleans 9/8/13 @ Jacksonville 9/19/13 @ Philadelphia 10/26/14 vs. St. Louis 12/28/14 vs. San Diego 11/28/16 @ Denver

NFL LEADERS SACKS, SINCE 2011 (HOUSTON’S FIRST NFL SEASON) 1. 89.0 Von Miller Denver 2. 83.0 J.J. Watt Houston 3. 73.5 Cameron Wake Miami 4t. 72.5 Justin Houston Kansas City 72.5 Ryan Kerrigan Washington

Player Justin Houston Derrick Thomas* Jared Allen Neil Smith Tamba Hali Neil Smith Art Still Derrick Thomas*

Year 2014 1990 2007 1993 2010 1992 1984 1992

Sacks 22.0 20.0 15.5 15.0 14.5 14.5 14.5 14.5

*Pro Football Hall of Famer

Total 3.0 (-15.0 yds) 3.0 (-25.0 yds) 3.0 (-27.0 yds.) 4.5 (-28.0 yds.) 3.0 (-17.0 yds.) 4.0 (-21.0 yds.) 3.0 (-17.0 yds)

17


CHIEFS DEFENSIVE NOTES CHIEFS EXCEL WHEN SACKING THE QB The Chiefs and Defensive Coordinator Bob Sutton have placed an emphasis on putting pressure on opposing quarterbacks. The Chiefs have recorded 6.0 or more team sacks 59 times in team history. In those 59 games, Kansas City has a 53-5-1 (.907) record and has outscored its opponents 1,729-719. Record When Recording 6.0 or More Team Sacks Date 12/4/1960 12/18/1960 9/23/1962 12/8/1963 12/14/1963 11/8/1964 10/31/1965 10/8/1967 9/28/1968 11/10/1968 12/8/1968 12/14/1968 10/26/1969 11/2/1969 9/28/1970 12/6/1970 10/1/1972 11/12/1973 12/2/1973 9/23/1979 10/5/1980 11/13/1983 11/27/1983 9/30/1984 12/8/1985 9/21/1986 9/23/1990 10/7/1990 11/11/1990 12/2/1990 10/7/1991 11/17/1991 10/11/1992 11/8/1992 12/27/1992 10/3/1993 10/17/1994 10/1/1995 9/15/1996 11/16/1997 12/7/1997 12/14/1997 9/6/1998 12/26/1998 9/17/2000 11/26/2000 12/10/2000 12/8/2002 12/4/2011 9/8/2013 9/19/2013 10/13/2013 12/8/2013 10/26/2014 12/28/2014 11/1/2015 1/3/2016 10/30/2016 9/17/2017

18

Opponent Houston Buffalo @ Oakland Denver Boston Oakland Oakland Miami @ Miami @ Cincinnati @ San Diego @ Denver Cincinnati @ Buffalo @ Baltimore Denver @ Denver Chicago Cleveland Oakland @ Oakland Cincinnati @ Seattle Cleveland Atlanta Houston @ Green Bay @ Indianapolis Seattle @ New England Buffalo Denver Philadelphia San Diego Denver LA Raiders @ Denver @ Arizona @ Seattle Denver Oakland @ San Diego Oakland @ Oakland San Diego @ San Diego Carolina St. Louis Chicago @ Jacksonville @ Philadelphia Oakland @ Washington St. Louis San Diego Detroit Oakland @ Indianapolis Philadelphia

Sacks 7.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 7.0 6.0 7.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 7.0 6.0 9.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 6.0 7.0 6.0 11.0 7.0 7.0 6.0 7.0 9.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 6.0 6.0 7.0 10.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 6.0 6.0 9.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0

Yds 54 37 67 47 54 65 62 77 55 35 61 78 23 93 73 45 63 64 50 55 54 49 40 78 53 42 35 62 70 44 43 47 39 56 56 46 30 68 18 38 45 34 58 44 31 28 18 49 45 50 34 63 31 44 42 32 37 38 34

Result W, 24-0 W, 24-7 W, 26-16 W, 52-21 W, 35-3 W, 42-7 W, 14-7 W, 41-0 W, 48-3 W, 16-9 W, 40-3 W, 30-7 W, 42-22 W, 29-7 W, 44-24 W, 16-0 W, 45-24 W, 19-7 T, 20-20 W, 35-7 W, 31-17 W, 20-15 L, 48-51 (OT) W, 10-6 W, 38-10 W, 27-13 W, 17-3 L, 19-23 L, 16-17 W, 37-7 W, 33-6 L, 20-24 W, 24-17 W, 16-14 W, 42-20 W, 24-9 W, 31-28 W, 24-3 W, 35-17 W, 24-22 W, 30-0 W 29-7 W, 28-8 W, 31-24 W, 42-10 L, 16-17 W, 15-14 W, 49-10 W, 10-3 W, 28-2 W, 26-16 W, 24-7 W, 45-10 W, 34-7 W, 19-7 W, 45-10 W, 23-17 W, 30-14 W, 27-20

CHIEFS DEFENSE NO STRANGER TO END ZONE The Chiefs defense has one-return TD this season. KC’s defense had three TDs in 2017. In 2016, KC found the end zone five times. The Chiefs found the end zone six times on defense in 2015. In 2014, the Chiefs had one returned TD on defense. In 2013, the Chiefs defense found the end zone six times. Below is a look at Kansas City’s most recent defensive touchdowns. Kansas City is 117-29-2 (.797) when producing a defensive score. KC is 108-26-1 (.804) when scoring a defensive TD and 14-3-1 (.806) when recording a safety. Kansas City’s defense ranks third in the NFL in scoring defense since 2013. Most Recent Defensive Scores Date Opponent Defensive Score 10/7/18 JAX DL Chris Jones 20-yd INT return 12/31/17 @ DEN LB Ramik Wilson 11-yd fum. return 10/30/17 DEN CB Marcus Peters 45-yd fum. return 10/2/17 WAS LB Justin Houston 13-yd fum. return 12/4/16 @ ATL S Eric Berry 37-yd INT return 11/27/16 @ DEN LB Justin Houston safety (R. Okung) 11/13/16 @ CAR S Eric Berry 42-yd INT return 10/23/16 NO S Daniel Sorensen 48-yd INT return 9/25/16 NYJ LB Derrick Johnson 55-yd INT return 12/20/15 @ Bal CB Marcus Peters 90-yd INT return 12/20/15 @ Bal S Tyvon Branch 73-yd fumble return 12/6/15 @ Oak S Tyvon Branch 38-yd INT return 11/22/15 SD LB Justin Houston 17-yd INT return 10/11/15 CHI LB Ramik Wilson FR in endzone 9/17/15 DEN CB Marcus Peters 55-yd INT return 9/29/14 NE S Husain Abdullah 39-yd INT return 12/15/13 @ Oak S Eric Berry 47-yard INT return 11/3/13 @ Buf LB Tamba Hali 11-yard fumble return 11/3/13 @ Buf CB Sean Smith 100-yd INT return 10/13/13 OAK S Husain Abdullah 44-yd INT return 9/19/13 @ Phi S Eric Berry 38-yd INT return 9/8/13 @ Jax LB Tamba Hali 10-yd INT return

Result W, 30-14 W, 27-24 W, 29-19 W, 29-20 W, 29-28 W, 30-27 W, 20-17 W, 27-21 W, 24-3 W, 34-14 W, 34-14 W, 34-20 W, 33-3 L, 18-17 L, 31-24 W, 41-14 W, 56-31 W, 23-13 W, 23-13 W, 24-7 W, 26-16 W, 28-2

Chiefs


SPECIAL TEAMS NOTES BUTTKICKER.COM

COLQUITT INSIDE THE 20

In his rookie season, K Harrison Butker recorded 142 points, ranking first in franchise history for most points by a kicker in a single season, passing Nick Loweryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous mark of 139 set in 1990. His 142 points rank third in franchise history for most points in a single-season by a player at any position. Butker holds the franchise record for most field goals with 38. Butker converted a field goal in 13 consecutive games, the second-longest individual steak in a single-season in franchise history.

Dating back to 2005, Chiefs P Dustin Colquitt leads all NFL punters in pinning opponents inside the 20. His current mark of 426 stands as a Chiefs franchise record.

CHIEFS MOST POINTS, SEASON, KICKER Points Player 1. 142 Harrison Butker 2. 139 Nick Lowery 3t. 129 Jan Stenerud Cairo Santos Cairo Santos

Year 2017 1990 1968 2015 2016

CHIEFS MOST POINTS, SEASON Points Player 1. 162 Priest Holmes 2. 144 Priest Holmes 3. 142 Harrison Butker 4. 139 Nick Lowery 5. 129 Jan Stenerud Cairo Santos Cairo Santos

Year 2003 2002 2017 1990 1968 2015 2016

In. 20 426 372 361 359 355

Net Avg. 39.8 39.5 39.7 40.0 40.0

NFL RECORD BOOK: PUNTS INSIDE 20, SINGLE SEASON

Team Baltimore Kansas City Minnesota Cincinnati Indianapolis

KR 187 226 227 201 194

Yds. 4,880 5,790 5,703 4,896 4,722

Avg. 26.1 25.6 25.1 24.4 24.3

TDs 3 4 5 0 1

Rk. 1. 2. 4. 3. 5.

Team Kansas City Baltimore Minnesota Philadelphia Detroit

PR 236 199 166 172 164

Yds. 2,654 2,096 1,737 1,785 1,687

Avg. 11.2 10.5 10.5 10.4 10.3

TDs 7 3 4 4 5

KR TDs 4 5 4 3 1

Avg 44.9 45.3 45.6 46.9 48.1

He is the Chiefs all-time leader in punts inside the 20 with 426.

Rk. 1. 2. 3 4. 5.

PR TDs 7 4 4 3 5

Punts 1,047 974 1,092 1,075 1,084

Chiefs P Dustin Colquitt finished tied for first in the NFL for most punts inside the 20-yard line with 35 in 2013. Colquitt set a personal singleseason career high, a team record and was one punt shy of tying an NFL record for most punts inside the 20 with 45 in 2012. In 2014, 30 of his 66 punts landed inside the 20. He had 37 in 2015. In 2016, he landed 37 inside the 20. In 2017, he had 29 inside the 20. So far this season he has six punts inside the 20 yard line.

Over the past six seasons (2013-18) under Special Teams Coordinator Dave Toub, the Chiefs special teams units have performed consistently. In fact, over the six-year span, the club ranks second in the league in kick return average and first in punt return average. Additionally, the Chiefs have a combined 11 return touchdowns, which ranks first in the league.

Team Kansas City Minnesota Philadelphia Baltimore Detroit

TM KC BAL LAC ARI ---

COLQUITT PINS OPPONENTS

QUALITY SPECIAL TEAMS PLAY

Rk. 1. 2. 3. 4t.

Rk. Player 1. Dustin Colquitt 2. Sam Koch 3. Donnie Jones 4. Andy Lee 5. Shane Lechler

Tot TDs 11 9 8 6 6

Rank 1. 2. 3. 4t.

Inside 20 51 46 45 42

Player Johnny Hekker (LAR) Dave Zastudil (ARI) Dustin Colquitt (KC) Ben Graham (ARI)

Year 2016 2012 2012 2009

CHIEFS RECORD BOOK: PUNTS INSIDE 20, CAREER Rank 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Inside 20 426 117 62 58 54

Player Dustin Colquitt Louie Aguiar Bryan Barker Jim Arnold Kelly Goodburn

Years 2005-18 1994-98 1990-93 1983-85 1987-90

KICK RETURN RECORD The NFL record for highest kickoff return average in a single season was previously 29.4, set by the 1972 Chicago Bears. Under Special Teams Coordinator Dave Toub, the Chiefs took over the the top mark in NFL history in 2013 averaging 29.9 yards per return. NFL RECORD BOOK - KICKOFF RETURN AVERAGE, SEASON Rk. Team Avg. Year 1. Kansas City 29.9 2013 2. Chicago 29.4 1972 3. Pittsburgh 28.9 1952 4. Baltimore 28.3 2014

HILL MAKING HISTORY Chiefs wide receiver and return specialist Tyreek Hill has a knack for finding the end zone when teams kick to him. In 34 games thus far he has returned five kicks for scores. Below is where he ranks in team history. Chiefs Record Book - Career Returns for TDs Rk. 1. 2. 3 4. 5.

Player Dante Hall Tamarick Vanover Tyreek Hill J.T. Smith Dexter McCluster

Chiefs

PR 5 4 4 4 3

KR 6 4 1 0 0

Total 11 8 5 4 3

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MISC. NOTES GLOBAL TIES

2018 DRAFT CLASS ON ROSTER

The 2018 Chiefs roster has several global ties, including two internationally born players.

LB Breeland Speaks was selected 46th overall out of Mississippi after Kansas City traded up eight spots with Cincinnati. Speaks was the first pick of the 2018 Draft for the Chiefs. At Mississippi, Speaks amassed 127 tackles, 15 TFLs and nine sacks. He was the only player from Mississippi taken in the first three rounds of the 2018 NFL Draft.

• G Laurent Duvernay-Tardif is from Quebec, where he attended McGill University and became just the second player out of McGill to be drafted into the NFL. Sticking to his Canadian roots during the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, Duvernay-Tardif served as a reporter for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

DT Derrick Nnadi was selected in the 3rd round, 75th overall from Florida State. In 44 career games, Nnadi recorded 165 tackles, 24.5 TFLs and 12.0 sacks. Nnadi is the first Seminole drafted by the Chiefs since C Rodney Hudson was drafted 55th overall in 2011. LB Dorian O’Daniel was drafted with the final pick of the 3rd round (100th overall) from Clemson. O’Daniel was the Chiefs second selection in the 3rd round, joining DT Derrick Nnadi. At Clemson, he played in three College Football Playoffs and won the 2016 National Championship. O’Daniel had 116 tackles, 15.5 TFLs and 3.5 sacks in 40 career games. S Armani Watts was taken 124th overall in the 4th round out of Texas A&M. A four-year starter, Watts led the team in interceptions his freshman year (3). He would finish his career with 328 tackles and 10 interceptions. Watts is the first defensive back from Texas A&M drafted by the Chiefs in team history.

• WR Chris Conley, was born in Adana, Turkey, while his father was stationed there with the Air Force. • Despite not being born internationally, LB Tanoh Kpassagnon spent his summers visiting his father, an economist in Ivory Coast. • After S Daniel Sorensen’s freshman season at BYU in 2008, he missed the next two football seasons while he was serving in the Costa Rica San Jose Mission in 2010-11.

CB Tremon Smith was drafted in the 6th round, 196th overall, from Central Arkansas. He is the first player from Central Arkansas drafted by Kansas City in team history. Smith was a four-year starter at cornerback and had 15 interceptions. He finished his career with 146 tackles and 9.0 TFLs. G Kahlil McKenzie was selected 198th overall out of Tennessee, the Chiefs second 6th round pick of the 2018 Draft. McKenzie played defensive tackle in college, registering 72 tackles and 3.0 sacks. After being drafted, the Chiefs converted him to an offensive guard. Kahlil is the son of the divison rival Oakland Raiders’ General Manager Reggie McKenzie.

• Born in Virginia Beach, Va., DT Derrick Nnadi is a first generation American. His father came to the United States in 1978 from Nigeria in search of a better life for himself and his family.

THE NEW GUYS Since the beginning of 2018, the Kansas City Chiefs signed, traded for or claimed off waivers 10 new players that are currently on the 53-man roster. Pos. CB LB WR QB DT RB DB S CB S

Name Kendall Fuller Anthony Hitchens Sammy Watkins Chad Henne Xavier Williams Damien Williams Orlando Scandrick Jordan Lucas Charvarius Ward Ron Parker

Last Team Washington Dallas L.A. Rams Jacksonville Arizona Miami Washington Miami Dallas Atlanta

How Acquired Trade Signed Signed Signed Signed (RFA) Signed Signed Trade Trade Signed

2017 ROAD WIN STREAK The Chiefs won their ninth-consecutive road victory in Houston in 2017, a streak that dated back to Week 6 of the 2016 season (at Oakland, Oct. 16, 2016). The club’s nine-game road winning streak tied for the longest such streak in franchise history, matching a nine-game streak that was set in the 1966-67 seasons. Chiefs Record Book - Most Consecutive Road Wins Rk. 1t. 3. 4t.

20

Streak 9 9 6 5

Seasons 1966-67 2016-17 1967-68 1968-69 1971-72

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2018 OFFSEASON NOTES HUNT HONORED BY CHIEFS

CHIEFS TRADE FOR CB KENDALL FULLER

After the season, the club announced running back Kareem Hunt earned the team’s Mack Lee Hill Award for the 2017 season.

The Kansas City Chiefs announced on March 14 that the club had acquired CB Kendall Fuller in a trade with the Washington Redskins.

After his breakout rookie campaign, Hunt led the league in rushing yards (1,327), becoming only the sixth rookie to lead the NFL in rushing. In his rookie season, Hunt became the first player in NFL history to record seven consecutive games with 100 or more scrimmage yards to start their rookie campaign and finished with 10 games with 100 yards from scrimmage. He earned AFC Offensive Rookie of the Month honors for September and December and was named to his first Pro Bowl following the 2017 season.

The trade between the Chiefs and the Redskins sent QB Alex Smith to Washington in exchange for a 2018 third-round draft pick and Fuller.

The Mack Lee Hill Award is given to the club’s top rookie performer and was voted on by Hunt’s teammates.

CHIEFS SIGN THREE KEY FREE AGENTS The Kansas City Chiefs signed three key free agents during the 2018 offseason: Wide receiver Sammy Watkins, linebacker Anthony Hitchens and defensive tackle Xavier Williams. Watkins (6-1, 211) has played in 52 games (51 starts) in four NFL seasons with the Los Angeles Rams (2017) and Buffalo Bills (2014-16). His career numbers include 192 receptions for 3,052 yards (15.9 avg.) with 25 touchdowns. In 2015, Watkins eclipsed 1,000 receiving yards, tallying 1,047 yards on 60 catches. He has 11 career games with 100-plus receiving yards, including four games over 150 yards. The Fort Myers, Florida, native originally entered the NFL as a first-round selection (fourth overall) of the Bills in the 2014 NFL Draft. Hitchens (6-0, 235) has played in 60 games (48 starts) in four NFL seasons with the Dallas Cowboys (2014-17). His career numbers include 301 tackles (190 solo), 21 tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks and 14 pressures. He owns two forced fumbles, eight passes defensed and one interception. The Lorain, Ohio, native, originally entered the NFL as a fourth-round selection (119th overall) of the Cowboys in the 2014 NFL Draft. Williams (6-2, 309) has played in 23 games (two starts) in three NFL seasons with the Arizona Cardinals (2015-17). His career numbers include 28 tackles (22 solo), 0.5 sacks (-5.0 yards), two tackles for loss and one forced fumble. He originally entered the NFL as an undrafted free agent with the Cardinals on May 5, 2015. The Kansas City, Missouri, native, played collegiately at Northern Iowa and prepped at Grandview High School in Grandview, Missouri.

“We’re excited to have Kendall join our secondary,” Chiefs General Manager Brett Veach said. “He’s an ascending player with strong cover skills and a phenomenal work ethic. He’ll add value and versatility to our defense.” Fuller (5-11, 198) played in 29 games (12 starts) in two seasons with the Washington Redskins, logging 94 tackles (74 solo), including two for a loss, four interceptions, 12 passes defensed and a forced fumble. The Baltimore, Maryland, native entered the league as a third-round pick (84th overall) by Washington in the 2016 NFL Draft.

CHIEFS NAME BIENIEMY OC Head Coach Andy Reid and the Kansas City Chiefs announced on Jan. 9 that the club had named Eric Bieniemy the team’s offensive coordinator. “I’ve known Eric a long time, both as a player and a coach,” Reid said. “He’s done a phenomenal job with our running backs and has been involved in every aspect of our offense over the last five years. He’s a great teacher and has earned this opportunity. I know he will do a good job.” Bieniemy will enter his 11th season as a coach in the National Football League in 2018 and his sixth season with the Chiefs, after serving as the club’s running backs coach for five seasons (2013-17). Under Bieniemy’s tutelage in 2017, rookie running back Kareem Hunt earned the NFL’s rushing title and a Pro Bowl berth with 1,327 rushing yards. Hunt had 10 games with 100-plus scrimmage yards. In 2016, RB Spencer Ware and Charcandrick West appeared as a double threat. Ware had 921 rushing yards and three rushing TDs and West rushed for 293 yards with a touchdown. Bieniemy also mentored RB Jamaal Charles, the franchise’s all-time leading rusher, for four seasons (2013-16). He spent nine seasons as an NFL running back with the Chargers (199194) and Bengals (1995-98) and spent the 1999 season with the Eagles under Head Coach Andy Reid.

CHIEFS P DUSTIN COLQUITT SIGNS EXTENSION The Kansas City Chiefs announced on March 15 that punter Dustin Colquitt signed an extension with the club. “Dustin has played an important role in our team’s success the last five seasons, and has consistently performed at a high level his entire career here,” General Manager Brett Veach said. “He wanted to be in Kansas City, and we are happy to keep him here for the foreseeable future.” “Dustin is without a doubt one of the best punters in the National Football League,” Head Coach Andy Reid said. “He’s been critical for us in flipping field position and pinning opponents deep. Off the field he’s been a staple in the community, and we are glad he’s staying with us.” Colquitt (6-3, 210) has played in 206 games in 13 seasons with the Chiefs (2005-17). His career numbers include 1,031 punts for 46,246 yards (44.9 avg.) with 90 touchbacks and 420 inside the 20. He holds a career net average of 39.7 yards and a long of 81 yards. Colquitt holds many Chiefs records for punting, including highest career average (44.9), highest net average (39.7) and most career punts inside the 20 (420). Colquitt has earned Pro Bowl honors twice, his first following the 2012 season and his most recent following the 2016 season. He has the third-most games played in franchise history (206). The Knoxville, Tennessee, native, originally entered the NFL as Kansas City’s third-round draft pick (99th overall) in the 2005 NFL Draft.

Chiefs

CHIEFS NAME TOUB ASSISTANT HEAD COACH The Kansas City Chiefs announced on April 6 that Head Coach Andy Reid named Dave Toub the team’s assistant head coach. “Dave has had the opportunity to work with our team on both sides of the football, on the field and in the classroom,” Reid said. “His leadership qualities have entrusted me to promote him to Assistant Head Coach.” Toub enters his sixth season with the Chiefs in 2018. Since Toub’s arrival in 2013, the Chiefs have 10 special teams touchdowns (six punt, four kickoff), which is the most in the NFL over that span. The Chiefs took over the top mark for kick return average in NFL history in 2013 averaging 29.9 yards per return.

21


DUVERNAY-TARDIF GETS HIS M.D. To some, playing in the National Football League is the second-most impressive accomplishment on Laurent Duvernay-Tardif’s resume. On May 29, Duvernay-Tardif became the first practicing medical doctor on an NFL roster, graduating from McGill University in Montreal with his M.D. Duvernay-Tardif was finishing his third year of med school at McGill at the time of the 2014 NFL Draft. With hopes of being selected on the second night, Duvernay-Tardif was unable to follow along live. Not that he didn’t want to, he was just preoccupied in the ER assisting an emergency Csection for a premature newborn. Though he wasn’t selected on that second night, the Chiefs eventually used the 200th overall pick to acquire Duvernay-Tardif in the sixth round. While spending much of his rookie season learning from the sidelines, Duvernay-Tardif appeared in 16 games while starting 13 in 2015 and 14 in 2016 and became the starting right guard during the 2017 season. His offseasons are spent back in Montreal at various hospitals on rotations, where patients have begun to recognize the Canadian standout. “It’s been a great journey for the last four years,” Duvernay-Tardif said. “I don’t think it would have been possible if it was not for Coach Reid.” While football remains his number one priority right now, Duvernay-Tardif plans to someday pursue his medical goals of specializing as an Emergency Room doctor.

CHIEFS COACHING STAFF CHANGES The club continued to add to the coaching staff by hiring Deland McCullough to serve as the team’s running backs coach, Jay Valai as a defensive quality control coach and David Girardi as the offensive quality control coach. McCullough joins the Chiefs after spending the last eight years coaching in the collegiate ranks at USC (2017), Indiana (2011-16) and Miami of Ohio (2010). He spent two years as an NFL running back with the Bengals and the Eagles. Valai joins the Chiefs coaching staff after spending the last two seasons as the University of Georgia’s defensive quality control coach. Girardi joins the Chiefs after seven years coaching at the collegiate level at Lafayette College (2017), Northwestern (2014-16), Geneva College (2013) and Seton Hill University (2011-12). Additionally, this offseason, the club promoted Mike Kafka to quarterbacks coach after serving as the offensive quality control coach for the 2017 season. Mike Smith and Mark DeLeone were named the outside linebackers and inside linebackers coaches, respectively. Smith previously served as the assistant defensive line coach (2016-17) and DeLeone served as the club’s assistant linebackers coach (2015-17) and defensive quality control coach (2013-14). After serving two seasons (2016-17) as the club’s offensive quality control coach, Joe Bleymaier was promoted to the passing game analyst/assistant quarterbacks coach. Terry Bradden was also named a defensive quality control coach after serving as the team’s defensive assistant in 2017. Corey Matthaei is now the assistant offensive line coach after serving as the assistant quarterbacks coach from 2015-17.

NEW YEAR NEW CHIEFS Led by 22-year-old Patrick Mahomes at quarterback the 2018 Chiefs have an average age of 25.7 years old. This offseason, GM Brett Veach made significant moves to attract young talent to the Kansas City Chiefs like 25-year-old WR Sammy Watkins, 26-year-old LB Anthony Hitchens, 26-year-old DT Xavier Williams and 23-year-old CB Kendall Fuller. “We have a lot of talent here,” Veach said. “It’s a lot of young talent which is exciting for the fans, but we realize there may be some growing pains, but we have guys that can straight up play football and they’re exciting.”

AN ALL DEFENSIVE 2018 DRAFT CLASS The 2018 NFL Draft marked the first time in the modern era that the Kansas City Chiefs have taken a college defensive player with every selection in the draft. With no first-round draft selection the Chiefs traded up from the 54th overall pick in the second round to the 46th overall pick in the second round to select LB Breeland Speaks. In the third round the Chiefs traded up from the 86th overall pick to the 75th overall pick in the third round to select DT Derrick Nnadi and selected LB Dorian O’Daniel with the 100th overall pick. This sparked a trend of selecting defensive players that lasted throughout the 2018 Draft leading to an all defensive draft class.

With the loss of veteran linebackers Derrick Johnson and Tamba Hali, the Chiefs are looking to their young talent to lead the team more than ever. After 13 seasons with the Chiefs, Johnson and the club decided to part ways following the 2017 season. Johnson left the Chiefs as the team’s all-time leading tackler compiling 1,262 career stops (993 solo). Following a 12-year NFL career all spent with Kansas City, Hali will go down as one of the most successful pass rushers in franchise history. Under the guidance of veteran linebacker Justin Houston, young talent like Anthony Hitchens, third-year LB Reggie Ragland and rookie linebacker and second-round draft pick Breeland Speaks have a chance to make a name for themselves in honor of Chiefs legends Derrick Johnson and Tamba Hali. “Whether it’s the quarterback position, inside linebacker position, outside linebacker position, you’re missing a few of those guys and you have new guys coming in that you have an opportunity to see perform,” Reid said. “That’s exciting to me, I’m looking forward to that.”

With the loss of several key defensive players during the offseason the Chiefs had a need to select young defensive talent to complement the club’s stacked offensive roster.

Protected by a veteran offensive line, second-year QB Patrick Mahomes has multiple young offensive weapons at his disposal. With the addition of WR Sammy Watkins, Mahomes also has third-year WR Tyreek Hill, second-year RB Kareem Hunt and sixth-year TE Travis Kelce to make up, arguably, one of the NFL’s most dynamic offensive units.

The Chiefs selected S Armani Watts with the 124th overall pick in the fourth round and CB Tremon Smith with the 196th overall pick in the sixth round.

In what some might consider a transition year, Reid and the Chiefs are ready to make an impact starting in 2018.

With their final draft choice of 2018 the Chiefs selected G Kahlil McKenzie with the 198th overall pick of the sixth round. Although McKenzie was a defensive tackle throughout college, the Chiefs drafted him with the idea of transforming him into an offensive lineman. The selection of McKenzie made for a record all-defensive draft for the Chiefs going into 2018.

When speaking about his expectations for the 2018 Chiefs, Reid said, “We’re striving to win a championship and then to consistently be in a position where we can win a championship as the years go on. And it starts today.”

22

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CHIEFS MISCELLANEOUS NOTES BY THE NUMBERS

OWNERSHIP OF 50+ YEARS The Chiefs are one of only six current NFL franchises that have been owned by the same individual family for over 50 years. Ownership Halas Family Bidwill Family Rooney Family Hunt Family Adams Family Ford Family

Franchise Chicago Bears Arizona Cardinals Pittsburgh Steelers Kansas City Chiefs Tennessee Titans Detroit Lions

Years 97 86 85 59 59 55

2

Super Bowl appearances

3

AFL Championship appearances

8

AFC West Division Championships

471

Franchise wins including Postseason

11

Pro Football Hall of Famers

48

Chiefs Hall of Famers

218

NFL IMPORTANT DATES 2018 Mid Oct. ............. Clubs are Permitted to Practice Players on PUP/NFI Oct. 16-17 ......................... Fall League Meetings, New York, New York Oct. 21 ...................... NFL London Series, Tennessee vs. LA Chargers Oct. 28 .....................NFL London Series, Philadelphia vs. Jacksonville Oct. 30 ...................................... All Trading Ends for 2018 at 3 p.m. CT Nov. 13 .............................Signing Period Ends for Franchised Players Nov. 19 ......................................... NFL Mexio Series, Chiefs vs. Rams Dec. 12 ................................................ League Meetings, Irving, Texas Dec. 30 ......................................... Final Week of Regular Season Play 2019 Jan. 5-6.....................................................................Wild Card Playoffs Jan. 12-13................................................................. Divisional Playoffs Jan. 19 ...................... East-West Shrine Game, St. Petersburg, Florida Jan. 20 ........................................ AFC and NFC Championship Games Jan. 26 ................................................... Senior Bowl, Mobile, Alabama Jan. 27 ......................................................... Pro Bowl, Orlando, Florida Feb. 3 .................................................Super Bowl LII, Atlanta, Georgia Feb.26-March 4 ............................ NFL Combine, Indianapolis, Indiana March 5...................................Deadline to Designate Franchise Player March 11-13...................................................Clubs Begin Negotiations March 13.......................................................2019 League Year Begins March 24-27 ..................... Annual League Meetings, Phoenix, Arizona April 1 ................... Clubs with New Head Coaches to Being Offseason April 15 ................ Clubs Returning Head Coaches to Begin Offseason

Number of Chiefs wins vs. AFC West opponents, the most of any other AFC West team in intradivision affairs

10

Retired Chiefs numbers

59

The club is in its 59th season of existence

82,893

Largest crowd (regular season)

142.2

Highest decibel level at Arrowhead Stadium

199

Games won by Head Coach Andy Reid

25.7

Average Age of the Current Chiefs Roster

72.5

Justin Houston has 72.5 Career Sacks with KC

47

Seasons at Arrowhead Stadium

April 25-27 ..........................................NFL Draft, Nashville, Tennessee

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23


CHIEFS ALL-TIME YEAR-BY-YEAR RESULTS YEAR 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

24

PRESEASON REG. SEASON PLAYOFFS 6-0 .........................8-6 .........................0-0 4-1 .........................6-8 .........................0-0 2-3 ........................11-3 ........................1-0 3-2 ....................... 5-7-2........................0-0 4-1 .........................7-7 .........................0-0 3-2 ....................... 7-5-2........................0-0 4-0 ...................... 11-2-1 .............. 1-1(S.B. loss) 4-1 .........................9-5 .........................0-0 4-1 ........................12-2 ........................0-1 6-0 ........................11-3 ............... 3-0 (S.B. win) 4-3 ....................... 7-5-2........................0-0 4-1-1 .................... 10-3-1.......................0-1 5-2 .........................8-6 .........................0-0 2-4 ....................... 7-5-2........................0-0 3-3 .........................5-9 .........................0-0 3-3 .........................5-9 .........................0-0 2-4 .........................5-9 .........................0-0 3-3 ........................2-12 ........................0-0 2-2 ........................4-12 ........................0-0 3-1 .........................7-9 .........................0-0 3-1 .........................8-8 .........................0-0 1-3 .........................9-7 .........................0-0 2-1-1 .......................3-6 .........................0-0 2-2 ........................6-10 ........................0-0 1-3 .........................8-8 .........................0-0 3-1 ........................6-10 ........................0-0 2-2 ........................10-6 ........................0-1 4-1 ........................4-11 ........................0-0 2-1-1 .................... 4-11-1 .......................0-0 1-3 ....................... 8-7-1........................0-0 1-3 ........................11-5 ........................0-1 2-2 ........................10-6 ........................1-1 1-3 ........................10-6 ........................0-1 3-1 ........................11-5 ........................2-1 2-3 .........................9-7 .........................0-1 3-1 ........................13-3 ........................0-1 3-1 .........................9-7 .........................0-0 1-3 ........................13-3 ........................0-1 2-3 .........................7-9 .........................0-0 2-2 .........................9-7 .........................0-0 0-4 .........................7-9 .........................0-0 2-2 ........................6-10 ........................0-0 3-1 .........................8-8 .........................0-0 3-2 ........................13-3 ........................0-1 1-3 .........................7-9 .........................0-0 0-4 ........................10-6 ........................0-0 2-2 .........................9-7 .........................0-1 0-4 ........................4-12 ........................0-0 2-2 ........................2-14 ........................0-0 0-4 ........................4-12 ........................0-0 1-3 ........................10-6 ........................0-1 0-4 .........................7-9 .........................0-0 1-3 ........................2-14 ........................0-0 2-2 ........................11-5 ........................0-1 1-3 .........................9-7 .........................0-0 4-0 ........................11-5 ........................1-1 2-2 ........................12-4 ........................0-1 2-2 ........................10-6 ........................0-1 2-2 .........................5-1 .........................0-0

PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAMER EMMITT THOMAS Pro Football Hall of Fame Cornerback Emmitt Thomas is in his ninth season as defensive backs coach with the Kansas City Chiefs. Thomas works alongside former NFL Cornerback Al Harris, who joined the Chiefs as a defensive assistant/secondary coach in 2013. Harris was promoted to Secondary/Cornerbacks Coach in 2016. One of the best defenders in Chiefs history, Thomas finished his career with 58 interceptions – a Chiefs record – as well as five defensive touchdowns in 181 games, all with Kansas City. Thomas holds the Chiefs record for interception return yardage with 937 yards. Thomas was a member of the Chiefs Super Bowl IV Championship squad and was elected to the Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1986 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2008.

THE FIRST LADY OF FOOTBALL Norma Hunt continues to play an integral part of the Chiefs in Kansas City. She owns the distinction of being the only woman known to have attended all 52 Super Bowls and was selected to preside over the coin toss at Super Bowl XLI along with Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino. She is involved in numerous philanthropic and civic efforts in Kansas City and Texas. Her late husband, Lamar Hunt, was the guiding force behind the formation of the Kansas City Chiefs and the American Football League and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1972. He, with the help of his family, coined the term “Super Bowl.” Hunt, along with her daughter-in-law Tavia Hunt and granddaughter Gracie Hunt all participate in the NFL Women’s Apparel advertising campaigns. The Hunts have been featured alongside other female NFL leaders such as Charlotte Jones Anderson (Dallas Cowboys Executive Vice President/Chief Brand Officer and NFL Foundation chair), Suzanne Johnson (wife of New York Jets owner Woody Johnson) and Tanya Snyder (wife of Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder).

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VEACH INSPIRES FAMILY TRIP TO ARROWHEAD

CHIEFS PLAYERS FISH WITH URBAN YOUTH They grabbed their fishing rods and got to work. General Manager Brett Veach cast a line down by the water, quarterback Chad Henne scouted out a spot on the other side of the pond and defensive end Allen Bailey took his place on the bridge overlooking the fishing derby - backed by “Urban Kids Fish” - that was taking place at Kansas City Kansas Community College. Veach, Henne and Bailey – along with Chiefs President Mark Donovan and several other players - were all here at the invitation of wide receiver De’Anthony Thomas, the locker room’s resident angler, with the simple goal of teaching more than 20 kids how to fish. “This is designed to help kids connect with nature,” said Wayne Hubbard, founder of “Urban Kids Fish” and one of the event’s leaders. “One of the big things with this is that most people don’t realize that fishing can take you to college. There are universities that have collegiate fishing teams. That’s really the goal here – to get these kids connected to nature by using fishing and, hey, maybe one of these kids will fall in love with it.”

On Sunday, Oct. 7, the Chiefs hosted the Jaguars in the 2018 edition of Kansas City’s “Crucial Catch” game to help intercept cancer. One of those behind the cause was Chiefs GM Brett Veach. The day before the game, Veach was photographed holding an “I Cheer Card” remembering family friend Brianna Millard, who passed after a battle with cancer in 1994. The photo, tweeted by the Chiefs, made its way to Veach’s mother and then to Marianne Millard, Brianna’s mother. Marianne was so moved that Veach chose to remember her daughter that she, along with Brianna’s sister Lauren, bought tickets and hopped on a flight to Kansas City for the “Crucial Catch” game. Once they arrived, they watched the game from a suite and were invited on the field before the game by Veach. “It sent chills up my spine when I saw Brett holding that [card],” Lauren said. “She meant so much to us, so to see somebody like Brett do something as little as writing her name on a piece of paper meant the world to us.”

OFFENSIVE LINE SUPPORTS WOMEN WITH CANCER

The players in attendance certainly did their part to bring the experience to life. Bailey, for example, has been fishing since he was three years old. “It teaches the kids some life skills – this stuff comes in handy,” Bailey explained. “The thrill of catching one never gets old. You don’t always know what you’re about to catch – so there’s an element of surprise there, too. It’s also a challenge and it teaches patience. You have to be patient doing this while having a little bit of skill and luck at the same time.”

ED SHEERAN ROCKS ARROWHEAD On Saturday, pop-star Ed Sheeran’s North American Stadium Tour came to Arrowhead, presented by the Cocherl Family Foundation. Sheeran played to a crowd of over 51,000 in his first time headlining a show at Arrowhead and his second appearance ever. He opened for the Rolling Stones in 2015. Sheeran opened with his hit “Castle On the Hill” before playing through his array of chart-toppers and wrapping with “Shape of You,” his second #1 song from the album. Before Sheeran took the stage, performing entirely by himself, Lauv and Snow Patrol opened for the Arrowhead crowd.

The Kansas City Chiefs offensive line hosted a “Look Good, Feel Better” session for 20 female cancer patients at Arrowhead Stadium on Tuesday afternoon. The event, which took place in partnership with The University of Kansas Health System and the American Cancer Society, sought to teach beauty techniques to individuals currently going through chemotherapy, radiation or other forms of cancer treatment. “Cancer affects everyone in one way or another,” said center Mitch Morse. “These women are so tough and strong – it’s just a privilege to be here supporting them. Even in a way as small as this, hopefully we’re able to be there for them.” “I watched one of the strongest women that I’ve ever known go through cancer,” offensive OL Cam Erving added about his grandmother. “She passed away, but it wasn’t about defeat. It’s about the way that she fought and the way that she lived.”

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25


THIS IS OUR HOUSE

CHIEFS FANS SET WORLD RECORD

TOP CROWDS AT ARROWHEAD (Regular Season and Playoffs)

On Monday, Sept. 29, 2014, Kansas City defeated the New England Patriots 41-14, and Chiefs fans set a Guinness World Record for Loudest Crowd Roar at a Sports Stadium (Outdoors). Chiefs fans reached a peak decibel reading of 142.2 as Guinness World Records adjudicator Philip Robertson monitored the sound levels. The mark was set early in the contest while the club was on defense. The Arrowhead Stadium record passed the old record of 137.5 decibels and broke Seattle’s record of 137.6. The Chiefs still hold the record nearly four years later.

Date Oct. 2, 2000 Nov. 5, 1972 Sept. 11, 1994 Sept. 17, 1972 Nov. 23, 2006 Sept. 22, 1996 Oct. 26, 1998 Oct. 9, 1995 Sept. 8, 1996 Nov. 10, 1996 Oct. 7, 1996 Jan. 11, 2004

Opponent Seattle Oakland San Francisco Miami Denver Denver Pittsburgh San Diego Oakland Green Bay Pittsburgh Indianapolis

Attendance 82,893* 82,094 79,907 79,829 79,484 79,439 79,431 79,288 79,281 79,281 79,189 79,159

THE ARROWHEAD ADVANTAGE “The fans, they’re phenomenal. 142.2 decibels, I never thought I would be fired up (for) decibel levels but I’m fired up for them. My ears are still ringing, I mean it was loud, loud down there. Like incredibly loud.” - Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid “It’s a great feeling (playing at Arrowhead). On 3rd-and-long when you hear the crowd and you see the opposing quarterback yelling, trying to change the play and struggling to communicate with the offensive linemen. That’s a great feeling because you know your percentage of getting a sack just went up. I love playing in front of our fans.” - LB Justin Houston “A legendary environment like that at Arrowhead Stadium is something else. We’re excited about it, we respect it, we realize that the environment is an issue and an element of play and it’s something that we need to be prepared for and ultimately combat.” - Steelers Head Coach Mike Tomlin

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Chiefs


2018 NFL STANDINGS

Team New England Miami New York Jets Buffalo Bills

W 4 4 3 2

L 2 2 3 4

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .667 .667 .500 .333

PF 176 130 165 76

AFC East PA 148 145 139 138

Home 4-0-0 3-0-0 2-1-0 1-1-0

Road 0-2-0 1-2-0 1-2-0 1-3-0

AFC 4-1-0 3-2-0 2-3-0 1-3-0

NFC 0-1-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 1-1-0

DIV 1-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

Streak Won 3 Won 1 Won 2 Lost 1

Team Cincinnati Baltimore Pittsburgh Cleveland

W 4 4 3 2

L 2 2 2 3

T 0 0 1 1

PCT .667 .667 .583 .417

PF 174 153 171 128

AFC North PA 158 77 154 151

Home 2-1-0 2-0-0 1-2-0 2-1-1

Road 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-0-1 0-2-0

AFC 3-1-0 4-2-0 1-2-1 2-2-1

NFC 1-1-0 0-0-0 2-0-0 0-1-0

DIV 1-1-0 1-2-0 1-1-1 1-0-1

Streak Lost 1 Won 1 Won 2 Lost 1

Team Tennessee Houston Jacksonville Indianapolis

W 3 3 3 1

L 3 3 3 5

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .500 .500 .500 .167

PF 87 135 109 152

AFC South PA 107 137 126 180

Home 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 0-2-0

Road 1-2-0 1-2-0 1-2-0 1-3-0

AFC 2-3-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 0-4-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-1-0

DIV 2-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

Streak Lost 2 Won 3 Lost 2 Lost 4

Team Kansas City L.A. Chargers Denver Raiders

W 5 4 2 1

L 1 2 4 5

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .833 .667 .333 .167

PF 215 175 120 110

AFC West PA 172 144 154 176

Home 2-0-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 1-2-0

Road 3-1-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 0-3-0

AFC 4-1-0 3-1-0 1-3-0 1-3-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

DIV 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

Streak Lost 1 Won 3 Lost 4 Lost 2

Team Washington Dallas Philadelphia N.Y. Giants

W 3 3 3 1

L 2 3 3 5

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .600 .500 .500 .167

PF 106 123 137 117

NFC East PA 104 103 117 162

Home 2-1-0 3-0-0 2-1-0 0-3-0

Road 1-1-0 0-3-0 1-2-0 1-2-0

NFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 0-4-0

AFC 0-1-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-1-0

DIV 0-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0

Streak Won 1 Won 1 Won 1 Lost 3

Team Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

W 3 3 3 2

L 2 2 2 3

T 0 1 1 0

PCT .600 .583 .583 .400

PF 139 148 140 125

NFC North PA 96 144 148 137

Home 2-0-0 3-0-1 2-1-0 2-1-0

Road 1-2-0 0-2-0 1-1-1 0-2-0

NFC 3-1-0 2-2-1 3-1-1 1-2-0

AFC 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 1-1-0

DIV 0-1-0 1-1-1 0-0-1 1-0-0

Streak Lost 1 Won 1 Won 2 Won 1

Team New Orleans Carolina Tampa Bay Atlanta

W 4 3 2 2

L 1 2 3 4

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .800 .600 .400 .333

PF 180 121 141 167

NFC South PA 140 114 173 192

Home 2-1-0 3-0-0 1-1-0 2-2-0

Road 2-0-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 0-2-0

NFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 2-2-0

AFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-2-0

DIV 1-1-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 2-1-0

Streak Won 4 Lost 1 Lost 3 Won 1

Team L.A. Rams Seattle Arizona San Francisco

W 6 3 1 1

L 0 3 5 5

T 0 0 0 0

PCT 1.000 .500 .167 .167

PF 196 143 82 148

NFC West PA 118 117 139 179

Home 3-0-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 1-1-0

Road 3-0-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 0-4-0

NFC 3-0-0 2-2-0 1-5-0 1-3-0

AFC 3-0-0 1-1-0 0-0-0 0-2-0

DIV 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-1-0

Streak Won 6 Won 1 Lost 1 Lost 4

Chiefs

27


KANSAS CITY CHIEFS / WEEK 6 / THROUGH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2018 WON 5, LOST 1 09/09 W 38-28 09/16 W 42-37 09/23 W 38-27 10/01 W 27-23 10/07 W 30-14 10/14 L 40-43 10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30

at L.A. Chargers 25,351 at Pittsburgh 63,956 San Francisco 76,023 at Denver 76,656 Jacksonville 75,289 at New England 65,878 Cincinnati Denver at Cleveland Arizona at L.A. Rams at Oakland Baltimore L.A. Chargers at Seattle Oakland K.C. Opp. TOTAL FIRST DOWNS 140 173 Rushing 38 51 Passing 86 104 Penalty 16 18 3rd Down: Made/Att 28/63 24/71 3rd Down Pct. 44.4 33.8 4th Down: Made/Att 4/4 10/14 4th Down Pct. 100.0 71.4 POSSESSION AVG. 29:10 30:50 TOTAL NET YARDS 2511 2809 Avg. Per Game 418.5 468.2 Total Plays 371 428 Avg. Per Play 6.8 6.6 NET YARDS RUSHING 672 767 Avg. Per Game 112.0 127.8 Total Rushes 153 141 NET YARDS PASSING 1839 2042 Avg. Per Game 306.5 340.3 Sacked/Yards Lost 6/26 17/100 Gross Yards 1865 2142 Att./Completions 212/135 270/171 Completion Pct. 63.7 63.3 Had Intercepted 4 6 PUNTS/AVERAGE 16/48.6 18/41.6 NET PUNTING AVG. 16/45.5 18/30.1 PENALTIES/YARDS 50/430 41/352 FUMBLES/BALL LOST 6/1 9/3 TOUCHDOWNS 26 19 Rushing 6 9 Passing 18 10 Returns 2 0 * SCORE BY PERIODS Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 OT PTS TEAM 65 47 51 52 0 215 OPPONENTS 19 61 38 54 0 172 * SCORING TD-Ru-Pa-Rt K-PAT FG S PTS Butker 0 0 0 0 26/26 11/11 0 59 Hill 7 0 6 1 0 42 Hunt 6 4 2 0 0 36 Kelce 3 0 3 0 0 18 Conley 2 0 2 0 0 12 Mahomes 2 2 0 0 0 12 Harris 1 0 1 0 0 6 Jones 1 0 0 1 0 6 Robinson 1 0 1 0 0 6 Sherman 1 0 1 0 0 6 Thomas 1 0 1 0 0 6 Watkins 1 0 1 0 0 6 TEAM 26 6 18 2 26/26 11/11 0 215 OPPONENTS 19 9 10 0 12/14 12/14 1 172 2-Pt Conv: TM 0-0, OPP 4-5 SACKS: Bailey 4, Ford 4, Houston 3, Jones 2, Te. Smith 1, Speaks 1, Watts 1, X. Williams 1, TM 17, OPP 6 FUM/LOST: Mahomes 3/0, Conley 1/1, Thomas 1/0, Watkins 1/0 * PASSING Mahomes TEAM OPPONENTS

Att Cmp 212 135 212 135 270 171

* RUSHING No. Yds Avg Long TD Hunt 103 456 4.4 45 4 Mahomes 24 75 3.1 11 2 Watkins 4 50 12.5 31 0 Ware 10 47 4.7 27 0 Hill 8 37 4.6 21 0 Thomas 1 6 6.0 6 0 Dam. Williams 3 1 0.3 1 0 TEAM 153 672 4.4 45 6 OPPONENTS 141 767 5.4 26 9 * RECEIVING No. Yds Avg Long TD Hill 34 567 16.7 75t 6 Kelce 33 468 14.2 40 3 Watkins 22 272 12.4 40 1 Conley 12 98 8.2 19 2 Hunt 10 171 17.1 67t 2 Ware 6 59 9.8 15 0 Harris 4 77 19.3 35 1 Sherman 4 65 16.3 36t 1 Robinson 3 34 11.3 23 1 Thomas 3 29 9.7 15 1 Dam. Williams 3 18 6.0 9 0 Kemp 1 7 7.0 7 0 TEAM 135 1865 13.8 75t 18 OPPONENTS 171 2142 12.5 46 10 * INTERCEPTIONS No. Yds Avg Long TD Lucas 1 49 49.0 49 0 Jones 1 20 20.0 20t 1 E. Murray 1 0 0.0 0 0 Nelson 1 0 0.0 0 0 Parker 1 0 0.0 0 0 Scandrick 1 0 0.0 0 0 TEAM 6 69 11.5 49 1 OPPONENTS 4 44 11.0 27 0 * PUNTING No. Yds Avg Net TB In Lg B Colquitt 16 778 48.6 45.5 2 6 67 0 TEAM 16 778 48.6 45.5 2 6 67 0 OPPONENTS 18 749 41.6 30.1 1 6 63 0 * PUNT RETURNS Ret FC Yds Avg Long TD Hill 6 1 139 23.2 91t 1 Thomas 1 0 48 48.0 48 0 TEAM 7 1 187 26.7 91t 1 OPPONENTS 6 4 10 1.7 6 0 * KICKOFF RETURNS No. Yds Avg Long TD Tr. Smith 4 180 45.0 97 0 Thomas 3 58 19.3 26 0 Harris 1 11 11.0 11 0 Ware 1 10 10.0 10 0 TEAM 9 259 28.8 97 0 OPPONENTS 12 226 18.8 32 0 * FIELD GOALS 1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+ Butker 0/ 0 3/ 3 4/ 4 4/ 4 0/ 0 TEAM 0/ 0 3/ 3 4/ 4 4/ 4 0/ 0 OPPONENTS 0/ 0 2/ 2 5/ 5 4/ 6 1/ 1 Butker: (46G)()(37G)(33G,21G)(22G,42G,38G)(42G, 43G,24G,30G) OPP: (45G,39G,48N)(49N)(39G,35G)(42G,34G,46G)() (48G,24G,39G,50G,28G)

Yds Cmp% Yds/Att 1865 63.7 8.80 1865 63.7 8.80 2142 63.3 7.93

TD 18 18 10

TD% Int Int% Long Sack/Lost Rating 8.5 4 1.9 75t 6/ 26 112.2 8.5 4 1.9 75t 6/ 26 112.2 3.7 6 2.2 46 17/ 100 91.0


2018 REGULAR SEASON KANSAS CITY CHIEFS DEFENSIVE STATS (THROUGH WEEK 6) POS. PLAYER SOLO ASST. TOTAL TFL SACKS/YDS. PR FR FF INT./YDS. PD LB Hitchens, Anthony 34 26 60 5 0.0/0 1 0/0 0 0 0 DB Parker, Ron 29 7 36 0.0/0 1/0 3 0 0 0 0 DB Fuller, Kendall 27 8 35 0.0/0 0/0 3 0 0 0 0 LB Ragland, Reggie 17 15 32 0.0/0 1 0/0 0 0 0 0 DB Murray, Eric 17 9 26 0.0/0 1/0 2 0 0 0 0 DB Nelson, Steven 19 5 24 2 0.0/0 1/0 3 0 0 0 LB Smith, Terrance 13 7 20 1 1.0/5 1 0/0 0 0 0 DT Williams, Xavier 10 7 17 1 1.0/5 1 0/0 0 0 0 DE Ford, Dee 14 2 16 3 4.0/23 12 1 0/0 1 0 DB Lucas, Jordan 8 8 16 0.0/0 1/49 2 0 0 0 0 CB Scandrick, Orlando 14 1 15 0.0/0 1/0 7 0 0 0 0 DE Bailey, Allen 10 2 12 3 4.0/23 6 1 0/0 0 0 LB Houston, Justin 8 3 11 3 3.0/15 4 2 0/0 0 0 DT Jones, Chris 9 2 11 4 2.0/12 4 1 1/20 1 0 DL Nnadi, Derrick 6 5 11 0.0/0 0/0 0 0 0 0 0 LB Speaks, Breeland 6 5 11 1.0/7 2 1 1 0/0 0 0 DE Jenkins, Jarvis 3 1 4 0.0/0 0/0 0 0 0 0 0 DE Kpassagnon, Tanoh 2 1 3 0.0/0 1 0/0 0 0 0 0 DB Watts, Armani 1 1 2 1 1.0/10 2 0/0 1 0 0 DB Shaw, Josh 1 1 0.0/0 0/0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DB Smith, Tremon 1 1 0.0/0 0/0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS 249 115 364 23 17.0/100 35 2 5 6/69 23 DEFENSIVE SCORES 2018 REGULAR SEASON CHIEFS SPECIAL TEAMS STATS INT (1) (1:56) (Shotgun) B.Bortles pass short right intended for T.Yeldon POS. PLAYER TKIS. ASST. TOTAL INTERCEPTED by C.Jones at JAX 20. C.Jones for 20 yards. WR Thomas, 4 4 0 PENALTY on JAX-J.Parnell, Face Mask (15 Yards), 15 yards, De'Anthony enforced between downs. vs. JAX (10/07/18) DB Ward, Charvarius 2 1 3 FR (0) DB Watts, Armani 2 1 3 Safety (0) WR Kemp, Marcus 1 1 2 SPECIAL TEAMS BIG PLAYS FR (1) (10:35) D.Colquitt punts 59 yards to LAC 14, Center-J.Winchester. FB Sherman, Anthony 1 1 2 J.Jones MUFFS catch, and recovers at LAC 6. J.Jones to LAC 6 for no DB Smith, Tremon 2 2 0 gain (D.Thomas). FUMBLES (D.Thomas), RECOVERED by KCRB Williams, Damien 2 2 0 J.Winchester at LAC 2. @ LAC (09/09/18) TE Harris, Demetrius 1 1 0 TD (1) (13:24) D.Kaser punts 57 yards to KC 9, Center-M.Windt. T.Hill for 91 yards. @ LAC (09/09/18) DB Lucas, Jordan 1 1 0 DB Shaw, Josh 1 1 0 TOTALS 15 6 21 Regular Season defensive and special teams statistics are based on press box statistics.


CINCINNATI BENGALS / WEEK 6 / THROUGH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2018 WON 4, LOST 2 09/09 W 34-23 09/13 W 34-23 09/23 L 21-31 09/30 W 37-36 10/07 W 27-17 10/14 L 21-28 10/21 10/28 11/11 11/18 11/25 12/02 12/09 12/16 12/23 12/30

at Indianapolis 58,699 Baltimore 50,018 at Carolina 72,161 at Atlanta 71,985 Miami 52,708 Pittsburgh 60,594 at Kansas City Tampa Bay New Orleans at Baltimore Cleveland Denver at L.A. Chargers Oakland at Cleveland at Pittsburgh Cin. Opp. TOTAL FIRST DOWNS 134 143 Rushing 31 36 Passing 88 93 Penalty 15 14 3rd Down: Made/Att 28/66 47/88 3rd Down Pct. 42.4 53.4 4th Down: Made/Att 2/2 3/7 4th Down Pct. 100.0 42.9 POSSESSION AVG. 28:34 31:26 TOTAL NET YARDS 2113 2455 Avg. Per Game 352.2 409.2 Total Plays 364 417 Avg. Per Play 5.8 5.9 NET YARDS RUSHING 539 703 Avg. Per Game 89.8 117.2 Total Rushes 123 152 NET YARDS PASSING 1574 1752 Avg. Per Game 262.3 292.0 Sacked/Yards Lost 12/100 13/66 Gross Yards 1674 1818 Att./Completions 229/149 252/167 Completion Pct. 65.1 66.3 Had Intercepted 7 5 PUNTS/AVERAGE 23/41.0 19/44.8 NET PUNTING AVG. 23/36.3 19/40.1 PENALTIES/YARDS 39/354 45/408 FUMBLES/BALL LOST 3/1 6/3 TOUCHDOWNS 22 18 Rushing 5 6 Passing 14 11 Returns 3 1 * SCORE BY PERIODS Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 OT PTS TEAM 45 49 17 63 0 174 OPPONENTS 17 86 26 29 0 158 * SCORING TD-Ru-Pa-Rt K-PAT FG S PTS Bullock 0 0 0 0 21/21 7/ 9 0 42 Green 5 0 5 0 0 30 Boyd 4 0 4 0 0 24 Bernard 3 3 0 0 0 18 Mixon 3 2 1 0 0 18 Ross 2 0 2 0 0 12 Eifert 1 0 1 0 0 6 Fejedelem 1 0 0 1 0 6 Hubbard 1 0 0 1 0 6 Johnson 1 0 0 1 0 6 Uzomah 1 0 1 0 0 6 TEAM 22 5 14 3 21/21 7/ 9 0 174 OPPONENTS 18 6 11 1 15/15 11/12 0 158 2-Pt Conv: TM 0-1, OPP 1-3 SACKS: Atkins 6, Dunlap 4, Hubbard 1, Lawson 1, Williams 1, TM 13, OPP 12 FUM/LOST: Green 2/1, Phillips 1/0 * PASSING Dalton TEAM OPPONENTS

Att Cmp 229 149 229 149 252 167

* RUSHING No. Yds Avg Long TD Mixon 71 336 4.7 31 2 Bernard 34 155 4.6 23 3 Dalton 8 31 3.9 11 0 Erickson 1 8 8.0 8 0 Walton 7 7 1.0 4 0 Boyd 1 5 5.0 5 0 Ross 1 -3 -3.0 -3 0 TEAM 123 539 4.4 31 5 OPPONENTS 152 703 4.6 45 6 * RECEIVING No. Yds Avg Long TD Boyd 37 455 12.3 49 4 Green 33 494 15.0 38t 5 Eifert 15 179 11.9 29 1 Uzomah 15 171 11.4 29 1 Bernard 14 78 5.6 17 0 Mixon 13 99 7.6 21 1 Ross 7 79 11.3 39t 2 Erickson 6 40 6.7 10 0 Kroft 4 36 9.0 16 0 Walton 4 31 7.8 24 0 Malone 1 12 12.0 12 0 TEAM 149 1674 11.2 49 14 OPPONENTS 167 1818 10.9 49 11 * INTERCEPTIONS No. Yds Avg Long TD Bates 2 21 10.5 21 0 Johnson 1 22 22.0 22t 1 P. Brown 1 2 2.0 2 0 Williams 1 1 1.0 1 0 TEAM 5 46 9.2 22t 1 OPPONENTS 7 70 10.0 32 0 * PUNTING No. Yds Avg Net TB In Lg B Huber 22 943 42.9 36.3 0 12 63 1 TEAM 23 943 41.0 36.3 0 12 63 1 OPPONENTS 19 851 44.8 40.1 1 10 69 0 * PUNT RETURNS Ret FC Yds Avg Long TD Erickson 6 9 46 7.7 13 0 Phillips 2 0 24 12.0 16 0 TEAM 8 9 70 8.8 16 0 OPPONENTS 8 8 109 13.6 71t 1 * KICKOFF RETURNS No. Yds Avg Long TD Erickson 8 277 34.6 51 0 Bernard 2 25 12.5 14 0 TEAM 10 302 30.2 51 0 OPPONENTS 12 318 26.5 53 0 * FIELD GOALS 1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+ Bullock 0/ 0 2/ 2 2/ 3 2/ 2 1/ 2 TEAM 0/ 0 2/ 2 2/ 3 2/ 2 1/ 2 OPPONENTS 0/ 0 4/ 4 2/ 2 2/ 2 3/ 4 Bullock: (42G,39G)(28G,40G)(53N)(36G)(37B,51G, 20G)() OPP: (21G,38G,51G,55N)(55G)(40G)(55G,28G,32G) (42G)(21G,24G)

Yds Cmp% Yds/Att 1674 65.1 7.31 1674 65.1 7.31 1818 66.3 7.21

TD 14 14 11

TD% Int Int% Long Sack/Lost Rating 6.1 7 3.1 49 12/ 100 94.4 6.1 7 3.1 49 12/ 100 94.4 4.4 5 2.0 49 13/ 66 93.7


GAME 1 Chiefs 38, Chargers 28 September 9, 2018 • StubHub Center • 25,351 Kansas City Chiefs .............. 14 3 14 7 Los Angeles Chargers .......... 6 6 0 16

KC — T.Hill 91 yd. punt return (H.Butker kick) LAC — C.Sturgis 45 yd. Field Goal (8-48, 3:43) KC — T.Hill 58 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (5-75, 2:41) LAC — C.Sturgis 39 yd. Field Goal (6-39, 3:41) LAC — A.Ekeler 13 yd. pass from P.Rivers (pass failed) (12-96, 6:11) KC — H.Butker 46 yd. Field Goal (11-47, 5:47) KC — D.Thomas 1 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (11-75, 5:35) KC — A.Sherman 36 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (6-86, 3:28) LAC — K.Allen 20 yd. pass from P.Rivers (P.Rivers-A.Gates pass) (9-91, 3:44) KC — T.Hill 1 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (3-2, 0:40) LAC — Ty.Williams 4 yd. pass from P.Rivers (M.Gordon run) (10-75, 4:41) TEAM STATISTICS CHIEFS CHARGERS First Downs .................................................... 19 33 Total Net Yards ............................................ 362 541 Rushes/Net Yards .................................... 27/106 22/123 Net Passing .................................................. 256 418 Pass Attempts/Completions ...................... 27/15 51/34 Had Intercepted ............................................... 0 1 Sacked/Yards Lost ......................................... 1/0 1/6 Punts/Average .......................................... 5/51.2 3/48.0 Penalties/Yards ........................................... 6/50 7/45 Fumbles/Lost ................................................. 0/0 2/1 Possession Time ........................................ 25:34 34:26

— 38 — 28

RUSHING KC — K. Hunt 16-49; S. Ware 3-32; P. Mahomes 5-21; T. Hill 2-4; D. Williams 1-(0) LAC — M. Gordon III 15-64; A. Ekeler 5-39; T. Benjamin 1-19; D. Watt 1-1 RECEIVING KC — T. Hill 7-169, 2 TDs; A. Sherman 1-36, TD; S. Watkins 3-21; C. Conley 1-15; S. Ware 1-8; T. Kelce 1-6; D. Thomas 1-1, TD LAC — K. Allen 8-108, TD; M. Gordon III 9-102; A. Ekeler 5-87, TD; M. Williams 5-81; V. Green 2-21; A. Gates 2-16; T. Williams 2-8, TD; T. Benjamin 1-1 PASSING KC — P. Mahomes 27-15-256, 4 TDs, 0 INT LAC — P. Rivers 51-34-424, 3 TDs, 1 INT INTERCEPTIONS KC — R. Parker 1 LAC — None SACKS KC — D. Ford 1.0 LAC — D. James 1.0 FIELD GOALS KC — H. Butker(46) LAC — C. Sturgis(45) (39) 48WL

GAME 2 Chiefs 42, Steelers 37 September 16, 2018 • Heinz Field • 63,956 Kansas City Chiefs .............. 21 0 14 7 Pittsburgh Steelers .............. 0 21 7 9

KC — C.Conley 15 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (2-10, 1:03) KC — T.Kelce 19 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (5-71, 2:32) KC — K.Hunt 5 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (6-61, 2:40) PIT — J.James 26 yd. pass from B.Roethlisberger (C.Boswell kick) (6-81, 3:04) PIT — J.Smith-Schuster 2 yd. pass from B.Roethlisberger (kick failed, wr) (11-85, 5:41) PIT — J.Washington 14 yd. pass from B.Roethlisberger (B.Roethlisberger-J.Conner pass) (10-90, 2:48) KC — T.Kelce 25 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (5-75, 2:18) PIT — J.Conner 1 yd. run (C.Boswell kick) (11-75, 5:30) KC — D.Robinson 3 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (7-75, 3:57) KC — T.Hill 29 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (5-65, 3:04) PIT — K.Hunt tackled in end zone by A.Burns, M.Burnett for a Safety PIT — B.Roethlisberger 3 yd. run (C.Boswell kick) (9-66, 3:04) TEAM STATISTICS CHIEFS STEELERS First Downs .................................................... 24 33 Total Net Yards ............................................ 449 475 Rushes/Net Yards .................................... 25/127 13/33 Net Passing .................................................. 322 442 Pass Attempts/Completions ...................... 28/23 60/39 Had Intercepted ............................................... 0 0 Sacked/Yards Lost ......................................... 1/4 1/10 Punts/Average .......................................... 2/50.0 5/45.2 Penalties/Yards ......................................... 12/76 12/90 Fumbles/Lost ................................................. 3/1 1/0 Possession Time ........................................ 27:49 32:11

— 42 — 37

RUSHING KC — K. Hunt 18-75; S. Watkins 1-31; P. Mahomes 5-18; S. Ware 1-3 PIT — J. Conner 8-17, TD; B. Roethlisberger 2-9, TD; R. Switzer 2-5; S. Ridley 1-2 RECEIVING KC — T. Kelce 7-109, 2 TDs; S. Watkins 6-100; T. Hill 5-90, TD; C. Conley 2-17, TD; K. Hunt 1-5, TD; D. Robinson 1-3, TD; D. Williams 1-2 PIT — J. James 5-138, TD; J. Smith-Schuster 13-121, TD; A. Brown 9-67; J. Conner 5-48; V. McDonald 3-26; R. Nix 1-19; R. Switzer 1-14; J. Washington 1-14, TD; S. Ridley 1-5 PASSING KC — P. Mahomes 28-23-326, 6 TDs, 0 INT PIT — B. Roethlisberger 60-39-452, 3 TDs, 0 INT INTERCEPTIONS KC — None PIT — None SACKS KC — A. Bailey 1.0 PIT — D. McCullers 1.0 FIELD GOALS KC — None PIT — C. Boswell49WL


GAME 3 Chiefs 38, 49ers 27 September 23, 2018 • Arrowhead Stadium • 76,023 San Francisco 49ers ............. 0 10 14 3 Kansas City Chiefs .............. 14 21 0 3

KC — K.Hunt 1 yd. run (H.Butker kick) (11-57, 4:55) KC — K.Hunt 1 yd. run (H.Butker kick) (8-84, 3:26) SF — K.Juszczyk 35 yd. pass from J.Garoppolo (R.Gould kick) (8-75, 5:28) KC — C.Conley 4 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (5-75, 2:58) KC — D.Harris 13 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (8-72, 3:35) KC — S.Watkins 12 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (9-68, 1:26) SF — R.Gould 39 yd. Field Goal (6-54, 0:34) SF — M.Goodwin 11 yd. pass from J.Garoppolo (kick failed, hlu) (7-87, 2:37) SF — A.Morris 3 yd. run (J.Garoppolo-G.Kittle pass) (11-77, 5:12) KC — H.Butker 37 yd. Field Goal (9-56, 3:56) SF — R.Gould 35 yd. Field Goal (17-58, 8:30) TEAM STATISTICS 49ERS CHIEFS First Downs ..................................................... 26 31 Total Net Yards ............................................. 406 384 Rushes/Net Yards .................................... 29/178 28/77 Net Passing .................................................. 228 307 Pass Attempts/Completions ....................... 30/20 38/24 Had Intercepted ............................................... 0 0 Sacked/Yards Lost ....................................... 4/23 2/7 Punts/Average .......................................... 4/37.0 2/43.5 Penalties/Yards ........................................ 14/147 6/48 Fumbles/Lost ................................................. 3/0 2/0 Possession Time ........................................ 29:59 30:01

— 27 — 38

RUSHING KC — K. Hunt 18-44, 2 TDs; S. Watkins 2-20; P. Mahomes 5-7; T. Hill 2-5; S. Ware 1-1 SF — M. Breida 10-90; A. Morris 14-67, TD; J. Garoppolo 3-23; R. Mostert 1-(0); M. Goodwin 1-(-2) RECEIVING KC — T. Kelce 8-114; S. Watkins 5-55, TD; T. Hill 2-51; S. Ware 2-29; D. Williams 2-16; A. Sherman 1-16; C. Conley 2-13, TD; D. Harris 1-13, TD; M. Kemp 1-7 SF — G. Kittle 5-79; K. Juszczyk 2-38, TD; M. Goodwin 3-30, TD; M. Breida 3-27; K. Bourne 1-27; T. Taylor 3-24; P. Garçon 1-11; R. Mostert 1-8; G. Celek 1-7 PASSING KC — P. Mahomes 38-24-314, 3 TDs, 0 INT SF — J. Garoppolo 30-20-251, 2 TDs, 0 INT INTERCEPTIONS KC — None SF — None SACKS KC — J. Houston 2.0; A. Bailey 1.0; D. Ford 1.0 SF — A. Armstead 1.0; A. Exum Jr. 1.0 FIELD GOALS KC — H. Butker(37) SF — R. Gould(39) (35)

GAME 4 Chiefs 27, Broncos 23 October 1, 2018 • Broncos Stadium at Mile High • 76,656 DEN — KC — KC — DEN — DEN — KC — DEN — DEN — KC —

Kansas City Chiefs ................ 3 7 3 14 Denver Broncos ..................... 3 10 7 3

B.McManus 42 yd. Field Goal (7-51, 3:27) H.Butker 33 yd. Field Goal (10-60, 5:30) P.Mahomes 8 yd. run (H.Butker kick) (12-89, 5:39) R.Freeman 14 yd. run (B.McManus kick) (5-78, 2:56) B.McManus 34 yd. Field Goal (12-60, 2:17) H.Butker 21 yd. Field Goal (12-72, 5:28) P.Lindsay 1 yd. run (B.McManus kick) (9-80, 4:33) B.McManus 46 yd. Field Goal (6-48, 2:43) T.Kelce 2 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (12-75, 6:20) KC — K.Hunt 4 yd. run (H.Butker kick) (8-60, 2:56) TEAM STATISTICS CHIEFS BRONCOS First Downs .................................................... 22 21 Total Net Yards ............................................ 446 385 Rushes/Net Yards .................................... 26/142 22/159 Net Passing .................................................. 304 226 Pass Attempts/Completions ...................... 45/28 33/21 Had Intercepted ............................................... 0 1 Sacked/Yards Lost ......................................... 1/0 4/19 Punts/Average .......................................... 4/42.0 3/41.0 Penalties/Yards ......................................... 10/93 3/25 Fumbles/Lost ................................................. 1/0 0/0 Possession Time ........................................ 35:02 24:58

— 27 — 23

RUSHING — K. Hunt 19-121, TD; P. Mahomes 3-7, TD; S. Ware 2-6; D. Thomas 1-6; T. Hill 1-2 DEN — P. Lindsay 12-69, TD; R. Freeman 8-67, TD; E. Sanders 1-18; D. Booker 1-5 RECEIVING KC — T. Kelce 7-78, TD; D. Harris 2-59; T. Hill 9-54; K. Hunt 3-54; D. Robinson 2-31; D. Thomas 1-15; C. Conley 4-13 DEN — J. Heuerman 4-57; C. Sutton 3-51; E. Sanders 5-45; A. Janovich 1-32; D. Thomas 4-24; M. LaCosse 1-17; P. Lindsay 2-10; D. Booker 1-9 PASSING KC — P. Mahomes 45-28-304, TD, 0 INT DEN — C. Keenum 33-21-245, 0 TDs, 1 INT INTERCEPTIONS KC — E. Murray 1 DEN — None SACKS KC — A. Bailey 1.0; D. Ford 1.0; J. Houston 1.0; A. Watts 1.0 DEN — T. Davis 0.5; Z. Kerr 0.5 FIELD GOALS KC — H. Butker(33) (21) DEN — B. McManus(42) (34) (46) KC


GAME 5 Chiefs 30, Jaguars 14 October 7, 2018 • Arrowhead Stadium • 75,289 KC — KC — KC — KC — KC — JAX —

Jacksonville Jaguars ............. 0 0 7 7 Kansas City Chiefs ................ 7 13 3 7

P.Mahomes 4 yd. run (H.Butker kick) (10-73, 5:23) H.Butker 22 yd. Field Goal (14-82, 5:51) H.Butker 42 yd. Field Goal (6-27, 2:19) C.Jones 20 yd. interception return (H.Butker kick) H.Butker 38 yd. Field Goal (12-78, 5:36) T.Yeldon 14 yd. pass from B.Bortles (J.Lambo kick) (6-75, 2:17) KC — K.Hunt 4 yd. run (H.Butker kick) (6-79, 3:13) JAX — B.Bortles 21 yd. run (J.Lambo kick) (14-58, 4:02) TEAM STATISTICS JAGUARS CHIEFS First Downs .................................................... 29 26 Total Net Yards ............................................ 502 424 Rushes/Net Yards .................................... 17/101 30/126 Net Passing .................................................. 401 298 Pass Attempts/Completions ...................... 61/33 38/22 Had Intercepted ............................................... 4 2 Sacked/Yards Lost ....................................... 5/29 1/15 Punts/Average .......................................... 3/36.0 2/58.0 Penalties/Yards ........................................... 5/45 11/105 Fumbles/Lost ................................................. 1/1 0/0 Possession Time ........................................ 27:17 32:43

— 14 — 30

RUSHING KC — K. Hunt 22-87, TD; T. Hill 2-26; P. Mahomes 4-13, TD; S. Ware 1-(0); D. Williams 1-(0) JAX — T. Yeldon 10-53; B. Bortles 4-34, TD; C. Grant 1-8; B. Wilds 2-6 RECEIVING KC — T. Kelce 5-100; S. Watkins 6-78; T. Hill 4-61; C. Conley 2-21; A. Sherman 1-15; D. Thomas 1-13; S. Ware 1-13; K. Hunt 1-7; D. Harris 1-5 JAX — D. Moncrief 6-76; K. Cole 4-70; T. Yeldon 8-69, TD; D. Chark 2-68; N. Paul 7-65; D. Westbrook 3-55; J. O'Shaughnessy 3-27 PASSING KC — P. Mahomes 38-22-313, 0 TDs, 2 INT JAX — B. Bortles 61-33-430, TD, 4 INT INTERCEPTIONS KC — C. Jones 1; J. Lucas 1; S. Nelson 1; O. Scandrick 1 JAX — A. Bouye 1; T. Gipson Sr. 1 SACKS KC — A. Bailey 1.0; D. Ford 1.0; C. Jones 1.0; T. Smith 1.0; X. Williams 1.0 JAX — Y. Ngakoue 1.0 FIELD GOALS KC — H. Butker(22) (42) (38) JAX — None

GAME 6 Patriots 43, Chiefs 40 October 14, 2018 • Gillette Stadium • 65,878 KC — NE — NE — KC — NE —

Kansas City Chiefs ................ 6 3 17 14 New England Patriots ........ 10 14 3 16

H.Butker 42 yd. Field Goal (8-35, 3:26) S.Gostkowski 48 yd. Field Goal (8-45, 3:47) S.Michel 4 yd. run (S.Gostkowski kick) (1-4, 0:04) H.Butker 43 yd. Field Goal (5-31, 1:32) J.Edelman 17 yd. pass from T.Brady (S.Gostkowski kick) (10-75, 5:33) KC — H.Butker 24 yd. Field Goal (11-69, 6:31) NE — S.Michel 1 yd. run (S.Gostkowski kick) (7-75, 4:24) KC — K.Hunt 67 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (3-75, 1:33) NE — S.Gostkowski 24 yd. Field Goal (12-65, 6:10) KC — H.Butker 30 yd. Field Goal (9-51, 3:41) KC — T.Hill 14 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (4-29, 1:27) NE — S.Gostkowski 39 yd. Field Goal (11-54, 5:34) KC — T.Hill 1 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (3-3, 1:44) NE — T.Brady 4 yd. run (S.Gostkowski kick) (7-75, 3:13) NE — S.Gostkowski 50 yd. Field Goal (5-47, 0:35) KC — T.Hill 75 yd. pass from P.Mahomes (H.Butker kick) (1-75, 0:12) NE — S.Gostkowski 28 yd. Field Goal (7-65, 3:03) TEAM STATISTICS CHIEFS PATRIOTS 31 First Downs ..................................................... 18 500 Total Net Yards ............................................. 446 38/173 Rushes/Net Yards ...................................... 17/94 327 Net Passing ................................................... 352 35/24 Pass Attempts/Completions ....................... 36/23 Had Intercepted ................................................ 2 0 2/13 Sacked/Yards Lost ......................................... 0/0 0/0.0 Punts/Average .......................................... 1/51.0 0/0 Penalties/Yards ............................................ 5/58 2/1 Fumbles/Lost ................................................. 0/0 36:09 Possession Time ........................................ 23:51

— 40 — 43

RUSHING KC — K. Hunt 10-80; P. Mahomes 2-9; S. Ware 2-5; D. Williams 1-1; T. Hill 1-(0); S. Watkins 1-(-1) NE — S. Michel 24-106, 2 TDs; J. White 6-39; K. Barner 3-16; J. Edelman 1-7; C. Patterson 1-3; T. Brady 3-2, TD RECEIVING KC — T. Hill 7-142, 3 TDs; K. Hunt 5-105, TD; T. Kelce 5-61; C. Conley 1-19; S. Watkins 2-18; S. Ware 2-9; A. Sherman 1-(-2) NE — R. Gronkowski 3-97; C. Hogan 4-78; J. Edelman 4-54, TD; J. White 5-53; J. Gordon 5-42; C. Patterson 1-13; J. Develin 2-3 PASSING KC — P. Mahomes 36-23-352, 4 TDs, 2 INT NE — T. Brady 35-24-340, TD, 0 INT INTERCEPTIONS KC — None NE — D. Harmon 1; D. Hightower 1 SACKS KC — C. Jones 1.0; B. Speaks 1.0 NE — None FIELD GOALS KC — H. Butker(42) (43) (24) (30) NE — S. Gostkowski(48) (24) (39) (50) (28)


2018 KANSAS CITY CHIEFS NUMERICAL ROSTER (As of October 16, 2018) NO. NAME 2 Dustin Colquitt 4 Chad Henne 7 Harrison Butker 10 Tyreek Hill 11 Demarcus Robinson 14 Sammy Watkins 15 Patrick Mahomes 17 Chris Conley 19 Marcus Kemp 20 Steven Nelson 21 Eric Murray 22 Orlando Scandrick 23 Kendall Fuller 24 Jordan Lucas 26 Damien Williams 27 Kareem Hunt 29 Eric Berry 30 Josh Shaw 31 Darrel Williams 32 Spencer Ware 34 Leon McQuay 35 Charvarius Ward 38 Ron Parker 39 Tremon Smith 41 James Winchester 42 Anthony Sherman 44 Dorian O'Daniel 48 Terrance Smith 50 Justin Houston 51 Frank Zombo 53 Anthony Hitchens 54 Nate Orchard 55 Dee Ford 56 Ben Niemann 57 Breeland Speaks 59 Reggie Ragland 61 Mitch Morse 62 Austin Reiter 65 Jordan Devey 66 Kahlil McKenzie 71 Mitchell Schwartz 72 Eric Fisher 74 Justin Hamilton 75 Cam Erving 77 Andrew Wylie 84 Demetrius Harris 87 Travis Kelce 91 Derrick Nnadi 92 Tanoh Kpassagnon 94 Jarvis Jenkins 95 Chris Jones 97 Allen Bailey 98 Xavier Williams Practice Squad 6 Josh Crockett 8 Chase Litton 12 Gehrig Dieter 40 D'Montre Wade 60 Ryan Hunter 67 Jimmy Murray 82 Deon Yelder 88 David Wells 90 Joey Ivie Practice Squad; Injured 52 Rob McCray Reserved/Injured 1 Byron Pringle 13 De'Anthony Thomas 25 Armani Watts J.D. Moore 43 47 Step Durham 49 Daniel Sorensen 64 Dillon Gordon Tejan Koroma 73 76 Laurent Duvernay-Tardif 82 Alex Ellis

POS. P QB K WR WR WR QB WR WR CB DB CB CB S RB RB S S RB RB S CB S CB LS FB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB C OL G G T T DT OL T TE TE DT LB DL DL DL DT

HT. 6-3 6-3 6-4 5-10 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-3 6-4 5-11 5-11 5-10 5-11 6-1 5-11 5-11 6-0 6-1 5-11 5-10 6-1 6-1 6-0 6-0 6-3 5-10 6-1 6-2 6-3 6-3 6-0 6-3 6-2 6-2 6-3 6-2 6-6 6-3 6-6 6-3 6-5 6-7 6-2 6-5 6-6 6-7 6-5 6-1 6-7 6-4 6-6 6-3 6-2

WT. 210 222 205 185 203 211 230 205 210 194 199 196 198 190 224 216 212 190 224 229 195 198 206 190 240 242 220 235 258 254 235 255 252 235 285 252 305 300 320 320 320 315 315 313 309 230 260 312 289 300 310 288 309

AGE 36 33 23 24 24 25 23 25 23 24 24 31 23 25 26 23 29 26 23 26 23 22 31 22 29 29 24 25 29 31 26 25 27 23 22 25 26 26 30 21 29 27 25 26 24 27 29 22 24 30 24 29 26

EXP. 14 10 2 3 3 5 2 4 1 4 3 11 3 3 5 2 9 4 R 5 1 R 8 R 4 8 R 3 8 9 5 4 5 R R 3 4 3 5 R 7 6 2 4 1 5 6 R 2 8 3 8 4

COLLEGE Tennessee Michigan Georgia Tech West Alabama Florida Clemson Texas Tech Georgia Hawaii Oregon State Minnesota Boise State Virginia Tech Penn State Oklahoma Toledo Tennessee USC LSU LSU USC Middle Tennessee State Newberry Central Arkansas Oklahoma Connecticut Clemson Florida State Georgia Central Michigan Iowa Utah Auburn Iowa Ole Miss Alabama Missouri South Florida Memphis Tennessee California Central Michigan Louisiana Florida State Eastern Michigan UW-Milwaukee Cincinnati Florida State Villanova Clemson Mississippi State Miami (Fla.) Northern Iowa

HOW ACQ. D3-05 UFA-18 FA-17 D5b-16 D4c-16 UFA-18 D1-17 D3a-15 FA-17 D3b-15 D4b-16 FA-18 T (WAS)-18 T (MIA)-18 UFA-18 D3-17 D1-10 FA-18 CFA-18 FA-14 FA-18 T (DAL)-18 FA-18 D6a-18 FA-15 T (ARI)-13 D3b-18 CFA-16 D3a-11 FA-18 UFA-18 FA-18 D1-14 CFA-18 D2-18 T (BUF)-17 D2-15 W (CLE)-18 FA-17 D6b-18 UFA-16 D1-13 FA-17 T (CLE)-17 FA-17 CFA-13 D3a-13 D3a-18 D2-17 UFA-17 D2-16 D3b-11 RFA-18

HOMETOWN Knoxville, Tenn. West Lawn, Pa. Decatur, Ga. Pearson, Ga. Fort Valley, Ga. Fort Myers, Fla. Tyler, Texas Dallas, Ga. Layton, Utah Warner Robins, Ga. Milwaukee, Wis. Los Alamitos, Calif. Baltimore, Md. New Rochelle, N.Y. San Diego, Calif. Willoughby, Ohio Fairburn, Ga. Palmdale, Calif. Marrero, La. Eunice, La. Seffner, Fla. McCombs, Miss. St. Helena Island, S.C. Anniston, Ala. Washington, Okla. North Attleborough, Mass. Olney, Md. Decatur, Ga. Statesboro, Ga. Sterling Heights, Mich. Lorain, Ohio Los Angeles, Calif. Odenville, Ala. Sycamore, Ill. Jackson, Miss. Madison, Ala. Austin, Texas Bradenton, Fla. American Fork, Utah Walnut Creek, Calif. Pacific Palisades, Calif. Rochester, Mich. Natchez, Miss. Moultrie, Ga. Midland, Mich. Little Rock, Ark. Cleveland Heights, Ohio Virginia Beach, Va. Kalamazoo, Mich. Clemson, S.C. Houston, Miss. Sapelo Island, Ga. Kansas City, Mo.

WR QB WR DB T C TE TE DT

6-4 6-5 6-3 5-11 6-3 6-5 6-4 6-6 6-3

195 230 207 206 316 305 255 260 301

23 23 25 23 23 23 23 23 23

R R 1 R R R R R 1

Central Oklahoma Marshall Alabama Murray State Bowling Green Holy Cross Western Kentucky San Diego State Florida

CFA-18 CFA-18 CFA-17 CFA-18 CFA-18 CFA-18 FA-18 FA-18 FA-18

Bristow, Okla. Tampa, Fla. South Bend, Ind. Columbia, Tenn. North Bay, Ontario Evanston, Ill. Louisville, Ky. Fresno, Calif. Pasco, Fla.

LB

6-2

280

22

R

Indiana

CFA-18

Rockdale, Ga.

WR WR S RB DB S T OL G TE

6-1 5-8 5-11 6-2 5-11 6-2 6-4 6-0 6-5 6-4

203 176 205 235 194 208 322 290 321 245

24 25 22 23 23 28 25 22 27 25

R 5 R R R 5 2 R 5 2

Kansas State Oregon Texas A&M LSU Georgia Tech BYU LSU BYU McGill Tennessee

CFA-18 D4-14 D4-18 CFA-18 CFA-18 CFA-14 FA-17 CFA-18 D6b-14 W (NO)-18

Tampa, Fla. Los Angeles, Calif. Forney, Texas Ruston, La. Jacksonville, Fla. Colton, Calif. River Ridge, La. Allen, Texas Montreal, Quebec Delmar, Del.

HEAD COACH: Andy Reid OFFENSE: Eric Bieniemy (Offensive Coordinator); Joe Bleymaier (Pass Game Analyst/Asst. QB); Andy Heck (Offensive Line); Mike Kafka (Quarterbacks); Greg Lewis

(Wide Receivers); Corey Matthaei (Asst. Offensive Line); Deland McCullough (Running Backs); Tom Melvin (Tight Ends); David Girardi (Offensive Quality Control).

DEFENSE: Bob Sutton (Defensive Coordinator); Terry Bradden (Defensive Asst.); Mark DeLeone (Inside Linebackers); Al Harris (Secondary/Cornerbacks); Britt Reid (Defensive Line); Mike Smith (Outside Linebackers); Emmitt Thomas (Defensive Backs); Alex Whittingham (Defensive Assistant); Jay Valai (Defensive Quality Control).

SPECIALISTS: Dave Toub (Assistant Head Coach/Special Teams Coordinator); Rod Wilson (Asst. Special Teams). MISCELLANEOUS: Barry Rubin (Head Strength & Conditioning); Travis Crittenden (Asst. Strength & Conditioning); Ryan Reynolds (Asst. Strength & Conditioning); Devin Woodhouse (Asst. Strength & Conditioning); Mike Frazier (Statistical Analysis Coordinator); Porter Ellett (Senior Asst. to Head Coach).


2018 KANSAS CITY CHIEFS ALPHABETICAL ROSTER (As of October 16, 2018) NO. NAME 97 Bailey, Allen 29 Berry, Eric 7 Butker, Harrison 2 Colquitt, Dustin 17 Conley, Chris 65 Devey, Jordan 75 Erving, Cam 72 Fisher, Eric 55 Ford, Dee 23 Fuller, Kendall 74 Hamilton, Justin 84 Harris, Demetrius 4 Henne, Chad 10 Hill, Tyreek 53 Hitchens, Anthony 50 Houston, Justin 27 Hunt, Kareem 94 Jenkins, Jarvis 95 Jones, Chris 87 Kelce, Travis 19 Kemp, Marcus 92 Kpassagnon, Tanoh 24 Lucas, Jordan 15 Mahomes, Patrick 66 McKenzie, Kahlil 34 McQuay, Leon 61 Morse, Mitch 21 Murray, Eric 20 Nelson, Steven 56 Niemann, Ben 91 Nnadi, Derrick 44 O'Daniel, Dorian 54 Orchard, Nate 38 Parker, Ron 59 Ragland, Reggie 62 Reiter, Austin 11 Robinson, Demarcus 22 Scandrick, Orlando 71 Schwartz, Mitchell 30 Shaw, Josh 42 Sherman, Anthony 48 Smith, Terrance 39 Smith, Tremon 57 Speaks, Breeland 35 Ward, Charvarius 32 Ware, Spencer 14 Watkins, Sammy 26 Williams, Damien 31 Williams, Darrel 98 Williams, Xavier 41 Winchester, James 77 Wylie, Andrew 51 Zombo, Frank Practice Squad 6 Crockett, Josh 12 Dieter, Gehrig 60 Hunter, Ryan 90 Ivie, Joey 8 Litton, Chase 67 Murray, Jimmy 40 Wade, D'Montre 88 Wells, David 82 Yelder, Deon Practice Squad; Injured 52 McCray, Rob Reserved/Injured 47 Durham, Step 76 Duvernay-Tardif, Laurent 82 Ellis, Alex 64 Gordon, Dillon 73 Koroma, Tejan 43 Moore, J.D. 1 Pringle, Byron 49 Sorensen, Daniel 13 Thomas, De'Anthony 25 Watts, Armani

POS. DL S K P WR G OL T LB CB DT TE QB WR LB LB RB DL DL TE WR LB S QB G S C DB CB LB DT LB LB S LB OL WR CB T S FB LB CB LB CB RB WR RB RB DT LS T LB

HT. 6-3 6-0 6-4 6-3 6-3 6-6 6-5 6-7 6-2 5-11 6-2 6-7 6-3 5-10 6-0 6-3 5-11 6-4 6-6 6-5 6-4 6-7 6-1 6-3 6-3 6-1 6-6 5-11 5-11 6-2 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-0 6-2 6-3 6-1 5-10 6-5 6-1 5-10 6-2 6-0 6-3 6-1 5-10 6-1 5-11 5-11 6-2 6-3 6-6 6-3

WT. 288 212 205 210 205 320 313 315 252 198 315 230 222 185 235 258 216 300 310 260 210 289 190 230 320 195 305 199 194 235 312 220 255 206 252 300 203 196 320 190 242 235 190 285 198 229 211 224 224 309 240 309 254

AGE 29 29 23 36 25 30 26 27 27 23 25 27 33 24 26 29 23 30 24 29 23 24 25 23 21 23 26 24 24 23 22 24 25 31 25 26 24 31 29 26 29 25 22 22 22 26 25 26 23 26 29 24 31

EXP. 8 9 2 14 4 5 4 6 5 3 2 5 10 3 5 8 2 8 3 6 1 2 3 2 R 1 4 3 4 R R R 4 8 3 3 3 11 7 4 8 3 R R R 5 5 5 R 4 4 1 9

COLLEGE Miami (Fla.) Tennessee Georgia Tech Tennessee Georgia Memphis Florida State Central Michigan Auburn Virginia Tech Louisiana-Lafayette UW-Milwaukee Michigan West Alabama Iowa Georgia Toledo Clemson Mississippi State Cincinnati Hawaii Villanova Penn State Texas Tech Tennessee USC Missouri Minnesota Oregon State Iowa Florida State Clemson Utah Newberry Alabama South Florida Florida Boise State California USC Connecticut Florida State Central Arkansas Ole Miss Middle Tennessee State LSU Clemson Oklahoma LSU Northern Iowa Oklahoma Eastern Michigan Central Michigan

HOW ACQ. D3b-11 D1-10 FA-17 D3-05 D3a-15 FA-17 T (CLE)-17 D1-13 D1-14 T (WAS)-18 FA-17 CFA-13 UFA-18 D5b-16 UFA-18 D3a-11 D3-17 UFA-17 D2-16 D3a-13 FA-17 D2-17 T (MIA)-18 D1-17 D6b-18 FA-18 D2-15 D4b-16 D3b-15 CFA-18 D3-18 D3b-18 FA-18 FA-18 T (BUF)-17 W (CLE)-18 D4c-16 FA-18 UFA-16 FA-18 T (ARI)-13 CFA-16 D6a-18 D2-18 T (DAL)-18 FA-14 UFA-18 UFA-18 CFA-18 RFA-18 FA-15 FA-17 FA-18

HOMETOWN Sapelo Island, Ga. Fairburn, Ga. Decatur, Ga. Knoxville, Tenn. Dallas, Ga. American Fork, Utah Moultrie, Ga. Rochester, Mich. Odenville, Ala. Baltimore, Md. Natchez, Miss. Little Rock, Ark. West Lawn, Pa. Pearson, Ga. Lorain, Ohio Statesboro, Ga. Willoughby, Ohio Clemson, S.C. Houston, Miss. Cleveland Heights, Ohio Layton, Utah Kalamazoo, Mich. New Rochelle, N.Y. Tyler, Texas Walnut Creek, Calif. Seffner, Fla. Austin, Texas Milwaukee, Wis. Warner Robins, Ga. Sycamore, Ill. Virginia Beach, Va. Olney, Md. Los Angeles, Calif. St. Helena Island, S.C. Madison, Ala. Bradenton, Fla. Fort Valley, Ga. Los Alamitos, Calif. Pacific Palisades, Calif. Palmdale, Calif. North Attleborough, Mass. Decatur, Ga. Anniston, Ala. Jackson, Miss. McCombs, Miss. Eunice, La. Fort Myers, Fla. San Diego, Calif. Marrero, La. Kansas City, Mo. Washington, Okla. Midland, Mich. Sterling Heights, Mich.

WR WR T DT QB C DB TE TE

6-4 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-5 6-5 5-11 6-6 6-4

195 207 316 301 230 305 206 260 255

23 25 23 23 23 23 23 23 23

R 1 R 1 R R R R R

Central Oklahoma Alabama Bowling Green Florida Marshall Holy Cross Murray State San Diego State Western Kentucky

CFA-18 CFA-17 CFA-18 FA-18 CFA-18 CFA-18 CFA-18 FA-18 FA-18

Bristow, Okla. South Bend, Ind. North Bay, Ontario Pasco, Fla. Tampa, Fla. Evanston, Ill. Columbia, Tenn. Fresno, Calif. Louisville, Ky.

LB

6-2

280

22

R

Indiana

CFA-18

Rockdale, Ga.

DB G TE T OL RB WR S WR S

5-11 6-5 6-4 6-4 6-0 6-2 6-1 6-2 5-8 5-11

194 321 245 322 290 235 203 208 176 205

23 27 25 25 22 23 24 28 25 22

R 5 2 2 R R R 5 5 R

Georgia Tech McGill Tennessee LSU BYU LSU Kansas State BYU Oregon Texas A&M

CFA-18 D6b-14 W (NO)-18 FA-17 CFA-18 CFA-18 CFA-18 CFA-14 D4-14 D4-18

Jacksonville, Fla. Montreal, Quebec Delmar, Del. River Ridge, La. Allen, Texas Ruston, La. Tampa, Fla. Colton, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. Forney, Texas

HEAD COACH: Andy Reid OFFENSE: Eric Bieniemy (Offensive Coordinator); Joe Bleymaier (Pass Game Analyst/Asst. QB); Andy Heck (Offensive Line); Mike Kafka (Quarterbacks); Greg Lewis (Wide Receivers); Corey Matthaei (Asst. Offensive Line); Deland McCullough (Running Backs); Tom Melvin (Tight Ends); David Girardi (Offensive Quality Control).

DEFENSE: Bob Sutton (Defensive Coordinator); Terry Bradden (Defensive Asst.); Mark DeLeone (Inside Linebackers); Al Harris (Secondary/Cornerbacks); Britt Reid (Defensive Line); Mike Smith (Outside Linebackers); Emmitt Thomas (Defensive Backs); Alex Whittingham (Defensive Assistant); Jay Valai (Defensive Quality Control).

SPECIALISTS: Dave Toub (Assistant Head Coach/Special Teams Coordinator); Rod Wilson (Asst. Special Teams). MISCELLANEOUS: Barry Rubin (Head Strength & Conditioning); Travis Crittenden (Asst. Strength & Conditioning); Ryan Reynolds (Asst. Strength & Conditioning); Devin Woodhouse (Asst. Strength & Conditioning); Mike Frazier (Statistical Analysis Coordinator); Porter Ellett (Senior Asst. to Head Coach).


2018 KANSAS CITY CHIEFS POSITION-BY-POSITION ROSTER (As of October 16, 2018)

NO. 4 15

NAME Henne, Chad Mahomes, Patrick

POS. QB QB

HT. 6-3 6-3

WT. 222 230

NO. 27 42 32 26 31

NAME Hunt, Kareem Sherman, Anthony Ware, Spencer Williams, Damien Williams, Darrel

POS. RB FB RB RB RB

HT. 5-11 5-10 5-10 5-11 5-11

WT. 216 242 229 224 224

NO. 17 10 19 11 14

NAME Conley, Chris Hill, Tyreek Kemp, Marcus Robinson, Demarcus Watkins, Sammy

POS. WR WR WR WR WR

HT. 6-3 5-10 6-4 6-1 6-1

WT. 205 185 210 203 211

NO. 84 87

NAME Harris, Demetrius Kelce, Travis

POS. TE TE

HT. 6-7 6-5

WT. 230 260

NO. 65 75 72 66 61 62 71 77

NAME Devey, Jordan Erving, Cam Fisher, Eric McKenzie, Kahlil Morse, Mitch Reiter, Austin Schwartz, Mitchell Wylie, Andrew

POS. G OL T G C OL T T

HT. 6-6 6-5 6-7 6-3 6-6 6-3 6-5 6-6

WT. 320 313 315 320 305 300 320 309

NO. 97 74 94 95 91 98

NAME Bailey, Allen Hamilton, Justin Jenkins, Jarvis Jones, Chris Nnadi, Derrick Williams, Xavier

POS. DL DT DL DL DT DT

HT. 6-3 6-2 6-4 6-6 6-1 6-2

WT. 288 315 300 310 312 309

NO. 55 53 50 92 56 44 54 59 48 57 51

NAME Ford, Dee Hitchens, Anthony Houston, Justin Kpassagnon, Tanoh Niemann, Ben O'Daniel, Dorian Orchard, Nate Ragland, Reggie Smith, Terrance Speaks, Breeland Zombo, Frank

POS. LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB LB

HT. 6-2 6-0 6-3 6-7 6-2 6-1 6-3 6-2 6-2 6-3 6-3

WT. 252 235 258 289 235 220 255 252 235 285 254

NO. 29 23 24 34 21 20 38 22 30 39 35

NAME Berry, Eric Fuller, Kendall Lucas, Jordan McQuay, Leon Murray, Eric Nelson, Steven Parker, Ron Scandrick, Orlando Shaw, Josh Smith, Tremon Ward, Charvarius

POS. S CB S S DB CB S CB S CB CB

HT. 6-0 5-11 6-1 6-1 5-11 5-11 6-0 5-10 6-1 6-0 6-1

WT. 212 198 190 195 199 194 206 196 190 190 198

NO. 7 2 41

NAME Butker, Harrison Colquitt, Dustin Winchester, James

POS. K P LS

HT. 6-4 6-3 6-3

WT. 205 210 240

QUARTERBACKS (2) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 10 Michigan 33 2 Texas Tech 23 RUNNING BACKS (5) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 2 Toledo 23 Connecticut 29 8 5 LSU 26 5 Oklahoma 26 23 R LSU WIDE RECEIVERS (5) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 4 Georgia 25 3 West Alabama 24 1 Hawaii 23 3 Florida 24 5 Clemson 25 TIGHT ENDS (2) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 5 UW-Milwaukee 27 6 Cincinnati 26 OFFENSIVE LINE (8) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 4 Memphis 30 4 Florida State 26 27 6 Central Michigan R Tennessee 21 4 Missouri 26 3 South Florida 26 7 California 29 1 Eastern Michigan 24 DEFENSIVE LINE (6) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 8 Miami (Fla.) 29 2 Louisiana 25 8 Clemson 30 3 Mississippi State 24 R Florida State 22 4 Northern Iowa 26 LINEBACKERS (11) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 5 Auburn 27 5 Iowa 26 8 Georgia 29 2 Villanova 24 23 R Iowa R Clemson 24 4 Utah 25 Alabama 25 3 3 Florida State 25 R Ole Miss 22 9 Central Michigan 31 DEFENSIVE BACKS (11) AGE EXP. COLLEGE 9 Tennessee 29 3 Virginia Tech 23 3 Penn State 25 1 USC 23 3 Minnesota 24 4 Oregon State 24 8 Newberry 31 10 Boise State 31 4 USC 26 R Central Arkansas 22 R Middle Tennessee State 22 SPECIALISTS (3) AGE EXP. COLLEGE Georgia Tech 23 2 36 14 Tennessee Oklahoma 29 4

HOMETOWN West Lawn, Pa. Tyler, Texas

HOW ACQ. UFA-18 D1-17

HOMETOWN Willoughby, Ohio North Attleborough, Mass. Eunice, La. San Diego, Calif. Marrero, La.

HOW ACQ. D3-17 T (ARI)-13 FA-14 UFA-18 CFA-18

HOMETOWN Dallas, Ga. Pearson, Ga. Layton, Utah Fort Valley, Ga. Fort Myers, Fla.

HOW ACQ. D3a-15 D5b-16 CFA-17 D4c-16 UFA-18

HOMETOWN Little Rock, Ark. Cleveland Heights, Ohio

HOW ACQ. CFA-13 D3a-13

HOMETOWN American Fork, Utah Moultrie, Ga. Rochester, Mich. Walnut Creek, Calif. Austin, Texas Bradenton, Fla. Pacific Palisades, Calif. Midland, Mich.

HOW ACQ. FA-17 T (CLE)-17 D1-13 D6b-18 D2-15 W (CLE)-18 UFA-16 FA-17

HOMETOWN Sapelo Island, Ga. Natchez, Miss. Clemson, S.C. Houston, Miss. Virginia Beach, Va. Kansas City, Mo.

HOW ACQ. D3b-11 FA-17 UFA-17 D2-16 D3-18 RFA-18

HOMETOWN Odenville, Ala. Lorain, Ohio Statesboro, Ga. Kalamazoo, Mich. Sycamore, Ill. Olney, Md. Los Angeles, Calif. Madison, Ala. Decatur, Ga. Jackson, Miss. Sterling Heights, Mich.

HOW ACQ. D1-14 UFA-18 D3a-11 D2-17 CFA-18 D3b-18 FA-18 T (BUF)-17 CFA-16 D2-18 FA-18

HOMETOWN Fairburn, Ga. Baltimore, Md. New Rochelle, N.Y. Seffner, Fla. Milwaukee, Wis. Warner Robins, Ga. St. Helena Island, S.C. Los Alamitos, Calif. Palmdale, Calif. Anniston, Ala. McCombs, Miss.

HOW ACQ. D1-10 T (WAS)-18 T (MIA)-18 FA-18 D4b-16 D3b-15 FA-18 FA-18 FA-18 D6a-18 T (DAL)-18

HOMETOWN Decatur, Ga. Knoxville, Tenn. Washington, Okla.

HOW ACQ. FA-17 D3-05 FA-15


2018 KANSAS CITY CHIEFS UNOFFICIAL DEPTH CHART (As of October 16, 2018) OFFENSE WR LT LG C RG RT TE WR QB RB FB

10 72 75 61 65 71 87 14 15 27 42

Tyreek Hill Eric Fisher Cam Erving Mitch Morse Jordan Devey Mitchell Schwartz Travis Kelce Sammy Watkins Patrick Mahomes Kareem Hunt Anthony Sherman

11 77 66 65 75 77 84 17 4 32

Demarcus Robinson Andrew Wylie Kahlil McKenzie Jordan Devey Cam Erving Andrew Wylie Demetrius Harris Chris Conley Chad Henne Spencer Ware

LDE NT RDE LOLB LILB RILB ROLB LCB RCB S S

95 98 97 50 53 59 55 20 23 29 38

Chris Jones Xavier Williams Allen Bailey Justin Houston Anthony Hitchens Reggie Ragland Dee Ford Steven Nelson Kendall Fuller Eric Berry Ron Parker

94 91 74 92 48 56 57 22 39 21 24

Jarvis Jenkins Derrick Nnadi Justin Hamilton Tanoh Kpassagnon Terrance Smith Ben Niemann Breeland Speaks Orlando Scandrick Tremon Smith Eric Murray Jordan Lucas

P K H LS PR KR

2 7 2 41 10 39

Dustin Colquitt Harrison Butker Dustin Colquitt James Winchester Tyreek Hill Tremon Smith

62 Austin Reiter

19 Marcus Kemp 26 Damien Williams

DEFENSE

54 Nate Orchard 44 Dorian O'Daniel 51 Frank Zomob 35 Charvarius Ward 30 Josh Shaw 34 Leon McQuay SPECIALISTS

7 Harrison Butker 2 Dustin Colquitt

Rookies Underlined

Jordan Devey Tyreek Hill Travis Kelce Tanoh Kpassagnon Ben Niemann Derrick Nnadi Austin Reiter Tremon Smith Charvarius Ward Xavier Williams Andrew Wylie

PRONUNCIATION GUIDE dev-EE tie-REEK KEL-see TAWN-o pass-N-yo NEE-man NAH-dee RIGHT-er Tray-mon CHAR-Vair-EE-us EX-zay-vier WHY-lee

31 Darrel Williams


HOW THE 2018 CHIEFS ROSTER WAS BUILT (As of October 16, 2018) YEAR DRAFT

2005 P Dustin Colquitt (3) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 S Eric Berry (1) 2011 LB Justin Houston (3a) DL Allen Bailey (3b) 2012 2013 T Eric Fisher (1) TE Travis Kelce (3a) 2014 LB Dee Ford (1)

FREE AGENTS

TRADE/WAIVERS

TE Demetrius Harris (CFA)

FB Anthony Sherman (T/ARI)

RB Spencer Ware (FA)

2015 C Mitch Morse (2) WR Chris Conley (3a) CB Steven Nelson (3b)

LS James Winchester (FA)

2016 DL Chris Jones (2) DB Eric Murray (4b) WR Demarcus Robinson (4c) WR Tyreek Hill (5b)

T Mitchell Schwartz (UFA) LB Terrance Smith (CFA)

2017 QB Patrick Mahomes (1) DL Tanoh Kpassagnon (2) RB Kareem Hunt (3)

DL Jarvis Jenkins (UFA) OL Jordan Devey (FA) K Harrison Butker (FA) DT Justin Hamilton (FA) WR Marcus Kemp (FA)

LB Reggie Ragland (T/BUF) OL Cam Erving (T/CLE)

2018 LB Breeland Speaks (2) DT Derrick Nnadi (3a) LB Dorian O'Daniel (3b) CB Tremon Smith (6a) G Kahlil McKenzie (6b)

OL Andrew Wylie (FA) WR Sammy Watkins (UFA) LB Anthony Hitchens (UFA) QB Chad Henne (UFA) DT Xavier Williams (RFA) RB Damien Williams (UFA) LB Ben Niemann (CFA) RB Darrel Williams (CFA) CB Orlando Scandrick (FA) S Ron Parker (FA) S Josh Shaw (FA) LB Frank Zombo (FA) LB Nate Orchard (FA) S Leon McQuay (FA)

CB Kendall Fuller (T/WAS) CB Charvarius Ward (T/DAL) S Jordan Lucas (T/MIA) OL Austin Reiter (W/CLE)

TOTAL ROSTER BREAKDOWN 22 Draft Choices

6 Unrestricted Free Agents 13 Free Agents 4 College Free Agents 1 Restricted Free Agent

1 Waiver Claims 6 Trades


2018 CHIEFS ROSTER BY EXPERIENCE (As of October 16, 2018) 14th Year (1) P Dustin Colquitt 11th Year (1) CB Orlando Scandrick 10th Year (1) QB Chad Henne 9th Year (2) S Eric Berry LB Frank Zombo 8th Year (4) DL Allen Bailey LB Justin Houston DL Jarvis Jenkins FB Anthony Sherman

5th Year (8) G Jordan Devey LB Dee Ford TE Demetrius Harris LB Anthony Hitchens S Daniel Sorensen RB Spencer Ware WR Sammy Watkins RB Damien Williams 4th Year (8) WR Chris Conley OL Cam Erving C Mitch Morse CB Steven Nelson LB Nate Orchard S Josh Shaw DT Xavier Williams LS James Winchester

3rd Year (9) CB Kendall Fuller WR Tyreek Hill DL Chris Jones S Jordan Lucas DB Eric Murray LB Reggie Ragland OL Austin Reiter WR Demarcus Robinson LB Terrance Smith 2nd Year (5) K Harrison Butker DT Justin Hamilton RB Kareem Hunt DL Tanoh Kpassagnon QB Patrick Mahomes

1st Year (3) WR Marcus Kemp S Leon McQuay T Andrew Wylie Rookies (8) G Kahlil McKenzie LB Ben Niemann DT Derrick Nnadi LB Dorian O'Daniel CB Tremon Smith LB Breeland Speaks CB Charvarius Ward RB Darrel Williams

7th Year (1) T Mitchell Schwartz 6th Year (2) T Eric Fisher TE Travis Kelce

2018 CHIEFS ROSTER BY DRAFT ROUND [Overall selection in brackets] 1st Round (6)

[1] T Eric Fisher (2013) [4] WR Sammy Watkins (2014) [5] S Eric Berry (2010) [10] QB Patrick Mahomes (2017) [19] OL Cam Erving (2015-CLE) [23] LB Dee Ford (2014)

2nd Round (9)

[37] T Mitchell Schwartz (2012 - CLE) [37] DL Chris Jones (2016) [41] DL Jarvis Jenkins (2011-WAS) [41] LB Reggie Ragland (2016-BUF) [46] LB Breeland Speaks (2018) [49] C Mitch Morse (2015) [51] LB Nate Orchard (2015-CLE) [57] QB Chad Henne (2008-MIA) [59] Tanoh Kpassagnon (2017)

3rd Round (10)

[63] TE Travis Kelce (2013) [70] LB Justin Houston (2011) [75] DT Derrick Nnadi (2018) [76] WR Chris Conley (2015) [84] CB Kendall Fuller (2016-WAS) [86] Allen Bailey (2011) [86] Kareem Hunt (2017) [98] CB Steven Nelson (2015) [99] P Dustin Colquitt (2005) [100] LB Dorian O'Daniel (2018)

4th Round (4)

[106] DB Eric Murray (2016) [119] LB Anthony Hitchens (2014-DAL) [120] S Josh Shaw (2015-CIN) [126] WR Demarcus Robinson (2016)

5th Round (3)

[136] FB Anthony Sherman (2011-ARI) [143] CB Orlando Scandrick (2008-DAL) [165] WR Tyreek Hill (2016)

6th Round (5)

[194] RB Spencer Ware (2013-SEA) [196] CB Tremon Smith (2018) [198] G Kahlil McKenzie (2018) [204] S Jordan Lucas (2016-MIA) [218] S Leon McQuay (2017)

7th Round (2)

[222] OL Austin Reiter (2015-CLE) [233] K Harrison Butker (2017-CAR)

Undrafted (14)

TE Demetrius Harris (2013), OL Jordan Devey (2013 - BAL), LS James Winchester (2013 - PHI), RB Damien Williams (2014-MIA), DT Justin Hamilton (2015 BUF), DT Xavier Williams (2015-ARI), LB Terrance Smith (2016), WR Marcus Kemp (2017), T Andrew Wylie (2017 - IND), LB Ben Niemann (2018), CB Charvarius Ward (2018 - DAL), RB Darrel Williams (2018), S Ron Parker (2011-SEA), LB Frank Zombo (2010-GB)


KANSAS CITY CHIEFS 2018 TRANSACTIONS (as of 10/16/18)

Date Jan. 3 Jan. 3 Jan. 3 Jan. 3 Jan. 4 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 8 Jan. 9 Jan. 9 Jan. 12 Jan. 15 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Feb. 8 Feb. 16 Mar. 12 Mar. 12 Mar. 13 Mar. 14 Mar. 14 Mar. 14 Mar. 14 Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar. 15 Mar. 15 Mar. 15 Mar. 15 Mar. 16 Mar. 16 Mar. 20 Mar. 21 Mar. 22 Mar. 30 Mar. 30 April 3 April 4 April 7 April 9 April 16 April 27 April 27 April 27 April 28 April 28 April 28 April 30 April 30 April 30 May 2 May 2 May 3 May 3 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4

Player ..................................................................... Transaction AUGUSTA, Josh, NT .............................. Reserve/Future Signing DORLEANT, Makinton, CB ..................... Reserve/Future Signing PRICE, Sheldon, CB............................... Reserve/Future Signing SHIPPEN, Brandon, WR......................... Reserve/Future Signing IWORAH, Prince Charles, CB ................. Reserve/Future Signing ATKINSON, George, RB......................... Reserve/Future Signing BRAVERMAN, Daniel, WR ..................... Reserve/Future Signing DIETER, Gehrig, WR .............................. Reserve/Future Signing FIRKSER, Anthony, TE .......................... Reserve/Future Signing GORDON, Dillon, OL .............................. Reserve/Future Signing HOLMES, Tyrone, LB ............................. Reserve/Future Signing JOHNSON, Kaleb, OL ............................ Reserve/Future Signing PURCELL, Mike, NT ............................... Reserve/Future Signing REDMOND, Will, CB .............................. Reserve/Future Signing WYLIE, Andrew, OL................................ Reserve/Future Signing AMARO, Jace, TE .................................. Reserve/Future Signing BIENIEMY, Eric ............................ Named Offensive Coordinator MCCULLOUGH, Deland ............... Named Running Backs Coach MCGILL, T.Y., DL ................................... Reserve/Future Signing KAFKA, Mike ...........................................Promoted to QB Coach DELEONE, Mark .................................... Promoted to ILB Coach SMITH, Mike..........................................Promoted to OLB Coach MATTHAEI, Corey .. Promoted to Assistant Offensive Line Coach BLEYMAIER, Joe ...... Promoted to Pass Game Analyst/Asst. QB BRADDEN, Terry........... Promoted to Def. Quality Control Coach VALAI, Jay............................. Named Def. Quality Control Coach GIRARDI, David ....................Named. Off. Quality Control Coach REVIS, Darrelle, CB ..................................................... Released AMERSON, David, CB ..................................................... Signed PARKER, Ron, S .......................................................... Released HALI, Tamba, LB .......................................................... Released WHITTINGHAM, Andrew .................. Named Defensive Assistant FULLER, Kendall, CB .......... Acquired via trade from Washington SMITH, Alex, QB ..............................................................Traded PETERS, Marcus, CB....................................................... Traded SMITH, Terrance, LB ........................................................ Signed THOMAS, De’Anthony, WR .............................................. Signed HITCHENS, Anthony, LB .................................................. Signed JENKINS, Jarvis, DE ........................................................ Signed SHERMAN, Anthony, FB .................................................. Signed WATKINS, Sammy, WR ................................................... Signed COLQUITT, Dustin, P ....................................................... Signed DEVEY, Jordan, G............................................................ Signed HENNE, Chad, QB ........................................................... Signed CHARLES, Stefan, DT...................................................... Signed WILLIAMS, Xavier, DT...................................................... Signed WILLIAMS, Damien, RB ................................................... Signed MCGLOIN, Matt, QB ......................................................... Signed SPRUCE, Nelson, WR...................................................... Signed GOLDEN, Robert, S ......................................................... Signed ATKINSON, George, RB.................................................. Waived TOUB, Dave ................................. Named Assistant Head Coach WRIGHT, Tim, TE ............................................................ Signed WILLIAMS, Kerywnn, RB .................................................. Signed SPEAKS, Breeland, LB ................................. Drafted in 2nd round NNADI, Derrick, DT ....................................... Drafted in 3rd round O’DANIEL, Dorian, LB ................................... Drafted in 3rd round WATTS, Armani, S ........................................ Drafted in 4th round SMITH, Tremon, CB ...................................... Drafted in 6th round MCKENZIE, Kahlil, G..................................... Drafted in 6th round FIRKSER, Anthony, TE ................................................... Waived PURCELL, Mike, NT ........................................................ Waived PRICE, Sheldon, DB..................................................... Released NICOLAS, Dadi, LB .......................................................... Traded TELFER, Randall, TE ............. Acquired via trade from Cleveland AUGUSTA, Josh, NT ....................................................... Waived CHARLES, Orson, TE .................................................. Released TEFLER, Randall, TE ........................................... Trade Nullified NICOLAS, Dadi, LB ......................................................... Waived DAVISON, Raymond, LB .................................................. Signed HUNTER, Ryan, T ............................................................ Signed LINER, Dee, T .................................................................. Signed

May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 4 May 7 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 10 May 10 May 14 May 14 May 16 May 16 May 24 May 29 May 29 May 30 June 14 June 14 June 14 June 14 June 14 June 14 June 14 June 20 July 25 July 27 July 31 July 31 Aug. 5 Aug. 7 Aug. 10 Aug. 10 Aug. 10 Aug. 13 Aug. 13 Aug. 15 Aug. 19 Aug. 22 Aug. 31 Aug. 31 Aug. 31 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1

LITTON, Chase, QB ......................................................... Signed MACK, Blake, TE.............................................................. Signed MARKS, Elijah, WR .......................................................... Signed MOORE, John David, RB ................................................. Signed MURRAY, James, C ......................................................... Signed NIEMANN, Ben, LB .......................................................... Signed PRINGLE, Byron, WR....................................................... Signed SEYMOUR, Devondre, T .................................................. Signed SPRINGS, Arrion, DB ....................................................... Signed WADE, D’Montre, DB ....................................................... Signed WILLIAMS, Darrel, RB ...................................................... Signed SMITH, Tremon, CB ......................................................... Signed IWORAH, Prince Charles, DB .......................................... Waived SEYMOUR, DeVondre, T ................................................ Waived SHIPPEN, Brandon, WR ................................................. Waived SPRUCE, Nelson, WR..................................................... Waived HUNT, Akeem, RB .................Waived (Reverts to Reserve/PUP) DURHAM, Step, DB.......................................................... Signed KOROMA, Tejan, C .......................................................... Signed MCCRAY, Robert, OLB .................................................... Signed REAVES, Malik, DB .......................................................... Signed SMALLWOOD, Jordan, WR.............................................. Signed CHARLES, Stefan, DT.................................................. Released ELLIS, Alex, TE ............................................ Claimed off waivers NUNEZ-ROCHES, Rakeem, DE ...................................... Waived CHARLES, Stefan, DT...................................................... Signed WATTS, Armani. S ........................................................... Signed MCKENZIE, Kahlil, G........................................................ Signed SMALLWOOD, Jordan, WR.......................................... Released GRAYSON, Davon, WR ................................................... Signed SPEAKS, Breeland, LB..................................................... Signed O’DANIEL, Dorian, LB ...................................................... Signed GRAYSON, Davon, WR .................................................. Waived SMALLWOOD, Jordan, WR.............................................. Signed JOHNSON, Kaleb, G ....................................................... Waived REAVES, Malik, DB ......................................................... Waived MOORE, J.D., RB.................................................Waived/injured BROWN, Algernon, RB..................................................... Signed CROCKETT, Josh, WR .................................................... Signed SPAIN, Bentley, T............................................................. Signed NNADI, Derrick, NT .......................................................... Signed HUNT, Akeem, RB ........................ Waived with injury settlement MARKS, Elijah, WR ......................................................... Waived PURCELL, Mike, DT ......................................................... Signed LAMPKIN, Ashton, CB ............ Waived (Reverts to Reserve/PUP) PETERS, Otha, LB ........................................................... Signed KOROMA, Tejan, OL ........................................... Waived/Injured COOPER, Ethan, G ........................................................ Claimed LAMPKIN, Ashton, CB .......................................Injury Settlement GORDON, Dillon, T ................................................Waived/Injury OFFICER, Alex, G ............................................................ Signed OFFICER, Alex, G ........................................................... Waived LAWRY, Ray, RB ............................................................. Signed GOLDEN, Robert, S ..................................................... Released SCANDRICK, Orlando, CB ............................................... Signed WEST, Charcandrick, RB ............................................. Released EHINGER, Parker, G ........................................................ Traded WARD, Charvarius, CB .................Acquired via trade with Dallas LUCAS, Jordan, S ......................... Acquired via trade with Miami AMARO, Jace, TE ........................................................... Waived BRAVERMAN, Daniel, WR .............................................. Waived BROWN, Algernon, RB.................................................... Waived CHESSON, Jehu, WR ..................................................... Waived COOPER, Ethan, G ......................................................... Waived CROCKETT, Josh, WR ................................................... Waived DAVISON, Raymond, LB ................................................. Waived DIETER, Gehrig, WR ....................................................... Waived Dorleant, Makinton, DB.................................................... Waived ELIGWE, Ukeme, LB ....................................................... Waived HOLMES, Tyrone, LB ...................................................... Waived HUNTER, Ryan, T ........................................................... Waived LAWRY, Ray, RB ............................................................ Waived LINER, Dee, DT............................................................... Waived


Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 2 Sept. 3 Sept. 3 Sept. 4 Sept. 4 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept. 12 Sept. 17 Sept. 17 Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 8 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 13 Oct. 13 Oct. 13

LITTON, Chase, QB ........................................................ Waived MACK, Blake, WR ........................................................... Waived MCCRAY, Rob, LB .......................................................... Waived MCGILL, T.Y., NT ............................................................ Waived MCQUAY, Leon, DB ........................................................ Waived MURRAY, Jimmy, C ........................................................ Waived PETERS, Otha, LB .......................................................... Waived PURCELL, Mike, NT ........................................................ Waived REDMOND, Will, DB ....................................................... Waived SMALLWOOD, Jordan, WR............................................. Waived SPAIN, Bentley, T............................................................ Waived SPRINGS, Arrion, DB ...................................................... Waived STERNS, Jordan, S ......................................................... Waived WADE, D’Montre, DB ...................................................... Waived AMERSON, David, CB ................................................. Released CHARLES, Stefan, DT.................................................. Released WILLIAMS, Kerwynn, RB .............................................. Released WRIGHT, Tim, TE ........................................................ Released ZOMBO, Frank, LB ....................................................... Released DURHAM, Step, DB............................................. Waived/Injured REASER, Keith, DB ............................................. Waived/Injured PRINGLE, Byron, WR.............................................. Placed on IR BOETTGER, Ike, G ...................................... Claimed off waivers MCGLOIN, Matt, QB ..................................................... Released CROCKETT, Josh, WR ........................ Signed to practice squad DIETER, Gehrig, WR ............................ Signed to practice squad HUNTER, Ryan, T ................................ Signed to practice squad LINER, Dee, DT.................................... Signed to practice squad LITTON, Chase, QB ............................. Signed to practice squad MCCRAY, Robert, LB ........................... Signed to practice squad MCQUAY, Leon, S ............................... Signed to practice squad MURRAY, James, C ............................. Signed to practice squad SPRINGS, Arrion, DB ........................... Signed to practice squad WADE, D’Montre, DB ........................... Signed to practice squad SORENSEN, Daniel, S ............................................ Placed on IR PARKER, Ron, S .............................................................. Signed WITZMANN, Bryan, G .................................................. Released REITER, Austin, OL ...................................... Claimed off waivers ERVING, Cam, OL...........................Signed to contract extension LINER, Dee, DT............................ Released from practice squad IVIE, Joey, DT ...................................... Signed to practice squad BOETTGER, Ike, G ......................................................... Waived REASER, Keith, CB ........................................... Injury settlement SPRINGS, Arrion, DB ................... Released from practice squad WELLS, David, TE ................................ Signed to practice squad ELLIS, Alex, TE ................................................... Waived/Injured SHAW, Josh, CB .............................................................. Signed WELLS, David, TE ........................ Released from practice squad MCQUAY, LEON, DB ........................... Signed to practice squad DUVERNAY-TARDIF, Laurent, G ............................ Placed on IR WATTS, Armani, S .................................................. Placed on IR ZOMBO, Frank, LB ........................................................... Signed MCCRAY, Rob, LB ................................. Practice Squad; Injured ORCHARD, Nate, LB........................................................ Signed WELLS, David, TE ................................ Signed to practice squad THOMAS, De’Anthony, WR ..................................... Placed on IR MCQUAY, Leon, S ....................... Released from practice squad MCQUAY, Leon, S ........................................................... Signed


2018 REGULAR SEASON CHIEFS GAME-BY-GAME OFFENSE 09/09

@ LAC

09/16

@ PIT

09/23

SF

10/01

@ DEN

10/07

JAX

10/14 10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30

@ NE

FIRST DOWNS Total 19 24 31 22 26 18 Rushing 7 4 9 8 6 4 Passing 10 17 15 13 17 14 Penalty 2 3 7 1 3 0 THIRD DOWNS Attempts 10 5 11 15 12 10 Converted 4 2 7 7 4 4 Percentage 40.0% 40.0% 63.6% 46.7% 33.3% 40.0% TOT. OFFENSE Net Yards 362 449 384 446 424 446 Plays 55 54 68 72 69 53 Avg./Play 6.6 8.3 5.6 6.2 6.1 8.4 RUSHING Net Yards 106 127 77 142 126 94 Rush. Att. 27 25 28 26 30 17 Avg./Att. 3.9 5.1 2.8 5.5 4.2 5.5 PASSING Net Yards 256 322 307 304 298 352 Attempts 27 28 38 45 38 36 Completions 15 23 24 28 22 23 Intercepted 2 2 0 0 0 0 Gross Yards 256 326 314 304 313 352 Sacked 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 Yards Lost 4 7 15 0 0 0 ADVANCES Rushes 27 25 28 26 30 17 Completions 15 23 24 28 22 23 Totals 42 48 52 54 52 40 PENALTIES Number 6 12 6 10 11 5 Yards 50 76 48 93 105 58 FUMBLES Number 3 2 1 0 0 0 Lost 1 0 0 0 0 0 SCORING 40 30 27 38 42 38 Points 2 2 2 0 TD Rushing 0 0 4 1 3 6 0 4 TD Passing 0 0 0 TD KO Returns 0 0 0 0 0 0 TD Punt Returns 1 0 0 0 0 TD Sp. Teams 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 TD Def. Returns 0 0 0 4 3 2 1 1 FG Attempts 0 4 3 2 1 1 FG Made 0 0 0 Safety 0 0 0 0

@ @ @ @ CIN DEN CLE ARI LAR OAK BAL LAC SEA OAK


2018 REGULAR SEASON CHIEFS GAME-BY-GAME DEFENSE 09/09

@ LAC

09/16

@ PIT

09/23

SF

10/01

@ DEN

10/07

JAX

10/14 10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30

@ NE

FIRST DOWNS Total 33 33 26 21 29 31 Rushing 7 2 11 10 6 15 Passing 23 25 12 10 20 14 Penalty 3 6 3 1 3 2 THIRD DOWNS Attempts 11 11 9 11 16 13 Converted 3 3 2 2 7 7 Percentage 27.3% 27.3% 22.2% 18.2% 43.8% 53.8% TOT. OFFENSE Net Yards 541 475 406 385 502 500 Plays 74 74 63 59 83 75 Avg./Play 7.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 6.0 6.7 RUSHING Net Yards 123 33 178 159 101 173 Rush. Att. 22 13 29 22 17 38 Avg./Att. 5.6 2.5 6.1 7.2 5.9 4.6 PASSING Net Yards 418 442 228 226 401 327 Attempts 51 60 30 33 61 35 Completions 34 39 20 21 33 24 Intercepted 1 1 4 0 0 0 Gross Yards 424 452 251 245 430 340 Sacked 1.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 5.0 2.0 Yards Lost 6 10 23 19 29 13 ADVANCES Rushes 22 13 29 22 17 38 Completions 34 39 20 21 33 24 Totals 56 52 49 43 50 62 PENALTIES Number 7 12 14 3 5 0 Yards 45 90 147 25 45 0 FUMBLES Number 2 1 3 1 2 0 Lost 1 1 1 0 0 0 SCORING 43 14 23 27 37 28 Points 3 1 2 1 2 TD Rushing 0 1 1 2 3 3 TD Passing 0 0 0 TD KO Returns 0 0 0 0 0 0 TD Punt Returns 0 0 0 0 0 0 TD Sp. Teams 0 0 0 0 0 0 TD Def. Returns 0 0 0 0 5 3 2 1 3 0 FG Attempts 5 3 2 2 0 FG Made 0 0 1 0 Safety 0 0 0

@ @ @ @ CIN DEN CLE ARI LAR OAK BAL LAC SEA OAK


2018 REGULAR SEASON CHIEFS INDIVIDUAL SINGLE-GAME HIGHS Passes Attempted 45 Patrick Mahomes at Broncos Passes Completed 28 Patrick Mahomes at Broncos Passing Yards 352 Patrick Mahomes at Patriots Touchdown Passes 6 Patrick Mahomes at Steelers Pass Receptions 9 Tyreek Hill at Broncos Receiving Yards 169 Tyreek Hill at Chargers Touchdown Receptions 3 Tyreek Hill at Patriots Rushing Yards 121 Kareem Hunt at Broncos Rushing Attempts 22 Kareem Hunt vs. Jaguars Rushing Touchdowns 2 Kareem Hunt vs. 49ers Yards From Scrimmage 185 Kareem Hunt at Patriots Combined Net Yards 268 Tyreek Hill at Chargers Interceptions Made 1 Ron Parker at Chargers Eric Murray at Broncos Chris Jones vs. Jaguars Jordan Lucas vs. Jaguars Steven Nelson vs. Jaguars Orlando Scandrick vs. Jaguars INT Return Yards 49 Jordan Lucas vs. Jaguars Sacks 2.0 Justin Houston vs. 49ers Punts 5 Dustin Colquitt at Chargers Punting Average 58.0 Dustin Colquitt vs. Jaguars Punt Returns 2 Tyreek Hill at Chargers Punt Return Yards 95 Tyreek Hill at Chargers Kickoff Returns 4 Tremon Smith at Patriots Kickoff Return Yards 180 Tremon Smith at Patriots Field Goals Attempted 4 Harrison Butker at Patriots Field Goals Made 4 Harrison Butker at Patriots 2018 REGULAR SEASON KANSAS CITY CHIEFS LONGEST PLAYS Run From Scrimmage 45 Kareem Hunt at Broncos Touchdown Run 8 Patrick Mahomes at Broncos Pass Reception 75 Tyreek Hill at Patriots Touchdown Reception 75 Tyreek Hill at Patriots Interception Return 49 Jordan Lucas vs. Jaguars Punt Return 91 Tyreek Hill at Chargers Kickoff Return 97 Tremon Smith at Patriots Punt 67 Dustin Colquitt at Chargers Field Goal 46 Harrison Butker at Chargers

10/1 10/1 10/14 9/16 10/1 9/9 10/14 10/1 10/7 9/23 10/14 9/9 9/9 10/1 10/7 10/7 10/7 10/7 10/7 9/23 9/9 10/7 9/9 9/9 10/14 10/14 10/14 10/14 10/1 10/1 10/14 10/14 10/7 9/9 10/14 9/9 9/9


2018 REGULAR SEASON OPPONENTS INDIVIDUAL SINGLE-GAME HIGHS Passes Attempted 61 Blake Bortles vs. Jaguars Passes Completed 39 Ben Roethlisberger at Steelers Passing Yards 452 Ben Roethlisberger at Steelers Touchdown Passes 3 Philip Rivers at Chargers Ben Roethlisberger at Steelers Pass Receptions 13 JuJu Smith-Schuster at Steelers Receiving Yards 138 Jesse James at Steelers Touchdown Receptions 1 Keenan Allen at Chargers Austin Ekeler at Chargers Tyrell Williams at Chargers Jesse James at Steelers JuJu Smith-Schuster at Steelers James Washington at Steelers Marquise Goodwin vs. 49ers Kyle Juszczyk vs. 49ers T.J. Yeldon vs. Jaguars Julian Edelman at Patriots Rushing Yards 106 Sony Michel at Patriots Rushing Attempts 24 Sony Michel at Patriots Rushing Touchdowns 2 Sony Michel at Patriots Yards From Scrimmage 166 Melvin Gordon III at Chargers Combined Net Yards 166 Melvin Gordon III at Chargers Interceptions Made 1 A.J. Bouye vs. Jaguars Tashaun Gipson Sr. vs. Jaguars Duron Harmon at Patriots Dont'a Hightower at Patriots INT Return Yards 27 Dont'a Hightower at Patriots Sacks 1.0 Derwin James at Chargers Daniel McCullers at Steelers Arik Armstead vs. 49ers Antone Exum Jr. vs. 49ers Yannick Ngakoue vs. Jaguars Punts 5 Jordan Berry at Steelers Punting Average 60.0 Drew Kaser at Chargers Punt Returns 1 Travis Benjamin at Chargers J.J. Jones at Chargers Ryan Switzer at Steelers Dante Pettis vs. 49ers Adam Jones at Broncos Jaydon Mickens vs. Jaguars Punt Return Yards 6 Ryan Switzer at Steelers Jaydon Mickens vs. Jaguars Kickoff Returns 4 Ryan Switzer at Steelers Kickoff Return Yards 67 Ryan Switzer at Steelers Field Goals Attempted 5 Stephen Gostkowski at Patriots Field Goals Made 5 Stephen Gostkowski at Patriots 2018 REGULAR SEASON OPPONENTS LONGEST PLAYS Run From Scrimmage 26 Matt Breida vs. 49ers Touchdown Run 21 Blake Bortles vs. Jaguars Pass Reception 46 Jesse James at Steelers Touchdown Reception 35 Kyle Juszczyk vs. 49ers Interception Return 27 Dont'a Hightower at Patriots Punt Return 6 Ryan Switzer at Steelers Jaydon Mickens vs. Jaguars Kickoff Return 32 Phillip Lindsay at Broncos Punt 63 Drew Kaser at Chargers Field Goal 50 Stephen Gostkowski at Patriots

10/7 9/16 9/16 9/9 9/16 9/16 9/16 9/9 9/9 9/9 9/16 9/16 9/16 9/23 9/23 10/7 10/14 10/14 10/14 10/14 9/9 9/9 10/7 10/7 10/14 10/14 10/14 9/9 9/16 9/23 9/23 10/7 9/16 9/9 9/9 9/9 9/16 9/23 10/1 10/7 9/16 10/7 9/16 9/16 10/14 10/14 9/23 10/7 9/16 9/23 10/14 9/16 10/7 10/1 9/9 10/14


DATE 9/9 9/16 9/16 9/23 10/7 10/14 10/14

OPPONENT at Chargers at Steelers at Steelers vs. 49ers vs. Jaguars at Patriots at Patriots

DATE OPPONENT 10/1 at Broncos DATE 9/16 9/23 10/1 10/7 10/14

DATE 9/9 9/9 9/16 9/16

OPPONENT at Steelers vs. 49ers at Broncos vs. Jaguars at Patriots

OPPONENT at Chargers at Chargers at Steelers at Steelers

DATE OPPONENT 10/14 at Patriots DATE 9/9 9/16 10/7 10/14

OPPONENT at Chargers at Steelers vs. Jaguars at Patriots

2018 REGULAR SEASON BIG YARDAGE GAMES 100-YARD PASS RECEIVERS PLAYER ATT. YDS. AVG. Tyreek Hill 7 169 24.1 Travis Kelce 7 109 15.6 Sammy Watkins 6 100 16.7 Travis Kelce 8 114 14.3 Travis Kelce 5 100 20.0 Tyreek Hill 7 142 20.3 Kareem Hunt 5 105 21.0 100-YARD RUSHERS PLAYER ATT. YDS. AVG. Kareem Hunt 19 121 6.4 300-YARD PASSERS PLAYER ATT. YDS. COMP. Patrick Mahomes 28 326 23 Patrick Mahomes 38 314 24 Patrick Mahomes 45 304 28 Patrick Mahomes 38 313 22 Patrick Mahomes 36 352 23 2018 OPPONENTS BIG YARDAGE GAMES 100-YARD PASS RECEIVERS PLAYER ATT. YDS. AVG. Keenan Allen 8 108 13.5 Melvin Gordon III 9 102 11.3 Jesse James 5 138 27.6 JuJu Smith-Schuster 13 121 9.3 100-YARD RUSHERS PLAYER ATT. YDS. AVG. Sony Michel 24 106 4.4 300-YARD PASSERS PLAYER ATT. YDS. COMP. Philip Rivers 51 424 34 Ben Roethlisberger 60 452 39 Blake Bortles 61 430 33 Tom Brady 35 340 24

LG 58t 31 40 25 40 75t 67t

TD 2 2 0 0 0 3 1

LG 45

TD 1

LG 40 42 35 40 75t

TD 6 3 1 0 4

LG 23 25 46 21

TD 1 0 1 1

LG 15

TD 2

LG 30 46 38 42

TD 3 3 1 1


DATE 9/9 9/16 9/23 10/14

OPPONENT PLAYER at Chargers Patrick Mahomes at Steelers Patrick Mahomes vs. 49ers Patrick Mahomes at Patriots Patrick Mahomes

2018 REGULAR SEASON 100.0+ PASSER RATING PASSING GAMES ATT. CMP. YDS. CMP.% YDS/ATT. YDS/CMP. TD TD% INT INT% LONG SACK/LOST RATING 27 15 256 55.6% 9.48 17.07 4 14.8% 0 0.0% 58t 1/0 127.5 28 23 326 82.1% 11.64 14.17 6 21.4% 0 0.0% 40 1/4 154.8 38 24 314 63.2% 8.26 13.08 3 7.9% 0 0.0% 42 2/7 115.5 36 23 352 63.9% 9.78 15.30 4 11.1% 2 5.6% 75t 0/0 110.0

2018 OPPONENTS 100.0+ PASSER RATING PASSING GAMES DATE OPPONENT PLAYER ATT. CMP. YDS. CMP.% YDS/ATT. YDS/CMP. TD TD% INT INT% LONG SACK/LOST RATING 9/9 at Chargers Philip Rivers 51 34 424 66.7% 8.31 12.47 3 5.9% 1 2.0% 30 1/6 103.7 9/16 at Steelers Ben Roethlisberger 60 39 452 65.0% 7.53 11.59 3 5.0% 0 0.0% 46 1/10 104.3 9/23 vs. 49ers Jimmy Garoppolo 30 20 251 66.7% 8.37 12.55 2 6.7% 0 0.0% 35t 4/23 114.7 10/14 at Patriots Tom Brady 35 24 340 68.6% 9.71 14.17 1 2.9% 0 0.0% 42 2/13 109.2 *NEED MINIMUM OF 20 ATTEMPTS TO QUALIFY


DATE 9/9 9/16 9/23 10/1 10/7 10/14

OPPONENT @ L.A. Chargers @ Pittsburgh San Francisco @ Denver Jacksonville @ New England

*Points per game

2018 REGULAR SEASON OFFENSE *POINTS TOTAL RUSH PASS SCORED 13 20 11 5 6 10 9 1 7 15 7 1 8 14 9 1 5 T-11 11 2 5 13 7 2

DEFENSE TOTAL 32 32 32 32 32 32

RUSH 22 T-6 T-18 28 24 27

PASS 31 32 T-31 31 31 31

*POINTS SCORED 25 29 30 25 20 27


PASSING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS ATT

CMP

YDS

COMP%

Y/A

CHAD HENNE Y/C TD TD%

INT

INT%

LG

SK/YD

RATE

0

0%

--

0/0.0

0.0

DID NOT PLAY

09/16 at Pittsburgh

DID NOT PLAY

09/23 San Francisco

DID NOT PLAY

10/01 at Denver

DID NOT PLAY

10/07 Jacksonville

DID NOT PLAY

10/14 at New England

DID NOT PLAY

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS PASSING: DATE OPP.

0

0

0

0.0%

0.00

Y/A

ATT

CMP

YDS

COMP% 55.6%

9.48

09/16 at Pittsburgh

28

23

326

82.1%

09/23 San Francisco

38

24

314

10/01 at Denver

45

28

10/07 Jacksonville

38

10/14 at New England

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

27

15

256

0.00

0

0%

PATRICK MAHOMES Y/C TD TD%

INT

INT% 0.0%

58t

LG

SK/YD

RATE

21.4%

0

0.0%

40

1/4.0

154.8

3

7.9%

0

0.0%

42

2/7.0

115.5

10.86

1

2.2%

0

0.0%

35

1/0.0

89.5

8.24

14.23

0

0.0%

2

5.3%

40

1/15.0

62.7

63.9%

9.78

15.30

4

11.1%

2

5.6%

75t

0/0.0

110.0

63.7%

8.80

13.81

18

8.5%

4

1.9%

75t

6/26.0

112.2

17.07

4

14.8%

11.64

14.17

6

63.2%

8.26

13.08

304

62.2%

6.76

22

313

57.9%

36

23

352

212

135

1,865

0

1/0.0

127.5

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS


RUSHING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS

NO. 2

TYREEK HILL YDS AVG LG 4

2.0

7

TD

NO.

0

16

KAREEM HUNT YDS AVG LG 49

3.1

13

TD

NO.

0

5

PATRICK MAHOMES YDS AVG LG 21

4.2

8

TD 0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0

0

0

--

0

18

75

4.2

16

0

5

18

3.6

10

0

09/23 San Francisco

2

5

2.5

5

0

18

44

2.4

10

2

5

7

1.4

7

0 1

10/01 at Denver

1

2

2.0

2

0

19

121

6.4

45

1

3

7

2.3

8t

10/07 Jacksonville

2

26

13.0

21

0

22

87

4.0

24

1

4

13

3.3

11

1

10/14 at New England

1

0

0.0

--

0

10

80

8.0

31

0

2

9

4.5

6

0

8

37

4.6

21

0

103

456

4.4

45

4

24

75

3.1

11

2

TD

NO.

SPENCER WARE YDS AVG LG

TD

NO.

0

1

0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS RUSHING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 09/16 at Pittsburgh

NO. 0

0

DE'ANTHONY THOMAS YDS AVG LG 0

0

--

0

0

--

0

3

32

10.7

27

3

3.0

3

0

SAMMY WATKINS YDS AVG LG 0

0

--

1

31

31.0

31

0

TD 0

0

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

--

0

1

1

1.0

1

0

2

20

10.0

11

0

10/01 at Denver

1

6

6.0

6

0

2

6

3.0

4

0

0

0

0

--

0

10/07 Jacksonville

0

0

0

--

0

10/14 at New England

RESERVE/INJURED

1

0

0.0

--

0

0

0

0

--

0

2

5

2.5

4

0

1

-1

-1.0

-1

0

10

47

4.7

27

0

4

50

12.5

31

0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS RUSHING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

09/16 at Pittsburgh

1

NO. 1

0

6

6.0

6

DAMIEN WILLIAMS YDS AVG LG 0

0.0

--

0

0

--

0

TD 0

0

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

--

0

10/01 at Denver

0

0

0

--

0

10/07 Jacksonville

1

0

0.0

--

0

10/14 at New England

1

1

1.0

1

0

3

1

0.3

1

0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS


RECEIVING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS

NO. 1

CHRIS CONLEY YDS AVG LG 15

15.0

15

TD 0

NO.

DEMETRIUS HARRIS YDS AVG LG

TD

NO.

RESERVE/LEAGUE SUSP.

7

TYREEK HILL YDS AVG LG 169

24.1

58t

TD 2

09/16 at Pittsburgh

2

17

8.5

15t

1

0

0

0

--

0

5

90

18.0

36

1

09/23 San Francisco

2

13

6.5

9

1

1

13

13.0

13t

1

2

51

25.5

42

0

10/01 at Denver

4

13

3.3

5

0

2

59

29.5

35

0

9

54

6.0

15

0

10/07 Jacksonville

2

21

10.5

14

0

1

5

5.0

5

0

4

61

15.3

36

0

10/14 at New England

1

19

19.0

19

0

0

0

0

--

0

7

142

20.3

75t

3

12

98

8.2

19

2

4

77

19.3

35

1

34

567

16.7

75t

6

TD

NO.

TD

NO.

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS RECEIVING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

NO. 0

KAREEM HUNT YDS AVG LG 0

0

--

0

1

TRAVIS KELCE YDS AVG LG 6

6.0

6

0

0

MARCUS KEMP YDS AVG LG 0

0

--

TD 0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

1

5

5.0

5t

1

7

109

15.6

31

2

0

0

0

--

0

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

--

0

8

114

14.3

25

0

1

7

7.0

7

0

10/01 at Denver

3

54

18.0

27

0

7

78

11.1

29

1

0

0

0

--

0

10/07 Jacksonville

1

7

7.0

7

0

5

100

20.0

40

0

0

0

0

--

0

10/14 at New England

5

105

21.0

67t

1

5

61

12.2

17

0

0

0

0

--

0

10

171

17.1

67t

2

33

468

14.2

40

3

1

7

7.0

7

0

TD

NO.

TD

NO.

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS RECEIVING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

NO. 0

DEMARCUS ROBINSON YDS AVG LG 0

0

--

3

3.0

3t

1

0

1

ANTHONY SHERMAN YDS AVG LG 36

36.0

36t

1

1

0

0

0

--

0

0

DE'ANTHONY THOMAS YDS AVG LG

TD

1

1.0

1t

0

0

--

0

1

09/16 at Pittsburgh

1

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

--

0

1

16

16.0

16

0

0

0

0

--

0

10/01 at Denver

2

31

15.5

23

0

0

0

0

--

0

1

15

15.0

15

0

10/07 Jacksonville

0

0

0

--

0

1

15

15.0

15

0

1

13

13.0

13

0

10/14 at New England

0

0

0

--

0

1

-2

-2.0

-2

0

3

34

11.3

23

1

4

65

16.3

36t

1

RESERVE/INJURED

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

3

29

9.7

15

1


RECEIVING: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

NO. 1

SPENCER WARE YDS AVG LG 8

8.0

8

TD

NO.

0

3

SAMMY WATKINS YDS AVG LG 21

7.0

16

TD

NO.

0

0

DAMIEN WILLIAMS YDS AVG LG 0

0

--

TD 0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0

0

0

--

0

6

100

16.7

40

0

1

2

2.0

2

0

09/23 San Francisco

2

29

14.5

15

0

5

55

11.0

15

1

2

16

8.0

9

0

10/01 at Denver

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

--

0

10/07 Jacksonville

1

13

13.0

13

0

6

78

13.0

33

0

0

0

0

--

0

10/14 at New England

2

9

4.5

5

0

2

18

9.0

15

0

0

0

0

--

0

6

59

9.8

15

0

22

272

12.4

40

1

3

18

6.0

9

0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS


PUNTING: DATE OPP. 09/09

at L.A. Chargers

09/16

at Pittsburgh

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS NO.

YDS

AVG

2

100

50.0

5

256

51.2

DUSTIN COLQUITT TB IN 20 0

3

0

1

LG 67

52.2

NET

BLK

55

47.0

0

0

09/23

San Francisco

2

87

43.5

0

1

48

43.0

0

10/01

at Denver

4

168

42.0

2

0

44

31.5

0

10/07

Jacksonville

2

116

58.0

0

1

63

55.0

0

10/14

at New England

1

51

51.0

0

0

51

51.0

0

10/21

Cincinnati

10/28

Denver

11/04

at Cleveland

11/11

Arizona

11/19

at L.A. Rams

12/02

at Oakland

12/09

Baltimore

12/13

L.A. Chargers

12/23

at Seattle

12/30

Oakland 16

778

48.6

2

6

67

45.5

0

TOTALS


FIELD GOALS: DATE OPP.

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS 0-19

20-29

30-39

40-49

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0-0

0-0

0-0

09/23 San Francisco

0-0

0-0

1-1

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-1

HARRISON BUTKER 50+ TOTAL

FGM

FGA 1

100.0

0-0

0

0

0.0

0

1-1

1

1

100.0

37

0-0

1-1

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

1

PCT

LG 46

10/01 at Denver

0-0

1-1

1-1

0-0

0-0

2-2

2

2

100.0

33

10/07 Jacksonville

0-0

1-1

1-1

1-1

0-0

3-3

3

3

100.0

42

10/14 at New England

0-0

1-1

1-1

2-2

0-0

4-4

4

4

100.0

43

0-0

3-3

4-4

4-4

0-0

11-11

11

11

100.0

46

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS


2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL DEFENSIVE GAME-BY-GAME STATS

DATE OPP.

ALLEN BAILEY S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

DEE FORD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD 4 0 4

1

1.0

0

0

0

4

0

KENDALL FULLER S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD 3 3 6

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

2 0 2

1

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

2 0 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

6 1 7

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

2

09/23 San Francisco

3 1 4

2

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

1 0 1

1

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

3 2 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

1 0 1

0

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

3 0 3

1

1.0

0

0

0

3

0

7 0 7

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

10/07 Jacksonville

2 0 2

0

1.0

0

0

0

2

0

4 1 5

0

1.0

0

0

1

3

1

6 1 7

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/14 at New England 2 1 3

0

0.0

0

1

0

0

0

0 1 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

2 1 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

3 4.0

0

1 0

6

0

14 2 16

3 4.0

0

0 1

0 0.0

0

0 0

0

3

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

10 2 12

12 1

27 8 35

DATE OPP.

JUSTIN HOUSTON JARVIS JENKINS ANTHONY HITCHENS S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 6

8 14

2

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 1 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

7

5 12

1

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

2 2 4

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

6

0

6

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

4 0 4

2

2.0

0

0

2

2

0

2 0 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

1

2

3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

2 0 2

1

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

8

3 11

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/14 at New England 6

8 14

2

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 1 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

5 0.0

0

0

0

1

0

31 4

0 0.0

0

0

0

0

0

INACTIVE

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

34 26 60

8 3 11

3 3.0

DATE OPP.

TANOH KPASSAGNON JORDAN LUCAS CHRIS JONES S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 3 0 3

1

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

1 1 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

1 0 1

1

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 0 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

3 0 3

1

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

2

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

1 0 1

1

1.0

1

0

0

1

1

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

4 2 6

0

0.0

1

0

0

0

1

10/14 at New England 1 2 3

0

1.0

0

0

1

0

0

4 6 10

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

4

2.0

1

0

1

4

1

8 8 16

0

0.0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

4

0

INACTIVE

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

9 2 11

2 1 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0


DATE OPP.

ERIC MURRAY S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 4 5 9

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

STEVEN NELSON DERRICK NNADI S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD 4 4 8

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

5 1 6

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

3 0 3

1

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

3 2 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

3 0 3

1

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 2 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

5 1 6

0

0.0

1

0

0

0

1

3 0 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 0 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/14 at New England

INACTIVE

2 1 3

0

0.0

1

0

0

0

2

3 0 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

4 0 4

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 3 4

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

2 0.0

1

0

0

0

3

6 5 11

0 0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

17 9 26

0 0.0

1

0

0

0

2

19 5 24

DATE OPP.

RON PARKER S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 7 2 9

0

0.0

1

0

0

0

2

REGGIE RAGLAND S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD 2

5

7

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

ORLANDO SCANDRICK S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD 1 0 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

09/16 at Pittsburgh

3 0 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

4

1

5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

6 1 7

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

4

4

8

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

2 0 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

10/01 at Denver

5 0 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

5 0 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

10/07 Jacksonville

2 1 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

3 0 3

0

0.0

1

0

0

0

4

10/14 at New England 6 3 9

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

4

3

7

0

0.0

0

0

0

1

0

3 1 4

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0.0

1

0 0

0

3

0 0.0

0

0 0

1

0

14 1 15

0 0.0

1

0 0

0

7

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

29 7 36

DATE OPP.

JOSH SHAW S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 09/16 at Pittsburgh

17 15 32

TERRANCE SMITH TREMON SMITH S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

NOT ON ROSTER

2 3 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

NOT ON ROSTER

5 0 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 0 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

NOT ON ROSTER

0 2 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

NOT ON ROSTER

1 0 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

4 1 5

1

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 1 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0.0

0

0

0

0

0

13 7 20

1 1.0

0

0

0

1

0

10 1

0 0.0

0

0

0

0

0

INACTIVE

10/14 at New England 1 0 1

INACTIVE

0

INACTIVE

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

10 1


DATE OPP.

ARMANI WATTS BREELAND SPEAKS S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

09/09 at L.A. Chargers 0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 3 4

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

3 0 3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

1 1 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 1 1

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

2 0 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

1 0 1

1

1.0

0

0

0

2

0

2 0 2

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

1 0 1

0

0.0

0

1

0

2

0

0 0 0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

1

2 1 3

1

1.0

0

0

0

1

0

10/14 at New England 2 4 6

0

1.0

0

0

1

0

0

2 3 5

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0 1.0

0

1

1

2

0

1 1.0

0

0

0

1

0

RESERVE/INJURED

XAVIER WILLIAMS S A TK TFL SK INT FR FF PR PD

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

6 5 11

11 2

1 1.0

0

0

0

2

1

10 7 17


2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL SPECIAL TEAMS GAME-BY-GAME STATS DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

DEMETRIUS HARRIS

TKL

AST

TOT

RESERVE/LEAGUE SUSP.

TKL 1

MARCUS KEMP

AST 1

TOT 2

TKL 0

JORDAN LUCAS

AST 0

TOT 0

TKL

JOSH SHAW

AST

TOT

NOT ON ROSTER

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NOT ON ROSTER

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NOT ON ROSTER

10/01 at Denver

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

NOT ON ROSTER

10/07 Jacksonville

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

10/14 at New England

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

1

1

1

2

1

0

1

0

1

1

TOT

TKL

INACTIVE

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

ANTHONY SHERMAN

TKL 0

AST 0

TOT 0

TREMON SMITH

TKL 1

AST 0

1

DE'ANTHONY THOMAS

1

AST 0

TOT 1

CHARVARIUS WARD

TKL

AST

TOT

INACTIVE

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0

0

0

1

0

1

2

0

2

09/23 San Francisco

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

0

0

0

INACTIVE

0

0

0

2

1

3

10/07 Jacksonville

0

0

0

INACTIVE

1

0

1

0

0

0

10/14 at New England

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

2

2

0

2

2

1

3

RESERVE/INJURED

INACTIVE INACTIVE

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

DATE OPP.

ARMANI WATTS

DAMIEN WILLIAMS

TKL

AST

TOT

TKL

AST

09/16 at Pittsburgh

1

0

1

1

0

1

09/23 San Francisco

1

0

1

0

0

0

10/01 at Denver

0

0

0

0

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

2

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

10/14 at New England

0

1

1

RESERVE/INJURED

0

0

TOT 0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

2

1

3

4

0

4


PUNT RETURNS: DATE OPP. 09/09

at L.A. Chargers

09/16

at Pittsburgh

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS NO.

YDS

1

0

2

95

TYREEK HILL AVG LG 47.5

91t

0.0

--

FC

TD

NO.

0

0

1

0

1

0

DE'ANTHONY THOMAS YDS AVG LG FC 0

0

--

0

48

48.0

48

0

TD 0

0

09/23

San Francisco

1

5

5.0

5

1

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/01

at Denver

1

37

37.0

37

0

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

10/07

Jacksonville

1

2

2.0

2

0

0

10/14

at New England

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/21

Cincinnati

10/28

Denver

11/04

at Cleveland

11/11

Arizona

11/19

at L.A. Rams

12/02

at Oakland

12/09

Baltimore

12/13

L.A. Chargers

12/23

at Seattle

12/30

Oakland 6

139

23.2

91t

1

1

TOTALS

RESERVE/INJURED

1

48

48.0

48


KICKOFF RETURNS: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

2018 REGULAR SEASON INDIVIDUAL GAME-BY-GAME STATS

NO.

DEMETRIUS HARRIS YDS AVG LG FC

TD

NO.

RESERVE/LEAGUE SUSP.

0

TREMON SMITH YDS AVG LG FC 0

0

--

0

TD

NO.

0

2

DE'ANTHONY THOMAS YDS AVG LG FC 33

16.5

26

0

TD 0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

--

0

0

0

0

0

--

0

0

1

25

25.0

25

0

0

10/01 at Denver

0

0

0

--

0

0

INACTIVE

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

1

11

11.0

11

0

0

INACTIVE

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/14 at New England

0

0

0

--

0

0

4

180

45.0

97

0

0

1

11

11.0

11

0

0

4

180

45.0

97

0

0

0

0

RESERVE/INJURED

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS KICKOFF RETURNS: DATE OPP.

09/09 at L.A. Chargers

NO. 0

SPENCER WARE YDS AVG LG FC 0

0

--

0

TD 0

09/16 at Pittsburgh

0

0

0

--

0

0

09/23 San Francisco

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/01 at Denver

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/07 Jacksonville

0

0

0

--

0

0

10/14 at New England

1

10

10.0

10

0

0

1

10

10.0

10

0

0

10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland TOTALS

3

58

19.3

26


2018 Regular Season Kansas City Chiefs Player Participation @ LAC @ PIT SF @ DEN JAX @ NE CIN DEN @ CLE ARI @ LAR @ OAK BAL LAC @ SEA OAK P/S DNP/* PLAYERS 9/9 9/16 9/23 10/1 10/7 10/14 10/21 10/28 11/4 11/11 11/19 12/2 12/9 12/13 12/23 12/30 P/S DNP/* Bailey, Allen LDE P LDE LDE LDE LDE 6/5 0/0 Berry, Eric * * * * * * 0/0 0/6 Boettger, Ike * I ^ ^ ^ ^ 0/0 0/1 Butker, Harrison P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Colquitt, Dustin P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Conley, Chris WR WR WR WR WR WR 6/6 0/0 Devey, Jordan P P P P P RG 6/1 0/0 Duvernay-Tardif, RG RG RG RG RG IR 5/5 0/0 Laurent Ellis, Alex P P DNP * IR IR 2/0 1/1 Erving, Cam LG LG LG LG LG LG 6/6 0/0 Fisher, Eric LT LT LT LT LT LT 6/6 0/0 Ford, Dee ROLB ROLB ROLB LOLB LOLB LOLB 6/6 0/0 Fuller, Kendall RCB RCB LCB LCB LCB CB 6/6 0/0 Hamilton, Justin * * * * * * 0/0 0/6 Henne, Chad DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP 0/0 6/0 Hill, Tyreek WR WR WR WR WR WR 6/6 0/0 Hitchens, LILB LILB RILB LILB LILB RILB 6/6 0/0 Anthony Houston, Justin LOLB LOLB LOLB ROLB ROLB * 5/5 0/1 Hunt, Kareem RB RB RB RB RB RB 6/6 0/0 Jenkins, Jarvis P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Jones, Chris RDE RDE RDE RDE RDE P 6/5 0/0 Kelce, Travis TE TE TE TE TE TE 6/6 0/0 Kemp, Marcus P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Kpassagnon, P P P P P * 5/0 0/1 Tanoh Lucas, Jordan P P P P P S 6/1 0/0 Mahomes, QB QB QB QB QB QB 6/6 0/0 Patrick McKenzie, Kahlil * * * * * * 0/0 0/6 Morse, Mitch C C C C C C 6/6 0/0 Murray, Eric S S S S S * 5/5 0/1 Nelson, Steven LCB LCB RCB RCB RCB RCB 6/6 0/0 Niemann, Ben P * * P P P 4/0 0/2 Nnadi, Derrick P P P P NT NT 6/2 0/0 O'Daniel, Dorian P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Parker, Ron S S S S S S 6/6 0/0 Ragland, Reggie RILB RILB LILB RILB RILB LILB 6/6 0/0 Reiter, Austin * * * * * P 1/0 0/5 Robinson, P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Demarcus Scandrick, P CB P P P LCB 6/2 0/0 Orlando Schwartz, RT RT RT RT RT RT 6/6 0/0 Mitchell Sherman, P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Anthony Smith, Terrance P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Smith, Tremon P P P * * P 4/0 0/2 Speaks, P P P P P ROLB 6/1 0/0 Breeland Thomas, P P P P P IR 5/0 0/0 De'Anthony Ward, * * * P P P 3/0 0/3 Charvarius Ware, Spencer P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Watkins, Sammy WR WR WR WR WR WR 6/6 0/0 Watts, Armani P P P P P IR 5/0 0/0 Williams, P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Damien Williams, Darrel * * * * * * 0/0 0/6 Williams, Xavier NT NT NT NT P P 6/4 0/0 Winchester, P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 James Wylie, Andrew P P P P P P 6/0 0/0 Harris, R/SUS P P P P P 5/0 0/0 Demetrius Sorensen, IR IR IR IR IR IR 0/0 0/0 Daniel Dieter, Gehrig PS PS PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 Reaser, Keith IR ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 0/0 0/0 Gordon, Dillon IR IR IR IR IR IR 0/0 0/0 Pringle, Byron IR IR IR IR IR IR 0/0 0/0 Hunter, Ryan PS PS PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 Litton, Chase PS PS PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 Moore, J.D. IR IR IR IR IR IR 0/0 0/0 Springs, Arrion PS PS ^ ^ ^ ^ 0/0 0/0 Wade, D'Montre PS PS PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 Koroma, Tejan IR IR IR IR IR IR 0/0 0/0 McCray, Rob PS PS PS PS PS PSI 0/0 0/0 Durham, Step IR IR IR IR IR IR 0/0 0/0 Crockett, Josh PS PS PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 Ivie, Joey PS PS PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 McQuay, Leon PS PS PS PS NOT DNP 0/0 1/0 Wells, David ^ ^ PS PS PS PS 0/0 0/0 Shaw, Josh ^ ^ ^ ^ * P 1/0 0/1 Yelder, Deon ^ ^ ^ ^ PS PS 0/0 0/0 Zombo, Frank ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ P 1/0 0/0 Orchard, Nate ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ DNP 0/0 1/0 Murray, Jimmy ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ PS 0/0 0/0

LEGEND: Starters indicated by position, P=Played, *=Inactive, DNP=Did Not Play, IR=Reserve/Injured, IRD=Injured Reserve â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Designated For Return, NF=Non-Football Injury (NF), NFI=Non-Football Illness (NFI), PS=Practice Squad, PSI=Practice Squad Injured, PSIR=Practice Squad/Injured Reserve, PUP=Active/PUP, INJ=Injured, I=Inactive, I/SUS=Inactive/League Susp., N/NFIN=Inactive/NFIN, R/SUS=Reserve/League Susp., R/PUP=Reserve/Physically-Unable-To-Perform, R/NFIN=Reserve/Non-Football Injury, R/NFIL=Reserve/NFIL, R/Team SUS.=Team Suspension, UNS=Unsigned, NOT=Not on Roster, #=Roster Exemption, IPP=International Player Pathway/PS Exemption, ^=With Other Team


2018 Offense OFFENSE DATE OPPONENT QB RB WR WR TE LT LG C RG RT WR 9/9 at L.A. P.Mahomes K.Hunt T.Hill C.Conley T.Kelce E.Fisher C.Erving M.Morse L.Duvernay-Tardif M.Schwartz S.Watkins Chargers 9/16 at Pittsburgh P.Mahomes K.Hunt T.Hill C.Conley T.Kelce E.Fisher C.Erving M.Morse L.Duvernay-Tardif M.Schwartz S.Watkins 9/23 San P.Mahomes K.Hunt T.Hill C.Conley T.Kelce E.Fisher C.Erving M.Morse L.Duvernay-Tardif M.Schwartz S.Watkins Francisco 10/1 at Denver P.Mahomes K.Hunt T.Hill C.Conley T.Kelce E.Fisher C.Erving M.Morse L.Duvernay-Tardif M.Schwartz S.Watkins 10/7 Jacksonville P.Mahomes K.Hunt T.Hill C.Conley T.Kelce E.Fisher C.Erving M.Morse L.Duvernay-Tardif M.Schwartz S.Watkins 10/14 at New P.Mahomes K.Hunt T.Hill C.Conley T.Kelce E.Fisher C.Erving M.Morse J.Devey M.Schwartz S.Watkins England 10/21 Cincinnati -----------10/28 Denver -----------11/4 at Cleveland -----------11/11 Arizona -----------11/19 at L.A. Rams -----------12/2 at Oakland -----------12/9 Baltimore -----------12/13 L.A. -----------Chargers 12/23 at Seattle -----------12/30 Oakland -----------2018 Defense DEFENSE DATE OPPONENT LDE NT RDE LOLB LILB RILB ROLB LCB RCB S S NICKEL 9/9 at L.A. A.Bailey X.Williams C.Jones J.Houston A.Hitchens R.Ragland D.Ford S.Nelson K.Fuller E.Murray R.Parker -Chargers 9/16 at Pittsburgh -X.Williams C.Jones J.Houston A.Hitchens R.Ragland D.Ford S.Nelson K.Fuller E.Murray R.Parker O.Scandrick 9/23 San A.Bailey X.Williams C.Jones J.Houston R.Ragland A.Hitchens D.Ford K.Fuller S.Nelson E.Murray R.Parker -Francisco 10/1 at Denver A.Bailey X.Williams C.Jones D.Ford A.Hitchens R.Ragland J.Houston K.Fuller S.Nelson E.Murray R.Parker -10/7 Jacksonville A.Bailey D.Nnadi C.Jones D.Ford A.Hitchens R.Ragland J.Houston K.Fuller S.Nelson E.Murray R.Parker -10/14 at New A.Bailey D.Nnadi -D.Ford R.Ragland A.Hitchens B.Speaks O.Scandrick S.Nelson J.Lucas R.Parker K.Fuller England 10/21 Cincinnati ------------10/28 Denver ------------11/4 at Cleveland ------------11/11 Arizona ------------11/19 at L.A. Rams ------------12/2 at Oakland ------------12/9 Baltimore ------------12/13 L.A. ------------Chargers 12/23 at Seattle ------------12/30 Oakland -------------


DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at L.A. Chargers 09/16 at Pittsburgh 09/23 San Francisco 10/01 at Denver 10/07 Jacksonville 10/14 at New England 10/21 Cincinnati 10/28 Denver 11/04 at Cleveland 11/11 Arizona 11/19 at L.A. Rams 12/02 at Oakland 12/09 Baltimore 12/13 L.A. Chargers 12/23 at Seattle 12/30 Oakland

2018 - CAPTAINS OFFENSE DEFENSE Patrick Mahomes Justin Houston Travis Kelce Allen Bailey Mitchell Schwartz Steven Nelson Chris Conley Anthony Hitchens Mitch Morse Ron Parker Eric Fisher Dee Ford ---------------------

SPECIAL TEAMS Dustin Colquitt Tyreek Hill De'Anthony Thomas Anthony Sherman Demetrius Harris Terrance Smith -----------


DATE 09/09

09/16

09/23

10/01

10/07

10/14

10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30

2018 REGULAR SEASON INACTIVES OPPONENT PLAYERS at L.A. Chargers Eric Berry Austin Reiter Ike Boettger Charvarius Ward Justin Hamilton Darrel Williams Kahlil McKenzie at Pittsburgh Eric Berry Austin Reiter Justin Hamilton Charvarius Ward Kahlil McKenzie Darrel Williams Ben Niemann San Francisco Eric Berry Austin Reiter Justin Hamilton Charvarius Ward Kahlil McKenzie Darrel Williams Ben Niemann at Denver Eric Berry Austin Reiter Alex Ellis Tremon Smith Justin Hamilton Darrel Williams Kahlil McKenzie Jacksonville Eric Berry Josh Shaw Justin Hamilton Tremon Smith Kahlil McKenzie Darrel Williams Austin Reiter at New England Eric Berry Kahlil McKenzie Justin Hamilton Eric Murray Justin Houston Darrel Williams Tanoh Kpassagnon Cincinnati --Denver --at Cleveland --Arizona --at L.A. Rams --at Oakland --Baltimore --L.A. Chargers --at Seattle --Oakland ---


Turnover Chart 2018 REGULAR SEASON - DEFENSIVE TAKEAWAYS DATE OPPONENT TAKEAWAY 9/9 at L.A. R. Parker INT (P. Rivers) Chargers 9/16 at Pittsburgh none 9/23 San none Francisco 10/1 at Denver E. Murray INT (C. Keenum) 10/7 Jacksonville B. Speaks FR (D. Ford FF) C. Jones INT (B. Bortles) S. Nelson INT (B. Bortles: touchback) J. Lucas INT (B. Bortles) O. Scandrick INT (B. Bortles: touchback) 10/14 at New A. Bailey FR (B. Speaks FF) England 10/21 Cincinnati -10/28 Denver -11/04 at Cleveland -11/11 Arizona -11/19 at L.A. Rams -12/02 at Oakland -12/09 Baltimore -12/13 L.A. -Chargers 12/23 at Seattle -12/30 Oakland -2018 REGULAR SEASON - OFFENSIVE GIVEAWAYS DATE OPPONENT GIVEAWAY 9/9 at L.A. none Chargers 9/16 at Pittsburgh C. Conley fumble (C. Heyward FF; A. Chickillo FR) 9/23 San none Francisco 10/1 at Denver none 10/7 Jacksonville P. Mahomes INT (T. Gipson Sr.) P. Mahomes INT (A. Bouye) 10/14 at New P. Mahomes INT (D. Hightower) England P. Mahomes INT (D. Harmon: touchback) 10/21 Cincinnati -10/28 Denver -11/04 at Cleveland -11/11 Arizona -11/19 at L.A. Rams -12/02 at Oakland -12/09 Baltimore -12/13 L.A. -Chargers 12/23 at Seattle -12/30 Oakland --

QTR. YD-LINE RESULT 3 KC-14 TD

3 2 2 2 4 4 3

KC-43 Punt KC-49 FG JAX-20 TD KC-(-5) End of Half KC-1 INT KC-(-4) EOG NE-29 TD

---------

---------

---------

---

---

---

QTR. YD-LINE RESULT

4

PIT-34

2 4 1 2 ---------

KC-49 Fumble JAX-33 TD KC-31 TD NE-(-3) End of Half -----------------

---

---

TD

---


2018 REGULAR SEASON - SPECIAL TEAMS/MISC TAKEAWAYS DATE OPPONENT TAKEAWAY 9/9 at L.A. J. Winchester FR (D. Thomas FF) Chargers 2018 REGULAR SEASON - TURNOVERS 5 Giveaways 21 Points (3 TD, 0 FG) Defense: 8 Takeaways 24 Points (3 TD, 1 FG) Special Teams: 0 Giveaways 0 Points (0 TD, 0 FG) 1 Takeaways 7 Points (1 TD, 0 FG)

Offense:

QTR. YD-LINE RESULT 4 LAC-2 TD

Ratio +4 (9 takes, 5 gives)

Points Off Turnovers Ratio +10 (31 scored, 21 allowed)


2018 REGULAR SEASON - INSIDE THE 20 DATE OPPONENT OFFENSE 09/09 at L.A. Chargers TD - Pass TD - Pass 09/16 at Pittsburgh TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass 09/23 San Francisco TD - Run TD - Run TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass FG - 37 yards 10/01 at Denver FG - 33 yards TD - Run FG - 21 yards TD - Pass TD - Run 10/07 Jacksonville TD - Run FG - 22 yards FG - 42 yards TD - Run 10/14 at New England

10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30

Cincinnati Denver at Cleveland Arizona at L.A. Rams at Oakland Baltimore L.A. Chargers at Seattle Oakland

FG - 24 yards Interception FG - 30 yards TD - Pass TD - Pass -----------

DEFENSE TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Run TD - Run TD - Pass TD - Run FG - 35 yards TD - Run FG - 34 yards TD - Run Downs Interception TD - Pass Downs Interception TD - Run TD - Pass TD - Run FG - 24 yards TD - Run FG - 28 yards -----------

Inside the 20 Scores Touchdowns Field Goals Total Points in 20 Fumbles Interceptions Missed Field Goals Lost on Downs End of Half/Game TDs Outside

OFFENSE DEFENSE 26 23 25 19 18 15 7 4 147 117 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 4


DATE 09/09 09/16 09/23 10/01 10/07

10/14

10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30

2018 REGULAR SEASON - GOAL TO GO SITUATIONS OPPONENT OFFENSE DEFENSE at L.A. Chargers TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass at Pittsburgh TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Pass TD - Run TD - Run TD - Run San Francisco TD - Run TD - Run Field Goal - 35 yards TD - Pass at Denver TD - Run TD - Run Field Goal - 21 yards TD - Pass Jacksonville TD - Run Interception Field Goal - 22 yards Field Goal - 42 yards TD - Run at New England Field Goal - 24 yards TD - Run TD - Pass TD - Run Field Goal - 24 yards TD - Run Field Goal - 28 yards Cincinnati --Denver --at Cleveland --Arizona --at L.A. Rams --at Oakland --Baltimore --L.A. Chargers --at Seattle --Oakland --Goal-To-Go Situations Scores Touchdowns Field Goals Total Points Fumbles Interceptions Missed Field Goals Lost on Downs End of Half/Game

OFFENSE DEFENSE 16 13 16 12 12 9 4 3 96 73 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


DATE 09/09

09/16

09/23

10/01

10/07

10/14

10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30 TOTALS

2018 REGULAR SEASON - BIG RUN PLAYS (10+ YARDS) OPPONENT CHIEFS PLAYER YDS. OPP. PLAYER at L.A. Chargers Kareem Hunt 13 Travis Benjamin Spencer Ware 27 Melvin Gordon III Melvin Gordon III Austin Ekeler at Pittsburgh Sammy Watkins 31 NONE Patrick Mahomes 10 Patrick Mahomes 10 Kareem Hunt 16 San Francisco Sammy Watkins 11 Matt Breida Kareem Hunt 10 Matt Breida Matt Breida Alfred Morris Matt Breida Jimmy Garoppolo at Denver Kareem Hunt 45 Royce Freeman Kareem Hunt 13 Phillip Lindsay Royce Freeman Phillip Lindsay Royce Freeman Emmanuel Sanders Phillip Lindsay Royce Freeman Jacksonville Tyreek Hill 21 T.J. Yeldon Patrick Mahomes 11 T.J. Yeldon Kareem Hunt 24 Blake Bortles Kareem Hunt 15 at New England Kareem Hunt 22 Sony Michel Kareem Hunt 31 Sony Michel Kenjon Barner James White Sony Michel James White James White Cincinnati ---Denver ---at Cleveland ---Arizona ---at L.A. Rams ---at Oakland ---Baltimore ---L.A. Chargers ---at Seattle ---Oakland ---16 - 310 (19.4), 0 TDS 28 - 418 (14.9), 2 TDS

YDS. 19 18 11 10

26 21 21 16 13 13 18 17 11 13 14T 18 19 10 17 11 21T 11 12 10 10 15 11 12 -----------


2018 REGULAR SEASON - BIG PASS PLAYS (20+ YARDS) DATE OPPONENT CHIEFS PLAYER YDS. OPP. PLAYER 09/09 at L.A. Chargers Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 58T Philip Rivers -> Austin Ekeler Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 30 Philip Rivers -> Melvin Gordon III Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 20 Philip Rivers -> Melvin Gordon III Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 21 Philip Rivers -> Keenan Allen Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 34 Philip Rivers -> Mike Williams Patrick Mahomes -> Anthony 36T Philip Rivers -> Keenan Allen Sherman Philip Rivers -> Mike Williams Philip Rivers -> Keenan Allen 09/16 at Pittsburgh Patrick Mahomes -> Sammy Watkins 40 Ben Roethlisberger -> James Conner Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 36 Ben Roethlisberger -> Jesse James Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 25T Ben Roethlisberger -> Jesse James Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 31 Ben Roethlisberger -> Jesse James Patrick Mahomes -> Sammy Watkins 25 Ben Roethlisberger -> JuJu Smith-Schuster Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 29T Ben Roethlisberger -> Jesse James 09/23 San Francisco Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 25 Jimmy Garoppolo -> Kyle Juszczyk Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 42 Jimmy Garoppolo -> Kendrick Bourne Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 21 Jimmy Garoppolo -> George Kittle 10/01 at Denver Patrick Mahomes -> Kareem Hunt 27 Case Keenum -> Courtland Sutton Patrick Mahomes -> Demetrius Harris 24 Case Keenum -> Andy Janovich Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 29 Case Keenum -> Jeff Heuerman Patrick Mahomes -> Kareem Hunt 22 Patrick Mahomes -> Demarcus Robinson 23 Patrick Mahomes -> Demetrius Harris 35 10/07 Jacksonville Patrick Mahomes -> Sammy Watkins 33 Blake Bortles -> D.J. Chark Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 40 Blake Bortles -> D.J. Chark Patrick Mahomes -> Travis Kelce 30 Blake Bortles -> Dede Westbrook Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 36 Blake Bortles -> Dede Westbrook Blake Bortles -> Keelan Cole Blake Bortles -> Donte Moncrief Blake Bortles -> Keelan Cole 10/14 at New England Patrick Mahomes -> Kareem Hunt 25 Tom Brady -> Julian Edelman Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 27 Tom Brady -> Chris Hogan Patrick Mahomes -> Kareem Hunt 67T Tom Brady -> Rob Gronkowski Patrick Mahomes -> Tyreek Hill 75T Tom Brady -> Rob Gronkowski 10/21 Cincinnati ---10/28 Denver ---11/04 at Cleveland ---11/11 Arizona ---11/19 at L.A. Rams ---12/02 at Oakland ---12/09 Baltimore ---12/13 L.A. Chargers ---12/23 at Seattle ---12/30 Oakland ---TOTALS 29 - 966 (33.3), 6 TDS 31 - 893 (28.8), 3 TDS

YDS. 30 25 20 20 25 20T 23 23 22 26T 20 32 21 46 35T 27 23 42 32 36

38 30 30 23 32 25 23 21 42 42 39 -----------


DATE 09/09 09/16 09/23 10/01 10/07 10/14 10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30 TOTALS

2018 REGULAR SEASON CHIEFS ADVANCES OPPONENT RUSHES COMPLETIONS ADVANCES at L.A. Chargers 27 15 42 at Pittsburgh 25 23 48 San Francisco 28 24 52 at Denver 26 28 54 Jacksonville 30 22 52 at New England 17 23 40 Cincinnati ---Denver ---at Cleveland ---Arizona ---at L.A. Rams ---at Oakland ---Baltimore ---L.A. Chargers ---at Seattle ---Oakland ---153 135 288

OUTCOME W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 43-40 -----------

DATE 09/09 09/16 09/23 10/01 10/07 10/14 10/21 10/28 11/04 11/11 11/19 12/02 12/09 12/13 12/23 12/30 TOTALS

2018 REGULAR SEASON OPPONENT ADVANCES OPPONENT RUSHES COMPLETIONS ADVANCES at L.A. Chargers 22 34 56 at Pittsburgh 13 39 52 San Francisco 29 20 49 at Denver 22 21 43 Jacksonville 17 33 50 at New England 38 24 62 Cincinnati ---Denver ---at Cleveland ---Arizona ---at L.A. Rams ---at Oakland ---Baltimore ---L.A. Chargers ---at Seattle ---Oakland ---141 171 312

OUTCOME W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 43-40 -----------

Having Having Having Having

45 or more advances 50 or more advances less than 45 advances less than 50 advances

Allowing Allowing Allowing Allowing

45 or more advances 50 or more advances less than 45 advances less than 50 advances

CHIEFS RECORD WHEN: 4-0 3-0 1-1 2-1

NOTE: Advances equal to all rushing attempts plus completions.

4 3 1 2

-

1 1 0 0


CHIEFS 2018 REGULAR SEASON SCORING DRIVES DRIVE FIRST DATE OPPONENT ACQUIRED START PLAYS YARDS Q|TIME DOWNS SCORING PLAY T. Hill: 58-yard pass from P. Mahomes 09/09 at L.A. Chargers Kickoff KC 25 5 75 Q1|2:41 2 3 H. Butker: 46-yard FG Kickoff KC 25 11 47 Q2|5:47 75 Q3|5:35 7 D. Thomas: 1-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff KC 25 11 6 86 Q3|3:28 3 A. Sherman: 36-yard pass from P. Mahomes Interception KC 14 Fumble LAC 2 3 2 Q4|0:40 1 T. Hill: 1-yard pass from P. Mahomes 09/16 at Pittsburgh Punt PIT 10 2 10 Q1|1:03 1 C. Conley: 15-yard pass from P. Mahomes Punt KC 29 5 71 Q1|2:32 3 T. Kelce: 19-yard pass from P. Mahomes K. Hunt: 5-yard pass from P. Mahomes Missed FG KC 39 6 61 Q1|2:40 3 3 T. Kelce: 25-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff KC 25 5 75 Q3|2:18 75 Q3|3:57 5 D. Robinson: 3-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff KC 25 7 KC 35 5 65 Q3|3:04 3 Q4: T. Hill: 29-yard pass from P. Mahomes Punt 09/23 San Francisco Punt KC 43 11 57 Q1|4:55 5 K. Hunt: 1-yard run Punt KC 16 8 84 Q1|3:26 6 K. Hunt: 1-yard run Kickoff KC 25 5 75 Q2|2:58 3 C. Conley: 4-yard pass from P. Mahomes Punt KC 28 8 72 Q2|3:35 4 D. Harris: 13-yard pass from P. Mahomes Punt KC 32 9 68 Q2|1:26 5 S. Watkins: 12-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff KC 25 9 56 Q3|3:56 4 Q4: H. Butker: 37-yard FG 10/01 at Denver Kickoff KC 25 10 60 Q1|5:30 3 H. Butker: 33-yard FG Punt KC 11 12 89 Q1|5:39 5 Q2: P. Mahomes: 8-yard run Kickoff KC 25 12 72 Q3|5:28 3 H. Butker: 21-yard FG Kickoff KC 25 12 75 Q4|6:20 5 T. Kelce: 2-yard pass from P. Mahomes Punt KC 40 8 60 Q4|2:56 3 K. Hunt: 4-yard run 10/07 Jacksonville Punt KC 27 10 73 Q1|5:23 6 P. Mahomes: 4-yard run Punt KC 14 14 82 Q1|5:51 4 Q2: H. Butker: 22-yard FG Fumble KC 49 6 27 Q2|2:19 1 H. Butker: 42-yard FG Punt KC 2 12 78 Q3|5:36 5 H. Butker: 38-yard FG Kickoff KC 21 6 79 Q3|3:13 5 Q4: K. Hunt: 4-yard run 10/14 at New England Downs KC 41 8 35 Q1|3:26 2 H. Butker: 42-yard FG Kickoff KC 45 5 31 Q1|1:32 1 H. Butker: 43-yard FG Kickoff KC 25 11 69 Q2|6:31 4 H. Butker: 24-yard FG Kickoff KC 25 3 75 Q3|1:33 1 K. Hunt: 67-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff KC 37 9 51 Q3|3:41 2 H. Butker: 30-yard FG Fumble NE 29 4 29 Q3|1:27 2 T. Hill: 14-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff NE 3 3 3 Q4|1:44 1 T. Hill: 1-yard pass from P. Mahomes Kickoff KC 25 1 75 Q4|0:12 1 T. Hill: 75-yard pass from P. Mahomes 10/21 Cincinnati -------10/28 Denver -------11/04 at Cleveland -------11/11 Arizona -------11/19 at L.A. Rams -------12/02 at Oakland -------12/09 Baltimore -------12/13 L.A. Chargers -------12/23 at Seattle -------12/30 Oakland -------AVG 7.49 60.5 3:29 3.29 TOTALS 262 2,117 122:22 115


CHIEFS OPPONENTS 2018 REGULAR SEASON SCORING DRIVES DRIVE FIRST DATE OPPONENT ACQUIRED START PLAYS YARDS Q|TIME DOWNS SCORING PLAY 09/09 at L.A. Chargers Kickoff LAC 25 8 48 Q1|3:43 3 C. Sturgis: 45-yard FG LAC 40 6 39 Q1|3:41 2 C. Sturgis: 39-yard FG Punt 12 96 Q2|6:11 7 A. Ekeler: 13-yard pass from P. Rivers Punt LAC 4 91 Q3|3:44 4 Q4: K. Allen: 20-yard pass from P. Rivers Kickoff LAC 9 9 5 T. Williams: 4-yard pass from P. Rivers Kickoff LAC 25 10 75 Q4|4:41 5 Q2: J. James: 26-yard pass from B. Roethlisberger 09/16 at Pittsburgh Kickoff PIT 19 6 81 Q1|3:04 J. Smith-Schuster: 2-yard pass from B. Roethlisberger Punt PIT 15 11 85 Q2|5:41 7 Punt PIT 10 10 90 Q2|2:48 5 J. Washington: 14-yard pass from B. Roethlisberger Kickoff PIT 25 11 75 Q3|5:30 7 J. Conner: 1-yard run PIT 34 9 66 Q4|3:04 3 B. Roethlisberger: 3-yard run Fumble 09/23 San Francisco Kickoff SF 25 8 75 Q1|5:28 4 Q2: K. Juszczyk: 35-yard pass from J. Garoppolo Kickoff SF 25 6 54 Q2|0:34 2 R. Gould: 39-yard FG Punt SF 13 7 87 Q3|2:37 5 M. Goodwin: 11-yard pass from J. Garoppolo Punt SF 23 11 77 Q3|5:12 6 A. Morris: 3-yard run Kickoff SF 25 17 58 Q4|8:30 6 R. Gould: 35-yard FG 10/01 at Denver Kickoff DEN 25 7 51 Q1|3:27 3 B. McManus: 42-yard FG Kickoff DEN 22 5 78 Q2|2:56 3 R. Freeman: 14-yard run Punt DEN 24 12 60 Q2|2:17 4 B. McManus: 34-yard FG Punt DEN 20 9 80 Q3|4:33 5 P. Lindsay: 1-yard run Punt DEN 24 6 48 Q3|2:43 2 Q4: B. McManus: 46-yard FG 10/07 Jacksonville Kickoff JAX 25 6 75 Q3|2:17 3 T. Yeldon: 14-yard pass from B. Bortles Interception JAX 42 14 58 Q4|4:02 4 B. Bortles: 21-yard run S. Gostkowski: 48-yard FG 4 45 Q1|3:47 8 NE 25 10/14 at New England Kickoff S. Michel: 4-yard run 1 Q1|0:04 4 1 Interception KC 4 Q2: J. Edelman: 17-yard pass from T. Brady 5 75 Q1|5:33 10 NE 25 Kickoff S. Michel: 1-yard run 4 75 Q2|4:24 7 NE 25 Kickoff S. Gostkowski: 24-yard FG 4 65 Q3|6:10 12 NE 30 Kickoff Q4: S. Gostkowski: 39-yard FG 3 54 Q3|5:34 11 NE 25 Kickoff T. Brady: 4-yard run 3 75 Q4|3:13 7 NE 25 Kickoff S. Gostkowski: 50-yard FG 1 47 Q4|0:35 5 NE 21 Punt S. Gostkowski: 28-yard FG 3 65 Q4|3:03 7 NE 25 Kickoff 10/21 Cincinnati -------10/28 Denver -------11/04 at Cleveland -------11/11 Arizona -------11/19 at L.A. Rams -------12/02 at Oakland -------12/09 Baltimore -------12/13 L.A. Chargers -------12/23 at Seattle -------12/30 Oakland -------AVG 8.65 66.2 3:50 3.97 TOTALS 268 2,052 119:06 123


2018 Regular Season (As of October 16, 2018)

PASSING

KC 11/14/2010 @ Denver Opp 10/7/2018 vs. Jacksonville

469 yards 430 yards

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

352 yards 340 yards

KC 11/14/2010 @ Denver Opp 10/7/2018 vs. Jacksonville

433 yards 401 yards

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

352 yards 327 yards

KC 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh

6 tds

500 YARDS PASSING Elvis Grbac Warren Moon 400 YARDS PASSING Matt Cassel Blake Bortles 300 YARDS PASSING Patrick Mahomes Tom Brady 400 NET PASSING YARDS Matt Cassel Blake Bortles 300 NET PASSING YARDS Patrick Mahomes Tom Brady SIX TOUCHDOWN PASSES Patrick Mahomes:

KC 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh

6 tds

* Never Has Happened * FIVE TOUCHDOWN PASSES Patrick Mahomes:

Opp 10/8/2017 @ Houston

5 tds

KC 11/5/2000 @ Oakland 504 yards Opp 12/6/1990 @ Houston Oilers 527 yards

Opp

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

4 tds

Opp 10/8/2017 @ Houston

5 tds

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

4 tds

Opp 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh

3 tds

KC 9/29/1985 vs. Seattle Opp 10/7/2001 @ Denver

4 int 4 int

KC 11/27/2005 vs. New England 3 int Opp 10/1/1989 @ Bengals 3 int KC 12/16/2017 vs. L.A. Chargers 2 int Opp 9/7/2014 vs. Tennessee 2 int

KC Opp KC 12/23/2012 vs. Indianapolis Opp 12/20/2009 vs. Cleveland KC 10/1/2018 @ Denver Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England KC 12/23/2012 vs. Indianapolis Opp 10/19/2008 vs. Tennessee KC Opp 12/7/2003 @ Denver

(15, 19, 5, 25, 3, 29)

(15, 19, 5, 25, 3, 29)

Deshaun Watson: (1, 34, 48, 9, 6)

FOUR TOUCHDOWN PASSES Patrick Mahomes: (67, 14, 1, 75)

Deshaun Watson: (1, 34, 48, 9, 6)

THREE TOUCHDOWN PASSES Patrick Mahomes: (67, 14, 1, 75)

Ben Roethlisberger: (26, 2, 14)

FOUR OR MORE INTERCEPTION GAME Derron Cherry Deltha O'Neal THREE INTERCEPTION GAME Greg Wesley David Fulcher TWO INTERCEPTION GAME Marcus Peters Jason McCourty

RUSHING

300 YARDS RUSHER * Never Has Happened * * Never Has Happened * 200 YARDS RUSHER 226 yards Jamaal Charles 286 yards Jerome Harrison 100 YARDS RUSHER 121 yards Kareem Hunt 106 yards Sony Michel TWO 100-YARD RUSHERS 226 yards Jamaal Charles 101 yards Peyton Hillis 168 yards Chris Johnson 149 yards LenDale White FIVE TOUCHDOWNS RUSHING * Never Has Happened * 5 tds Clinton Portis: (11, 1, 59, 28, 53)

FOUR TOUCHDOWNS RUSHING


KC 10/24/2004 vs. Atlanta

Opp 12/7/2003 @ Denver

4 yards 4 tds

Priest Holmes:

5 tds

Clinton Portis:

KC 9/28/2015 @ Green Bay

3 tds

Opp 9/7/2017

3 tds

@ New England

KC 9/23/2018 vs. San Francisco 2 tds

(1, 2, 2, 15)

Derrick Blaylock: (1, 7, 3, 2)

(11, 1, 59, 28, 53)

THREE TOUCHDOWNS RUSHING Jamaal Charles: (9, 4, 7)

Mike Gillislee: (1, 2, 2)

TWO TOUCHDOWNS RUSHING Kareem Hunt: (1, 1)

Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

2 tds

Sony Michel:

KC 10/24/2004 vs. Atlanta

TWO PLAYERS WITH TWO TD RUSHING 4 yards Derrick Blaylock: (1, 7, 3, 2) 4 tds Priest Holmes:

(4, 1)

(1, 2, 2, 15)

Opp

* Never Has Happened *

RECEIVING

KC 12/15/2013 @ Oakland

TWO 100-YARD RECEIVERS 142 yards Tyreek Hill 105 yards Kareem Hunt 138 yards Jesse James 121 yards JuJu Smith-Schuster 200 YARDS RECEIVER * Never Has Happened * 210 yards Amari Cooper 100 YARDS RECEIVER 142 yards Tyreek Hill 105 yards Kareem Hunt 138 yards Jesse James 121 yards JuJu Smith-Schuster FOUR TOUCHDOWNS RECEPTIONS 4 tds Jamaal Charles:

Opp 12/1/2013 vs. Denver

4 tds

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England Opp 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh KC Opp 10/19/2017 @ Oakland KC 10/14/2018 @ New England Opp 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

3 tds

Opp 10/8/2017 @ Houston

3 tds

(71, 39, 16, 49)

Eric Decker: (41, 37, 15, 1)

THREE TOUCHDOWNS RECEPTIONS Tyreek Hill: (14, 1, 75)

DeAndre Hopkins: (1, 34, 6)

TWO TOUCHDOWNS RECEPTIONS Tyreek Hill:

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

3 tds

Opp 11/5/2017 @ Dallas

2 tds

KC 12/3/2017 @ N.Y. Jets

TWO PLAYERS WITH TWO TD RECEPTIONS 2 yards Tyreek Hill: 2 tds (40, 79) Travis Kelce:

Opp 10/8/2017 @ Houston

3 yards 2 tds

(14, 1, 75)

Cole Beasley: (7, 6)

(36, 22)

DeAndre Hopkins: (1, 34, 6)

Will Fuller V: (48, 9)

COMBINED YARDS AND TOUCHDOWNS

KC 10/1/2018 @ Denver Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

100-YARD RUSHER AND 300-YARD PASSER 121 yards Kareem Hunt 304 yards Patrick Mahomes 106 yards Sony Michel 340 yards Tom Brady 100-YARD RECEIVER AND 300-YARD PASSER 142/105 yards Tyreek Hill/Kareem Hunt 352 yards Patrick Mahomes


Opp 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh

138/121 yards Jesse James/JuJu Smith-Schuster 452 yards Ben Roethlisberger 100 YARDS RUSHING AND RECEIVING KC 10/2/2017 vs. Washington 101 yards Kareem Hunt 111 yards Travis Kelce Opp 10/15/2017 vs. Pittsburgh 179 yards Le'Veon Bell 155 yards Antonio Brown 100-YARD RUSHER, 300-YARD PASSER, 100-YARD RECEIVER KC 9/7/2017 @ New England 148 yards Kareem Hunt 368 yards Alex Smith 133 yards Tyreek Hill Opp 12/1/2013 vs. Denver 117 yards Montee Ball 403 yards Peyton Manning 174 yards Eric Decker

DEFENSE

INTERCEPTED PASS RETURNED FOR A TOUCHDOWN (1:56) (Shotgun) 5-B.Bortles pass short right intended KC 10/7/2018 vs. Jacksonville 20 yards Chris Jones for 24-T.Yeldon INTERCEPTED by 95-C.Jones at JAX 20. Opp 1/1/2017

@ San Diego

90 yards

Jahleel Addae

95-C.Jones for 20 yards, TOUCHDOWN. PENALTY on JAX-78-J.Parnell, Face Mask (15 Yards), 15 yards, enforced between downs. (10:43) (Shotgun) 11-A.Smith pass short right intended for 34-K.Davis INTERCEPTED by 37-J.Addae (54M.Ingram) at SD 10. 37-J.Addae for 90 yards, TOUCHDOWN.

KC 12/31/2017 @ Denver

FUMBLE RETURNED FOR A TOUCHDOWN (3:17) 12-P.Lynch sacked at DEN 21 for -8 yards (9511 yards Ramik Wilson C.Jones). FUMBLES (95-C.Jones) [95-C.Jones], touched

Opp 12/31/2017 @ Denver

38 yards

KC 11/27/2016 @ Denver

(6:20) (Shotgun) 13-T.Siemian sacked at DEN 0 for -8 yards (50-J.Houston). FUMBLES (50-J.Houston) [50-J.Houston], recovered by DEN-73-R.Okung at DEN -5. 73-R.Okung tackled in End Zone, SAFETY. (12:09) 27-K.Hunt up the middle tackled in End Zone for -1 yards, SAFETY (25-A.Burns, 42-M.Burnett).

Zaire Anderson SAFETY SCORED

Opp 9/16/2018 @ Pittsburgh KC 10/23/2011 @ Oakland Opp 12/16/2012 @ Oakland

Kansas City 28, Oakland 0

KC 12/28/2014 vs. San Diego Opp 11/9/2003 vs. Cleveland

4.0 sacks 4.0 sacks

SHUTOUT

Oakland 15, Kansas City 0

KC 9/17/2017 vs. Philadelphia 3.0 sacks Opp 9/24/2017 @ L.A. Chargers 3.0 sacks KC 9/23/2018 vs. San Francisco 2.0 sacks Opp 12/10/2017 vs. Oakland 2.0 sacks

FOUR SACK GAME Justin Houston Andra Davis THREE SACK GAME Chris Jones Melvin Ingram III TWO SACK GAME Justin Houston Bruce Irvin

SPECIAL TEAMS

KICKOFF RETURNED FOR A TOUCHDOWN 9-R.Dixon kicks 66 yards from DEN 20 to KC 14. 1086 yards Tyreek Hill T.Hill for 86 yards, TOUCHDOWN.

KC 11/27/2016 @ Denver Opp 11/7/2010 @ Oakland

KC 9/9/2018

at DEN 19, RECOVERED by KC-53-R.Wilson at DEN 11. 53-R.Wilson for 11 yards, TOUCHDOWN. (7:02) (Shotgun) 9-T.Bray FUMBLES (Aborted) at KC 42, RECOVERED by DEN-50-Z.Anderson at KC 38. 50Z.Anderson for 38 yards, TOUCHDOWN.

94 yards

Jacoby Ford

6-R.Succop kicks 64 yards from KC 30 to OAK 6. 12J.Ford for 94 yards, TOUCHDOWN. PENALTY on OAK-54S.Williams, Unsportsmanlike Conduct, 15 yards, enforced between downs.

PUNT RETURNED FOR A TOUCHDOWN (13:24) 8-D.Kaser punts 57 yards to KC 9, Center-47@ L.A. Chargers 91 yards Tyreek Hill M.Windt. 10-T.Hill for 91 yards, TOUCHDOWN.

Opp 12/9/2012 @ Cleveland

KC 12/6/1987 @ Cincinnati Opp KC 9/13/2009 @ Baltimore

93 yards

Travis Benjamin

(15:00) (Punt formation) 2-D.Colquitt punts 41 yards to CLV 7, Center-43-T.Gafford. 80-T.Benjamin for 93 yards, TOUCHDOWN. Longest Punt Return in Cleveland Franchise History

BLOCKED FIELD GOAL RETURNED FOR A TOUCHDOWN 28 yards Kevin Ross * Never Has Happened * BLOCKED PUNT RETURNED FOR A TOUCHDOWN

Opp 11/28/2010 @ Seattle

(10:09) (Punt formation) 4-S.Koch punt is BLOCKED by 47-J.McGraw, Center-70-M.Katula, RECOVERED by KC-47J.McGraw at BLT 0. TOUCHDOWN. (:39) 2-D.Colquitt punt is BLOCKED by 39-K.Cox, Center-43-T.Gafford, RECOVERED by SEA-29-E.Thomas at KC 10. 29E.Thomas for 10 yards, TOUCHDOWN.

MADE FIELD GOAL OF 50 YARDS OR LONGER (11:04) 7-H.Butker 51 yard field goal is GOOD, KC 12/16/2017 vs. L.A. Chargers 51 yards Harrison Butker Center-41-J.Winchester, Holder-2-D.Colquitt.

Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

50 yards

Stephen Gostkowski

KC 10/11/2015 vs. Chicago

27 yards

BLOCKED FIELD GOAL Cairo Santos

(3:19) 3-S.Gostkowski 50 yard field goal is GOOD, Center-49-J.Cardona, Holder-6-R.Allen. NE 3-Gostkowski 400th career FGA, 30th all-time. (8:49) 5-C.Santos 27 yard field goal is BLOCKED (92P.McPhee), Center-41-J.Winchester, Holder-2-D.Colquitt, recovered by KC-42-A.Sherman at CHI 15. 42A.Sherman to CHI 15 for no gain (90-J.Ratliff).


53 yards

KC 9/8/2013 Opp 1/3/2016

(12:32) 2-D.Colquitt punt is BLOCKED by 52-J.Thomas, Center-43-T.Gafford, ball out of bounds in End Zone, SAFETY.

@ Jacksonville vs. Oakland

Giorgio Tavecchio

(4:56) 2-G.Tavecchio 53 yard field goal is BLOCKED (21E.Murray), Center-59-J.Condo, Holder-7-M.King.

Opp 10/19/2017 @ Oakland

BLOCKED PUNT

(9:05) 7-M.King punt is BLOCKED by 57-D.Alexander, Center-47-T.Gafford, ball out of bounds in End Zone, SAFETY.

MISSED POINT AFTER TOUCHDOWN ATTEMPT 5-C.Santos extra point is No Good, Wide Left, Center-41-J.Winchester, Holder-2-D.Colquitt. KC 12/25/2016 vs. Denver Opp 9/23/2018 vs. San Francisco 9-R.Gould extra point is No Good, Hit Left Upright, Center-86-K.Nelson, Holder-5-B.Pinion. POINT AFTER TOUCHDOWN ATTEMPT BLOCKED KC * Never Has Happened * 5-C.Santos extra point is Blocked (77-R.Hageman), Center-41-J.Winchester, Holder-2-D.Colquitt. Opp 12/4/2016 @ Atlanta SUCCESSFUL ONSIDE KICK 2-D.Colquitt kicks 48 yards from KC 20 to PIT 32. RECOVERED by KC-80-J.Chesson. KC 10/15/2017 vs. Pittsburgh kicks onside 13 yards from JAX 35 to JAX 48. RECOVERED by JAX-4-J.Lambo. Kansas City challenged the kick Opp 10/7/2018 vs. Jacksonville 4-J.Lambo touched ruling, and the play was Upheld. The ruling on the field stands. (Timeout #2.) KC 12/24/2017 vs. Miami

5 fg

FIVE FIELD GOALS Harrison Butker:

Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

5 fg

Stephen Gostkowski:

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

4 fg

FOUR FIELD GOALS Harrison Butker:

Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

5 fg

Stephen Gostkowski:

KC 10/14/2018 @ New England

4 fg

THREE FIELD GOALS Harrison Butker:

Opp 10/14/2018 @ New England

5 fg

Stephen Gostkowski:

(49, 29, 21, 32, 31) (48, 24, 39, 50, 28)

(42, 43, 24, 30)

(48, 24, 39, 50, 28)

(42, 43, 24, 30)

(48, 24, 39, 50, 28)


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DUSTIN COLQUITT - NFL REGULAR SEASON PUNTING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2005 Chiefs 2006 Chiefs 2007 Chiefs 2008 Chiefs 2009 Chiefs 2010 Chiefs 2011 Chiefs 2012 Chiefs 2013 Chiefs 2014 Chiefs 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

GP 16 16 16 14 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 6 212

NO. 65 71 95 70 96 88 89 83 87 71 75 76 65 16 1,047

YDS. 2,564 3,145 4,322 3,110 4,361 3,908 4,084 3,887 4,005 3,164 3,333 3,427 2,936 778 47,024

AVG. 39.4 44.3 45.5 44.4 45.4 44.4 45.9 46.8 46.0 44.6 44.4 45.1 45.2 48.6 44.9

OPP. RET. 23 32 50 28 40 42 36 27 38 29 26 30 24 6 431

YDS. 179 254 387 209 285 361 411 362 246 190 170 157 164 10 3,385

NET. YDS. 2,285 2,791 3,755 2,741 3,956 3,347 3,573 3,385 3,539 2,874 3,063 3,090 2,672 728 41,799

AVG. 35.2 39.3 39.1 39.2 40.8 37.6 40.1 40.8 40.2 40.5 40.8 40.7 41.1 45.5 39.8

TB 5 5 9 8 6 10 5 7 11 5 5 9 5 2 92

IN20 27 23 27 27 41 33 27 45 35 31 37 38 29 6 426

LG 62 72 81 73 70 72 68 71 65 69 62 64 77 67 81

BK 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

LG 66 54 47 56 54 54 66

BK 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

DUSTIN COLQUITT - NFL POSTSEASON PUNTING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2006 Chiefs 2010 Chiefs 2013 Chiefs 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

1

GP 1 1 1 2 1 1 7

NO. 6 3 2 7 4 5 27

YDS. 314 153 78 288 183 250 1,266

AVG. 52.3 51.0 39.0 41.1 45.8 50.0 46.9

OPP. RET. 3 0 0 1 2 3 9

YDS. 28 0 0 22 9 18 77

NET. YDS. 286 113 78 266 174 212 1,129

AVG. 47.7 37.7 39.0 38.0 43.5 42.4 41.8

TB 0 2 0 0 0 1 3

IN20 1 1 1 5 1 0 9

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6

NO. 5 2 2 4 2 1 16

YDS. 256 100 87 168 116 51 778

AVG. 51.2 50.0 43.5 42.0 58.0 51.0 48.6

OPP. RET. 2 1 1 1 1 0 6

YDS. -5 6 1 2 6 0 10

NET. YDS. 261 94 86 126 110 51 728

AVG 52.2 47.0 43.0 31.5 55.0 51.0 45.5

TB 0 0 0 2 0 0 2

IN20 3 1 1 0 1 0 6

LG 67 55 48 44 63 51 67

BK W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

CHAD HENNE - NFL REGULAR SEASON PASSING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2008 Dolphins 2009 Dolphins 2010 Dolphins 2011 Dolphins 2012 Jaguars 2013 Jaguars 2014 Jaguars 2015 Jaguars 2016 Jaguars 2017 Jaguars 2018 Chiefs TOTALS

GP 3 14 15 4 10 15 3 0 1 2 0 67

GS 0 13 14 4 6 13 3 0 0 0 0 53

ATT. 12 451 490 112 308 503 78 0 0 2 0 1,956

CMP. 7 274 301 64 166 305 42 0 0 0 0 1,159

PCT. 58.3 60.8 61.4 57.1 53.9 60.6 53.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 59.3

YDS 67 2,878 3,301 868 2,084 3,241 492 0 0 0 0 12,931

AVG. 5.6 6.4 6.7 7.8 6.8 6.4 6.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.6

TD 0 12 15 4 11 13 3 0 0 0 0 58

INT. 0 14 19 4 11 14 1 0 0 0 0 63

LG 19 67 57t 41 81t 62t 63t 0 0 0 0 81t

SK 0 26 30 11 28 38 16 0 0 0 0 149

LST 0 176 178 67 169 243 105 0 0 0 0 938

RATE 74.0 75.2 75.4 79.0 72.2 76.5 80.7 0.0 0.0 39.6 0.0 75.5

LST 0 0 0

RATE 0.0 0.0 0.0

CHAD HENNE - NFL POSTSEASON PASSING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2008 Dolphins 2017 Jaguars TOTALS

2

GP 0 0 0

GS 0 0 0

ATT. 0 0 0

CMP. 0 0 0

PCT. 0.0 0.0 0.0

YDS 0 0 0

AVG. 0.0 0.0 0.0

TD 0 0 0

INT. 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0

SK 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


CHAD HENNE - NFL REGULAR SEASON RUSHING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2008 Dolphins 2009 Dolphins 2010 Dolphins 2011 Dolphins 2012 Jaguars 2013 Jaguars 2014 Jaguars 2015 Jaguars 2016 Jaguars 2017 Jaguars 2018 Chiefs TOTALS

NO. 0 16 35 15 19 27 4 0 1 5 0 122

YDS. 0 32 52 112 64 77 25 0 -2 -5 0 355

AVG. 0.0 2.0 1.5 7.5 3.4 2.9 6.3 0.0 -2.0 -1.0 0.0 2.9

LG 0 12 10 20 15 14 12 0 0 0 0 20

TD 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

CHAD HENNE - NFL POSTSEASON RUSHING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2008 Dolphins 2017 Jaguars TOTALS

NO. 0 0 0

YDS. 0 0 0

AVG. 0.0 0.0 0.0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

PASSING DATE OPPONENT P/S ATT CMP YDS PCT Y/A Y/C TD DID 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers DID 09/23 49ERS DID 10/01 at Broncos DID 10/07 JAGUARS DID 10/14 at Patriots DID 2018 TOTALS 0-0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0

3

INT NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT 0

RUSHING LG SK/YD RATE ATT YDS LG TD W/L SCORE PLAY W 38-28 PLAY W 42-37 PLAY W 38-27 PLAY W 27-23 PLAY W 30-14 PLAY L 40-43 0 0/0 0.0 0 0 0 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


HARRISON BUTKER - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP 2017 Panthers 0 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

13 6 19

FGM 0

FGA 0

38 11 49

42 11 53

PCT. LG XP 0.0 0 0 Went from Panthers to Chiefs. 90.5 53 28 100.0 46 26 92.5 53 54

XPA 0

PCT. 0.0

BLK 0

PTS 0

28 26 54

100.0 100.0 100.0

0 0 0

142 59 201

BLK 0 0

PTS 3 3

HARRISON BUTKER - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP 2017 Chiefs 1 NFL 1 TOTALS

FGM 0 0

PCT. 0.0 0.0

LG 0 0

XP 3 3

XPA 3 3

PCT. 100.0 100.0

REGULAR SEASON FIELD-GOAL ACCURACY

DATE TEAM 2017 Panthers 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

FGA 1 1

1-19 0-0

PCT. 0.0

0-0 0-0 0-0

0.0 0.0 0.0

1-19 0-0 0-0

20-29 PCT. 30-39 PCT. 0-0 0.0 0-0 0.0 Went from Panthers to Chiefs. 8-8 100.0 16-17 94.1 3-3 100.0 4-4 100.0 11-11 100.0 20-21 95.2

40-49 0-0

PCT. 0.0

50+ 0-0

PCT. 0.0

10-12 4-4 14-16

83.3 100.0 87.5

4-5 0-0 4-5

80.0 0.0 80.0

50+ 0-0 0-0

PCT. 0.0 0.0

POSTSEASON FIELD-GOAL ACCURACY PCT. 0.0 0.0

20-29 0-0 0-0

PCT. 0.0 0.0

30-39 0-0 0-0

PCT. 0.0 0.0

40-49 0-1 0-1

PCT. 0.0 0.0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6

4

FGM 1 0 1 2 3 4 11

FIELD GOALS FGA PCT 1 100.0 0.0 0 1 100.0 2 100.0 3 100.0 4 100.0 11 100.0

LG 46 0 37 33 42 43 46

XP 5 6 5 3 3 4 26

EXTRA POINTS XPA PCT 5 100.0 6 100.0 5 100.0 3 100.0 3 100.0 4 100.0 26 100.0

BLK 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PTS W/L SCORE 8 W 38-28 6 W 42-37 8 W 38-27 9 W 27-23 12 W 30-14 16 L 40-43 59 5-1

@CHIEFS


TYREEK HILL - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 16 1 2017 Chiefs 15 13 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 37 20 TOTALS

NO. 61 75 34 170

RECEIVING YDS AVG 593 9.7 1,183 15.8 567 16.7 2,343 13.8

LG 49 79t 75t 79t

TD 6 7 6 19

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 267 11.1 59 3.5 37 4.6 363 7.4

NO. 24 17 8 49

LG 70t 16 21 70t

TD 3 0 0 3

LG 8 14 14

TD 0 0 0

TYREEK HILL - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 1 0 2017 Chiefs 1 1 NFL 2 1 TOTALS

NO. 4 7 11

RECEIVING YDS AVG 27 6.8 87 12.4 114 10.4

LG 9 45 45

TD 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 18 6.0 14 14.0 32 8.0

NO. 3 1 4

TYREEK HILL - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 14 0 0 14

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 384 27.4 0.0 0 0.0 0 384 27.4

LG 86t 0 0 86t

TD 1 0 0 1

NO. 39 25 6 70

FC 8 9 1 18

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 592 15.2 204 8.2 139 23.2 935 13.4

LG 95t 82t 91t 95t

TD 2 1 1 4

LG 0 8 8

TD 0 0 0

TYREEK HILL - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 4 1 5

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 72 18.0 17 17.0 89 17.8

LG 21 17 21

TD 0 0 0

NO. 0 2 2

FC 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 8 4.0 8 4.0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

5

NO 7 5 2 9 4 7 34

RECEIVING YDS LG 169 58t 90 36 51 42 54 15 61 36 142 75t 567 75t

TD 2 1 0 0 0 3 6

ATT 2 0 2 1 2 1 8

RUSHING YDS 4 0 5 2 26 0 37

LG 7 0 5 2 21 0 21

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


DEMARCUS ROBINSON - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 16 0 2017 Chiefs 16 8 2018 Chiefs 6 0 NFL 38 8 TOTALS

NO. 0 21 3 24

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 212 10.1 34 11.3 246 10.3

LG 0 33 23 33

TD 0 0 1 1

NO. 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

DEMARCUS ROBINSON - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 1 0 2017 Chiefs 1 1 NFL 2 1 TOTALS

NO. 0 4 4

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 57 14.3 57 14.3

LG 0 15 15

TD 0 1 1

NO. 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

DEMARCUS ROBINSON - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 1 0 1

FC 0 1 0 1

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 -4 -4.0 0.0 0 -4 -4.0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

DEMARCUS ROBINSON - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

6

RET. 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6-0

NO 0 1 0 2 0 0 3

RECEIVING YDS LG 0 0 3 3t 0 0 31 23 0 0 0 0 34 23

TD 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

RUSHING YDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ATT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

SAMMY WATKINS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2014 Bills 16 16 2015 Bills 13 13 2016 Bills 8 8 2017 Rams 15 14 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 58 57 TOTALS

NO. 65 60 28 39 22 214

RECEIVING YDS AVG 982 15.1 1,047 17.5 430 15.4 593 15.2 272 12.4 3,324 15.5

LG 84 63 62 67t 40 84

TD 6 9 2 8 1 26

NO. 2 1 0 0 4 7

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 8 4.0 1 1.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 50 12.5 59 8.4

LG 5 1 0 0 31 31

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

SAMMY WATKINS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Rams 1 1 NFL 1 1 TOTALS

7

NO. 1 1

RECEIVING YDS AVG 23 23.0 23 23.0

LG 23 23

TD 0 0

NO. 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

@CHIEFS


SAMMY WATKINS - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2014 Bills 2015 Bills 2016 Bills 2017 Rams 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

RET. 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

SAMMY WATKINS - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Rams NFL TOTALS

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

RET. 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

NO. 0 0

FC 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

NO 3 6 5 0 6 2 22

RECEIVING YDS LG 21 16 100 40 55 15 0 0 78 33 18 15 272 40

TD 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

RUSHING YDS 0 31 20 0 0 -1 50

ATT 0 1 2 0 0 1 4

LG 0 31 11 0 0 -1 31

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

PATRICK MAHOMES - NFL REGULAR SEASON PASSING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs TOTALS

8

GP 1 6 7

GS 1 6 7

ATT. 35 212 247

CMP. 22 135 157

PCT. 62.9 63.7 63.6

YDS 284 1,865 2,149

AVG. 8.1 8.8 8.7

TD 0 18 18

INT. 1 4 5

LG 51 75t 75t

SK 2 6 8

LST 15 26 41

RATE 76.4 112.2 107.2

@CHIEFS


PATRICK MAHOMES - NFL POSTSEASON PASSING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs TOTALS

GP 0 0

GS 0 0

ATT. 0 0

CMP. 0 0

PCT. 0.0 0.0

YDS 0 0

AVG. 0.0 0.0

TD 0 0

INT. 0 0

LG 0 0

SK 0 0

LST 0 0

RATE 0.0 0.0

PATRICK MAHOMES - NFL REGULAR SEASON RUSHING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs TOTALS

NO. 7 24 31

YDS. 10 75 85

AVG. 1.4 3.1 2.7

LG 5 11 11

TD 0 2 2

PATRICK MAHOMES - NFL POSTSEASON RUSHING STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs TOTALS

NO. 0 0

YDS. 0 0

AVG. 0.0 0.0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S ATT CMP YDS 09/09 at Chargers S 27 15 256 09/16 at Steelers S 28 23 326 09/23 49ERS S 38 24 314 10/01 at Broncos S 45 28 304 10/07 JAGUARS S 38 22 313 10/14 at Patriots S 36 23 352 2018 TOTALS 6-6 212 135 1,865

PASSING RUSHING PCT Y/A Y/C TD INT LG SK/YD RATE ATT YDS LG TD W/L SCORE 55.6 9.5 17.1 4 1/0 127.5 5 21 8 0 58t 0 W 38-28 82.1 11.6 14.2 6 1/4 154.8 5 18 10 0 40 0 W 42-37 63.2 8.3 13.1 3 2/7 115.5 5 7 7 0 42 0 W 38-27 62.2 6.8 10.9 1 1/0 89.5 3 7 8t 1 W 27-23 0 35 57.9 8.2 14.2 2 40 1/15 62.7 4 13 11 1 W 30-14 0 63.9 9.8 15.3 4 2 75t 0/0 110.0 2 9 6 0 L 40-43 63.7 8.8 13.8 18 4 75t 6/26 112.2 24 75 11 2 5-1

CHRIS CONLEY - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Chiefs 16 5 2016 Chiefs 16 11 2017 Chiefs 5 5 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 43 27 TOTALS

9

NO. 17 44 11 12 84

RECEIVING YDS AVG 199 11.7 530 12.0 175 15.9 98 8.2 1,002 11.9

LG 44 39 35 19 44

TD 1 0 0 2 3

NO. 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


CHRIS CONLEY - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Chiefs 2 0 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 3 1 TOTALS

NO. 6 2 0 8

RECEIVING YDS AVG 42 7.0 19 9.5 0.0 0 61 7.6

LG 16 12 0 16

TD 1 0 0 1

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

CHRIS CONLEY - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 1 0 1 0 2

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 14 14.0 0.0 0 8 8.0 0.0 0 22 11.0

LG 14 0 8 0 14

TD 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

CHRIS CONLEY - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

10

NO 1 2 2 4 2 1 12

RECEIVING YDS LG 15 15 17 15t 13 9 13 5 21 14 19 19 98 19

TD 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

ATT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


MARCUS KEMP - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Chiefs 1 0 2018 Chiefs 6 0 NFL 7 0 TOTALS

NO. 0 1 1

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 7 7.0 7 7.0

LG 0 7 7

TD 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

MARCUS KEMP - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Chiefs 1 0 NFL 1 0 TOTALS

NO. 0 0

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0

MARCUS KEMP - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

MARCUS KEMP - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

NO. 0 0

FC 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6-0

11

NO 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

RECEIVING YDS 0 0 7 0 0 0 7

LG 0 0 7 0 0 0 7

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ATT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


STEVEN NELSON - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Chiefs 12 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Chiefs 15 15 64 58 6 4 5 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 16 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 9 6 41 33 8 2 2 0.0 0.0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Chiefs 6 6 24 19 5 2 4 0.0 0.0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 42 27 130 111 19 8 11 0.0 0.0 1 1 0 0 0 23 1 2 0 8 8 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

STEVEN NELSON - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Chiefs 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Chiefs 1 1 5 4 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 1 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 4 2 8 6 2 2 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 8 4 09/16 at Steelers S 3 3 09/23 49ERS S 3 3 10/01 at Broncos S 3 3 10/07 JAGUARS S 3 2 10/14 at Patriots S 4 4 2018 TOTALS 6-6 24 19

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 4 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 1 2 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 1 2 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 5 0.0 0.0 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

ERIC MURRAY - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 16 0 2017 Chiefs 14 2 2018 Chiefs 5 5 NFL 35 7 TOTALS

12

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 3 3 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 30 26 4 2 13 1.0 9.0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 1 0 0 0 0 26 17 9 1 2 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59 46 13 2 13 1.0 9.0 1 1 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 12 11 1 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


ERIC MURRAY - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2016 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 9 4 09/16 at Steelers S 6 5 09/23 49ERS S 5 3 10/01 at Broncos S 6 5 10/07 JAGUARS S 0 0 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS 5-5 26 17

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 INACTIVE L 40-43 9 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

A 5 1 2 1 0

ORLANDO SCANDRICK - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK 2008 Cowboys 16 2 27 26 1 1 0 1.0 2009 Cowboys 16 4 46 43 3 1 0 1.0 2010 Cowboys 16 3 45 40 5 7 0 2.5 2011 Cowboys 13 7 49 42 7 4 0 2.0 2012 Cowboys 11 3 21 16 5 2 0 0.0 2013 Cowboys 16 15 64 59 5 4 14 2.0 2014 Cowboys 14 14 55 50 5 2 7 1.0 2015 Cowboys 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 2016 Cowboys 12 10 46 39 7 2 3 2.0 2017 Cowboys 11 11 38 32 6 4 28 0.0 2018 Chiefs 6 2 15 14 1 0 0 0.0 NFL TOTALS 131 71 406 361 45 27 52 11.5

13

INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 9.0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 9 9 0 0 0 0 0 10.0 1 1 0 0 0 9 2 1 15 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 22.0 3 1 40 40t 1 9 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 14.0 4 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12.0 2 2 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1 2 2 2 0 9 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.0 2 1 0 0 0 8 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69.0 15 9 42 40t 1 70 8 1 15 15 15 0 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


ORLANDO SCANDRICK - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2009 Cowboys 2 1 4 4 2014 Cowboys 2 2 8 6 2016 Cowboys 1 1 3 3 NFL TOTALS 5 4 15 13

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.0 9.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 9 1.0 9.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers P 1 1 09/16 at Steelers S 0 0 09/23 49ERS P 2 2 10/01 at Broncos P 5 5 10/07 JAGUARS P 3 3 10/14 at Patriots S 4 3 2018 TOTALS 6-2 15 14

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

KENDALL FULLER - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2016 Redskins 13 6 40 32 8 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 2017 Redskins 16 6 54 42 12 2 5 0.0 0.0 4 4 3 0 10 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Chiefs 6 6 35 27 8 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 35 18 129 101 28 2 5 0.0 0.0 1 4 4 3 0 15 1 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 6 3 09/16 at Steelers S 7 6 09/23 49ERS S 5 3 10/01 at Broncos S 7 7 10/07 JAGUARS S 7 6 10/14 at Patriots S 3 2 2018 TOTALS 6-6 35 27

14

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 8 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


JORDAN LUCAS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2016 Dolphins 8 0 0 0 2017 Dolphins 11 0 2 2 2018 Chiefs 6 1 16 8 NFL TOTALS 25 1 18 10

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 2 0 0 0 0 8 1 49 49 2 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 49 49 0 2 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 7 3 4 0 0 0 0

JORDAN LUCAS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2016 Dolphins 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 6 4 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 49 49 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots S 10 4 6 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-1 16 8 8 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 49 49 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

15

@CHIEFS


DAMIEN WILLIAMS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2014 Dolphins 16 0 2015 Dolphins 16 0 2016 Dolphins 15 0 2017 Dolphins 11 4 2018 Chiefs 6 0 NFL TOTALS 64 4

NO. 36 16 35 46 3 136

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 122 3.4 59 3.7 115 3.3 181 3.9 1 0.3 478 3.5

LG 19 19 23 69 1 69

TD 0 0 3 0 0 3

NO. 21 21 23 20 3 88

RECEIVING YDS AVG 187 8.9 142 6.8 249 10.8 155 7.8 18 6.0 751 8.5

LG 32 23 58 24 9 58

TD 1 1 3 1 0 6

LG 4t 4t

TD 1 1

DAMIEN WILLIAMS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Dolphins 1 0 NFL TOTALS 1 0

NO. 3 3

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 14 4.7 14 4.7

LG 15 15

TD 0 0

NO. 1 1

RECEIVING YDS AVG 4 4.0 4 4.0

DAMIEN WILLIAMS - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2014 Dolphins 2015 Dolphins 2016 Dolphins 2017 Dolphins 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 5 21 2 0 0 28

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 102 20.4 457 21.8 32 16.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 591 21.1

LG 26 37 17 0 0 37

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

DAMIEN WILLIAMS - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2016 Dolphins NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

NO. 0 0

FC 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6-0

16

ATT 1 0 0 0 1 1 3

RUSHING YDS 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

LG 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO 0 1 2 0 0 0 3

RECEIVING YDS 0 2 16 0 0 0 18

LG 0 2 9 0 0 0 9

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


KAREEM HUNT - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Chiefs 16 16 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 22 22 TOTALS

NO. 272 103 375

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 1,327 4.9 456 4.4 1,783 4.8

LG 69t 45 69t

TD 8 4 12

NO. 53 10 63

RECEIVING YDS AVG 455 8.6 171 17.1 626 9.9

LG 78t 67t 78t

TD 3 2 5

LG 7 7

TD 0 0

KAREEM HUNT - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Chiefs 1 1 NFL 1 1 TOTALS

NO. 11 11

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 42 3.8 42 3.8

LG 16 16

TD 1 1

NO. 3 3

RECEIVING YDS AVG 5 1.7 5 1.7

KAREEM HUNT - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

KAREEM HUNT - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

17

RET. 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

NO. 0 0

FC 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

ATT 16 18 18 19 22 10 103

RUSHING YDS 49 75 44 121 87 80 456

LG 13 16 10 45 24 31 45

TD 0 0 2 1 1 0 4

NO 0 1 0 3 1 5 10

RECEIVING YDS LG 0 0 5 5t 0 0 54 27 7 7 105 67t 171 67t

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 1 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 1 L 40-43 2 5-1

ERIC BERRY - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2010 Chiefs 16 16 94 73 2011 Chiefs 1 1 0 0 2012 Chiefs 16 16 86 73 2013 Chiefs 15 15 74 66 2014 Chiefs 6 5 37 32 2015 Chiefs 16 15 61 55 2016 Chiefs 16 16 77 62 2017 Chiefs 1 1 7 4 2018 Chiefs 0 0 0 0 NFL 87 85 436 365 TOTALS

TACKLES A TFL YDS SK 21 5 0 2.0 0 0 0 0.0 13 10 0 0.0 8 11 41 3.5 5 0 0 0.0 6 0 0 0.0 15 2 2 0.0 3 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 0.0 71 29 43 5.5

INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 11.0 6 4 102 54t 1 9 1 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26.5 7 3 134 49 2 11 1 2 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 2 40 25 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 4 98 42t 2 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37.5 14 14 374 54t 5 51 3 2 24 5 5 0 0 0 0 0

ERIC BERRY - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2010 Chiefs 1 1 2013 Chiefs 1 1 2015 Chiefs 2 2 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 5 5 TOTALS

18

TK S 10 9 9 7 10 8 7 4 0 0 36 28

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 1 4 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0.0 0.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0.0 0.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 3 0.0 0.0 2 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers 09/23 49ERS 10/01 at Broncos 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE INACTIVE W 38-28 INACTIVE W 42-37 INACTIVE W 38-27 INACTIVE W 27-23 INACTIVE W 30-14 INACTIVE L 40-43 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

JOSH SHAW - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 15 13 2 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 4 0 0 0 0 47 31 16 1 3 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 9 7 2 0 0 0 0 34 28 6 1 1 0.0 0.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Went from Bengals to Chiefs. 2018 Chiefs 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 48 14 97 73 24 1 1 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 20 13 7 0 0 0 0 DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Bengals 15 1 2016 Bengals 16 12 2017 Bengals 16 1 2018 Bengals 0 0

JOSH SHAW - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Bengals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (BENGALS/CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Colts 09/13 RAVENS 09/23 at Panthers 09/30 at Falcons 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS

19

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE NOT ON ROSTER W 34-23 NOT ON ROSTER W 34-23 NOT ON ROSTER L 21-31 NOT ON ROSTER W 37-36 Went from Bengals to Chiefs. INACTIVE W 30-14 P 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 1-0 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4-2

@CHIEFS


DARREL WILLIAMS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2018 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 0 0 TOTALS

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

DARREL WILLIAMS - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

NO. 0 0

FC 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0

TD 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers 09/23 49ERS 10/01 at Broncos 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS 0-0

20

ATT

0

RUSHING YDS

LG

0

0

TD INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE 0

NO

0

RECEIVING YDS

LG

0

0

TD W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


SPENCER WARE - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Seahawks 2 0 2015 Chiefs 11 2 2016 Chiefs 14 14 2017 Chiefs 0 0 2018 Chiefs 6 0 NFL TOTALS 33 16

NO. 3 72 214 0 10 299

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 10 3.3 403 5.6 921 4.3 0.0 0 47 4.7 1,381 4.6

LG 5 52 46 0 27 52

TD 0 6 3 0 0 9

NO. 0 6 33 0 6 45

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 5 0.8 447 13.5 0.0 0 59 9.8 511 11.4

LG 0 5 46t 0 15 46t

TD 0 0 2 0 0 2

LG 0 4 0 4

TD 0 0 0 0

SPENCER WARE - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Chiefs 2 0 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 3 1 TOTALS

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 67 4.2 35 4.4 0.0 0 102 4.3

NO. 16 8 0 24

LG 23 11 0 23

TD 1 1 0 2

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 1 0.5 0.0 0 1 0.5

NO. 0 2 0 2

SPENCER WARE - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2013 Seahawks 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 1 0 0 1 2

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 14 14.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 10 10.0 24 12.0

LG 0 14 0 0 10 14

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

SPENCER WARE - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6-0

21

ATT 3 1 1 2 1 2 10

RUSHING YDS 32 3 1 6 0 5 47

LG 27 3 1 4 0 4 27

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO 1 0 2 0 1 2 6

RECEIVING YDS LG 8 8 0 0 29 15 0 0 13 13 9 5 59 15

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


LEON MCQUAY - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2017 Chiefs 1 1 4 3 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Chiefs 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 1 1 4 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

LEON MCQUAY - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2017 Chiefs 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers 09/23 49ERS 10/01 at Broncos 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS

22

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE PRACTICE SQUAD W 38-28 PRACTICE SQUAD W 42-37 PRACTICE SQUAD W 38-27 PRACTICE SQUAD W 27-23 NOT ON ROSTER W 30-14 DID NOT PLAY L 40-43 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


CHARVARIUS WARD - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2018 Chiefs 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 NFL 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE INACTIVE 09/09 at Chargers W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers INACTIVE W 42-37 09/23 49ERS INACTIVE W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 3-0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 5-1

RON PARKER - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2011 Seahawks 2 0 2011 Raiders 2012 Panthers 2012 Seahawks 2013 Chiefs 2014 Chiefs 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

23

3 3 2 16 16 16 16 15 6 95

0 0

TK 0

S 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 1 7 7 15 94 84 16 78 67 16 61 52 15 67 58 6 36 29 69 343 297

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Went from Seahawks to Raiders. 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 Went from Panthers to Seahawks. 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.0 3.0 0 2 29 15 0 3 1 2 20 10 10 0 0 1 10 2 18 1.0 14.0 1 1 10 10 0 12 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 6 17 5.0 16.0 5 3 5 5 0 12 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 1 0.0 0.0 1 1 0 12 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 2 7 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 9 36 7.0 33.0 6 10 45 15 0 46 5 4 27 13 13 0 0 1

MISC S A 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


RON PARKER - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2013 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 2015 Chiefs 2 2 10 6 2016 Chiefs 1 1 5 4 2017 Chiefs 1 1 5 5 NFL 5 4 20 15 TOTALS

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 9 7 09/16 at Steelers S 3 3 09/23 49ERS S 7 6 10/01 at Broncos S 5 5 10/07 JAGUARS S 3 2 10/14 at Patriots S 9 6 2018 TOTALS 6-6 36 29

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 7 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos INACTIVE W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS INACTIVE W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 4-0 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

24

@CHIEFS


JAMES WINCHESTER - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP 2015 Chiefs 16 2016 Chiefs 16 2017 Chiefs 16 2018 Chiefs 6 NFL 54 TOTALS

JAMES WINCHESTER - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP 2015 Chiefs 2 2016 Chiefs 1 2017 Chiefs 1 NFL 4 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

25

@CHIEFS


ANTHONY SHERMAN - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2011 Cardinals 15 7 2012 Cardinals 13 4 2013 Chiefs 16 8 2014 Chiefs 16 6 2015 Chiefs 16 2 2016 Chiefs 16 3 2017 Chiefs 16 3 2018 Chiefs 6 0 NFL TOTALS 114 33

NO. 1 0 2 2 1 0 14 0 20

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 3 3.0 0.0 0 3 1.5 8 4.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 40 2.9 0.0 0 54 2.7

LG 3 0 2 4 0 0 9 0 9

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

NO. 8 5 18 10 4 4 6 4 59

RECEIVING YDS AVG 72 9.0 39 7.8 155 8.6 71 7.1 34 8.5 11 2.8 47 7.8 65 16.3 494 8.4

LG 19 19 26 24 18 6 11 36t 36t

TD 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 3

LG 5t 3 3 0 5t

TD 1 0 0 0 1

ANTHONY SHERMAN - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Chiefs 1 1 2015 Chiefs 2 0 2016 Chiefs 1 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 NFL 5 1 TOTALS

NO. 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 2 2 1 0 5

RECEIVING YDS AVG 1 0.5 4 2.0 3 3.0 0.0 0 8 1.6

ANTHONY SHERMAN - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2011 Cardinals 2012 Cardinals 2013 Chiefs 2014 Chiefs 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 4

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 13 13.0 20 10.0 0.0 0 7 7.0 0.0 0 40 10.0

LG 0 0 0 13 11 0 7 0 13

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ANTHONY SHERMAN - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2013 Chiefs 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

26

RET. 0 0 0 0 0

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6-0

ATT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO 1 0 1 0 1 1 4

RECEIVING YDS LG 36 36t 0 0 16 16 0 0 15 15 -2 -2 65 36t

TD W/L SCORE 1 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 1 5-1

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

27

@CHIEFS


TERRANCE SMITH - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2016 Chiefs 9 2 2 2 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 15 1 6 5 1 1 7 7 2 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Chiefs 6 0 20 13 7 1 5 1.0 5.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 30 3 28 20 8 1 5 1.0 5.0 1 1 7 7 2 0 0 0 0 6 5 1 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

TERRANCE SMITH - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2016 Chiefs 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers P 5 2 09/16 at Steelers P 5 5 09/23 49ERS P 2 0 10/01 at Broncos P 1 1 10/07 JAGUARS P 5 4 10/14 at Patriots P 2 1 2018 TOTALS 6-0 20 13

28

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1 1.0 5.0 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 7 1.0 5.0 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


JUSTIN HOUSTON - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2011 Chiefs 16 10 51 43 8 10 9 0 0 5.5 27.5 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 5 3 2 0 0 0 0 2012 Chiefs 16 16 66 53 13 13 10 10.0 69.0 18 1 32 32 0 6 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 Chiefs 11 11 44 41 3 11 63 11.0 75.0 15 0 0 0 0 4 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 Chiefs 16 16 69 60 9 23 112 22.0 99.0 25 0 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 Chiefs 11 11 30 25 5 9 50 7.5 54.0 13 2 16 17t 1 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Chiefs 5 5 21 20 1 6 21 4.0 17.0 6 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 15 15 59 46 13 16 74 9.5 54.0 20 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 2018 Chiefs 5 5 11 8 3 3 9 3.0 15.0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 95 89 351 296 55 91 339 72.5 410.5 110 3 48 32 1 31 11 5 17 5 3 2 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

JUSTIN HOUSTON - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2013 Chiefs 1 1 4 3 2015 Chiefs 2 1 3 2 2016 Chiefs 1 1 6 5 2017 Chiefs 1 1 2 2 NFL 5 4 15 12 TOTALS

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 1 1 7 1.0 7.0 3 1 0 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1.0 1.0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 8 2.0 8.0 6 2 0 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers S 1 0 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers S 4 2 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS S 4 4 0 2.0 8.0 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos S 2 2 0 1.0 7.0 1 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS S 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots INACTIVE L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 5-5 11 8 3 3.0 15.0 3 9 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

29

@CHIEFS


FRANK ZOMBO - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2010 Packers 13 8 38 28 2011 Packers 5 1 9 7 2012 Packers 7 0 6 4 2013 Chiefs 16 5 23 20 2014 Chiefs 16 0 1 1 2015 Chiefs 16 2 10 8 2016 Chiefs 16 11 39 28 2017 Chiefs 16 9 39 22 2018 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 106 36 165 118

TACKLES A TFL YDS SK 10 5 0 4.0 2 1 0 1.0 2 0 0 0.0 3 0 0 2.0 0 0 0 0.0 2 2 14 3.0 11 3 8 1.0 17 4 13 1.5 0 0 0 0.0 47 15 35 12.5

INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR 34.0 6 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 15.0 5 1 5 5 0 2 1 0 0 4 3 1 0 1 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 7 0 0 1 25.0 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 8 1 0 0 5.0 4 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 8.0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 4 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 94.0 26 1 5 5 0 4 5 2 0 29 26 3 0 2

MISC S A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FRANK ZOMBO - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2010 Packers 1 1 5 5 2011 Packers 1 0 1 0 2012 Packers 0 0 0 0 2013 Chiefs 1 0 1 1 2015 Chiefs 2 1 1 1 2016 Chiefs 1 0 1 0 2017 Chiefs 1 1 7 3 NFL TOTALS 7 3 16 10

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2 1 0 0 1.0 2.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1 1 0 0 0 1.0 2.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 10/14 at Patriots P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 1-0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-1

30

@CHIEFS


ANTHONY HITCHENS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK 2014 Cowboys 16 11 73 57 16 3 5 0.0 2015 Cowboys 16 9 66 39 27 5 20 2.0 2016 Cowboys 16 16 78 39 39 4 21 1.5 2017 Cowboys 12 12 84 55 29 9 13 0.0 2018 Chiefs 6 6 60 34 26 5 12 0.0 NFL TOTALS 66 54 361 224 137 26 71 3.5

INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0.0 2 1 8 8 0 4 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 14.0 5 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 12.0 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26.0 15 1 8 8 0 8 2 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0

ANTHONY HITCHENS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2014 Cowboys 2 0 9 7 2016 Cowboys 1 1 7 4 NFL TOTALS 3 1 16 11

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 14 6 8 0.0 0.0 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 12 7 5 0.0 0.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 6 6 0 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 3 1 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 11 8 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 14 6 8 0.0 0.0 2 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 60 34 26 0.0 0.0 5 12 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

NATE ORCHARD - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Browns 15 11 36 24 12 4 20 3.0 15.0 4 1 46 46 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Browns 3 1 4 2 2 0.0 3 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Browns 16 1 25 14 11 5 24 2.0 16.0 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Bills 3 0 4 3 1 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Went from Bills to Chiefs. 2018 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 38 13 69 43 26 9 44 5.0 31.0 13 1 46 46 0 5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

31

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (BILLS/CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE NOT ON ROSTER L 3-47 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 20-31 27-6 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 4 3 1 0.0 0.0 0-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L NOT ON ROSTER W 13-12 Went from Bills to Chiefs. P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 4-0 4 3 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2-4

DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Ravens 09/16 CHARGERS P 09/23 at Vikings P 09/30 at Packers P 10/07 TITANS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS

DEE FORD - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2014 Chiefs 16 0 2015 Chiefs 14 5 2016 Chiefs 15 14 2017 Chiefs 6 6 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 57 31 TOTALS

TK 8 23 38 13 16 98

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 4 4 10.0 5 1 0 0 0 0 1.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 2 6 28 4.0 25.0 10 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 13 12 54 10.0 52.5 17 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 2 4 20 2.0 16.0 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 2 3 15 4.0 23.0 12 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 23 25 117 21.5 126.5 51 0 0 0 0 7 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

DEE FORD - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Chiefs 2 1 6 6 0 2 8 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Chiefs 1 1 3 1 2 1 0 0 0.5 3.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 3 2 9 7 2 2 8 0.5 3.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

32

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 4 4 09/16 at Steelers S 2 2 09/23 49ERS S 1 1 10/01 at Broncos S 3 3 10/07 JAGUARS S 5 4 10/14 at Patriots S 1 0 2018 TOTALS 6-6 16 14

A 0 0 0 0 1 1 2

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 1.0 6.0 1 6 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 1.0 7.0 1 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 1.0 2.0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1.0 8.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 4.0 23.0 3 15 12 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

BEN NIEMANN - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2018 Chiefs 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers INACTIVE W 42-37 09/23 49ERS INACTIVE W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 4-0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

33

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 2 1 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 2 2 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots S 6 2 4 1.0 7.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-1 11 6 5 1.0 7.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

REGGIE RAGLAND - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Bills 0 0 2017 Chiefs 12 10 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 18 16 TOTALS

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 44 31 13 4 7 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 17 15 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 76 48 28 4 7 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

REGGIE RAGLAND - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2017 Chiefs 1 1 9 5 4 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 1 1 9 5 4 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers S 7 2 5 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers S 5 4 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS S 8 4 4 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos S 3 2 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS S 2 1 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots S 7 4 3 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-6 32 17 15 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

34

@CHIEFS


MITCH MORSE - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Chiefs 15 15 2016 Chiefs 16 16 2017 Chiefs 7 7 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 44 44 TOTALS

MITCH MORSE - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Chiefs 0 0 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 1 1 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

35

@CHIEFS


AUSTIN REITER - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Redskins 0 0 2016 Redskins 0 0 2016 Browns 2017 Browns 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

1 16 1 18

1 0 0 1

Went from Redskins to Browns.

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers 09/23 49ERS 10/01 at Broncos 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 1-0

INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

JORDAN DEVEY - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Patriots 0 0 2014 Patriots 7 4 2015 49ers 15 9 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 10 1 2018 Chiefs 6 1 NFL TOTALS 39 16

JORDAN DEVEY - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Patriots 0 0 2014 Patriots 0 0 2016 Chiefs 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 NFL TOTALS 1 0

36

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-1

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

KAHLIL MCKENZIE - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2018 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers 09/23 49ERS 10/01 at Broncos 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS 0-0

37

INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE INACTIVE

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

@CHIEFS


MITCHELL SCHWARTZ - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2012 Browns 16 16 2013 Browns 16 16 2014 Browns 16 16 2015 Browns 16 16 2016 Chiefs 16 16 2017 Chiefs 16 16 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL TOTALS 102 102

MITCHELL SCHWARTZ - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 1 1 NFL 2 2 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

ERIC FISHER - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Chiefs 14 13 2014 Chiefs 16 16 2015 Chiefs 16 14 2016 Chiefs 16 16 2017 Chiefs 16 15 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 84 80 TOTALS

38

@CHIEFS


ERIC FISHER - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Chiefs 0 0 2015 Chiefs 2 2 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 1 1 NFL 4 4 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

JUSTIN HAMILTON - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Went from Packers to Seahawks. 2015 Seahawks 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Seahawks 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Eagles 3 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 0.5 3.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Went from Eagles to Chiefs. 2017 Chiefs 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Chiefs 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 4 1 3 1 2 1 0 0 0.5 3.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DATE TEAM 2015 Packers

JUSTIN HAMILTON - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Seahawks 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Seahawks 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

39

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE INACTIVE W 38-28 INACTIVE W 42-37 INACTIVE W 38-27 INACTIVE W 27-23 INACTIVE W 30-14 INACTIVE L 40-43 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

DATE OPPONENT 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers 09/23 49ERS 10/01 at Broncos 10/07 JAGUARS 10/14 at Patriots 2018 TOTALS

CAM ERVING - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Browns 16 4 2016 Browns 13 13 2017 Chiefs 13 4 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL TOTALS 48 27

CAM ERVING - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

40

@CHIEFS


ANDREW WYLIE - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2017 Colts

GP GS 0 0

2017 Browns

0

0

2017 Chargers

0

0

2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

0 6 6

0 0 0

Went from Colts to Browns. Went from Browns to Chargers. Went from Chargers to Chiefs.

ANDREW WYLIE - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2017 Chiefs 0 0 NFL 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers P 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 6-0

W/L SCORE W 38-28 W 42-37 W 38-27 W 27-23 W 30-14 L 40-43 5-1

41

@CHIEFS


DEMETRIUS HARRIS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Chiefs 0 0 2014 Chiefs 8 3 2015 Chiefs 16 9 2016 Chiefs 16 11 2017 Chiefs 16 7 2018 Chiefs 5 0 NFL 61 30 TOTALS

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 20 6.7 74 10.6 123 7.2 224 12.4 77 19.3 518 10.6

NO. 0 3 7 17 18 4 49

LG 0 10 25 13 51 35 51

TD 0 0 1 1 1 1 4

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

DEMETRIUS HARRIS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Chiefs 2 1 2016 Chiefs 1 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 NFL 4 1 TOTALS

RECEIVING YDS AVG 10 10.0 0.0 0 22 11.0 32 10.7

NO. 1 0 2 3

LG 10 0 13 13

TD 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0

DEMETRIUS HARRIS - NFL REGULAR SEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2013 Chiefs 2014 Chiefs 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 0 0 1 0 1 2

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 19 19.0 0.0 0 11 11.0 30 15.0

LG 0 0 0 19 0 11 19

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

DEMETRIUS HARRIS - NFL POSTSEASON RETURN STATISTICS DATE TEAM 2015 Chiefs 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

RET. 0 1 0 1

KICKOFF RETURNS YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 25 25.0 0.0 0 25 25.0

LG 0 25 0 25

TD 0 0 0 0

NO. 0 0 0 0

FC 0 0 0 0

PUNT RETURNS YDS AVG 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

LG 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers 09/16 at Steelers P 09/23 49ERS P 10/01 at Broncos P 10/07 JAGUARS P 10/14 at Patriots P 2018 TOTALS 5-0

42

NO 0 1 2 1 0 4

RECEIVING YDS 0 13 59 5 0 77

LG TD ATT RESERVE/LEAGUE SUSP. 0 0 0 13t 1 0 35 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 35 1 0

RUSHING YDS

LG

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

TD W/L SCORE W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


TRAVIS KELCE - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Chiefs 1 0 2014 Chiefs 16 11 2015 Chiefs 16 16 2016 Chiefs 16 15 2017 Chiefs 15 15 2018 Chiefs 6 6 NFL 70 63 TOTALS

NO. 0 67 72 85 83 33 340

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 862 12.9 875 12.2 1,125 13.2 1,038 12.5 468 14.2 4,368 12.8

LG 0 34 42t 80t 44 40 80t

TD 0 5 5 4 8 3 25

NO. 0 0 0 1 2 0 3

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 -5 -5.0 7 3.5 0.0 0 2 0.7

LG 0 0 0 -5 4 0 4

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0

TRAVIS KELCE - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2013 Chiefs 0 0 2015 Chiefs 2 2 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2017 Chiefs 1 1 NFL 4 4 TOTALS

NO. 0 14 5 4 23

RECEIVING YDS AVG 0.0 0 151 10.8 77 15.4 66 16.5 294 12.8

LG 0 48 24 27 48

TD 0 0 0 1 1

NO. 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS. AVG. 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT P/S 09/09 at Chargers S 09/16 at Steelers S 09/23 49ERS S 10/01 at Broncos S 10/07 JAGUARS S 10/14 at Patriots S 2018 TOTALS 6-6

43

NO 1 7 8 7 5 5 33

RECEIVING YDS LG 6 6 109 31 114 25 78 29 100 40 61 17 468 40

TD 0 2 0 1 0 0 3

ATT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

RUSHING YDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TD W/L SCORE 0 W 38-28 0 W 42-37 0 W 38-27 0 W 27-23 0 W 30-14 0 L 40-43 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 3 1 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS S 3 3 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots S 4 1 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-2 11 6 5 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

TANOH KPASSAGNON - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2017 Chiefs 16 1 13 7 6 3 20 2.0 17.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2018 Chiefs 5 0 3 2 1 0.0 1 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 21 1 16 9 7 3 20 2.0 17.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

44

@CHIEFS


TANOH KPASSAGNON - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2017 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 2 1 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots INACTIVE L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 5-0 3 2 1 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

JARVIS JENKINS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2011 Redskins 0 0 2012 Redskins 16 14 2013 Redskins 12 5 2014 Redskins 16 14 2015 Bears 15 15 2016 Jets 9 1 2016 Chiefs 2017 Chiefs 2018 Chiefs NFL TOTALS

45

TK 0 25 22 29 32 9

S 0 11 12 19 22 7

7 0 5 5 11 1 9 7 6 0 4 3 92 50 135 86

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 2 3 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 3 2.0 8.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 3 4 0.0 0.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 3 17 4.0 22.5 11 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Went from Jets to Chiefs. 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1.0 0.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 10 25 7.0 30.5 23 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

@CHIEFS


JARVIS JENKINS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2012 Redskins 1 1 5 0 5 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Chiefs 1 0 3 2 1 1 0 0 0.5 3.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 3 1 8 2 6 1 0 0 0.5 3.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS P 2 2 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS P 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots P 2 1 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-0 4 3 1 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

CHRIS JONES - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2016 Chiefs 16 11 2017 Chiefs 16 7 2018 Chiefs 6 5 NFL 38 23 TOTALS

TACKLES TK S A TFL YDS SK 28 17 11 5 26 2.0 32 22 10 5 24 6.5 11 9 2 4 19 2.0 71 48 23 14 69 10.5

INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 19.0 10 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42.0 13 1 -3 7 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12.0 4 1 20 20t 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 73.0 27 2 17 20t 1 12 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

CHRIS JONES - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2016 Chiefs 1 1 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 2 2 4 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

46

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS)

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE OPPONENT TK S A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 09/09 at Chargers S 3 3 0 0.0 0.0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 09/16 at Steelers S 1 1 0 0.0 0.0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 09/23 49ERS S 3 3 0 0.0 0.0 1 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 10/01 at Broncos S 2 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 10/07 JAGUARS S 1 1 0 1.0 6.0 1 6 1 1 20 20 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 10/14 at Patriots P 3 1 2 1.0 6.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 2018 TOTALS 6-5 11 9 2 2.0 12.0 4 19 4 1 20 20t 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

ALLEN BAILEY - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS TK S 2011 Chiefs 16 0 10 8 2012 Chiefs 10 1 5 3 2013 Chiefs 15 3 30 25 2014 Chiefs 14 14 41 27 2015 Chiefs 12 12 38 26 2016 Chiefs 5 5 7 5 2017 Chiefs 14 13 38 21 2018 Chiefs 6 5 12 10 NFL 92 53 181 125 TOTALS

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2 4 9.0 3 0 1.0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 1 8 1.0 8.0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 10 38 5.0 32.0 8 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 7 21 4.5 22.0 8 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 6 18 2.0 8.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 19 4.0 23.0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 56 32 106 17.5 102.0 29 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 4

ALLEN BAILEY - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2013 Chiefs 1 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 Chiefs 2 2 4 3 1 0 0 2.0 17.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 Chiefs 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2017 Chiefs 1 1 1 0 1 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL 4 3 5 3 2 1 2 0 0 0 2.0 17.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTALS

47

@CHIEFS


2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 0 0 09/16 at Steelers P 2 2 09/23 49ERS S 4 3 10/01 at Broncos S 1 1 10/07 JAGUARS S 2 2 10/14 at Patriots S 3 2 2018 TOTALS 6-5 12 10

A 0 0 1 0 0 1 2

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 0.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 1.0 10.0 1 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 1.0 8.0 2 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 1.0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1.0 5.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 4.0 23.0 3 19 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

XAVIER WILLIAMS - NFL REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS DATE TEAM GP GS 2015 Cardinals 4 0 2016 Cardinals 8 1 2017 Cardinals 11 1 2018 Chiefs 6 4 NFL TOTALS 29 6

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2 2 0 1 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 2 1 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 16 4 1 4 0.5 5.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 10 7 1 5 1.0 5.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 32 13 3 12 1.5 10.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

XAVIER WILLIAMS - NFL POSTSEASON STATISTICS TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC DATE TEAM GP GS TK S A TFL YDS SK YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A 2015 Cardinals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NFL TOTALS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2018 GAME-BY-GAME REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS (CHIEFS) DATE OPPONENT TK S 09/09 at Chargers S 4 1 09/16 at Steelers S 3 3 09/23 49ERS S 0 0 10/01 at Broncos S 2 2 10/07 JAGUARS P 3 2 10/14 at Patriots P 5 2 2018 TOTALS 6-4 17 10

48

TACKLES INTERCEPTIONS O. FUMB ST MISC A SK YDS TFL YDS QBH NO YDS LG TD PD FF FR YDS TK S A FF FR S A W/L SCORE 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-28 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 42-37 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 38-27 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 27-23 1 1.0 5.0 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 30-14 3 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L 40-43 7 1.0 5.0 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5-1

@CHIEFS


Service Most Seasons, Active Players 15 Jerrel Wilson 14 Len Dawson 14 Ed Budde 14 Nick Lowery 14 Will Shields 14 Dustin Colquitt 13 Jim Tyrer 13 Buck Buchanan 13 Emmitt Thomas 13 Jan Stenerud 13 Jack Rudnay 13 John Alt 13 Derrick Johnson 12 Johnny Robinson 12 Dave Hill 12 Bobby Bell 12 Mike Livingston 12 Henry Marshall 12 Tony Gonzalez 12 Tamba Hali

1963-77 1962-75 1963-76 1980-93 1993-06 2005-18 1961-73 1963-75 1966-78 1967-79 1970-82 1984-96 2005-17 1960-71 1963-74 1963-74 1968-79 1976-87 1997-08 2006-17

Most Games Played, Career (All 175+) 224 Will Shields 1993-06 212 Nick Lowery 1980-93 212 Dustin Colquitt 2005-18 203 Jerrel Wilson 1963-77 190 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 186 Jan Stenerud 1967-79 183 Len Dawson 1962-75 183 Buck Buchanan 1963-75 182 Derrick Johnson 2005-17 181 Emmitt Thomas 1966-78 180 Jim Tyrer 1961-73 179 John Alt 1984-96 178 Jack Rudnay 1970-82 177 Ed Budde 1963-76 177 Tamba Hali 2006-17 Most Games Started, Career (Since 1968) 223 Will Shields 1993-06 174 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 171 Jack Rudnay 1970-82 169 Derrick Johnson 2005-17 164 Tim Grunhard 1990-00 *158 Len Dawson (*Since 1962) 1962-75 157 Derrick Thomas 1989-99 157 Tamba Hali 2006-17 Most Starts, Rookie, Season 16 Sylvester Hicks 16 Art Still 16 Dave Lutz 16 Kevin Ross 16 Dino Hackett 16 Derrick Thomas 16 Greg Wesley 16 Derrick Johnson 16 Tamba Hali 16 Brandon Carr 16 Glenn Dorsey 16 Eric Berry

1

1978 1978 1983 1984 1986 1989 2000 2005 2006 2008 2008 2010

16 Dontari Poe 16 Marcus Peters 16 Kareem Hunt

2012 2015 2017

Most Consecutive Games Played, Career 224 Will Shields Sept. 5, 1993 - Dec. 31, 2006 186 Jan Stenerud Sept. 9, 1967 - Dec. 16, 1979 180 Jim Tyrer Sept. 10, 1961 - Dec. 2, 1973 168 Bobby Bell Sept. 7, 1963 - Dec. 14, 1974 166 Buck Buchanan Sept. 7, 1963 - Dec. 1, 1974 Most Consecutive Games Started (Since 1968) 223 Will Shields Sept. 12, 1993 - Dec. 31, 2006 144 Emmitt Thomas Sept. 28, 1968 - Oct. 15, 1978 134 Jim Lynch Sept. 9, 1968 - Nov. 6, 1977 120 Tim Grunhard Sept. 5, 1993 - Oct. 29, 2000 120 Tony Gonzalez Sept. 19, 1999 - Nov. 12, 2006 Most Consecutive Games Started To Begin Career 101 Gary Barbaro 1976-82 64 Brandon Carr 2008-11 51 Art Still 1978-81 41 Tamba Hali 2006-08 37 Greg Wesley 2000-02 Most Games Started, Quarterback, Career 158 Len Dawson 1962-75 88 Trent Green 2001-06 77 Bill Kenney 1979-88 76 Alex Smith 2013-17 75 Mike Livingston 1968-79 52 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 Most Consecutive Games Started, Quarterback 81 Trent Green Sept. 9, 2001 - Sept. 10, 2006 44 Len Dawson Oct. 31, 1965 - Nov. 3, 1968 35 Steve DeBerg Nov. 26, 1989 - Dec. 8, 1991 28 Steve Bono Sept. 3, 1995 - Nov. 24, 1996 28 Elvis Grbac Dec. 26, 1998 - Nov. 19, 2000 28 Len Dawson Sept. 8, 1962 - Nov. 8, 1963 Most Consecutive Seasons Starting Every Game, QB 5 Trent Green 2001-05 2 Len Dawson 1966-67

Scoring Most Points, Career (All 400+) 1,466 Nick Lowery 1,231 Jan Stenerud 517 Ryan Succop 500 Priest Holmes 462 Tony Gonzalez 442 Pete Stoyanovich

1980-93 1967-79 2009-13 2001-07 1997-08 1996-00

Most Seasons, 100 or More Points 11 Nick Lowery 1981, ’83-86, ’88-93 5 Jan Stenerud 1967-71 4 Ryan Succop 2009-10, '12-13 3 Pete Stoyanovich 1997-99 3 Lawrence Tynes 2004-06 3 Cairo Santos 2014-16 2 Lin Elliott 1994-95 2 Morten Andersen 2002-03 2 Priest Holmes 2002-03

@CHIEFS


2 1 1 1 1

Larry Johnson Jack Spikes Abner Haynes Todd Peterson Harrison Butker

2005-06 1960 1962 2001 2017

Most Points, Season (All 125+) 162 Priest Holmes 144 Priest Holmes 142 Harrison Butker 139 Nick Lowery 129 Jan Stenerud 129 Cairo Santos 129 Cairo Santos 126 Larry Johnson 125 Lawrence Tynes

8 Johnny Robinson (4 rush, 4 rec.) 8 Mike Garrett (6 rush, 1 rec., 1 PR) Most Touchdowns, Game 5 Abner Haynes vs. Oakland 5 Jamaal Charles at Oakland 4 Frank Jackson vs. Denver 4 Abner Haynes vs. Boston 4 Frank Jackson at San Diego 4 Bert Coan at Denver 4 Priest Holmes at Cleveland 4 Priest Holmes vs. Atlanta 4 Derrick Blaylock vs. Atlanta 4 Larry Johnson vs. Seattle 3 39 times; Last, Tyreek Hill at New England

2003 2002 2017 1990 1968 2015 2016 2005 2005

Most Points, Non-Kickers, Rookie, Season 72 Abner Haynes 1960 72 Tyreek Hill 2016 66 Billy Jackson 1981 66 Kareem Hunt 2017 48 Johnny Robinson 1960 48 Mike Garrett 1966

Nov. 26, 1961 Dec. 15, 2013 Dec. 10, 1961 Sept. 8, 1962 Dec. 13, 1964 Oct. 23, 1966 Sept. 8, 2002 Oct. 24, 2004 Oct. 24, 2004 Oct. 29, 2006

Most Touchdowns, Career 83 Priest Holmes (76 rush, 7 rec.) 76 Tony Gonzalez (0 rush, 76 rec.) 64 Jamaal Charles (43 rush, 20 rec., 1 KR) 61 Larry Johnson (55 rush, 6 rec.) 60 Otis Taylor (3 rush, 57 rec.) 58 Abner Haynes(39 rush, 17 rec., 1 KR, 1 fum.) Most Touchdowns, Season 27 Priest Holmes (27 rush, 0 rec.) 24 Priest Holmes (21 rush, 3 rec.) 21 Larry Johnson (20 rush, 1 rec) 19 Abner Haynes (13 rush, 6 rec.) 19 Larry Johnson (17 rush, 2 rec.) 19 Jamaal Charles (12 rush, 7 rec.) Most Touchdowns, Rookie, Season 12 Abner Haynes (9 rush, 3 rec.) 12 Tyreek Hill (3 rush, 6 rec., 2 PR, 1 KR) 11 Billy Jackson (10 rush, 1 rec.) 11 Kareem Hunt (8 rush, 3 rec.)

2

Nov. 26, 1961 Dec. 15, 2013 Dec. 10, 1961 Sept. 8, 1962 Dec. 13, 1964 Oct. 23, 1966 Sept. 8, 2002 Oct. 24, 2004 Oct. 24, 2004 Oct. 29, 2006 Oct. 14, 2018

Most Consecutive Games Scoring Touchdowns 11 Priest Holmes 2002 9 Larry Johnson 2006 8 Priest Holmes 2003-04 8 Larry Johnson 2004-05 7 Marcus Allen 1993 7 Priest Holmes 2004-05 7 Larry Johnson 2005 7 Dwayne Bowe 2010 7 Jamaal Charles 2013

Most Points, Kickers, Rookie, Season 142 Harrison Butker 2017 113 Cairo Santos 2014 108 Jan Stenerud 1967 104 Jack Spikes 1960 104 Ryan Succop 2009 Most Points, Game 30 Abner Haynes vs. Oakland 30 Jamaal Charles at Oakland 24 Frank Jackson vs. Denver 24 Abner Haynes vs. Boston 24 Frank Jackson at San Diego 24 Bert Coan at Denver 24 Priest Holmes at Cleveland 24 Priest Holmes vs. Atlanta 24 Derrick Blaylock vs. Atlanta 24 Larry Johnson vs. Seattle

1960 1966

2001-07 1997-08 2008-16 2003-09 1965-75 1960-64

2003 2002 2005 1962 2006 2013 1960 2016 1981 2017

Most Points After TD Attempted, Career 483 Nick Lowery 1980-93 409 Jan Stenerud 1967-79 164 Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;Stoyanovich 1996-00 160 Ryan Succop 2009-13 149 Tommy Brooker 1962-66 Most Points After TD Attempted, Season 60 Lawrence Tynes 2004 59 Morten Andersen 2003 52 Ryan Succop 2013 51 Morten Andersen 2002 46 Tommy Brooker 1964 Most Points After TD Attempted, 8 Tommy Brooker at Denver 8 Mike Mercer at Denver 8 Lawrence Tynes vs. Atlanta 8 Ryan Succop at Oakland

Game Sept. 7, 1963 Oct. 23, 1966 Oct. 24, 2004 Dec. 15, 2013

Most Points After TD Made, Career 479 Nick Lowery 1980-93 394 Jan Stenerud 1967-79 163 Pete Stoyanovich 1996-00 160 Ryan Succop 2009-13 149 Tommy Brooker 1962-66 Most Points After TD Made, Season 58 Morten Andersen 2003 58 Lawrence Tynes 2004 52 Ryan Succop 2013 51 Morten Andersen 2002 46 Tommy Brooker 1964 Most Points After TD Made, Game 8 Tommy Brooker at Denver Sept. 7, 1963 8 Mike Mercer at Denver Oct. 23, 1966

@CHIEFS


8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Lawrence Tynes vs. Atlanta Ryan Succop at Oakland Cotton Davidson vs. Denver T. Brooker at N.Y. Titans Jack Spikes vs. Denver Tommy Brooker vs. Houston Morten Andersen vs. Arizona Morten Andersen vs. St. Louis Lawrence Tynes at Tennessee

Oct. 24, 2004 Dec. 15, 2013 Dec.10, 1961 Nov. 11, 1962 Dec. 8, 1963 Nov. 28, 1965 Dec. 1, 2002 Dec. 8, 2002 Dec. 13, 2004

Most Consecutive Points After TD 197 Nick Lowery 1983-89 160 Ryan Succop 2009-13 155 Jan Stenerud 1968-73 149 Tommy Brooker 1962-66 Highest Point After Percentage, Career (100 PATs) 100.00 Ryan Succop (160-160) 2009-13 100.00 Tommy Brooker (149-149) 1962-66 99.39 Pete Stoyanovich (163-164) 1996-00 99.17 Nick Lowery (479-483) 1980-93 99.09 Morten Andersen (109-110) 2002-03 97.16 Lawrence Tynes (137-141) 2004-06 Most Field Goals Attempted, Career 436 Jan Stenerud 1967-79 410 Nick Lowery 1980-93 147 Ryan Succop 2009-13 115 Pete Stoyanovich 1996-00 105 Cairo Santos 2014-17 Most Field Goals Attempted, Season 44 Jan Stenerud 1971 42 Jan Stenerud 1970 42 Harrison Butker 2017 40 Jan Stenerud 1968 Most Field Goals Attempted, Game 7 Cairo Santos at Cincinnati October 4, 2015 7 Jan Stenerud vs. Buffalo Dec. 19, 1971 6 Tommy Brooker vs. San Diego Dec. 16, 1962 6 Jan Stenerud 6 times Last; at Washington Oct. 10, 1976 6 Todd Peterson vs. Denver Dec. 16, 2001 6 Ryan Succop at New Orleans Sept. 23, 2012 6 Harrison Butker vs. Miami Dec. 24, 2017 Most Seasons Leading League, Field Goals Made 3 Jan Stenerud 1967, ’70, ’75 Most Field Goals Made, Career 329 Nick Lowery 279 Jan Stenerud 119 Ryan Succop 93 Pete Stoyanovich 89 Cairo Santos

1980-93 1967-79 2009-13 1996-00 2014-17

Most Field Goals Made, Season 38 Harrison Butker 2017 34 Nick Lowery 1990 31 Cairo Santos 2016 30 Jan Stenerud 1968, ’70 30 Cairo Santos 2015 28 Ryan Succop 2012 Most Field Goals Made, Rookie, Season

3

38 25 25 21 13 12

Harrison Butker Ryan Succop Cairo Santos Jan Stenerud Jack Spikes Tommy Brooker

Most Field Goals Made, Game 7 Cairo Santos at Cincinnati 6 Ryan Succop at New Orleans 5 Jan Stenerud Last; vs. Buffalo 5 Nick Lowery Last; vs. Denver 5 Ryan Succop vs. Minnesota 5 Cairo Santos at Denver 5 Harrison Butker Last; vs. Miami 4 Tommy Brooker vs. San Diego 4 Mike Mercer at N.Y. Jets 4 Lin Elliott vs. Seattle 4 Jan Stenerud 4 Nick Lowery 4 Pete Stoyanovich 4 Todd Peterson vs. Denver 4 Lawrence Tynes Last; vs. Denver 4 Nick Novak vs. Denver 4 Ryan Succop Last; at Tennessee 4 Cairo Santos Last; at Carolina 4 Harrison Butker Last; at New England

2017 2009 2014 1967 1960 1962 Oct. 5, 2015 Sept. 23, 2012 3 times Dec. 19, 1971 4 times Sept. 20, 1993 Oct. 2, 2011 Nov. 15, 2015 3 times Dec. 24, 2017 Dec. 16, 1962 Nov. 27, 1966 Dec. 24, 1995 10 times 8 times 2 times Dec. 16, 2001 2 times Nov. 23, 2006 Sept. 28, 2008 4 times Oct. 6, 2013 5 times Nov. 13, 2016 2 times Oct. 14, 2018

Most Consecutive Games Scoring Field Goals 15 Lawrence Tynes 2004-05 14 Jan Stenerud 1970 14 Harrison Butker 2017-18 12 Pete Stoyanovich 1997-98 11 Jan Stenerud 1968-69 11 Jan Stenerud 1971-72 11 Nick Lowery 1985-86 11 Morten Andersen 2002 Most Consecutive Games Scoring Field Goals, Single Season 14 Jan Stenerud 1970 13 Harrison Butker 2017 12 Lawrence Tynes 2005 11 Morten Andersen 2002 Most Consecutive Field Goals Made 23 Harrison Butker 2017 22 Pete Stoyanovich 1997-98 22 Ryan Succop 2011 21 Nick Lowery 1990 21 Nick Lowery 1991 16 Jan Stenerud 1969 Longest Field Goal 58 Nick Lowery at Washington 58 Nick Lowery vs. L.A. Raiders 57 Nick Lowery vs. Seattle 55 Jan Stenerud at Denver

Sept. 18, 1983 Sept. 12, 1985 Sept. 14, 1980 Oct. 4, 1970

@CHIEFS


54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54

Jan Stenerud at Houston Jan Stenerud at Denver Jan Stenerud at San Francisco Nick Lowery vs. L.A. Raiders Nick Lowery at Detroit Pete Stoyanovich vs. Denver Ryan Succop vs. Minnesota Cairo Santos at Houston

Sept. 9, 1967 Oct. 5, 1969 Dec. 6, 1971 Nov. 6, 1983 Nov. 26, 1987 Nov. 16, 1997 Oct. 2, 2011 Sept. 18, 2016

Highest Field Goal Percentage, Career (100 Attempts) 84.8 Cairo Santos (89-105) 2014-17 81.0 Ryan Succop (119-147) 2009-13 80.9 Pete Stoyanovich (93-115) 1996-00 80.2 Nick Lowery (329-410) 1980-93 64.0 Jan Stenerud (279-436) 1967-79 Highest Field Goal Percentage, Season 96.3 Pete Stoyanovich (26-27) 1997 91.9 Nick Lowery (34-37) 1990 91.6 Nick Lowery (22-24) 1992 90.5 Harrison Butker (38-42) 2017 88.9 Nick Lowery (24-27) 1985 Highest Field Goal Percentage, Career At Arrowhead 90.0 Harrison Butker (27-30) 2017-18 88.1 Pete Stoyanovich (52-59) 1996-00 85.6 Nick Lowery (179-209) 1980-93 82.4 Ryan Succop (61-74) 2009-13 79.2 Cairo Santos (38-48) 2014-17 Attempts Less Than 40 Yards, Season (15 Attempts) 23-26 Cairo Santos 2016 24-25 Harrison Butker 2017 21-21 Nick Lowery 1991 20-20 Pete Stoyanovich 1998 16-20 Ryan Succop 2012 17-18 Cairo Santos 2014 17-18 Cairo Santos 2015 17-17 Ryan Succop 2009 16-16 Morten Andersen 2002 15-16 Ryan Succop 2013 14-15 Ryan Succop 2011 Most Field Goals, No Misses, Game 7 Cairo Santos at Cincinnati Oct. 4, 2015 6 Ryan Succop at New Orleans Sept. 23, 2012 5 Jan Stenerud at Buffalo Nov. 2, 1969 5 Jan Stenerud vs. Buffalo Dec. 7, 1969 5 Nick Lowery vs. L.A. Raiders Sept. 12, 1985 5 Nick Lowery at Chicago Dec. 29, 1990 5 Nick Lowery vs. Denver Sept. 20, 1993 5 Ryan Succop vs. Minnesota Oct. 2, 2011 5 Harrison Butker at Houston Oct. 8, 2017 5 Harrison Butker vs. Denver Oct. 30, 2017 Most Field Goals, 50 or More Yards, Career 20 Nick Lowery 1980-93 12 Jan Stenerud 1967-79 9 Ryan Succop 2009-13 7 Cairo Santos 2014-16 6 Lawrence Tynes 2004-06 5 Pete Stoyanovich 1996-99 Most Field Goals, 50 or More Yards, Season

4

4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2

Nick Lowery Cairo Santos Harrison Butker Nick Lowery Ryan Succop Pete Stoyanovich Lawrence Tynes Ryan Succop Cairo Santos

1980 2015 2017 1985, 2011 1997, 2004, 2009, 2016

’88 ’98 2005, 2006 '12

Most Field Goals, 50 or More Yards, Game 2 Nick Lowery vs. Seattle Sept. 14, 1980 2 Nick Lowery at New Orleans Sept. 8, 1985 2 Nick Lowery at Detroit Nov. 26, 1987 2 Lawrence Tynes at Miami Oct. 21, 2005 2 Ryan Succop vs. Minnesota Oct. 2, 2011 2 Cairo Santos at Cincinnati Oct. 4, 2015 Most Defensive Touchdowns, Career 8 Bobby Bell (6 INTs, 2 FRs) 1963-74 5 Emmitt Thomas (5 INTs) 1966-78 5 Jim Kearney (5 INTs) 1967-75 5 Eric Berry (5 INTs) 2010-16 4 Lloyd Burruss (4 INTs) 1981-91 4 Derrick Thomas (4 FRs) 1989-99 4 James Hasty (3 INTs, 1 FR) 1995-99 4 Derrick Johnson (4 INTs) 2005-16 Most Defensive Touchdowns, Season 4 Jim Kearney (4 INTs) 3 David Webster (2 INTs, 1 FR) 3 Lloyd Burruss (3 INTs) 3 Charles Mincy (2 INTs, 1 FR) 3 Mark McMillian (3 INTs)

1972 1960 1986 1992 1997

Most Defensive Touchdowns, Game 2 Jim Kearney at Denver Oct. 1, 1972 2 Lloyd Burruss vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 2 Cris Dishman at Oakland Nov. 28, 1999 2 Derrick Johnson at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 Most Special Teams Touchdowns, Career 11 Dante Hall (5 PRs, 6 KORs) 2000-06 8 Tamarick Vanover (4 PRs, 4 KORs) 1995-99 5 Tyreek Hill (4 PRs, 1 KOR) 2016-18 4 J.T. Smith (4 PRs) 1978-84 3 Dexter McCluster (3 PRs) 2010-13 2 Five players tied Most Special Teams Touchdowns, Season 4 Dante Hall (2 PRs, 2 KRs) 2003 3 Tamarick Vanover (2 KRs, 1 PR) 1995 3 Dante Hall (2 PRs, 1 KR) 2002 3 Tyreek Hill (2 PRs, 1 KR) 2016 2 J.T. Smith (2 PRs) 1979 2 J.T. Smith (2 PRs) 1980 2 Paul Palmer (2 KRs) 1987 2 Dale Carter (2 PRs) 1992 2 Dante Hall (2 KRs) 2004 2 Dexter McCluster (2 PRs) 2013 Most Safeties, Career 3 Derrick Thomas 2 Bill Maas 2 Dan Saleaumua

1989-98 1984-92 1989-96

@CHIEFS


2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Joe Phillips Buck Buchanan Willie Lanier John Lohmeyer Ed Beckman Dino Hackett Albert Lewis Rob McGovern Bernard Pollard Tamba Hali Justin Houston D.J. Alexander

Most Safeties, Season 1 Buck Buchanan 1 Willie Lanier 1 John Lohmeyer 1 Ed Beckman 1 Dino Hackett 1 Albert Lewis 1 Bill Maas 1 Rob McGovern 1 Dan Saleaumua 1 Derrick Thomas 1 Joe Phillips 1 Bernard Pollard 1 Tamba Hali 1 Justin Houston 1 D.J. Alexander

1992-97 1963-75 1967-77 1973, ’75-77 1977-84 1986-92 1983-93 1989-90 2006-08 2006-16 2011-16 2015-16 1968 1974 1976 1978 1988 1988 1988, ’90 1989 1991, ’96 1994, ’97, ’98 1997 2007 2009 2012 2015

Most Two-Point Conversions, Career 3 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 3 Travis Kelce 2013-18 2 Bo Dickinson 1960-61 2 Curtis McClinton 1962-69 2 Jerrel Wilson 1963-77 2 Reg Carolan 1964-68 2 Trent Green 2001-06 2 Eddie Kennison 2001-07 Most Two-Point Conversions, Season 2 Bo Dickinson 1961 2 Travis Kelce 2015 Most Two-Point Conversion Passes, Career 8 Len Dawson 1962-75 4 Trent Green 2001-06 4 Alex Smith 2013-17 2 Randy Duncan 1961 2 Elvis Grbac 1997-00

Rushing Most Seasons Leading League in Rushing 1 Abner Haynes 1960 1 Christian Okoye 1989 1 Priest Holmes 2001 1 Kareem Hunt 2017 Most Rushing Attempts, Career 1,375 Larry Johnson 1,332 Jamaal Charles 1,321 Priest Holmes 1,246 Christian Okoye 1,157 Ed Podolak

5

2003-09 2008-16 2001-07 1987-92 1969-77

Most Rushing Attempts, Season *416 Larry Johnson 370 Christian Okoye 336 Larry Johnson 327 Priest Holmes 320 Priest Holmes *NFL RECORD

2006 1989 2005 2001 2003

Most Rushing Attempts, Consecutive 752 Larry Johnson (336, 416) 640 Priest Holmes (327, 313) 633 Priest Holmes (313, 320) 615 Christian Okoye (370, 245) 574 Larry Johnson (416, 158)

Seasons 2005-06 2001-02 2002-03 1989-90 2006-07

Most Rushing Attempts, Rookie, Season 272 Kareem Hunt 2017 234 Joe Delaney 1981 174 Robert Holmes 1968 157 Christian Okoye 1987 156 Abner Haynes 1960 Most Rushing Attempts, Game 39 Larry Johnson vs. Seattle 38 Christian Okoye at Green Bay 37 Christian Okoye vs. Seattle 36 Larry Johnson at Houston 35 Barry Word vs. L.A. Raiders Most Rushing Yards, Career 7,260 Jamaal Charles 6,070 Priest Holmes 6,015 Larry Johnson 4,897 Christian Okoye 4,451 Ed Podolak

Oct. 29, 2006 Dec. 10, 1989 Nov. 5, 1989 Nov. 20, 2005 Dec. 22, 1991 2008-16 2001-07 2003-09 1987-92 1969-77

Most Rushing Yards, Season (All 1,000+) 1,789 Larry Johnson 2006 1,750 Larry Johnson 2005 1,615 Priest Holmes 2002 1,555 Priest Holmes 2001 1,509 Jamaal Charles 2012 1,480 Christian Okoye 1989 1,467 Jamaal Charles 2010 1,420 Priest Holmes 2003 1,327 Kareem Hunt 2017 1,287 Jamaal Charles 2013 1,121 Joe Delaney 1981 1,120 Jamaal Charles 2009 1,087 Mike Garrett 1967 1,053 Tony Reed 1978 1,049 Abner Haynes 1962 1,033 Jamaal Charles 2014 1,031 Christian Okoye 1991 1,015 Barry Word 1990 Most Rushing Yards, Consecutive Seasons 3,539 Larry Johnson (1,750, 1,789) 2005-06 3,170 Priest Holmes (1,555, 1,615) 2001-02 3,035 Priest Holmes (1,615, 1,420) 2002-03 2,796 Jamaal Charles (1,509, 1,287) 2012-13 2,348 Larry Johnson (1,789, 559) 2006-07 Most Rushing Yards, Rookie, Season

@CHIEFS


1,327 1,121 875 866 801

Kareem Hunt Joe Delaney Abner Haynes Robert Holmes Mike Garrett

2017 1981 1960 1968 1966

2 Robert Holmes 2 Abner Haynes 2 Woody Green

Most Rushing Yards, Game (All 200+) 259 Jamaal Charles at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 233 Jamaal Charles at New Orleans Sept. 23, 2012 226 Jamaal Charles vs. Indianapolis Dec. 23, 2012 211 Larry Johnson at Houston Nov. 20, 2005 201 Larry Johnson vs. Cincinnati Jan. 1, 2006 200 Barry Word at Detroit Oct. 14, 1990 Most Rushing Yards, Rookie, Game (All 193 Joe Delaney vs. Houston 172 Kareem Hunt at Los Angeles Chargers 161 Mike Garrett at San Diego 158 Robert Holmes at Cincinnati 157 Abner Haynes at N.Y. Titans 155 Kareem Hunt vs. Los Angeles Chargers 150 Kolby Smith vs. Oakland

150+) Nov. 15, 1981 Sept. 24, 2017 Dec. 18, 1966 Nov. 10, 1968 Nov. 24, 1960 Dec. 16, 2017 Nov. 25, 2007

Most Rushing Yards, Consecutive Games (All 300+) 361 (102, 259) J. Charles Dec. 27, 2009 - Jan. 3, 2010 343 (132, 211) Larry Johnson Nov. 13-20, 2005 332 (131, 201) L. Johnson Dec. 24, 2005 - Jan. 1, 2006 330 (211, 119) Larry Johnson Nov. 20-27, 2005 327 (155, 172) Larry Johnson Oct. 29 - Nov. 5, 2006 321 (233, 88) Jamaal Charles Sept. 23-30, 2012 319 (121, 198) Larry Johnson Sept. 21-28, 2008 311 (154, 157) Larry Johnson Nov. 19-23, 2006 310 (197, 113) Priest Holmes Nov. 24 - Dec. 1, 2002 310 (143, 167) Larry Johnson Dec. 11-17, 2005 301 (104, 197) Priest Holmes Nov. 17-24, 2002 Most Rushing Yards vs. One Opponent, Season 327 (172, 155) Kareem Hunt vs. Los Angeles Chargers 315 (56, 259) Jamaal Charles vs. Denver 289 (154, 135) Larry Johnson vs. Oakland 283 (126, 157) Larry Johnson vs. Denver 282 (156, 126) Christian Okoye vs. Seattle

2017 2009 2006 2006 1989

Most Games, 100 or More Rushing Yards, Career 30 Larry Johnson 2003-09 24 Priest Holmes 2001-07 23 Jamaal Charles 2008-16 14 Christian Okoye 1987-92 13 Abner Haynes 1960-65 Most Games, 100 or More Rushing Yards, Season 11 Larry Johnson 2006 10 Larry Johnson 2005 9 Priest Holmes 2002 8 Christian Okoye 1989 7 Priest Holmes 2001 7 Jamaal Charles 2012 Most Games, 100 or More Rushing Yards, Rookie, Season 6 Kareem Hunt 2017 5 Joe Delaney 1981 3 Curtis McClinton 1962 2 Mike Garrett 1966

6

1968 1960 1974

Most Consecutive Games, 100 or More Rushing Yards 9 Larry Johnson Nov. 6, 2005 - Jan. 1, 2006 5 Priest Holmes Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 2002 4 Larry Johnson Nov. 19 - Dec. 10, 2006 4 Jamaal Charles Dec. 13, 2009 - Jan. 3 2010 3 Joe Delaney Oct. 4 - Oct. 18, 1981 3 Christian Okoye Sept. 24 - Oct. 8, 1989 3 Christian Okoye Oct. 22 - Nov. 5, 1989 3 Larry Johnson Dec. 5 - Dec. 19, 2004 3 Larry Johnson Oct. 22 - Nov. 5, 2006 3 Jamaal Charles Nov. 25 - Dec. 9, 2012 3 Kareem Hunt Sept.24 - Oct. 8, 2017 Longest Run From Scrimmage 91 (TD) Jamaal Charles 86 (TD) Jamaal Charles 84 (TD) Ted McKnight at Seattle 82 (TD) Joe Delaney vs. Denver 82 (TD) Derrick Alexander vs. Pittsburgh 80 (TD) Abner Haynes at N.Y. Jets 80 (TD) Warren McVea vs. Cincinnati 80 Jamaal Charles at St. Louis 80 (TD) Jamaal Charles at Cleveland

Sept. 23, 2012 Dec. 23, 2012 Sept. 30, 1979 Oct. 18, 1981 Dec. 12, 1999 Nov. 29, 1964 Oct. 26, 1969 Dec. 19, 2010 Dec. 9, 2012

Most Rushing Yards, QB, Career 1,672 Alex Smith 2013-17 1,253 Len Dawson 1962-75 712 Steve Fuller 1979-82 692 Trent Green 2001-06 682 Mike Livingston 1968-79 Most Rushing Yards, QB, Season 498 Alex Smith 2015 431 Alex Smith 2013 386 Tyler Thigpen 2008 355 Alex Smith 2017 274 Steve Fuller 1980 Most 10+ Yard Rushes, Career 196 Jamaal Charles 190 Priest Holmes 137 Larry Johnson 71 Marcus Allen 63 Kimble Anders Most 10+ Yard Rushes, Season 53 Priest Holmes 52 Priest Holmes 49 Larry Johnson 47 Larry Johnson 45 Jamaal Charles Most 10+ Yard Rushes, Game 10 Priest Holmes at Oakland 9 Priestâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;Holmes at Seattle 7 Larry Johnson at N.Y. Giants 7 Jamaal Charles vs. Buffalo

2008-16 2001-07 2003-09 1993-97 1991-00 2002 2001 2006 2005 2010 Dec. 9, 2001 Nov. 24, 2002 Dec. 17, 2005 Oct. 31, 2010

Highest Rushing Average, Career (400 attempts) 5.45 Jamaal Charles (1,332-7,260) 2008-16 4.80 Abner Haynes (794-3,814) 1960-64

@CHIEFS


4.60 Priest Holmes (1,321-6,070) 4.57 Kimble Anders (495-2,261) 4.44 Ted McKnight (528-2,344)

2001-07 1991-00 1977-81

Highest Rushing Average, Season (100 attempts) 6.38 Jamaal Charles (230-1,467) 2010 6.03 Ted McKnight (104-627) 1978 5.89 Jamaal Charles (190-1,120) 2009 5.61 Abner Haynes (156-875) 1960 5.49 Mack Lee Hill (105-576) 1964 Highest Rushing Average, Game (10 attempts) 14.27 A. Haynes at N.Y. Titans (11-157) Nov. 24, 1960 12.25 T. McKnight at Seattle (12-147) Sept. 30, 1979 11.58 E. Podolak vs. Denver (12-139) Dec. 6, 1970 11.45 J. Charles at St. Louis (11-126) Dec. 19, 2010 11.29 A. Haynes vs. Oakland (14-158) Nov. 26, 1961 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Career 76 Priest Holmes 2001-07 55 Larry Johnson 2003-09 44 Marcus Allen 1993-97 43 Jamaal Charles 2008-16 40 Christian Okoye 1987-92 39 Abner Haynes 1960-65 Most Rushing Touchdowns, QB, Career 10 Alex Smith 2013-17 9 Len Dawson 1962-75 7 Mike Livingston 1968-79 6 Pete Beathard 1964-73 Rich Gannon 1995-98 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Season 27 Priest Holmes 2003 21 Priest Holmes 2002 20 Larry Johnson 2005 17 Larry Johnson 2006 14 Priest Holmes 2004 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Consecutive Seasons 48 Priest Holmes (21, 27) 2002-03 41 Priest Holmes (27, 14) 2003-04 37 Larry Johnson (20, 17) 2005-06 29 Priest Holmes (8, 21) 2001-02 29 Larry Johnson (9, 20) 2004-05 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Rookie, Season 10 Billy Jackson 1981 9 Abner Haynes 1960 8 Kareem Hunt 2017 7 Robert Holmes 1968 6 Mike Garrett 1966 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Game 4 Abner Haynes vs. Oakland 4 Priest Holmes at Cleveland 4 Priest Holmes vs. Atlanta 4 Derrick Blaylock vs. Atlanta 3 Jack Spikes vs. Houston 3 Abner Haynes vs. Boston 3 Bert Coan at Denver 3 Ed Podolak at Detroit 3 Ed Podolak vs. Cleveland 3 Billy Jackson at Oakland

7

Nov. 26, 1961 Sept. 8, 2002 Oct. 24, 2004 Oct. 24, 2004 Oct. 1, 1961 Sept. 8, 1962 Oct. 23, 1966 Nov. 25, 1971 Dec. 12, 1976 Oct. 25, 1981

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Marcus Allen at Seattle Donnell Bennett at Philadelphia Bam Morris at San Diego Priest Holmes vs. Denver Priest Holmes vs. Pittsburgh Priest Holmes vs. Buffalo Priest Holmes vs. Detroit Priest Holmes at Minnesota Priest Holmes at Denver Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis Larry Johnson at Dallas Larry Johnson vs. Cincinnati Larry Johnson vs. Seattle Larry Johnson vs. Jacksonville Jamaal Charles at Green Bay

Dec. 5, 1993 Sept. 27, 1998 Nov. 22, 1998 Oct. 20, 2002 Sept. 14, 2003 Oct. 26, 2003 Dec. 14, 2003 Dec. 20, 2003 Sept. 12, 2004 Oct. 31, 2004 Dec. 11, 2005 Jan. 1, 2006 Oct. 29, 2006 Dec. 31, 2006 Sept. 28, 2015

Most Rushing Touchdowns, Consecutive Games 7 Priest Holmes Oct. 24-31, 2004 6 Priest Holmes Dec. 14-20, 2003 5 Priest Holmes 5 times Last; Dec. 20-28, 2003 5 Larry Johnson 3 times Last; Oct. 22-29, 2006 Most Consecutive Games With Rushing Touchdown 11 Priest Holmes Sept. 22 - Dec. 8, 2002 8 Priest Holmes Nov. 23, 2003 - Sept. 19, 2004 8 Larry Johnson Nov. 28, 2004 - Sept. 18, 2005 7 Larry Johnson Nov. 20, 2005 - Jan. 1, 2006 7 Larry Johnson Oct. 15 - Nov. 23, 2006 Most Rushing Touchdowns, QB, Season 5 Steve Bono 1995 Alex Smith 2016 4 Pete Beathard 1965 Steve Fuller 1980 3 Five Players Tied

Passing Most Seasons Leading League in Passing 4 Len Dawson 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968 Highest Passer Rating Career (1,000 attempts) 94.8 Alex Smith 2013-17 87.3 Trent Green 2001-06 83.2 Len Dawson 1962-75 81.8 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 80.6 Elvis Grbac 1997-00 Highest Passer Rating, Season (200 attempts) 104.7 Alex Smith 2017 101.9 Len Dawson 1966 98.8 Len Dawson 1968 98.4 Len Dawson 1962 98.0 Damon Huard 2006 96.3 Steve DeBerg 1990 Highest Passer Rating, Rookie, Season 112.3 Todd Blackledge 1983 76.4 Patrick Mahomes 2017 66.7 Hunter Enis 1960 55.8 Steve Fuller 1979 Highest Passer Rating, Game (20 attempts)

@CHIEFS


158.3 158.3 156.6 154.8 154.3 148.6 147.6 146.0

Trent Green vs. Detroit Alex Smith at Oakland Steve Bono at Seattle Patrick Mahomes at Pittsburgh Trent Green at Washington Alex Smith at New England Bill Kenney at San Diego Joe Montana at Tampa Bay

Dec. 14, 2003 Dec. 15, 2013 Sept. 3, 1995 Sept. 16, 2018 Sept. 30, 2001 Sept. 7, 2017 Dec. 16, 1984 Sept. 5, 1993

Most 100.0+ Passer Rating Games, Career 30 Len Dawson 1962-75 29 Alex Smith 2013-17 27 Trent Green 2001-06 19 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 14 Bill Kenney 1980-88 Most 100.0+ Passer Rating Games, Season 10 Steve DeBerg 1990 9 Alex Smith 2017 7 Trent Green 2003 7 Trent Green 2004 6 Alex Smith 2015 6 Matt Cassel 2010 Most Passes Attempted, Career 3,696 Len Dawson 1962-75 2,777 Trent Green 2001-06 2,436 Alex Smith 2013-17 2,430 Bill Kenney 1979-88 1,751 Mike Livingston 1968-79 1,616 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 Most Passes Attempted, Season (All 500+) 603 Bill Kenney 1983 556 Trent Green 2004 547 Elvis Grbac 2000 523 Trent Green 2001 523 Trent Green 2003 520 Steve Bono 1995 508 Alex Smith 2013 507 Trent Green 2005 505 Alex Smith 2017 Most Passes Attempted, Consecutive Seasons 1,079 Trent Green (523, 556) 2003-04 1,063 Trent Green (556, 507) 2004-05 1,046 Elvis Grbac (499, 547) 1999-00 994 Alex Smith (489, 505) 2016-17 993 Trent Green (523, 470) 2001-02 993 Trent Green (470, 523) 2002-03 Most Passes Attempted, Rookie, Season 270 Steve Fuller 1979 54 Hunter Enis 1960 35 Patrick Mahomes 2017 34 Todd Blackledge 1983 Most Passes Attempted, Game (All 50+) 55 Joe Montana at San Diego Oct. 9, 1994 55 Steve Bono at Miami Dec. 12, 1994 54 Joe Montana at Denver Oct. 17, 1994 54 Steve Bono at San Diego Sept. 29, 1996 53 Elvis Grbac at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 53 Trent Green at San Diego Jan. 2, 2005 53 Matt Cassel at Denver Nov. 14, 2010

8

52 50 50 50 50

Bill Kenney at Denver Bill Kenney vs. Buffalo Steve DeBerg at Cleveland Rich Gannon at Jacksonville Alex Smith at Pittsburgh

Oct. 30, 1983 Nov. 30, 1986 Nov. 24, 1991 Nov. 9, 1997 Oct. 2, 2016

Most Passes Completed, Career 2,115 Len Dawson 1962-75 1,720 Trent Green 2001-06 1,587 Alex Smith 2013-17 1,330 Bill Kenney 1979-88 934 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 912 Mike Livingston 1968-79 Most Passes Completed, Season (All 300+) 369 Trent Green (556 att.) 2004 346 Bill Kenney (603 att.) 1983 341 Alex Smith (505 att.) 2017 330 Trent Green (523 att.) 2003 328 Alex Smith (461 att.) 2016 326 Elvis Grbac (547 att.) 2000 317 Trent Green (507 att.) 2005 308 Alex Smith (508 att.) 2013 307 Alex Smith (470 att.) 2015 303 Alex Smith (464 att.) 2014 Most Passes Completed, Consecutive Seasons (All 600+) 699 Trent Green (330, 369) 2003-04 686 Trent Green (369, 317) 2004-05 669 Alex Smith (328, 341) 2016-17 635 Alex Smith (307, 328) 2015-16 620 Elvis Grbac (294, 326) 1999-00 617 Trent Green (287, 330) 2002-03 611 Alex Smith (308, 303) 2013-14 610 Alex Smith (303, 307) 2014-15 Most Passes Completed, Rookie, Season 146 Steve Fuller 1979 30 Hunter Enis 1960 22 Patrick Mahomes 2017 20 Todd Blackledge 1983 Most Passes Completed, Game (All 30+) 39 Elvis Grbac at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 37 Joe Montana at San Diego Oct. 9, 1994 34 Joe Montana at Denver Oct. 17, 1994 34 Trent Green at Denver Dec. 7, 2003 34 Alex Smith vs. San Diego Sept. 11, 2016 33 Steve Bono at Miami Dec. 12, 1994 33 Trent Green at San Diego Jan. 2, 2005 33 Matt Cassel at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 32 Trent Green at Tampa Bay Nov. 7, 2004 32 Trent Green vs. Oakland Dec. 25, 2004 31 Bill Kenney at San Diego Dec. 11, 1983 31 Elvis Grbac vs. Carolina Dec. 10, 2000 31 Trent Green at San Diego Oct. 30, 2005 31 Alex Smith at Pittsburgh Dec. 21, 2014 31 Alex Smith at Cincinnati Oct. 4, 2015 30 Steve DeBerg vs. Cleveland Nov. 24, 1991 30 Elvis Grbac vs. Seattle Nov. 21, 1999 30 Alex Smith at Pittsburgh Oct. 2, 2016 Most Consecutive Passes Completed 15 Len Dawson at Houston Sept. 9, 1967

@CHIEFS


15 Bill Kenney vs. San Diego (13) at Washington (2) 15 Alex Smith at Oakland 15 Alex Smith at Atlanta 14 Trent Green vs. Indianapolis

Sept. 12, 1983 Sept. 18, 1983 Oct. 16, 2016 Dec. 4, 2016 Oct. 31, 2004

Most Seasons Leading League *8 Len Dawson 1962, ’64-69, ’75 *NFL RECORD Most Consecutive Seasons Leading League *6 Len Dawson 1964-69 *NFL RECORD Highest Completion Percentage, Career (1,000 attempts) 65.15 Alex Smith (2,436-1,587) 2013-17 61.94 Trent Green (1,777-1,720) 2001-06 57.97 Steve DeBerg (1,616-934) 1988-91 57.94 Elvis Grbac (1,548-897) 1997-00 57.35 Matt Cassel (1,489-854) 2009-12 Highest Completion Percentage, Season (100 attempts) 67.52 Alex Smith (505-341) 2017 67.08 Alex Smith (489-328) 2016 66.43 Len Dawson (140-93) 1975 66.37 Trent Green (556-369) 2004 65.32 Alex Smith (470-307) 2015 65.30 Alex Smith (464-303) 2014 63.09 Trent Green (523-330) 2003 62.52 Trent Green (507-317) 2005 62.05 Damon Huard (206-332) 2007 Highest Completion Percentage, Rookie, Season 62.86 Patrick Mahomes (35-22) 2017 58.82 Todd Blackledge (34-20) 1983 55.56 Hunter Enis (54-30) 1960 54.07 Steve Fuller (270-146) 1979 Highest Completion Percentage, Game (20 attempts) 86.36 A. Smith at Oakland (22-19) Oct. 16, 2016 86.21 A. Smith vs. St. Louis (29-25) Oct. 26, 2014 85.00 A. Smith at Oakland (20-17) Dec. 15, 2013 84.00 A. Smith at Baltimore (25-21) Dec. 20, 2015 84.00 A. Smith at Atlanta (25-21) Dec. 4, 2016 Most Passing Yards, Career (All 10,000+) 28,507 Len Dawson 1962-75 21,459 Trent Green 2001-06 17,608 Alex Smith 2013-17 17,277 Bill Kenney 1979-88 11,873 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 11,295 Mike Livingston 1968-79 10,642 Elvis Grbac 1997-00 Most Passing Yards, Season (All 4,000+) 4,591 Trent Green 2004 4,348 Bill Kenney 1983 4,169 Elvis Grbac 2000 4,042 Alex Smith 2017 4,039 Trent Green 2003 4,014 Trent Green 2005 Most Passing Yards, Consecutive Seasons 8,630 Trent Green (4,039, 4,591) 2003-04

9

8,605 7,729 7,558 7,544

Trent Green (4,591, 4,014) Trent Green (3,690, 4,039) Elvis Grbac (3,389, 4,169) Alex Smith (3,502, 4,042)

2004-05 2002-03 1999-00 2016-17

Most Passing Yards, Rookie, Season 1,484 Steve Fuller 1979 357 Hunter Enis 1960 284 Patrick Mahomes 2017 259 Todd Bleckledge 1983 Most Passing Yards, Game (All 400+) 504 Elvis Grbac at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 469 Matt Cassel at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 435 Len Dawson vs. Denver Nov. 1, 1964 411 Bill Kenney at San Diego Dec. 11, 1983 400 Trent Green at Green Bay Oct. 12, 2003 Most Games, 300 Yards Passing, Career 24 Trent Green 2001-06 15 Bill Kenney 1979-88 9 Len Dawson 1962-75 8 Alex Smith 2013-17 7 Elvis Grbac 1997-00 5 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 5 Patrick Mahomes 2018 Most Games, 300 Yards Passing, Season 8 Trent Green 2004 7 Bill Kenney 1983 5 Elvis Grbac 2000 5 Trent Green 2003 5 Alex Smith 2017 5 Patrick Mahomes 2018 Most Consecutive Games, 300 Yards Passing, Season 5 Patrick Mahomes 2018 4 Bill Kenney 1983 4 Trent Green 2004 3 Elvis Grbac 2000 2 Joe Montana 1994 2 Steve Bono 1994 2 Trent Green 2001 2 Trent Green 2002 2 Trent Green 2003 Long Pass Completion (All TDs) *99 Trent Green vs. San Diego Dec. 22, 2002 (to Marc Boerigter) 93 Mike Livingston vs. Miami Oct. 19, 1969 (to Otis Taylor for 79 yards,lateral to Robert Holmes for 14 yards) 92 Len Dawson at Denver Nov. 18, 1962 (to Tommy Brooker) 92 Len Dawson at Oakland Nov. 3, 1968 (to Gloster Richardson) 90 Len Dawson vs. Houston Nov. 17, 1968 (to Frank Pitts) 90 Steve DeBerg vs. San Diego Nov. 18, 1990 (to J.J. Birden) *NFL RECORD Most 20+ Yard Passes, Career 274 Trent Green 2001-06 215 Alex Smith 2013-17

@CHIEFS


133 122 73 68

Elvis Grbac Matt Cassel Steve DeBerg Joe Montana

1997-00 2009-12 1990-91 1993-94

Most 20+ Yard Passes, Season 59 Trent Green 2004 55 Elvis Grbac 2000 54 Trent Green 2003 52 Alex Smith 2017 51 Trent Green 2001 51 Trent Green 2005 Most 20+ Yard Passes, Game 9 Matt Cassel at Denver 7 Dave Krieg at L.A. Raiders 7 Rich Gannon at San Diego 7 Elvis Grbac at Oakland 7 Trent Green at Arizona 7 Trent Green vs. Indianapolis 7 Alex Smith at New York Jets 6 14 times; Last P. Mahomes at DEN

Most Touchdown Passes, Rookie, Season 6 Steve Fuller 1979 3 Todd Blackledge 1983 1 Hunter Enis 1960 Nov. 14, 2010 Dec. 6, 1992 Nov. 22, 1998 Nov. 5, 2000 Oct. 21, 2001 Oct. 31, 2004 Dec. 3, 2017 Oct. 1, 2018

Most Seasons Leading League 3 Len Dawson 1962, ’66, ’69 Highest Passing Average, Career (1,000 attempts) 7.73 Trent Green (2,777-21,459) 2001-06 7.71 Len Dawson (3,696-28,507) 1962-75 7.35 Steve DeBerg (1,616-11,873) 1988-91 7.23 Alex Smith (2,436-17,608) 2013-17 7.11 Bill Kenney (2,430-17,277) 1979-88 6.88 Elvis Grbac (1,548-10,643) 1997-00 Highest Passing Average, Season (Qualifiers) 9.42 Len Dawson (224-2,109) 1968 8.90 Len Dawson (310-2,759) 1962 8.90 Len Dawson (284-2,527) 1966 Highest Passing Average, Game (20 attempts) 15.76 S. DeBerg at New England (21-331) Dec. 2, 1990 14.35 A. Smith at Oakland (20-287) Dec. 15, 2013 13.90 T. Green vs. Denver (21-292) Dec. 16, 2001 12.82 L. Dawson vs. Denver (22-282) Dec. 19, 1965 Most Seasons Leading League *4 Len Dawson 1962, ’63, ’65, ’66 *NFL RECORD Most Touchdown Passes, Career 237 Len Dawson 1962-75 118 Trent Green 2001-06 105 Bill Kenney 1979-88 102 Alex Smith 2013-17 67 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 Most Touchdown Passes, Season 30 Len Dawson 1964 29 Len Dawson 1962 28 Elvis Grbac 2000 27 Trent Green 2004 27 Matt Cassel 2010 26 Len Dawson 1963, ’66 26 Trent Green 2002 26 Alex Smith 2017

10

Most Touchdown Passes, Consecutive Seasons 56 Len Dawson (26, 30) 1963-64 55 Len Dawson (29, 26) 1962-63 51 Len Dawson (30, 21) 1964-65 51 Trent Green (24, 27) 2003-04 50 Elvis Grbac (22, 28) 1999-00 50 Len Dawson (26, 24) 1966-67 50 Trent Green (26, 24) 2002-03

Most Touchdown Passes, Game 6 Len Dawson vs. Denver 6 Patrick Mahomes at Pittsburgh 5 Len Dawson Last; vs. Miami 5 Elvis Grbac vs. San Diego 5 Trent Green vs. Miami 5 Alex Smith at Oakland 4 Len Dawson Last; at Baltimore 4 Bill Kenney Last; at Chicago 4 Trent Green at Cleveland 4 Matt Cassel Last; at Indianapolis 4 Alex Smith Last; at New York Jets 4 Patrick Mahomes Last; at New England

Nov. 1, 1964 Sept. 16, 2018 2 times Oct. 8, 1967 Sept. 17, 2000 Sept. 29, 2002 Dec. 15, 2013 6 times Sept. 28, 1970 4 times Nov. 1, 1987 Dec. 3, 2006 2 times Oct. 9, 2011 2 times Dec. 3, 2017 2 times Oct. 14, 2018

Most Consecutive Games, Touchdown Passes 15 Elvis Grbac Nov. 28, 1999 - Nov. 12, 2000 14 Len Dawson Oct. 3, 1965 - Oct. 8, 1966 12 Len Dawson Sept. 8, 1962 - Dec. 2, 1962 12 Trent Green Nov. 28, 2001 - Oct. 20, 2002 Most Consecutive Passes, None Intercepted 312 Alex Smith 2015 297 Alex Smith 2016-17 233 Steve DeBerg 1990 202 Rich Gannon 1997-98 187 Patrick Mahomes 2017-18 Most Passes Had Intercepted, Career 178 Len Dawson 1962-75 86 Bill Kenney 1979-88 85 Trent Green 2001-06 83 Mike Livingston 1968-79 50 Steve DeBerg 1988-91 Most Attempts, No Interceptions, 53 Matt Cassel at Denver 47 Trent Green at Denver 45 Patrick Mahomes 45 Alex Smith at Cincinnati 45 Bill Kenney at L.A. Raiders 45 Steve DeBerg at Denver 45 Trent Green at Green Bay 45 Alex Smith at Denver 45 Alex Smith at Pittsburgh 44 Alex Smith at Denver

Game (All 40+) Nov. 14, 2010 Dec. 7, 2003 Oct. 1, 2018 Oct. 4, 2015 Oct. 9, 1983 Sept. 17, 1990 Oct. 12, 2003 Nov. 17, 2013 Dec. 21, 2014 Nov. 27, 2016

@CHIEFS


43 43 43 43 43 42 42 42 41 41 41 41 40 40 40

Bill Kenney at Houston Rich Gannon at Denver Trent Green at Denver Trent Green at San Diego Matt Cassel vs. Buffalo Trent Green vs. Cleveland Trent Green at Cincinnati Alex Smith at Denver Todd Blackledge vs. Houston Steve Bono vs. San Diego Rich Gannon vs. Dallas Tyler Thigpen at San Diego Steve Bono vs. New England Elvis Grbac vs. San Diego Elvis Grbac vs. Oakland

Oct. 23, 1983 Dec. 6, 1998 Dec. 15, 2002 Oct. 30, 2005 Dec. 13, 2009 Nov. 9, 2003 Nov. 16, 2003 Sept. 14, 2014 Nov. 11, 1984 Oct. 9, 1995 Dec. 13, 1998 Nov. 9, 2008 Oct. 15, 1995 Oct. 16, 1997 Oct. 15, 2000

Most Passes Had Intercepted, Season 24 Trent Green 2001 23 Cotton Davidson 1961 19 Len Dawson 1963 19 Bill Kenney 1983 17 Len Dawson 1962, '67 17 Trent Green 2004 Most Passes Had Intercepted, Rookie, Season 14 Steve Fuller 1979 2 Hunter Enis 1960 2 Brodie Croyle 2006 1 Tyler Thigpen 2007 1 Patrick Mahomes 2017 1983 0 Todd Blackledge Most Interceptions, Game 6 Todd Blackledge vs. L.A. Rams 5 Cotton Davidson at Houston 5 Len Dawson vs. Oakland 5 Mike Livingston vs. Pittsburgh 5 Bill Kenney vs. San Diego 5 Steve DeBerg at San Diego

Oct. 20, 1985 Oct. 16, 1960 Nov. 23, 1969 Oct. 13, 1974 Sept. 20, 1981 Sept. 24, 1989

Lowest Percentage, Passes Had Intercepted, Career (1,000 att) 1.35 Alex Smith (2,436-33) 2013-17 2.96 Matt Cassel (1,489-44) 2009-12 3.04 Elvis Grbac (1,548-47) 1997-00 3.09 Steve DeBerg (1,616-50) 1988-91 3.54 Bill Kenney (2,430-85) 1979-88 Lowest Percentage, Passes Had Intercepted, Season (300 att) 0.90 Steve DeBerg (444-4) 1990 0.99 Alex Smith (505-5) 2017 1.29 Alex Smith (464-6) 2014 1.38 Alex Smith (508-7) 2013 1.49 Alex Smith (470-7) 2015 1.56 Matt Cassel (450-7) 2010 1.64 Alex Smith (489-8) 2016 1.69 Rich Gannon (354-6) 1998 1.83 Joe Montana (493-9) 1994 Times Sacked 195.0 Bill Kenney 192.0 Alex Smith 173.0 Trent Green 133.0 Mike Livingston

11

1979-88 2013-17 2001-06 1968-79

120.0 Steve Fuller 109.0 Matt Cassel 90.0 Len Dawson Times Sacked, Season 49.0 Steve Fuller 48.0 Dave Krieg 45.0 Alex Smith 45.0 Alex Smith 42.0 Matt Cassel 41.0 Bill Kenney 39.0 Trent Green 39.0 Alex Smith

1979-82 2009-12 1962-75 1980 1992 2014 2015 2009 1983 2001 2013

Times Sacked, Game 10.0 Steve Fuller vs. Baltimore 8.0 Steve Fuller at Pittsburgh

Nov. 2, 1980 Dec. 5, 1982

Pass Receiving Most Seasons Leading League 1 MacArthur Lane (66 recs.) 1 Tony Gonzalez (102 recs.) Most Pass Receptions, Career 916 Tony Gonzalez 532 Dwayne Bowe 416 Henry Marshall 410 Otis Taylor 391 Chris Burford

1976 2004 1997-08 2007-14 1976-87 1965-75 1960-67

Most Seasons, 50 or More Pass Receptions 11 Tony Gonzalez 1998-08 6 Dwayne Bowe 2007-08, 2010-13 5 Kimble Anders 1994-98 5 Eddie Kennison 2002-06 4 Chris Burford 1961, ’63-64, ’66 4 Otis Taylor 1966-67, ’71-72 4 Travis Kelce 2014-17 3 Carlos Carson 1983-84, ’87 3 Stephone Paige 1986, ’88, ’90 3 Derrick Alexander 1998-00 3 Priest Holmes 2001-03 Most Pass Receptions, Season (All 80+) 102 Tony Gonzalez 2004 99 Tony Gonzalez 2007 96 Tony Gonzalez 2008 93 Tony Gonzalez 2000 87 Jeremy Maclin 2015 86 Dwayne Bowe 2008 85 Travis Kelce 2016 83 Travis Kelce 2017 81 Dwayne Bowe 2011 80 Carlos Carson 1983 Most Pass Receptions, Consecutive 195 Tony Gonzalez (99, 96) 180 Tony Gonzalez (102, 78) 173 Tony Gonzalez (71, 102) 172 Tony Gonzalez (73, 99) 169 Tony Gonzalez (76, 93)

Seasons 2007-08 2004-05 2003-04 2006-07 1999-00

Most Pass Receptions, Game (All 10+) 14 Tony Gonzalez at San Diego Jan. 2, 2005

@CHIEFS


13 13 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Dwayne Bowe at Denver Dwayne Bowe at Seattle Ed Podolak vs. Denver Chris Burford at Buffalo Emile Harry at Cleveland Kimble Anders vs. N.Y. Giants Tony Gonzalez at New England Dante Hall at Denver Tony Gonzalez vs. Oakland Jeremy Maclin at Cincinnati Travis Kelce vs. Denver Chris Burford at Boston Chris Buford vs. Buffalo Frank Jackson at N.Y. Jets Chris Burford at Boston Otis Taylor vs. Cincinnati Ed Podolak at Houston Stephone Paige at Denver J.J. Birden at Miami Kimble Anders vs. Denver Tony Gonzalez at Denver Tony Gonzalez vs. Carolina Tony Gonzalez vs. Cincinnati Tony Gonzalez vs. Green Bay Tony Gonzalez vs. San Diego Tony Gonzalez at Detroit Tony Gonzalez at San Diego Tony Gonzalez vs. Buffalo Dwayne Bowe at Cincinnati Tyreek Hill at Carolina Albert Wilson at Denver

Nov. 14, 2010 Nov. 28, 2010 Oct. 7, 1973 Sept. 22, 1963 Nov. 24, 1991 Sept. 10, 1995 Dec. 4, 2000 Dec. 7, 2003 Dec. 25, 2004 Oct. 4, 2015 Dec. 25, 2016 Oct. 12, 1962 Oct. 13, 1963 Nov. 29, 1964 Sept. 25, 1966 Oct. 15, 1972 Sept. 29, 1974 Sept. 17, 1990 Dec. 12, 1994 Nov. 16, 1998 Sept. 24, 2000 Dec. 10, 2000 Sept. 10, 2006 Nov. 4, 2007 Dec. 2, 2007 Dec. 23, 2007 Nov. 9, 2008 Nov. 23, 2008 Dec. 28, 2008 Nov. 13, 2016 Dec. 31, 2017

Most Pass Receptions, Half 11 T. Gonzalez (2nd) at San Diego 10 E. Harry (2nd) at Cleveland 9 C. Burford (2nd) vs. Buffalo 9 K. Anders (2nd) vs. N.Y. Giants 9 T. Gonzalez (1st) vs. Oakland

Jan. 2, 2005 Nov. 24, 1991 Oct. 13, 1963 Sept. 10, 1995 Dec. 25, 2004

Most Consecutive Games, Pass Receptions 131 Tony Gonzalez Dec. 4, 2000 - Dec. 28, 2008 83 Stephone Paige Nov. 17, 1985 - Sept. 29, 1991 69 Travis Kelce Sept. 7, 2014 - Oct. 14, 2018 55 Eddie Kennison Dec. 9, 2001 - Oct. 2, 2005 48 Priest Holmes Sept. 9, 2001 - Sept. 19, 2004 Most Receptions, Running Back, Career 369 Kimble Anders 1991-00 288 Ed Podolak 1969-77 285 Jamaal Charles 2008-16 251 Priest Holmes 2001-07 197 Abner Haynes 1960-64 Most Receptions, Running Back, Season 74 Priest Holmes 2003 70 Priest Holmes 2002 70 Jamaal Charles 2013 67 Kimble Anders 1994 66 MacArthur Lane 1976 Most Receptions, Tight End, Career 916 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 340 Travis Kelce 2013-18 198 Fred Arbanas 1962-70 163 Walter White 1975-79

12

135 Jonathan Hayes 111 Keith Cash

1985-93 1992-96

Most Pass Receptions, Tight End, Season 102 Tony Gonzalez 2004 99 Tony Gonzalez 2007 96 Tony Gonzalez 2008 93 Tony Gonzalez 2000 85 Travis Kelce 2016 Most Pass Receptions, Rookie, Season 70 Dwayne Bowe 2007 61 Tyreek Hill 2016 55 Abner Haynes (RB) 1960 53 Kareem Hunt (RB) 2017 48 Sylvester Morris 2000 Most Receiving Yards, Career (All 6,000+) 10,940 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 7,306 Otis Taylor 1965-75 7,155 Dwayne Bowe 2007-14 6,454 Henry Marshall 1976-87 6,360 Carlos Carson 1980-89 6,341 Stephone Paige 1983-91 Most Seasons, 1,000 or More Receiving Yards 4 Tony Gonzalez 2000, 2004, 2007-08 3 Carlos Carson 1983-84, ’87 3 Dwayne Bowe 2008, 2010-11 2 Otis Taylor 1966, ’71 2 Eddie Kennison 2004-05 2 Travis Kelce 2016-17 1 Stephone Paige 1990 1 Andre Rison 1997 1 Derrick Alexander 2000 1 Jeremy Maclin   2015 1 Tyreek Hill 2017 Most Receiving Yards, Season (All 1,000+) 1,391 Derrick Alexander 2000 1,351 Carlos Carson 1983 1,297 Otis Taylor 1966 1,258 Tony Gonzalez 2004 1,203 Tony Gonzalez 2000 1,183 Tyreek Hill 2017 1,172 Tony Gonzalez 2007 1,162 Dwayne Bowe 2010 1,159 Dwayne Bowe 2011 1,125 Travis Kelce 2016 1,110 Otis Taylor 1971 1,102 Eddie Kennison 2005 1,092 Andre Rison 1997 1,086 Eddie Kennison 2004 1,078 Carlos Carson 1984 1,058 Tony Gonzalez 2008 1,044 Carlos Carson 1987 1,038 Travis Kelce 2017 1,034 Jeremy Maclin 2015 1,022 Dwayne Bowe 2008 1,021 Stephone Paige 1990 Most Receiving Yards, Consecutive Seasons 2,429 Carlos Carson (1,351, 1,078) 1983-84 2,321 Dwayne Bowe (1,162, 1,159) 2010-11 2,255 Otis Taylor (1,297, 958) 1966-67

@CHIEFS


2,230 Tony Gonzalez (1,172, 1,058) 2,223 Derrick Alexander (832, 1,391) 2,188 Eddie Kennison (1,086, 1,102) Most Receiving Yards, Game 309 Stephone Paige vs. San Diego (8 Receptions) 213 Curtis McClinton vs. Denver (5 Receptions) 210 Larry Brunson vs. San Diego (9 Receptions) 206 Stephone Paige at Denver (10 Receptions) 197 Carlos Carson at San Diego (9 Receptions)

2007-08 1999-00 2004-05 Dec. 22, 1985 Dec. 19, 1965 Nov. 10, 1974 Sept. 17, 1990 Oct. 25, 1987

Most Games, 100 or More Receiving Yards, Career 26 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 19 Otis Taylor 1965-75 18 Carlos Carson 1980-88 17 Eddie Kennison 2001-07 15 Dwayne Bowe 2007-14 15 Travis Kelce 2013-18 Most Games, 100 or More Receiving Yards, Season 6 Otis Taylor 1966 6 Carlos Carson 1983 6 Derrick Alexander 2000 6 Tony Gonzalez 2000 6 Tony Gonzalez 2004 6 Travis Kelce 2016 5 Eddie Kennison 2004 5 Eddie Kennison 2005 5 Tony Gonzalez 2007 5 Dwayne Bowe 2010 Most Consecutive Games, 100 or More Receiving Yards, Season 4 Tony Gonzalez 2000 4 Travis Kelce 2016 3 Frank Jackson 1964 3 Otis Taylor 1966 3 Willie Davis 1992 3 Dwayne Bowe 2010 Longest Pass Receptions (All TDs) *99 Marc Boerigter vs. San Diego (from Trent Green) Dec. 22, 2002 92 Tommy Brooker at Denver (from Len Dawson) Nov. 18, 1962 92 Gloster Richardson at Oakland (from Len Dawson) Nov. 3, 1968 90 Frank Pitts vs. Boston (from Len Dawson) Nov. 17, 1968 90 J.J. Birden vs. San Diego (from Steve DeBerg) Nov. 18, 1990 89 Otis Taylor vs. Miami (from Len Dawson) Nov. 13, 1966 86 Stephone Paige vs. New England (from Steve DeBerg) Dec. 2, 1990 86 Derrick Alexander at Chicago (from Elvis Grbac)â&#x20AC;&#x2C6; Sept. 12, 1999 *NFL RECORD Most Receiving Yards, Running Back, Career

13

2,829 2,739 2,457 2,456 2,377

Kimble Anders Abner Haynes Jamaal Charles Ed Podolak Priest Holmes

1991-00 1960-65 2008-16 1969-77 2001-07

Most Receiving Yards, Running Back, Season 693 Jamaal Charles 2013 690 Priest Holmes 2003 672 Priest Holmes 2002 614 Priest Holmes 2001 590 Curtis McClinton 1965 Most Receiving Yards, Running Back, Game 213 Curtis McClinton vs. Denver Dec. 19, 1965 195 Jamaal Charles at Oakland Dec. 15, 2013 149 Abner Haynes vs. San Diego Oct. 20, 1963 130 Johnny Robinson vs. Buffalo Dec. 18, 1960 129 Spencer Ware vs. San Diego Sept. 11, 2016 127 Abner Haynes at N.Y. Titans Dec. 3, 1961 Most Games, 100 or More Receiving Yards, RB, Career 5 Abner Haynes 1960-65 5 Priest Holmes 2001-07 3 Johnny Robinson 1960-71 3 Paul Palmer 1987-88 2 Curtis McClinton 1962-69 2 Larry Johnson 2003-09 2 Jamaal Charles 2008-16 Most Games, 100 or More Receiving Yards, RB, Season 3 Paul Palmer 1988 2 Johnny Robinson 1960 2 Abner Haynes 1964 2 Priest Holmes 2001 Most Receiving Yards, Tight End, Career (All 1,000+) 10,940 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 4,368 Travis Kelce 2013-18 3,101 Fred Arbanas 1962-70 2,396 Walter White 1975-79 1,541 Jonathan Hayes 1985-93 1,046 Keith Cash 1992-96 1,009 Tony Moeaki 2010-12 Most Receiving Yards, Tight End, Season 1,258 Tony Gonzalez 2004 1,203 Tony Gonzalez 2000 1,172 Tony Gonzalez 2007 1,125 Travis Kelce 2016 1,058 Tony Gonzalez 2008 Most Receiving Yards, Tight End, Game 160 Travis Kelce vs. Denver Dec. 25, 2016 147 Tony Gonzalez at New England Dec. 4, 2000 144 Tony Gonzalez at San Diego Jan. 2, 2005 140 Tony Gonzalez vs. Miami Sept. 29, 2002 140 Tony Gonzalez vs. San Diego Dec. 2, 2007 140 Travis Kelce at Atlanta Dec. 4, 2016 Most Receiving Yards, Rookie, Season 995 Dwayne Bowe 2007 789 Chris Burford 1960 678 Sylvester Morris 2000

@CHIEFS


611 Johnny Robinson (RB) 593 Tyreek Hill 576 Abner Haynes (RB)

1960 2016 1960

Highest Receiving Average, Career (200 receptions) 18.12 Carlos Carson (351-6,360) 1980-89 17.82 Otis Taylor (410-7,306) 1965-75 17.30 Derrick Alexander (213-3,685) 1998-01 16.82 Stephone Paige (377-6,341) 1983-91 16.29 Eddie Kennison (321-5,230) 2001-07 Highest Receiving Average, Season (24 receptions) 22.36 Otis Taylor (58-1,297) 1966 21.93 Stephone Paige (43-943) 1985 21.83 Frank Pitts (30-655) 1968 Highest Receiving Average, Game (3 receptions) 42.60 C. McClinton vs. Denver (5-213) Dec. 19, 1965 40.00 J. Robinson vs. N.Y. Titans (3-120) Oct. 2, 1960 39.67 Otis Taylor at Denver (3-119) Dec. 14, 1968 Most Receiving Touchdowns, Career 76 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 57 Otis Taylor 1965-75 55 Chris Burford 1960-67 49 Stephone Paige 1983-91 44 Dwayne Bowe 2007-14 Most Receiving Touchdowns, Season 15 Dwayne Bowe 2010 12 Chris Burford 1962 11 Otis Taylor 1967 11 Stephone Paige 1986 11 Tony Gonzalez 1999 10 Stephone Paige 1985 10 Derrick Alexander 2000 10 Tony Gonzalez 2003 10 Tony Gonzalez 2008 Most Receiving Touchdowns, Consecutive Seasons 21 Chris Burford (12, 9) 1962-63 21 Stephone Paige (10, 11) 1985-86 20 Tony Gonzalez (11, 9) 1999-00 20 Dwayne Bowe (15, 5) 2010-11 19 Otis Taylor (8, 11) 1966-67 19 Dwayne Bowe (4, 15) 2009-10 Most Receiving Touchdowns, Rookie, Season 6 Fred Arbanas 1962 6 Stephone Paige 1983 6 Tyreek Hill 2016 5 Chris Burford 1960 5 Otis Taylor 1965 5 Bill Jones 1990 5 Tim Barnett 1991 5 Dwayne Bowe 2007 Most Receiving Touchdowns, Game 4 Frank Jackson at San Diego Dec. 13, 1964 4 Jamaal Charles at Oakland Dec. 15, 2013 3 Chris Burford at Oakland Sept. 23, 1962 3 Chris Burford at Boston Sept. 25, 1966 3 Otis Taylor at Denver Dec. 17, 1967 3 Otis Taylor at N.Y. Jets Nov. 16, 1969 3 Sylvester Morris vs. San Diego Sept. 17, 2000

14

3 Tony Gonzalez vs. Miami 3 Dwayne Bowe at Seattle

Sept. 29, 2002 Nov. 28, 2010

Most Consecutive Games, Touchdown Receptions 7 Dwayne Bowe Oct. 17, 2010 - Nov. 28, 2010 5 Chris Burford Sept. 8, 1962 - Oct. 12, 1962 5 Otis Taylor Oct. 23, 1966 - Nov. 20, 1966 4 Curtis McClinton Sept. 11, 1966 - Oct. 2, 1966 4 Willie Frazier Sept. 17, 1972 - Oct. 8, 1972 4 Otis Taylor Sept. 25, 1972 - Oct. 15, 1972 4 Tony Gonzalez Sept. 24, 2000 - Oct. 22, 2000 4 Tony Gonzalez Dec. 7, 2008 - Dec. 28, 2008 Highest TD Catch Percentage, Season (20 recs.) 40.0 Marc Boerigter (20 recs., 8 TDs) 2002 33.3 Chris Burford (45 recs., 12 TDs) 1962 27.3 Gloster Richardson (22 recs., 6 TDs) 1968 25.0 Fred Arbanas (20 recs., 5 TDs) 1967 23.5 Fred Arbanas (34 recs., 8 TDs) 1964 Most 20+ Yard Receptions, Career 130 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 101 Dwayne Bowe 2007-14 81 Eddie Kennison 2001-07 65 Travis Kelce 2013-18 64 Derrick Alexander 1998-01 53 Willie Davis 1991-95 Most 20+ Yard Receptions, Season 24 Derrick Alexander 2000 20 Derrick Alexander 1998 19 Tony Gonzalez 2004 19 Dwayne Bowe 2010 19 Dwayne Bowe 2011 19 Travis Kelce 2017 18 Eddie Kennison 2004 Most 20+ Yard Receptions, Game 5 Derrick Alexander at San Diego 5 Tyreek Hill at Los Angeles Chargers 4 Derrick Alexander vs. St. Louis 4 Eddie Kennison vs. Jacksonville 4 Dwayne Bowe at Denver 3 40 times; Last, Kareem Hunt at New England

Nov. 22, 1998 Sept. 9, 2018 Oct. 22, 2000 Dec. 31, 2006 Nov. 14, 2010 Oct. 14, 2018

Total Yards From Scrimmage Most Attempts From Scrimmage, Career 1,617 Jamaal Charles (1,332 rush, 285 rec.) 1,572 Priest Holmes (1,321 rush, 251 rec.) 1,526 Larry Johnson (1,375 rush, 151 rec.) 1,445 Ed Podolak (1,157 rush, 288 rec.) 1,288 Christian Okoye (1,246 rush, 42 rec.) 1,073 Marcus Allen (932 rush, 141 rec.) Most Attempts From Scrimmage, Season 457 Larry Johnson (416 rush, 41 rec.) 394 Priest Holmes (320 rush, 74 rec.) 389 Priest Holmes (327 rush, 62 rec.) 383 Priest Holmes (313 rush, 70 rec.) 372 Christian Okoye (370 rush, 2 rec.)

2008-16 2001-07 2003-09 1969-77 1987-92 1993-97 2006 2003 2001 2002 1989

Most Attempts From Scrimmage, Game 41 (39 rush, 2 rec.) L. Johnson vs. Seattle Oct. 29, 2006

@CHIEFS


39 (33 rush, 6 rec.) J. Charles at New Orleans 38 (38 rush, 0 rec.) C. Okoye at Green Bay 38 (33 rush, 5 rec.) L. Johnson vs. JAX 37 (37 rush, 0 rec.) C. Okoye vs. Seattle 37 (36 rush, 1 rec.) L. Johnson at Houston

Sept. 23, 2012 Dec. Dec. Nov. Nov.

10, 1989 31, 2006 5, 1989 20, 2005

Most Yards From Scrimmage, Career 10,954 Tony Gonzalez (14 rush, 10,940 rec.) 9,717 Jamaal Charles (7,260 rush, 2,457 rec.) 8,447 Priest Holmes (6,070 rush, 2,377 rec.) 7,467 Otis Taylor (161 rush, 7,306 rec.) 7,384 Larry Johnson (6,015 rush, 1,369 rec.) Most Yards From Scrimmage, Season 2,287 Priest Holmes (1,615 rush, 672 rec.) 2,199 Larry Johnson (1,789 rush, 410 rec.) 2,169 Priest Holmes (1,555 rush, 614 rec.) 2,110 Priest Holmes (1,420 rush, 690 rec.) 2,093 Larry Johnson (1,750 rush, 343 rec.) Most Yards From Scrimmage, Game 309 Stephone Paige vs. San Diego (0 rush, 309 rec.) 307 Priest Holmes at Seattle (197 rush, 110 rec.) 288 Jamaal Charles at New Orleans (233 rush, 55 rec.) 277 Priest Holmes at Oakland (168 rush, 109 rec.) 262 Jamaal Charles at Denver (259 rush, 3 rec.)

1997-08 2008-16 2001-07 1965-75 2003-09 2002 2006 2001 2003 2005

Dec. 22, 1985 Nov. 24, 2002 Sept. 23, 2012 Dec. 9, 2001 Jan. 3, 2009

Yards Per Touch Average, RB, Career (350 touches) 6.60 Abner Haynes (993-6,553) 1960-64 6.57 Jamaal Charles (1,668-10,963) 2008-16 5.89 Kimble Anders (864-5,890) 1991-00 5.53 Curtis McClinton (916-5,069) 1962-69 5.48 Tony Reed (651-3,566) 1977-80 Yards Per Touch Average, RB, Season (200 touches) 7.0 Jamaal Charles (275-1,935) 2010 6.9 Abner Haynes (211-1,451) 1960 6.6 Abner Haynes (213-1,399) 1961 6.2 Abner Haynes (260-1,622) 1962 6.2 Jamaal Charles (230-1,417) 2009

Combined Yardage Most Combined Attempts, Career (All 1,000+) 1,668 Jamaal Charles 2008-16 1,572 Priest Holmes 2001-07 1,569 Ed Podolak 1969-77 1,526 Larry Johnson 2003-09 1,289 Christian Okoye 1987-92 1,114 Abner Haynes 1960-65 Most Combined Attempts, Season (All 300+) 457 Larry Johnson 2006 394 Priest Holmes 2003 389 Priest Holmes 2001 383 Priest Holmes 2002 372 Christian Okoye 1989 329 Jamaal Charles 2013 325 Kareem Hunt 2017 320 Jamaal Charles 2012

15

Most Combined Attempts, Game 41 Larry Johnson vs. Seattle 39 Jamaal Charles at New Orleans 38 Christian Okoye at Green Bay 38 Larry Johnson vs. Jacksonville 37 Christian Okoye vs. Seattle 37 L. Johnson at Houston 36 Abner Haynes at Denver 36 Derrick Blaylock at New Orleans 36 L. Johnson vs. New England 36 L. Johnson vs. San Diego

Oct. 29, 2006 Sept. 23, 2012 Dec. 10, 1989 Dec. 31, 2006 Nov. 5, 1989 Nov. 20, 2005 Oct. 30, 1960 Nov. 14, 2004 Nov. 27, 2005 Dec. 24, 2005

Most Combined Yards, Career (All 7,500+) 12,356 Dante Hall 2000-06 10,963 Tony Gonzalez 1997-08 10,963 Jamaal Charles 2008-16 8,447 Abner Haynes 1960-65 8,447 Priest Holmes 2001-07 8,343 Ed Podolak 1969-77 7,677 Carlos Carson 1980-89 Most Combined Yards, Season 2,446 Dante Hall 2,342 Jamaal Charles 2,287 Priest Holmes 2,236 Dante Hall 2,283 Dante Hall Most Combined Yards, Game 309 Stephone Paige vs. San Diego 307 Priest Holmes at Seattle 296 Dante Hall at Denver 290 Noland Smith at San Diego 288 Jamaal Charles at New Orleans

2003 2009 2002 2004 2005 Dec. 22, 1985 Nov. 24, 2002 Dec. 7, 2003 Oct. 15, 1967 Sept. 23, 2012

Punting Most Seasons Leading League *4 Jerrel Wilson 1965, ’68, ’72-73 *NFL RECORD 1 Bob Grupp 1979 1 Jim Arnold 1984 Most Punts, Career 1,047 Dustin Colquitt 1,018 Jerrel Wilson 421 Louie Aguiar 284 Jim Arnold 272 Bryan Barker Most Punts, Season 101 Daniel Pope 99 Lewis Colbert 98 Jim Arnold 96 Dustin Colquitt 95 Dustin Colquitt Most Punts, Game 11 Bob Grupp vs. Baltimore 11 Jim Arnold at San Francisco 11 Kelly Goodburn vs. Cleveland 11 Louie Aguiar vs. San Diego 11 Dustin Colquitt at Chicago 10 Jerrel Wilson at N.Y. Jets 10 Jerrel Wilson vs. Denver

2005-18 1963-77 1994-98 1983-85 1990-93 1999 1986 1984 2009 2007 Sept. 2, 1979 Nov. 17, 1985 Nov. 19, 1989 Nov. 13, 1994 Dec. 4, 2011 Sept. 18, 1965 Oct. 6, 1974

@CHIEFS


10 10 10 10

Kelly Goodburn at N.Y. Jets Todd Sauerbrun at San Diego Dustin Colquitt at N.Y. Jets Dustin Colquitt at Jacksonville

Longest Punt (All 70+) 81 Dustin Colquitt vs. San Diego 77 Dustin Colquitt at Denver 76 Dan Stryzinski vs. Oakland 74 Bob Grupp vs. San Diego 73 Dustin Colquitt vs. Oakland 72 Jerrel Wilson at San Diego 72 Dustin Colquitt at Oakland 72 Dustin Colquitt at St. Louis 71 Dustin Colquitt at Oakland 70 Jerrel Wilson at Denver 70 Jerrel Wilson vs. Buffalo 70 Jerrel Wilson vs. Houston 70 Dustin Colquitt at Jacksonville Most Punting Yards, Career 47,024 Dustin Colquitt 44,218 Jerrel Wilson 17,930 Louie Aguiar 11,934 Jim Arnold 11,267 Bryan Barker Most Punting Yards, Season 4,397 Jim Arnold 4,361 Dustin Colquitt 4,322 Dustin Colquitt 4,218 Daniel Pope 4,084 Dustin Colquitt

Oct. 2, 1988 Nov. 26, 2000 Dec. 30, 2007 Sept. 8, 2013 Dec. 2, 2007 Dec. 31, 2017 Sept. 9, 2001 Nov. 4, 1979 Sept. 14, 2008 Sept. 29, 1963 Dec. 23, 2006 Dec. 19, 2010 Dec. 16, 2012 Oct. 11, 1964 Oct. 18, 1964 Nov. 28, 1968 Nov. 8, 2009 2005-18 1963-77 1994-98 1983-85 1990-93 1984 2009 2007 1999 2011

Highest Punting Average, Career (200 punts) 44.91 Dustin Colquitt (1,047-47,024) 2005-18 43.44 Jerrel Wilson (1,018-44,218) 1963-77 42.59 Louie Aguiar (421-17,930) 1994-98 42.02 Jim Arnold (284-11,934) 1983-85

Highest Net Punting Average, Game 52.50 Dustin Colquitt vs. Denver 52.20 Dustin Colquitt at L.A. Chargers 52.00 Dustin Colquitt at Indianapolis 51.86 Dustin Colquitt at Oakland 51.25 Dustin Colquitt vs. San Diego 48.80 Dustin Colquitt at Miami

(4 Punts) Sept. 15, 2015 Sept. 9, 2018 Oct. 10, 2010 Dec. 16, 2012 Sept. 30, 2012 Sept. 21, 2014

Most Consecutive Punts, None Blocked 389 Dustin Colquitt 2013-18 377 Louie Aguiar 1994-98 256 Jerrel Wilson 1968-71 233 Jim Arnold 1983-85 Punts Had Blocked, Career 12 Jerrel Wilson 4 Dustin Colquitt 2 Bob Grupp 2 Jim Arnold 2 Bryan Barker 2 Daniel Pope

1963-77 2005-18 1979-81 1983-85 1990-93 1999

Punts Had Blocked, Season 2 Jerrel Wilson 2 Jim Arnold 2 Daniel Pope

1974 1985 1999

Punts Had Blocked, Game 2 Jim Arnold vs. Denver

Oct. 27, 1985

Most Punts Inside the 20, Career 424 Dustin Colquitt 2005-18 117 Louie Aguiar 1994-98 62 Bryan Barker 1990-93 58 Jim Arnold 1983-85 54 Kelly Goodburn 1987-90

Punt Returns 31, 2011 11, 1970 1, 1995 3, 1965

Highest Net Punting Average, Career (200 Punts) 40.08 Dustin Colquitt 2005-18 35.48 Louie Aguiar 1994-98 35.42 Jerrel Wilson 1963-77 35.13 Bob Grupp 1979-81 34.82 Bryan Barker 1990-93 Highest Net Punting Average, Season (50 Punts) 41.11 Dustin Colquitt 2017 40.84 Dustin Colquitt 2015 40.78 Dustin Colquitt 2009

16

2012 2016

Most Punts Inside the 20, Season 45 Dustin Colquitt 2012 41 Dustin Colquitt 2009 38 Dustin Colquitt 2016 37 Dustin Colquitt 2015 35 Dustin Colquitt 2013

Highest Punting Average, Season (50 punts) 46.83 Dustin Colquitt (83-3,887) 2012 46.03 Dustin Colquitt (87-4,005) 2013 45.89 Dustin Colquitt (89-4,084) 2011 45.70 Dustin Colquitt (65-2,971) 2015 45.53 Jerrel Wilson (80-3,642) 1973 45.49 Dustin Colquitt (95-4,322) 2007 Highest Punting Average, Game (4 punts) 57.20 Dustin Colquitt vs. San Diego (5-286) Oct. 56.40 Jerrel Wilson vs. Boston (5-282) Oct. 55.60 Louie Aguiar at Arizona (5-278) Oct. 54.75 Jerrel Wilson vs. Boston (4-129) Oct.

40.78 Dustin Colquitt 40.66 Dustin Colquitt

Most Punt Returns, Career 220 J.T. Smith 188 Dante Hall 181 Tamarick Vanover 105 Javier Arenas 86 Ed Podolak Most Punt Returns, Season 58 J.T. Smith 58 Dexter McCluster 51 Tamarick Vanover 51 Tamarick Vanover 50 J.T. Smith Most Punt Returns, Game 8 Ed Podolak vs. San Diego 8 De'Anthony Thomas vs. Oakland

1979-84 2000-06 1995-99 2010-12 1969-77 1979 2013 1995 1999 1981 Nov. 10, 1974 Dec. 14, 2014

@CHIEFS


7 7 7 7 7 7 7

J.T. Smith vs. Baltimore J.T. Smith vs. N.Y. Giants Tamarick Vanover vs. Detroit Tamarick Vanover at Denver Eddie Drummond at Oakland Dexter McCluster at Jacksonville Dexter McCluster at Washington

Sept. 2, 1979 Oct. 21, 1979 Sept. 26, 1999 Dec. 5, 1999 Oct. 21, 2007 Sept. 8, 2013 Dec. 8, 2013

Most Seasons Leading League 2 J.T. Smith 1979-80 Most Punt Return Yards, Career 2,322 J.T. Smith 1,930 Tamarick Vanover 1,882 Dante Hall 1,029 Javier Arenas 959 Dexter McCluster

1979-84 1995-99 2000-06 2010-12 2010-13

Most Punt Return Yards, Season 686 Dexter McCluster 640 Tamarick Vanover 612 J.T. Smith 592 Tyreek Hill 581 J.T. Smith

2013 1999 1979 2016 1980

Most Punt Return Yards, Game 177 Dexter McCluster at Washington 156 De'Anthony Thomas vs. Oakland 141 J.T. Smith vs. Oakland 130 Tamarick Vanover vs. New Orleans 128 Dante Hall vs. Arizona Longest Punt Return (All TDs) 95 Tyreek Hill at San Diego 94 Dexter McCluster vs. San Diego 93 Dante Hall vs. Denver 91 Tyreek Hill at L.A. Chargers 90 Dante Hall vs. Arizona 89 Dexter McCluster vs. N.Y. Giants Most Seasons Leading League 1 Abner Haynes 1 Noland Smith 1 Ed Podolak 1 J.T. Smith 1 Dante Hall 1 Tyreek Hill

Dec. 8, 2013 Dec. 14, 2014 Sept. 23, 1979 Dec. 21, 1997 Dec. 1, 2002 Jan. 1, 2017 Sept. 13, 2010 Oct. 5, 2003 Sept. 9, 2018 Dec. 1, 2002 Sept. 29, 2013

1960 1968 1970 1980 2003 2016

Highest Punt Return Average, Career (50 returns) 13.36 Tyreek Hill (70-935) 2016-18 12.14 Dexter McCluster (79-959) 2010-13 11.11 Noland Smith (53-589) 1967-69 10.87 Abner Haynes (54-587) 1960-64 10.66 Tamarick Vanover (181-1,930) 1995-99 10.60 J.T. Smith (216-2,289) 1978-84 Highest Punt Return Average, Season (12 returns) 16.28 Dante Hall (29-472) 2003 15.54 Dexter McCluster (13-202) 2010 15.36 Abner Haynes (14-215) 1960 15.18 Tyreek Hill (39-592) 2016 15.00 Noland Smith (18-270) 1968 Highest Punt Return Average, Game (3 returns) 35.00 D. Hall vs. Denver (3-105) Oct. 5, 2003 33.33 D. McCluster vs. San Diego (3-100) Sept. 13, 2010

17

28.67 M. Garrett at Buffalo (3-86) 28.67 N. Smith vs. N.Y. Jets (3-86) 28.25 D. McCluster vs. N.Y. Giants (4-113) Most Punt Return Touchdowns, 5 Dante Hall 4 J.T. Smith 4 Tamarick Vanover 4 Tyreek Hill

Sept. 11, 1966 Sept. 15, 1968 Sept. 29, 2013

Career 2000-06 1979-84 1995-99 2016-18

Most Punt Return Touchdowns, Season 2 J.T. Smith 1979 2 J.T. Smith 1980 2 Dale Carter 1992 2 Tamarick Vanover 1999 2 Dante Hall 2002 2 Dante Hall 2003 2 Dexter McCluster 2013 2 Tyreek Hill 2016 Most Punt Return Touchdowns, Game 1 28 times Last; Tyreek Hill at L.A. Chargers Sept. 9, 2018

Kickoff Returns Most Kickoff Returns, Career 360 Dante Hall 212 Tamarick Vanover 84 Dave Grayson 72 Knile Davis 68 Noland Smith

2000-06 1995-99 1961-64 2013-16 1967-69

Most Kickoff Returns, Season 68 Dante Hall 2004 65 Dante Hall 2005 57 Dante Hall 2002 57 Dante Hall 2003 53 Dante Hall 2006 Most Kickoff Returns, Game 9 Noland Smith vs. Oakland 9 Paul Palmer at Seattle

Nov. 23, 1967 Sept. 20, 1987

Most Kickoff Return Yards, Career 8,644 Dante Hall 2000-06 5,099 Tamarick Vanover 1995-99 2,231 Dave Grayson 1961-64 1,942 Knile Davis 2013-16 1,822 Noland Smith 1967-69 1,326 Abner Haynes 1960-64 Most Kickoff Return Yards, Season 1,718 Dante Hall 2004 1,560 Dante Hall 2005 1,478 Dante Hall 2003 1,354 Dante Hall 2002 1,308 Tamarick Vanover 1997 Most Kickoff Return Yards, Game 251 Jon Vaughn at Miami 244 Noland Smith at San Diego 234 Dante Hall vs. Philadelphia 233 Dante Hall vs. San Diego 221 Paul Palmer at Seattle 206 Noland Smith vs. Oakland

(All 200+) Dec. 12, 1994 Oct. 15, 1967 Oct. 2, 2005 Nov. 28, 2004 Sept. 20, 1987 Nov. 23, 1967

@CHIEFS


Longest Kickoff Return (All TDs) 108 Knile Davis vs. Denver 106 Noland Smith at Denver 100 Dante Hall vs. Pittsburgh 99 Dave Grayson at Denver 99 Tamarick Vanover at Seattle 99 Knile Davis vs. St. Louis 97 Boyce Green at Pittsburgh 97 Tamarick Vanover at Denver 97 Dante Hall at Baltimore 97 Dante Hall vs. Denver 97 Jamaal Charles vs. Pittsburgh Most Seasons Leading League 1 Dave Grayson

Dec. 1, 2013 Dec. 17, 1967 Sept. 14, 2003 Sept. 7, 1963 Sept. 3, 1995 Oct. 26, 2014 Dec. 21, 1986 Oct. 27, 1996 Sept. 28, 2003 Dec. 19, 2004 Nov. 22, 2009 1961

Highest Kickoff Return Average, Career (50 returns) 26.97 Knile Davis (72-1,942) 2013-16 26.79 Noland Smith (68-1,822) 1967-69 26.56 Dave Grayson (84-2,231) 1961-64 25.17 Abner Haynes (52-1,309) 1960-64 24.43 Jamaal Charles (51-1,246) 2008-16 24.05 Tamarick Vanover (212-5,099) 1995-99 Highest Kickoff Return Average, Season (15 returns) 30.06 Quintin Demps (33-992) 2013 28.31 Dave Grayson (16-453) 1961 28.30 Larry Marshall (23-651) 1972 29.71 Dave Grayson (18-535) 1962 Highest Kickoff Return Average, Game (3 returns) 48.67 Dante Hall vs. Pittsburgh (3-146) Sept. 14, 2003 45.00 Tremon Smith at New England Oct. 14, 2018 (4-180) 44.67 Dante Hall vs. St. Louis (3-134) Dec. 8, 2002 44.33 Paul Palmer vs. Seattle (3-133) Dec. 27, 1987 40.67 Noland Smith at San Diego (6-244) Oct. 15, 1967 40.33 L. Williams vs. Cincinnati (3-121) Nov. 21, 1976 40.33 Dante Hall at Baltimore (3-121) Sept. 28, 2003 Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns, Career 6 Dante Hall 2000-06 4 Tamarick Vanover 1995-99 2 Paul Palmer 1987-88 2 Knile Davis 2013-16 Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns, Season 2 Paul Palmer 1987 2 Tamarick Vanover 1995 2 Dante Hall 2003 2 Dante Hall 2004 Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns, Game 1 23 times Last; Tyreek Hill at Denver Nov. 27, 2016

Fumbles Most Opponents Fumbles Forced, Career 45 Derrick Thomas 1989-99 33 Tamba Hali 2006-17 29 Neil Smith 1988-96 23 Derrick Johnson 2005-17 13 Kevin Ross 1984-93, ’97 13 Jared Allen 2004-07

18

Most Opponents Fumbles Forced, Season 8 Derrick Thomas 1992 7 Jared Allen 2005 6 Derrick Thomas 1990 6 Derrick Thomas 1994 6 Tamba Hali 2006 Most Fumbles Forced, Rookie, Season 6 Tamba Hali 2006 4 Kevin Ross 1984 4 Tim Cofield 1986

Interceptions Most Seasons, Leading League 2 Johnny Robinson 1966, ’70 2 Emmitt Thomas 1969, ’74 Most Interceptions By, Career 58 Emmitt Thomas 57 Johnny Robinson 50 Deron Cherry 39 Gary Barbaro 38 Albert Lewis

1966-78 1960-71 1981-91 1976-82 1983-93

Most Interceptions By, Season 12 Emmitt Thomas 10 Johnny Robinson 10 Bobby Hunt 10 Johnny Robinson 10 Gary Barbaro 9 Emmitt Thomas 9 Deron Cherry

1974 1966 1966 1970 1980 1969 1986

Most Interceptions By, Rookie, Season 8 Marcus Peters 2015 8 Bobby Hunt 1962 7 Dale Carter 1992 6 Kevin Ross 1984 4 Bobby Ply 1962 4 Emmitt Thomas 1967 4 Lloyd Burruss 1981 4 Albert Lewis 1983 4 Eric Berry 2010 3 12players Most Interceptions By, Game *4 Bobby Ply vs. San Diego 4 Bobby Hunt vs. Houston 4 Deron Cherry vs. Seattle 3 Bobby Ply vs. Denver 3 Johnny Robinson at Baltimore 3 Albert Lewis vs. Atlanta 3 Lloyd Burruss vs. San Diego 3 Albert Lewis vs. Atlanta 3 Greg Wesley vs. Miami 3 Greg Wesley vs. New England *NFL RECORD

Dec. 16, 1962 Oct. 4, 1964 Sept. 29, 1985 Dec. 9, 1962 Sept. 28, 1970 Dec. 8, 1985 Oct. 19, 1986 Sept. 1, 1991 Sept. 29, 2002 Nov. 27, 2005

Most Consecutive Games, Passes Intercepted By 6 Eric Harris 1980 Most Interception Return Yards, Career 938 Emmitt Thomas (58 INTs) 1966-78 771 Gary Barbaro (39 INTs) 1975-82

@CHIEFS


741 Johnny Robinson (57 INTs) 688 Deron Cherry (50 INTs) 674 Bobby Hunt (37 INTs)

1960-71 1981-91 1962-67

Most Interception Return Yards, Season 280 Marcus Peters (8 INTs) 2015 274 Mark McMillian (8 INTs) 1997 228 Bobby Hunt (6 INTs) 1963 214 Emmitt Thomas (12 INTs) 1974 193 Lloyd Burruss (5 INTs) 1986 175 Derrick Johnson (3 INTs) 2009 Most Interception Return Yards Gained, Game 121 Lloyd Burruss vs. San Diego (3 INTs) Oct. 19, 1986 118 Brandon Flowers at N.Y. Jets (2 INTs) Oct. 26, 2008 108 Bobby Ply vs. San Diego (4 INTs) Dec. 16, 1962 105 Derrick Johnson vs. Denver (2 INTs) Jan. 3, 2010 102 Gary Barbaro vs. Seattle (1 INT) Dec. 11, 1977 Longest Interception Return 102 Gary Barbaro vs. Seattle 100 Tim Collier at Oakland 100 Sean Smith at Buffalo 99 Dave Grayson vs. N.Y. Titans 99 Kevin Ross at San Diego

Dec. 11, 1977 Dec. 18, 1977 Nov. 3, 2013 Dec. 17, 1961 Sept. 6, 1992

Most Interception Return Touchdowns, Career 6 Bobby Bell 1963-74 5 Emmitt Thomas 1966-78 5 Jim Kearney 1967-75 5 Eric Berry 2010-17 4 Lloyd Burruss 1981-91 4 Derrick Johnson 2005-17 Most Interception Return Touchdowns, Season *4 Jim Kearney 1972 3 Lloyd Burruss 1986 3 Mark McMillian 1997 2 Sherrill Headrick 1961 2 Emmitt Thomas 1974 2 Charles Mincy 1992 2 Jerome Woods 1993 2 Derrick Johnson 2009 2 Eric Berry 2013 2 Marcus Peters 2015 2 Eric Berry 2016 *NFL RECORD Most Interception Return Touchdowns, Game *2 Jim Kearney at Denver Oct. 1, 1972 2 Lloyd Burruss vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 2 Derrick Johnson at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 *NFL RECORD

Sacks Most Sacks, Career (All 50.0+) 126.5 Derrick Thomas 1989-99 89.5 Tamba Hali 2006-17 85.5 Neil Smith 1988-96 73.0 Art Still 1978-87 72.5 Justin Houston 2011-18 51.0 Mike Bell 1979-85, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;87-91 Most Sacks, Season

19

22.0 20.0 15.5 15.0 14.5 14.5 14.5 14.5 14.5

Justin Houston Derrick Thomas Jared Allen Neil Smith Art Still Art Still Neil Smith Derrick Thomas Tamba Hali

2014 1990 2007 1993 1980 1984 1992 1992 2010

Most Sacks, Consecutive Seasons 33.5 Derrick Thomas (20.0, 13.5) 33.0 Justin Houston (11.0, 22.0) 30.0 Derrick Thomas (10.0, 20.0) 29.5 Neil Smith (14.5, 15.0) 29.5 Justin Houston (22.0, 7.5) 28.0 Derrick Thomas (13.5, 14.5) 26.5 Neil Smith (15.0, 11.5) 26.5 Tamba Hali (14.5, 12.0) Most Sacks, Rookie, Season 10.0 Derrick Thomas 9.0 Jared Allen 8.0 Tamba Hali 6.5 Art Still 5.5 Sylvester Hicks 5.5 Mike Bell 5.5 Justin Houston Most Sacks, Game *7.0 Derrick Thomas vs. Seattle 6.0 Derrick Thomas vs. Oakland 4.5 Justin Houston at Philadelphia 4.0 Wilbur Young at San Diego 4.0 Art Still at Oakland 4.0 Derrick Thomas vs. Buffalo 4.0 Derrick Thomas vs. San Diego 4.0 Neil Smith vs. L.A. Raiders 4.0 Justin Houston vs. San Diego *NFL RECORD

1990-91 2013-14 1989-90 1992-93 2014-15 1991-92 1993-94 2010-11 1989 2004 2006 1978 1978 1979 2011 Nov. 11, 1990 Sept. 6, 1998 Sept. 19, 2013 Oct. 19, 1975 Oct. 5, 1980 Oct. 7, 1991 Nov. 8, 1992 Oct. 3, 1993 Dec. 28, 2014

Most Sack Yards, Career 699.0 Derrick Thomas 591.5 Tamba Hali 506.5 Neil Smith 410.5 Justin Houston 293.0 Eric Hicks

1989-99 2006-17 1988-96 2011-18 1998-06

Most Sack Yards, Season 127.0 Neil Smith 114.5 Neil Smith 113.0 Derrick Thomas 111.0 Jared Allen 109.0 Derrick Thomas

1993 1992 1992 2007 1996

Most Sack Yards, Game 36.0 Derrick Thomas vs. San Diego 36.0 Derrick Thomas vs. Oakland 35.0 Neil Smith vs. Los Angeles 34.0 Vonnie Holliday vs. San Diego 33.0 Darren Mickell vs. Denver

Nov. 8, 1992 Sept. 6, 1998 Oct. 3, 1993 Sept. 7, 2003 Dec. 17, 1995

Tackles Most Tackles, Career

@CHIEFS


1,262 999 992 927 876 827

Derrick Johnson Gary Spani Art Still Deron Cherry Donnie Edwards Kevin Ross

2005-17 1978-86 1978-87 1981-91 1996-01, 2007-08 1984-93, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;97

Most Tackles, Season 179 Derrick Johnson 162 Mike Maslowski 157 Gary Spani 153 Gary Spani 151 Deron Cherry 151 Donnie Edwards 151 Scott Fujita

2011 2002 1979 1981 1988 1998, 2000 2003

Most Tackles, Rookie, Season 144 Gary Spani 140 Dino Hackett 126 Eric Berry 120 Art Still 101 Greg Wesley

Gary Stills Rich Scanlon Ken Jolly Albert Lewis Todd McNair Bennie Thompson Greg Manusky

2003 2005 1984 1983 1990 1992 1999

Most Special Teams Tackles, Consecutive Seasons 63 Gary Stills 2002-03 54 Gary Stills 2003-04 52 Gary Stills 2001-02 51 Greg Manusky 1996-97 50 Greg Manusky 1998-99 50 Gary Stills 2004-05

Blocked Kicks

1978 1986 2010 1978 2000

Most Tackles, Consecutive Seasons 326 Derrick Johnson (147, 179) 306 Gary Spani (157, 149) 304 Derrick Johnson (179, 125) 302 Gary Spani (149, 153) 301 Gary Spani (144, 157)

29 29 28 27 27 27 27

2010-11 1979-80 2011-12 1980-81 1978-79

Special Team Tackles Most Special Teams Tackles, Career 148 Gary Stills 1999-05 147 Greg Manusky 1994-99 97 Danan Hughes 1993-98 96 Tony Richardson 1995-05 94 Louis Cooper 1985-90

Most Opponents Punts Blocked, Career 10 Albert Lewis 1983-93 3 Bernard Pollard 2006-08 2 Ed Beckman 1977-84 2 Gary Green 1977-83 2 Sherrill Headrick 1960-67 2 Bernard Pollard 2006 1 D.J. Alexander 2015 Most Opponents Punts Blocked, Season 4 Albert Lewis 1990 3 Albert Lewis 1986 2 Sherrill Headrick 1963 2 Bernard Pollard 2006 Most Opponents Punts Blocked, Game 2 Sherrill Headrick vs. Denver Dec. 8, 1963 Longest Return of Blocked Field Goal 78 (TD) Lloyd Burruss at Pittsburgh Dec. 21, 1986 65 (TD) Kevin Ross at Cincinnati Dec. 6, 1987

Most Special Teams Tackles, Season 34 Gary Stills 2002

20

@CHIEFS


Games Won Most Consecutive Games Won 11 2015-16 9 2003, 2013, 2017-18 7 1968-69, 1969, 1995, 1997-98, 2016-17 6 1968, 1997 5 1961-62, 1966-67, 1971, 1984-85, 2014, 2016 Most Consecutive Games Won, Single Season 10 2015 9 2003, 2013 7 1969, 1995 6 1968, 1997 5 1968, 1971, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018 Most Consecutive Games Won, Start of Season 9 2003, 2013 5 2017, 2018 4 1996, 2018 3 1962, 1966, 1994, 1995, 2010 Most Consecutive Games Won, End of Season 10 2015 6 1997 5 1968 4 2017 3 1960, 1963, 1966, 1967, 1971, 1972, 1984, 1986 Most Consecutive Home Games Won 13 2002-03 11 1994-96, 1997-98 10 1968-69, 2015-16 9 1970-71 Most Consecutive Road Games Won 9 1966-67, 2016-17 6 1967-68 5 1968-69, 1971-72

Games Lost Most Consecutive Games Lost 12 2007-08 9 1987, 2008-09 8 1975-76, 2012 7 1985, 2008 Most Consecutive Games Lost, Start of Season 5 1977, 2009 4 1976, 1980 3 1975, 2004, 2008, 2011 Most Consecutive Games Lost, End of Season 9 2007 6 1977 4 1975, 2008, 2012 Most Consecutive Home Games Lost 10 2008-09 8 1974-75 7 1975-76, 2011-12 6 1977-78, 2007-08 Most Consecutive Road Games Lost 9 2007-08

21

8 1978-79, 1985-86 6 1988, 2008-09, 2012

Scoring Most Points, Season (All 400+) 484 2003 483 2004 467 2002 448 1966 430 2013 415 2017 408 1967 405 2015 403 2005 Highest Scoring Average, Season 32.0 (448 in 14 games) 30.3 (484 in 16 games) 30.2 (483 in 16 games) 29.2 (467 in 16 games) 29.1 (408 in 14 games)

1966 2003 2004 2002 1967

Most Points, Consecutive Seasons 967 (484, 483) 2003-04 951 (467, 484) 2002-03 886 (483, 403) 2004-05 856 (448, 408) 1966-67 804 (389, 415) 2016-17 Fewest Points, Season 176 1982 (9 games) 211 2012 212 2011 225 1977 226 2007 Lowest Scoring Average, Season 13.2 (211 in 16 games) 13.3 (212 in 16 games) 14.1 (226 in 16 games) 14.9 (238 in 16 games) 15.2 (243 in 16 games) 15.9 (254 in 16 games)

2012 2011 2007 1979 1978 1988

Largest Scoring Differential, Season 201 (371 - 170) 1968 182 (359 - 177) 1969 176 (448 - 276) 1966 156 (369 - 233) 1962 154 (408 - 254) 1967 Most 40-Point Games, Season 5 2003 4 1966, 2002, 2004 3 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1967 2 1965, 1968, 1983, 2000, 2010, 2013, 2017, 2018 Most 30-Point Games, Season 8 1966, 2002, 2004 7 1999, 2003 6 1960, 1967, 2010 5 1962, 1965, 1968, 1983, 1994, 2005, 2006, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 Most Points Scored, Game

@CHIEFS


59 56 56 56 54 52

at Denver at Denver vs. Atlanta at Oakland vs. St. Louis 4 times; Last vs. Denver

Largest Margin of 52 Kansas City (59) 49 Kansas City (49) 48 Kansas City (48) 46 Kansas City (56) 46 Kansas City (56)

Sept. 7, 1963 Oct. 23, 1966 Oct. 24, 2004 Dec. 15, 2013 Oct. 22, 2000 Oct. 29, 1967

Victory, Game at Denver (7) vs. Arizona (0) vs. N.Y. Jets (0) vs. Denver (10) vs. Atlanta (10)

Sept. 7, 1963 Dec. 1, 2002 Dec. 22, 1963 Oct. 16, 1966 Oct. 24, 2004

Most Points, Both Teams, Game 99 KC (48) at Seattle (51) Nov. 27, 1983 (OT) 88 KC (49) vs. Denver (39) Nov. 1, 1964 88 KC (54) vs. St. Louis (34) Oct. 22, 2000 Fewest Points, Both Teams, Game 3 KC (0) at Tampa Bay (3) Dec. 16, 1979 9 KC (3) vs. Cleveland (6) Sept. 4, 1988 10 KC (7) at Denver (3) Jan. 1, 2012 12 KCâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;(6) vs. St. Louis (6) Nov. 22, 1970 12 KC (3) at Miami (9) Oct. 20, 1974 Most Points Shutout Victory, Game 49 vs. Arizona Dec. 1, 2002 48 vs. N.Y. Jets Dec. 22, 1963 41 vs. Miami Oct. 8, 1967 41 vs. San Francisco Oct. 1, 2006 34 vs. Boston Dec. 11, 1960 34 vs. Houston Nov. 26, 1989 34 vs. Cleveland Sept. 30, 1990 34 vs. San Diego Oct. 31, 1999 Fewest Points, Shutout Victory, Game 14 vs. Baltimore Sept. 2, 1979 16 vs. Denver Dec. 6, 1970 17 vs. L.A. Chargers Sept. 25, 1960 Largest Fourth-Quarter Comebacks Opponent Deficit Final 17 at Green Bay 14-31 40-34 (OT) 17 vs. San Diego 10-27 33-27 (OT) 14 at N.Y. Jets 3-17 17-17 (OT) 14 vs. N.Y. Giants 3-17 20-17 (OT) 14 at Oakland 20-34 37-34 14 at Carolina 3-17 20-17

Date Oct. 12, 2003 Sept. 11, 2016 Oct. 2, 1988 Sept. 10, 1995 Nov. 28, 1999 Nov. 13,2016

Largest Second-Half Comebacks Opponent Deficit Final 21 vs. San Diego 3-24 33-27 (OT) 18 at New Orleans 6-24 27-24 17 at Buffalo 10-27 27-27 17 at Oakland 0-17 28-17 17 at Green Bay 14-31 40-34 (OT) 16 at San Diego 0-16 24-23 14 at N.Y. Jets 3-17 17-17 (OT) 14 vs. San Diego 0-14 20-17 (OT) 14 vs. N.Y. Giants 3-17 20-17 (OT) 14 at Oakland 13-27 28-27 14 at Oakland 20-34 37-34 14 at Carolina 3-17 20-17

Date Sept. 11, 2016 Sept. 23, 2012 Sept. 22, 1963 Oct. 25, 1981 Oct. 12, 2003 Nov. 2, 1986 Oct. 2, 1988 Dec. 8, 1991 Sept. 10, 1995 Sept. 8, 1997 Nov. 28, 1999 Nov. 13, 2016

22

Most Consecutive Games Scoring 179 1963-76 139 1994-2002 91 1987-92 89 2012-18 84 2003-08 Most Points, Two Consecutive Games 104 (56, 48) Oct. 23, 1966 - Oct. 30, 1966 101 (45, 56) Dec. 8, 2013 - Dec. 15, 2013 Most First-Half Points, Game 42 vs. Denver Oct. 29, 1967 38 at Miami Sept. 28, 1968 38 at Washington Dec. 8, 2013 35 vs. Arizona Dec. 1, 2002 35 vs. St. Louis Dec. 8, 2002 35 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 35 at Oakland Dec. 15, 2013 35 vs. San Francisco Sept. 23, 2018 Most First-Quarter Points, Season 158 1966 124 2013 113 2004 112 2003 103 1962 Most First-Quarter Points, Game 24 at Miami 21 13 times, last at Pittsburgh

Sept. 28, 1968 Sept. 16, 2018

Most Second-Quarter Points, Season 153 2003 149 1997 143 1967 137 1989, 2004, 2010 136 2005 Most Second-Quarter Points, Game 28 vs. Denver Oct. 29, 1967 28 vs. Pittsburgh Oct. 18, 1971 28 vs. Denver Dec. 7, 1980 28 vs. San Diego Dec. 22, 1985 28 at Washington Sept. 30, 2001 24 vs. Houston Oct. 30, 1966 24 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 Most Second-Half Points, Game 35 at Denver Oct. 23, 1966 35 at Denver Dec. 1, 1972 35 at Tennessee Dec. 13, 2004 34 at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 31 at Denver Sept. 7, 1963 31 at New England Oct. 14, 2018 30 vs. Cleveland Dec. 14, 1975 Most Third-Quarter Points, Season 109 1963 106 1964 105 1998 94 1966 93 1999, 2004 Most Third-Quarter Points, Game 22 vs. New York Jets Nov. 5, 1967

@CHIEFS


22 22 21 21 21 21

vs. Buffalo vs. Oakland at Buffalo at Denver at Denver vs. Oakland

Oct. 18, 1969 Nov. 26, 1961 Nov. 6, 1960 Sept. 7, 1963 Oct. 1, 1972 Oct. 3, 1977

Most Fourth-Quarter Points, Season 168 2002 140 2004 131 2003 129 1962 127 1960 Most Fourth-Quarter Points, Game 23 at Buffalo Nov. 2, 1969 23 at Cleveland Sept. 8, 2002 22 at N.Y. Titans Nov. 24, 1960 21 at New England Sept. 7, 2017 20 at Green Bay Oct. 12, 2003 Most Touchdowns, Season 63 2003 62 2004 57 2002 55 1966 52 2013 Most Touchdowns, Consecutive Seasons 125 (63, 62) 2003-04 120 (57, 63) 2002-03 108 (62, 46) 2004-05 104 (55, 49) 1966-67 96 (50, 46) 1962-63 Fewest Touchdowns, Season 17 1982 (9 games) 18 2012 20 2011 23 1973 24 1988, 2007 Most Touchdowns, Game 8 at Denver 8 at Denver 8 vs. Atlanta 8 at Oakland 7 12 times; Last at Tennessee

Fewest Offensive Touchdowns, Season 13 1982 (9 games) 17 2012 18 2011 21 1973, 1974 23 2007 24 1970, 1977, 1987, 1988 25 1979 Most Return Touchdowns, Season 11 1992, 1999, 2013 8 2016 7 1995, 1997, 2003 Most Defensive Touchdowns, Season 9 1999 8 1992 6 2013, 2015 5 1972, 1974, 1977 4 1960, 1967, 1981, 1986, 1995, 1997, 2016 Fewest Defensive Touchdowns, Season 0 1962, 1976, 1978, 1988, 2006, 2012 1 1961, 1975, 1976, 1989, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2007 Most Defensive Touchdowns, Game 3 vs. Denver Dec. 27, 1992 2 15 times, last at Baltimore Dec. 20, 2015 Most Interception Return TDs, Season 6 1992 5 1972, 1974, 1999, 2013 4 1960, 1986, 1997, 2015, 2016 Most Fumble Return TDs, Season 4 1999 3 1997, 1980, 1981, 2017 2 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 2013

Sept. 7, 1963 Oct. 23, 1966 Oct. 24, 2004 Dec. 15, 2013 Dec. 13, 2004

Most Touchdowns, Both Teams, Game 13 Kansas City (7) at Seattle (6) Nov. 27, 1983 (OT) 13 Kansas City (8) at Oakland (5) Dec. 15, 2013 12 Kansas City (7) vs. Denver (5) Nov. 1, 1964 12 Kansas City (7) vs. St. Louis (5) Oct. 22, 2000 12 Kansas City (7) at Tennesse (5) Dec. 13, 2004 Most Consecutive Games Scoring Touchdowns 96 1963-70 64 1997-01 52 1960-63 35 1994-96 33 1976-78 Most Offensive Touchdowns, Season 58 2004 56 2003

23

53 2002 50 1962, 1966 46 1964

Most Special Teams Touchdowns, Season 5 1986, 1987, 2013 4 1995, 2003, 2016 3 1969, 1992, 2002, 2009 Most Special Teams Touchdowns, Game 3 at Pittsburgh Dec. 21, 1986 2 vs. Cleveland Sept. 30, 1990 2 vs. St. Louis Dec. 8, 2002 2 at Washington Dec. 8, 2013 Most Points After Touchdown, Season 58 2003, 2004 54 2002 52 2013 48 1966 47 1962 Fewest Points After Touchdown, Season 17 1982 (9 games), 2012 20 2011 21 1973, 2007 23 1988

@CHIEFS


Most Points After Touchdown, Game 8 at Denver Sept. 8, 1963 8 at Denver Oct. 23, 1966 8 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 8 at Oakland Dec. 15, 2013 Most Two-Point Attempts, Season 6 2001 5 1997 4 1961, 1994, 2008, 2015 3 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1995, 2002, 2003, 2007 Most Two-Point Conversions, Season 3 1961, 1965, 1994, 2001 2 1966, 1967, 1997, 2015, 2016 1 10 times, Last; 2009 Most Two-Point Attempts, Game 2 vs. Buffalo Oct. 18, 1964 2 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 2 at St. Louis Oct. 26, 1997 2 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 2 at Greeb Bay Sept. 28, 2015 2 at Oakland Nov. 20, 2015 Most Two-Point Conversions, Game 2 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 2 at St. Louis Oct. 26, 1997 Most Field Goals Attempted, Season 45 2017 44 1971 42 1970 40 1968 Fewest Field Goals Attempted, Season 17 1964 18 1977 20 2003 22 1979, 2008 Most Field Goals Attempted, Game 7 vs. Buffalo Dec. 19, 1971 7 vs. Cincinnati Oct. 4, 2015 6 8 times; Last at New Orleans Sept. 23, 2012 Most Field Goals Attempted, Both Teams, Game 10 Kansas City (7) vs. Buffalo (3) Dec. 19, 1971 10 Kansas City (5) at San Diego (5) Oct. 29, 1972 10 Kansas City (6) vs. Denver (4) Dec. 16, 2001 10 Kansas City (5) vs. Denver (5) Sept. 28, 2008 Most Field Goals Made, Season 41 2017 34 1990 31 2016 30 1968, 1970, 2015 28 2012 27 1969, 1988, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2005 Fewest Field Goals Made, Season 7 1961 8 1963, 1964 12 1979 Most Field Goals Made, Game

24

7 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

at Cincinnati at New Orleans at Buffalo vs. Buffalo vs. Buffalo vs. L.A. Raiders vs. Cincinnati at Chicago vs. Denver vs. Minnesota at Houston vs. Denver vs. Miami

Oct. 4, 2015 Sept. 23, 2012 Nov. 2, 1969 Dec. 7, 1969 Dec. 19, 1971 Sept. 12, 1985 Nov. 13, 1988 Dec. 29, 1990 Sept. 20, 1993 Oct. 2, 2011 Oct. 8, 2017 Oct. 30, 2017 Dec. 24, 2017

Most Field Goals Made, Both Teams, Game *9 Kansas City (4) at San Diego (5) Sept. 29, 1996 *NFL RECORD 8 Kansas City (5) vs. Buffalo (3) Dec. 19, 1971 8 Kansas City (4) vs. Denver (4) Sept. 28, 2008 7 Kansas City (5) vs. Buffalo (2) Dec. 7, 1969 7 Kansas City (4) vs. Denver (3) Dec. 16, 2001 7 Kansas City (3) at Indianapolis (4) Oct. 10, 2010 7 Kansas City (6) at New Orleans (1) Sept. 23, 2012 7 Kansas City (7) at Cincinnati (0) Oct. 4, 2015 7 Kansas City (5) vs. Denver (2) Oct. 30, 2017 7 Kansas City (5) vs. Miami (2) Dec. 24, 2017 Most Consecutive Games Scoring Field Goals 18 2001-02 16 2017-18 15 2005 14 1970 11 1968-69, 1971-72, 1985-86 10 1980-81, 2013 Most Safeties, Season 3 1988, 1997 Most Safeties, Game 1 21 times; Last at Denver

Nov. 27, 2016

First Downs Most First Downs, Season *398 2004 348 2003 347 2005 343 2002 324 2001 *NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;RECORD Fewest First Downs, Season 163 1982 (9 games) 183 1970 208 1973 Most First Downs, Game (All 30+) 36 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 33 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 32 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 32 at Seattle Nov. 24, 2002 32 vs. Oakland Dec. 25, 2004 31 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 31 vs. San Francisco Sept. 23, 2018 30 vs. Cleveland Nov. 9, 2003

@CHIEFS


30 at L.A. Raiders 30 vs. Seattle 30 at Denver Fewest First Downs, Game 4 at Tampa Bay 5 at San Diego 7 at Boston 7 at Oakland 7 at Denver 7 at Oakland 8 12 times; Last at Denver

Dec. 22, 1991 Oct. 29, 2006 Nov. 14, 2010 Dec. 16, 1979 Dec. 12, 2010 Oct. 23, 1964 Dec. 12, 1970 Dec. 9, 2007 Dec. 16, 2012 Dec. 30, 2012

Most First Downs, Both Teams, Game 64 KC (32) at Seattle (32) Nov. 24, 2002 62 KC (31) at Oakland (31) Nov. 5, 2000 59 KC (26) at Seattle (33) Nov. 27, 1983 (OT) 58 KC (24) at Denver (34) Nov. 18, 1974 Fewest First Downs, Both Teams, Games 15 Kansas City (7) vs. Denver (8) Dec. 6, 1970 18 Kansas City (7) at Boston (11) Oct. 23, 1964 Most Rushing First Downs, Season 160 1978, 1981 140 2002 138 2004, 2005 130 1980 129 1969, 1997, 2010 Fewest Rushing First Downs, Season 66 2007 71 1982 (9 games) 79 1985 83 1970, 1983, 1986 84 2000 Most Rushing First Downs, Game 21 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 20 vs. Houston Oct. 1, 1961 18 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 18 vs. Seattle Nov. 22, 1981 18 at Detroit Nov. 28, 1996 16 8 times; Last vs. Buffalo Oct. 7, 1991 Fewest Rushing First Downs, Game *0 at Cincinnati Nov. 24, 1974 Nov. 10, 1985 0 vs. Pittsburgh Dec. 6, 1992 0 at L.A. Raiders Oct. 27, 1996 0 at Denver Oct. 8, 2006 0 at Arizona Oct. 7, 2007 0 vs. Jacksonville Dec. 16, 2012 0 at Oakland 1 12 times; Last vs. Pittsburgh Oct. 15, 2017 *NFL RECORD Most Passing First Downs, Season 228 2004 211 1994 208 1983 207 2000 201 2003 Fewest Passing First Downs, Season 79 1982 (9 games) 86 1970

25

89 1968 91 1979 93 1973 Most Passing First Downs, Game (All 20+) 26 vs. Oakland Dec. 25, 2004 24 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 23 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 21 at Dallas Nov. 20, 1983 21 at Denver Oct. 17, 1994 21 at Denver Dec. 7, 2003 21 at Houston Oct. 8, 2017 20 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 Fewest Passing First Downs, Game 1 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 1 vs. Houston Sept. 10, 1978 1 at Tampa Bay Dec. 16, 1979 2 5 times; Last at Denver Dec. 30, 2012 Most Penalty First Downs, Season 34 2013 33 1996, 1998 32 2004, 2015 30 2000 29 1966, 1978, 1984, 1986, 2017 Fewest Penalty First Downs, Season 4 1969 8 1965 9 1973 10 1999 11 1968, 1972 Most Penalty First Downs, Game 9 vs. L.A. Raiders 7 vs. L.A. Raiders 7 vs. Seattle 7 vs. San Francisco 6 at Tennessee 6 at Oakland 5 9 times; Last vs. Washington

Oct. 3, 1993 Sept. 17, 1989 Oct. 17, 1996 Sept. 23, 2018 Dec. 13, 2004 Nov. 7, 2010 Oct. 2, 2017

Fewest Penalty First Downs, Game 0 Many times; Last, at New York Jets

Dec. 3, 2017

Net Yards Passing and Rushing Most Net Yards, Season 6,695 2004 6,192 2005 6,007 2017 6,000 2002 5,910 2003 Most Net Yards, Consecutive Seasons 12,887 (6,695, 6,192) 2004-05 12,605 (5,910, 6,695) 2003-04 11,910 (6,000, 5,910) 2002-03 11,673 (5,673, 6,000) 2001-02 11,495 (5,488, 6,007) 2016-17 Fewest Net Yards, Season 2,498 1982 (9 games) 3,536 1973 3,577 1970

@CHIEFS


3,828 1974 3,936 1977 Most Net Yards, Game (All 500+) 614 at Denver Oct. 23, 1966 590 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 566 vs. Detroit Oct. 14, 1990 552 at Seattle Nov. 24, 2002 551 vs. Buffalo Sept. 30, 1962 546 at Washington Sept. 30, 2001 542 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 540 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 537 at San Diego Dec. 11, 1983 537 vs. Cincinnati Jan. 1, 2006 537 at New England Sept. 7, 2017 524 at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 521 vs. Detroit Dec. 14, 2003 520 vs. Denver Nov. 1, 1964 513 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 512 vs. Seattle Dec. 27, 1987 510 vs. Houston Nov. 28, 1965 510 at New Orleans Sept. 23, 2012 508 at Cincinnati Sept. 28, 1969 507 vs. Indianapolis Dec. 23, 2012 506 vs. San Diego Oct. 14, 1984 504 at New Orleans Sept. 8, 1985 504 at N.Y. Jets Oct. 6, 2002 503 at Seattle Nov. 28, 2010 502 at Buffalo Oct. 3, 1976 500 at Oakland Dec. 5, 2004 Fewest Net Yards, Game 62 vs. Oakland 67 at San Diego 80 at Tampa Bay 104 at Buffalo 106 at Oakland

Nov. 8, 1963 Dec. 12, 2010 Dec. 16, 1979 Oct. 29, 1973 Dec. 8, 1973

Most Net Yards, Both Teams, Game 1,095 KC (590) vs. Indianapolis (505) 1,086 KC (552) at Seattle (534) 1,036 KC (524) at Denver (512) 1,013 KC (537) at San Diego (476) 986 KC (513) at Oakland (473)

Oct. 31, 2004 Nov. 24, 2002 Jan. 3, 2010 Dec. 11, 1983 Nov. 5, 2000

Fewest Net Yards, Both Teams, Game 323 KC (178) at N.Y. Jets (145) Nov. 7, 1971 335 KC (244) vs. Houston (91) Oct. 12, 1969 338 KC (62) vs. Oakland (276) Nov. 8, 1963 Most Games, 400 or More Net Yards, Season 9 2004 7 2005, 2010, 2017 6 1994, 2000, 2002 5 1969, 2001, 2003 4 1960, 1961, 1962, 1976, 1983, 1997, 2016 3 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1974, 1981, 1989,1990, 1991, 2009, 2011, 2012 Most Consecutive Games, 400 or More Net Yards 5 2004 4 1976, 2005 3 1974, 2000, 2010 Most Games, 300 or More Net Yards

26

15 14 13 12 11 10

2004 2005 2002, 1989, 1966, 1964,

2017 1995, 1999, 2003, 2010, 2013, 2015 1983, 1991, 1996, 2016 1968, 1981, 1984, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2001, 2014

Most Consecutive Games, 300 or More Net Yards 16 2004-05 13 2001-02 11 2005 10 1966-67, 1989, 2003 8 2010 7 1981, 1991 Most Plays, Season 1,098 1994 1,089 2004 1,074 1983 1,063 2010 1,059 1995 1,059 2005 Fewest Plays, Season 573 1982 (9 games) 712 2017 775 1970 831 1968 833 1965 836 1971 Most Plays, Game 92 at New Orleans 91 at Cincinnati 86 vs. N.Y. Giants 86 vs. Seattle 85 at Jacksonville 84 vs. Denver 84 at San Diego

Sept. 23, 2012 Sept. 3, 1978 Nov. 3, 1974 Sept. 28, 1997 Nov. 9, 1997 Oct. 24, 1976 Nov. 12, 1978

Fewest Plays, Game 38 at Oakland 38 at Tampa Bay 41 at San Diego 41 at San Diego 42 at Oakland 44 at Detroit 44 at New England 44 at Baltimore

Dec. 12, 1970 Dec. 16, 1979 Oct. 7, 1962 Dec. 12, 2010 Dec. 8, 1973 Nov. 25, 1971 Oct. 11, 1998 Sept. 13, 2009

Rushing Most Rushing Attempts, Season 663 1978 610 1981 569 1979 559 1989 556 2010 552 1980 Most Rushing Attempts, Consecutive Seasons 1,232 (663, 569) 1978-79 1,162 (552, 610) 1980-81 1,121 (569, 552) 1979-80 1,089 (456, 663) 1977-78

@CHIEFS


1,063 (559, 504)

1989-90

Fewest Rushing Attempts, Season 269 1982 (9 games) 379 2008 383 2000, 2007 387 1983 400 1963 Most Rushing Attempts, Game 69 at Cincinnati Sept. 3, 1978 60 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 57 vs. Seattle Nov. 5, 1989 Fewest Rushing Attempts, Game 9 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 10 vs. Jacksonville Oct. 7, 2007 10 at Oakland Dec. 16, 2012 11 at New England Oct. 11, 1998 11 at New York Jets Dec. 3, 2017 12 at Oakland Dec. 8, 1973 12 at Denver Oct. 27, 1996 13 vs. Buffalo Nov. 23, 2008 14 at San Diego Sept. 29, 1963 14 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 10, 1985 14 at L.A. Raiders Dec. 6, 1992 14 at Jacksonville Nov. 8, 2009 Most Rushing Attempts, Both Teams, Game 102 KC (52) at San Diego (50) Nov. 12, 1978 (OT) 100 KC (41) vs. Denver (59) Sept. 24, 1978 Fewest Rushing Attempts, Both Teams, Game 37 KC (21) vs. Houston (16) Dec. 16, 1990 40 KC (17) at Buffalo (23) Dec. 12, 1965 Most Games, 40 or More Rushing Attempts, Season 9 1978 8 1973, 1981 7 1968 6 1962, 1969, 1989 5 1976, 1979, 1980, 1997, 2010 Most Games, 30 or More Rushing Attempts, Season 14 1978 13 1981 12 1971, 1975, 1980 11 1969, 1989, 1990, 2005, 2006 10 1968, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1979, 1995, 1999, 2010 Most Consecutive Games, 40 or More Rushing Attempts 4 1968, 1978 3 1962, 1973, 1996 Most Consecutive Games, 30 or More Rushing Attempts 15 1980-81 8 1975, 1977-78 7 1972, 1978, 1978-79 6 1970, 1980, 1989, 1999 Most Rushing Yards, Season 2,986 1978 2,633 1981 2,627 2010

27

2,407 1962 2,395 2012 Most Rushing Yards, Home, Season 1,488 1981 1,468 1962 1,463 2010 1,436 1978 1,390 1961 Most Rushing Yards Per Game, Season 213.3 (2,986 in 16 games) 1978 171.9 (2,407 in 14 games) 1962 164.6 (2,633 in 16 games) 1981 164.2 (2,627 in 16 games) 2010 162.4 (2,274 in 14 games) 1966 Most Rushing Yards Per Game, Home, Season 209.7 (1,468 in 7 games) 1962 198.6 (1,390 in 7 games) 1961 186.0 (1,488 in 8 games) 1981 182.9 (1,463 in 8 games) 2010 179.5 (1,436 in 8 games) 1978 Most Rushing Yards, Consecutive Seasons 5,302 (2,986, 2,316) 1978-79 4,829 (1,843, 2,986) 1977-78 4,671 (2,289, 2,382) 2004-05 4,590 (2,183, 2,407) 1961-62 Fewest Rushing Yards, Season 943 1982 (9 games) 1,248 2007 1,254 1983 1,351 2017 1,465 2000 1,468 1986 Fewest Rushing Yards Per Game, Season 78.0 (1,248 in 16 games) 2007 78.4 (1,254 in 16 games) 1983 91.6 (1,465 in 16 games) 2000 91.8 (1,468 in 16 games) 1986 92.9 (1,486 in 16 games) 1985 Most Rushing Yards, Game (All 300+) 398 vs. Houston Oct. 1, 1961 380 at Denver Oct. 23, 1966 352 vs. Indianapolis Dec. 23, 2012 320 vs. Buffalo Sept. 30, 1962 317 at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 313 vs. Cincinnati Oct. 26, 1969 310 vs. Detroit Oct. 14, 1990 302 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 Fewest Rushing Yards, Game Dec. 19, 1965 0 vs. Denver 10 vs. Jacksonville Oct. 7, 2007 10 at Oakland Dec. 16, 2012 14 at New England Oct. 11, 1998 16 at Denver Dec. 9, 2007 17 at Boston Nov. 18, 1960 17 at L.A. Raiders Dec. 6, 1992 Most Games, 200 or More Rushing Yards 8 1978

@CHIEFS


6 5 4 3 2 2

2010 1962 1968, 1961, 1960, 1989,

23 1961 1979, 1967, 1963, 1996,

1981, 1991, 1965, 1997,

2002 2001, 2004, 2012 1966, 1969, 1970, 1975, 2005, 2006

Most Rushing Yards, Both Teams, Game 519 Kansas City (168) vs. Cleveland (351) Dec. 20, 2009 502 Texans (398) vs. Houston (104) Oct. 1, 1961 502 Texans (284) vs. Oakland (218) Nov. 26, 1961 479 Kansas City (251) vs. Detroit (228) Nov. 23, 1975 Fewest Rushing Yards, Both Teams, Game 75 KC (20) at Houston (55) Sept. 29, 1974 105 KC (27) vs. Boston (78) Nov. 17, 1968 111 Dallas Texans (108) at SD (3) Nov. 19, 1961 111 KC (48) at San Diego (63) Oct. 13, 1985 Most 10+ Yard Rushes, Season (Since 1990) 73 2002 72 2010 67 2005 64 2012 63 2001 Most 10+ Yard Rushes, Game (Since 1990) 11 at Oakland Dec. 9, 2001 (10 Holmes, 1 Cloud) 10 at Seattle Nov. 24, 2002 (9 Holmes, 1 Morton) 10 vs. Buffalo Oct. 31, 2010 (7 Charles, 3 Jones) 9 vs. Detroit Oct. 14, 1990 (5 Word, 3 Okoye, 1 McNair) 9 vs. Denver Dec. 17, 2000 (5 Richardson, 2 Grbac, 1 Alexander, 1 Moreau) 9 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 (6 Holmes, 3 Blaylock, 1 Hall) 9 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 (6 Holmes, 2 Morton, 1 Johnson) 9 vs. Indianapolis Dec. 23, 2012 (4 Charles, 4 Hillis, 1 McCluster) Highest Rushing Average, Season 5.18 1966 5.15 2002 5.03 1962 4.97 1961 4.91 2017 4.79 2012 Lowest Rushing Average, Season 3.24 1983 3.26 2007 3.39 1980 3.40 1986 3.43 1992 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Season 32 2003 31 2004 26 2002, 2005 24 1960

28

Most Rushing Touchdowns, Consecutive Seasons *63 (32, 31) 2003-04 58 (26, 32) 2002-03 57 (31, 26) 2004-05 47 (24, 23) 1960-61 44 (23, 21) 1961-62 *NFL RECORD Fewest Rushing Touchdowns, Season 3 1982 (9 games) 5 2011 6 1972, 2007 7 1987 8 1988, 2009 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Game *8 vs. Atlanta Oct. 24, 2004 5 at Denver Oct. 23, 1966 4 14 times; Last vs. Detroit Nov. 1, 2015 * NFL RECORD Most Rushing Touchdowns, Both Teams, Game 8 Kansas City (8) vs. Atlanta (0) Oct. 24, 2004 7 Texans (4) vs. Boston (3) Sept. 8, 1962 7 Kansas City (4) at Denver (3) Oct. 10, 1965

Passing Highest Passer Rating, Season 100.8 2017 97.1 1962 96.4 1968 95.4 2015 94.9 1990, 2004 93.5 2002 Lowest Passer Rating, Season 52.7 1961 52.9 1977 54.0 1979 55.2 1974 59.3 1978 Most Passes Attempted, Season 641 1983 615 1994 593 1984 582 2000 563 2007 Most Passes Attempted, Consecutive Seasons 1,234 (641, 593) 1983-84 1,146 (615, 531) 1994-95 1,110 (582, 528) 2000-01 1,105 (490, 615) 1993-94 1,104 (593, 511) 1984-85 1,104 (563, 541) 2007-08 Fewest Passes Attempted, Season 264 1982 (9 games) 270 1968 289 1970 313 1973 322 1962

@CHIEFS


Most Passes Attempted, Game 59 at Dallas Nov. 20, 1983 55 at San Diego Oct. 9, 1994 55 at Miami Dec. 12, 1994 54 at Denver Nov. 16, 1986 54 at Denver Oct. 17, 1994 54 at San Diego Sept. 29, 1996 54 vs. San Diego Nov. 24, 1996 Fewest Passes Attempted, Game 3 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 6 at Oakland Dec. 13, 1969 10 vs. Denver Sept. 24, 1978 Most Passes Attempted, Both Teams, Game 100 KC (46) vs. Tampa Bay (54) Oct. 28, 1964 95 KC (54) at San Diego (41) Sept. 29, 1996 90 KC (59) at Dallas (31) Nov. 20, 1983 90 KC (41) at San Diego (49) Dec. 11, 1983 Fewest Passes Attempted, Both Teams, Game 26 KC (6) at Oakland (20) Dec. 13, 1969 26 KC (13) at Tampa Bay (13) Dec. 16, 1979 27 KC (14) vs. Houston (13) Sept. 10, 1978 Most Passes Completed, Season 370 2004 369 1983 366 1994 365 2016 363 2017 Most Passes Completed, Consecutive Seasons 728 (365, 363) 2016-17 709 (339, 370) 2003-04 687 (370, 317) 2004-05 675 (310, 365) 2015-16 674 (369, 305) 1983-84 Fewest Passes Completed, Season 145 1982 (9 games) 154 1970 156 1968 Most Passes Completed, Game 39 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 37 at San Diego Oct. 9, 1994 34 at Denver Oct. 17, 1994 34 at Denver Dec. 7, 2003 34 vs. San Diego Sept. 11, 2016 33 at Dallas Nov. 20, 1983 33 at Miami Dec. 12, 1994 33 at San Diego Jan. 2, 2005 33 at Detroit Dec. 23, 2007 33 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 Fewest Passes Completed, Game 2 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 2 at Oakland Dec. 13, 1969 5 7 times: Last at Seattle Dec. 17, 1978 Most Passes Completed, Both Teams, 62 Kansas City (31) at San Diego (31) 59 Kansas City (34) vs. San Diego (25) 57 Kansas City (31) at San Diego (26)

29

Game Dec. 11, 1983 Sept. 11, 2016 Oct. 30, 2005

56 Kansas City (33) at Denver (23) 55 Kansas City (23) vs. San Diego (32) 55 Kansas City (26) vs. Tampa Bay (29)

Nov. 14, 2010 Oct. 14, 1984 Oct. 28, 1984

Fewest Passes Completed, Both Teams, Game 11 Kansas City (10) vs. San Diego (1) Sept. 20, 1998 12 Kansas City (7) at Tampa Bay (5) Dec. 16, 1979 13 Kansas City (2) at Oakland (11) Dec. 13, 1969 13 Kansas City (8) vs. Boston (5) Oct. 11, 1970 Most 20+ Yard Completions, Season (Since 1990) 60 2004 59 2000 55 2003 54 2017 53 2001 Most 20+ Yard Completions, Game (Since 1990) 9 vs. St. Louis Oct. 22, 2000 (6 Grbac, 2 Moon, 1 Morris) 9 at Denver (9 Cassel) Nov. 14, 2010 7 at L.A. Raiders (7 Krieg) Dec. 6, 1992 7 at San Diego (7 Gannon) Nov. 22, 1998 7 at Oakland (7 Grbac) Nov. 5, 2000 7 at Arizona (7 Green) Oct. 21, 2001 7 vs. Indianapolis (7 Green) Oct. 31, 2004 7 at New York Jets (7 Smith) Dec. 3, 2017 Most Net Passing Yards, Season 4,406 2004 4,341 1983 4,149 2000 4,104 2017 3,981 2003 Most Net Passing Yards, Consecutive Seasons 8,387 (3,981, 4,406) 2003-04 8,216 (4,406, 3,810) 2004-05 7,909 (4,341, 3,568) 1983-84 7,844 (3,740, 4,104) 2016-17 7,814 (4,149, 3,665) 2000-01 Fewest Passing Yards, Season 1,555 1982 (9 games) 1,660 1979 1,719 1970 Most Gross Passing Yards, Game (All 400+) 504 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 469 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 435 vs. Denver Nov. 1, 1964 432 at Dallas Nov. 20, 1983 412 vs. Denver Dec. 19, 1965 411 at San Diego Dec. 11, 1983 400 at Green Bay Oct. 12, 2003 Most Net Passing Yards, Game 474 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 433 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 406 at San Diego Dec. 11, 1983 400 at Green Bay Oct. 12, 2003 395 at New Orleans Sept. 8, 1985 Fewest Gross Passing Yards, Game 16 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 39 vs. Houston Nov. 15, 1981

@CHIEFS


42 at Seattle 44 at Denver 46 at Tampa Bay

Sept. 30, 1979 Oct. 8, 1961 Dec. 16, 1979

Fewest Net Passing Yards, Game -22 vs. Oakland Nov. 8, 1963 15 at Seattle Sept. 30, 1979 16 vs. Oakland Oct. 20, 1968 18 at Denver Oct. 4, 1970 19 at San Diego Dec. 12, 2010 Most Net Passing Yards, Both Teams, Game 859 Kansas City (387) vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 (472) 782 Kansas City (406) at San Diego (376) Dec. 11, 1983 764 Kansas City (322) at Pittsburgh (442) Sept. 16, 2018 748 Kansas City (331) at Oakland (417) Oct. 19, 2017 732 Kansas City (433) at Denver (299) Nov. 14, 2010 716 Kansas City (474) at Oakland (242) Nov. 5, 2000 698 Kansas City (229) at Oakland (469) Nov. 3, 1968 Fewest Passing Yards, Both Teams, Game 67 Kansas City (22) at Tampa Bay (45) Dec. 16, 1979 81 Kansas City (34) vs. Houston (47) Sept. 10, 1978 Most Individual 100-Yard Receiving Games, Season 14 2000, 2004 11 1964 9 2017 8 1966, 1983 7 1987, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2016 Most Consecutive Individual 100-Yard Receiving Games, Season 7 2000 6 2004 4 1964, 2016 3 1966, 1984, 1992, 1994, 2005, 2007, 2010 2 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1968, 1969, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2017 (3 times) Most Times Sacked, Season 57 1980 55 2007 53 1975 Fewest Times Sacked, Season 19 1994 21 1978, 1991, 1995, 2003 22 1990 Most Times Sacked, Game 10 vs. Baltimore 9 vs. San Diego 8 at Pittsburgh 8 vs. L.A. Raiders

Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.

2, 1980 2, 2007 5, 1982 12, 1982

Most Times Sacked, Both Teams, Game 13 Kansas City (2) vs. Cleveland (11) Sept. 30, 1984 13 Kansas City (6) vs. Houston (7) Sept. 21, 1986 Most Consecutive Games Without Allowing A Sack 3 1988, 2000 Most Consecutive Seasons Leading League, Completion Percentage

30

*4 1966-69 *NFL RECORD Highest Completion Percentage, Season 66.85 543-363 2017 66.85 546-365 2016 65.95 561-370 2004 65.54 473-310 2015 63.25 536-339 2003 Lowest Completion Percentage, Season 44.36 (399-177) 1961 48.05 (435-209) 1960 48.90 (409-200) 1965 49.33 (521-257) 1986 50.38 (395-199) 1965 Most Passing Touchdowns, Season 32 1964 31 1966 30 1963 29 1983, 2000 Fewest Passing Touchdowns, Season 7 1978, 1979 8 2012 10 1973, 1982 (9 games) 11 1974, 1977 13 1981, 2011 Most Passing Touchdowns, Game 6 vs. Denver Nov. 1, 1964 5 7 times; Last at Oakland Dec. 15, 2013 Most Passing Touchdowns, Both Teams, Game 9 Kansas City (4) at Denver (5) Nov. 14, 2010 9 Kansas City (6) at Pittsburgh (3) Sept. 16, 2018 8 Kansas City (6) vs. Denver (2) Nov. 1, 1964 8 Kansas City (4) at San Diego (4) Dec. 11, 1983 8 Kansas City (3) vs. IND (5) Oct. 31, 2004 Most Passes Had Intercepted, Season 27 1961 26 1977 25 1974 Fewest Passes Had Intercepted, Season 5 1990 6 2014 7 2015 8 1982 (9 games), 2010, 2016, 2017 9 2013 10 1993, 1994, 1997, 2005 Most Passes Had Intercepted, Game 7 vs. Pittsburgh Oct. 13, 1974 6 at Seattle Nov. 4, 1984 6 vs. L.A. Raiders Oct. 20, 1985 Most Passes Had Intercepted, Both Teams, Game 9 Kansas City (3) vs. Miami (6) Nov. 13, 1966 8 8 times Last; Kansas City (2) at Oakland (6) Oct. 23, 2011

Punting @CHIEFS


Most Seasons Leading League (Average Distance) *6 1968, 1971-73, 1979, 1984 *NFL RECORD Most Consecutive Seasons Leading League 3 1971-73 Most Punts, Season 104 1999 99 1986 98 1984 Fewest Punts, Season 38 1982 (9 games) 54 1962 55 2004 57 1991 Sept. 18, 1965 Sept. 2, 1979 Nov. 17, 1985 Nov. 19, 1989 Nov. 13, 1994 Dec. 4, 2011 Oct. 6, 1974 Oct. 5, 1980 Oct. 2, 1988 Nov. 26, 2000 Dec. 30, 2007 Sept. 8, 2013 Dec. 22, 1991 Dec. 10, 2000

Highest Punting Average Distance, Season 46.83 (83-3,887) 2012 45.89 (89-4,084) 2011 45.53 (80-3,642) 1973 45.33 (89-4,034) 2013 45.26 (65-2,942) 1968 Lowest Punting Average Distance, Season 36.06 (54-1,947) 1962 37.83 (64-2,422) 2002 38.53 (70-2,697) 1981 Most Punts Had Blocked, Season 2 1974, 1975, 1985, 1999 Most Punts Had Blocked, Game 2 vs. Denver Oct. 27, 1985

Punt Returns Most Seasons Leading League (Average Return) 6 1960, 1968, 1970, 1979-80, 2003 Most Punt Returns, Season (All 50+) 59 2013 58 1979, 1995, 1999 52 2010 Fewest Punt Returns, Season 15 1982 (9 games) 24 2004

31

Most Punt Returns, Game 9 at Oakland 8 vs. San Diego 8 at St. Louis 7 vs. Oakland 7 vs. N.Y. Giants 7 vs. Detroit 7 at Denver 7 at Oakland 7 at Jacksonville 7 at Washington

Nov. 15, 2009 Nov. 10, 1974 Dec. 19, 2010 Sept. 23, 1979 Oct. 21, 1979 Sept. 26, 1999 Dec. 5, 1999 Oct. 21, 2007 Sept. 8, 2013 Dec. 8, 2013

Most Punt Returns, Both Teams, Game 15 Kansas City (6) vs. Baltimore (9) Sept. 2, 1979

Most Punts, Game 11 at N.Y. Jets 11 vs. Baltimore 11 at San Francisco 11 at Cleveland 11 vs. San Diego 11 at Chicago 10 vs. Denver 10 at Oakland 10 at N.Y. Jets 10 at San Diego 10 at N.Y. Jets 10 at Jacksonville Fewest Punts, Game 0 at L.A. Raiders 0 vs. Carolina

26 1961, 1963, 2008

Most Punt Return Yards, Season (All 600+) 695 2013 640 1999 612 1979 Fewest Punt Return Yards, Season 126 1972 129 1982 (9 games) 150 1971 Most Punt Return Yards, Game 177 at Washington Dec. 8, 2013 160 vs. San Diego Sept. 13, 2010 141 vs. Oakland Sept. 23, 1979 139 at Denver Dec. 5, 1999 131 vs. Boston Dec. 11, 1960 Highest Punt Return Average, Season 16.42 (33-542) 2003 15.03 (33-496) 1960 14.80 (40-592) 2016 14.53 (40-581) 1980 14.52 (31-450) 1968 Lowest Punt Return Average, Season 4.34 (29-126) 1972 4.69 (32-150) 1971 6.29 (35-220) 2017 6.50 (26-169) 2008 6.53 (32-209) 2009 Most Punt Return Touchdowns, Season 2 1968, 1979, 1980, 1992, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2013, 2016 1 1960, 1965, 1966, 1987, 1995, 1997, 2006, 2010, 2017 Most Punt Return Touchdowns, Game 1 29 times; Last at L.A. Chargers Sept. 9, 2018 Most Punt Return Touchdowns, Both Teams, Game *2 Kansas City (1) at Buffalo (1) Sept. 11, 1966 *NFL RECORD

Kickoff Returns Most Kickoff Returns, Season 80 2008 77 2009 75 2004 70 1987, 2000

@CHIEFS


68 2005 Fewest Kickoff Returns, Season 31 1973 34 1982 (9 games) 35 2015 37 1962 38 1968, 1998 39 1992 Most Kickoff Returns, Game 11 vs. Buffalo Nov. 23, 2008 10 vs. Oakland Nov. 2, 1967 10 vs. Seattle Sept. 20, 1987 9 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 10, 1985 Most Kickoff Return Yards, Season 1,820 2004 1,716 2008 1,666 2009 1,591 2005 1,577 2003 Fewest Kickoff Return Yards, Season 722 1992 723 1982 (9 games) 725 1973 736 1968 784 1990 Most Kickoff Return Yards, Game 251 at Miami Dec. 12, 1994 245 at San Diego Oct. 15, 1967 236 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 10, 1985 Highest Kickoff Return Average, Season *29.91 (44-1,316) 2013 27.64 (53-1,465) 1961 26.59 (41-1,090) 1969 25.81 (37-955) 1962 *NFL RECORD Lowest Kickoff Return Average, Season 16.52 (56-925) 1988 17.04 (46-784) 1990 17.20 (54-929) 1983 Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns, Season 2 1987, 1995, 2003, 2004, 2013 1 1961, 1963, 1967, 1969, 1986, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2005, 2009, 2014, 2016 Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns, Game 1 23 times; Last at Denver Nov. 27, 2016

Fumbles Most Fumbles, Season 42 1980 Fewest Fumbles, Season 7 2002 13 1982 (9 games), 2003 14 2017 15 2010 16 2015

32

Most Fumbles, Game *10 vs. Houston

Oct. 12, 1969

Most Fumbles, Both Teams, Game *14 Kansas City (10) vs. Houston (4)

*NFL RECORD

Oct. 12, 1969 *NFL RECORD

Most Fumbles Lost, Season 24 1981, 1987 21 1965, 1977 Fewest Fumbles Lost, Season *2 2002 3 2017 4 1982 (9 games) 6 2003, 2010 8 1967, 1991, 2008, 2015

*NFL RECORD

Most Fumbles Lost, Game 6 vs. Houston Oct. 12, 1969 Most Turnovers, Season 47 1977 46 1981 41 1965, 1987, 1989 40 1964 Fewest Turnovers, Season 11 2017 12 1982 (9 games) 14 2010 15 2002, 2015 17 2014, 2016 Most Turnovers, Game 9 vs. Buffalo 9 vs. Pittsburgh 8 vs. San Diego

Oct. 17, 1965 Oct. 13, 1974 Sept. 20, 1981

Most Turnovers, Both Teams, Game 16 Kansas City (7) vs. Houston (9) Oct. 12, 1969

Penalties Fewest Penalties, Season 43 1982 (9 games) 52 1963 56 1964 61 1966 Most Penalties, Season *158 1998 127 1994 126 1999 122 1993, 1996 Fewest Penalties, Game *0 vs. Buffalo 0 vs. Oakland 1 24 times; Last at San Diego Most Penalties, Game 17 at Seattle

*NFL RECORD Oct. 2, 1966 Dec. 8, 1974 Dec. 29, 2013 *NFL RECORD Nov. 8, 1998

@CHIEFS


15 15 14 14

vs. San Diego at New England at Atlanta at Denver

Sept. 20, 1998 Sept. 7, 2017 Sept. 18, 1994 Oct. 17, 1994

Fewest Penalties, Both Teams, Game 1 Kansas City (0) vs. Buffalo (1) Oct. 2, 1966 Most Penalties, Both Teams, Game 30 Kansas City (17) at Seattle (13) 27 Kansas City (12) at Oakland (15) 26 Kansas City (7) vs. San Diego (19) 26 Kansas City (11) vs. Oakland (15) 25 Kansas City (11) vs. Denver (14) 24 Kansas City (13) at L.A. Raiders (11) 24 Kansas City (12) vs. L.A. Raiders (12) 24 Kansas City (10) vs. L.A. Raiders (14) 24 Kansas City (14) at Atlanta (10) 24 Kansas City (14) at Denver (10) 24 Kansas City (15) vs. San Diego (9) 24 Kansas City (10) at Oakland (14) 24 Kansas City (9) at Denver (15) 24 Kansas City (12) at Pittsburgh (12) Fewest Yards Penalized, Season 371 1982 (9 games) 515 1974 577 2006

33

Nov. 8, 1998 Nov. 7, 2010 Oct. 16, 1997 Dec. 24, 2011 Sept. 20, 1993 Oct. 9, 1983 Sept. 16, 1984 Dec. 13, 1987 Sept. 18, 1994 Oct. 17, 1994 Sept. 20, 1998 Oct. 23, 2011 Nov. 27, 2016 Sept. 16, 2018

602 2001 604 1964 Most Yards Penalized, Season 1,304 1998 Fewest Yards Penalized, Game 0 vs. Buffalo 0 vs. Oakland 1 vs. San Diego 3 vs. Buffalo 5 11 times; Last at San Diego

Oct. 2, 1966 Dec. 8, 1974 Dec. 22, 2002 Sept. 11, 2011 Dec. 29, 2013

Most Yards Penalized, Game 154 vs. Oakland Nov. 1, 1970 152 at Seattle Nov. 8, 1998 141 at San Diego Oct. 25, 1987 Fewest Yards Penalized, Both Teams, Game 10 Kansas City (10) vs. Boston (0) Nov. 17, 1968 10 Kansas City (0) vs. Oakland (10) Dec. 8, 1974 10 Kansas City (5) at Denver (5) Dec. 7, 2008 Most Yards Penalized, Both Teams, Game 259 KC (141) at San Diego (118) Oct. 25, 1987 258 KCâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;(126) vs. L.A. Raiders (132) Sept. 16, 1984

@CHIEFS


21 21 17 17 17 17 17

Scoring Fewest Points Allowed, Season 170 1968 177 1969 184 1982 (9 games) 192 1973 208 1971 Lowest Scoring Average, Season 12.1 (170 in 14 games) 12.6 (177 in 14 games) 13.7 (192 in 14 games) 14.5 (232 in 16 games) 14.9 (208 in 14 games)

1968 1969 1973 1997 1971

Most Points Allowed, Season 440 2008 435 2004 425 2012 424 2009 Highest Scoring Average, Season 27.5 (440 in 16 games) 27.2 (435 in 16 games) 26.9 (376 in 14 games) 26.6 (425 in 16 games) 26.5 (424 in 16 games)

2008 2004 1976 2012 2009

Most Points Allowed, Game 54 vs. Buffalo Nov. 23, 2008 51 at Seattle Nov. 27, 1983 (OT) 50 at Buffalo Oct. 3, 1976 49 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 49 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 Most First-Half Points Allowed, Game 35 at San Diego Oct. 25, 1987 35 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 34 vs. Seattle Dec. 11, 1977 31 Seven times, last at Pittsburgh Oct. 15, 2006

at Denver at Denver vs. Oakland at Denver vs. Pittsburgh at Denver vs. San Diego

Nov. 16, 1986 Nov. 14, 2010 Nov. 23, 1967 Oct. 27, 1996 Sept. 14, 2003 Sept. 26, 2005 Sept. 30, 2012

Most Second-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 152 2004 141 2008 135 1985 133 1999 127 1961, 1984 Fewest Second-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 45 1969 55 1979, 1982 (9 games) 57 1968, 1992 59 1995 64 1965 Most Second-Quarter Points Allowed, Game 28 vs. San Diego Nov. 15, 1964 28 vs. Oakland Oct. 16, 1966 28 at Baltimore Dec. 21, 1980 28 at Seattle Nov. 4, 1984 28 at Seattle Sept. 11, 1988 24 at Oakland Nov. 3, 1968 Most Third-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 106 2008, 2012 103 2001 100 2009 98 1975 95 2011 Fewest Third-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 22 1971 29 1995 31 1982 (9 games) 34 1974 35 1973

Fewest First-Half Points Allowed, Season 74 1969 95 1982 (9 games) 97 1965 101 1973 103 1968

Most Third-Quarter Points Allowed, Game 28 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 22 at Boston Nov. 18, 1960 21 Nine times; Last at Baltimore Sept. 13, 2009

Most First-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 101 1998 95 1976, 2012 93 2009 92 1997 88 1987

Most Fourth-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 139 1961 130 1983, 2002 129 2004 127 1976 121 1985

Fewest First-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 29 1963, 1969 30 1973 32 1970 33 1965, 1966 37 1984

Fewest Fourth-Quarter Points Allowed, Season 27 1968 44 1997 54 2013 56 1973 57 1960, 1962, 1981

Most First-Quarter Points Allowed, Game 31 at Buffalo Sept. 13, 1962 22 at Pittsburgh Oct. 2, 2016

Most Fourth-Quarter Points Allowed, Game 24 at New Orleans Sept. 8, 1985 22 vs. Denver Nov. 1, 1964

34

@CHIEFS


21 13 times; Last at Houston

Oct. 8, 2017

Most Second-Half Points Allowed, Game 38 at Houston Oct. 24, 1965 37* at Seattle Nov. 27, 1983 35 vs. San Diego Oct. 20, 1963 35 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 7, 1976 31 at Miami Sept. 22, 1985 31 at Miami Dec. 12, 1994 31 vs. San Diego Nov. 24, 2013 *Includes three in OT Fewest Second-Half Points Allowed, Season 67 1968 89 1982 (9 games) 91 1973, 1997 96 1971 101 1972 Fewest Touchdowns Allowed, Season 18 1968 19 1969 21 1971 Most Touchdowns Allowed, Season 53 2004 51 1976 49 2008 48 2009 47 2012 Most Touchdowns Allowed, Game 7 at Buffalo Oct. 3, 1976 7 at Oakland Nov. 5, 2000 7 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 6 16 times; Last at Pittsburgh Oct. 2, 2016 Most Shutouts, Season 3 1960 2 1967, 1969 Most Consecutive Shutouts 2 1960 Dec. 4-11, 1960 Most Games Allowed 10 Points or Less, Season 9 1968 7 1969 6 1973, 1979, 1990, 1995 Most Consecutive Games Allowed 10 Points or Less 5 1968 3 1960, 1968, 1995, 1997 Largest Opponent Comeback Victories Opponent Deficit Final Date 21 vs. Tampa Bay 24-3 27-30 (OT) Nov. 2, 2008 18 vs. Philadelphia 24-6 31-37 Oct. 2, 2005 18 vs. San Diego 21-3 21-22 Dec. 14, 2008 17 at Houston 17-0 36-38 Oct. 24, 1965 17 vs. L.A. Raiders 17-0 17-24 Oct. 5, 1986 17 at Chicago 17-0 27-28 Nov. 13, 1977 17 at San Diego 34-17 37-38 Nov. 22, 1998 17 vs. Oakland 17-0 38-41 (OT) Jan. 2, 2000

First Downs 35

Fewest First Downs Allowed, Season 170 1982 (9 games) 181 1969 200 1965 204 1964 Most First Downs Allowed, Season 367 2002 352 2017 344 1987, 2008 342 2016 336 1985 Fewest First Downs Allowed, Game 5 vs. Oakland Dec. 7, 1997 6 at Boston Sept. 21, 1969 6 vs. Boston Oct. 11, 1970 6 at Chicago Dec. 29, 1990 7 10 times; Last at Washington Oct. 18, 2009 Most First Downs Allowed, Game 35 vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 34 at Denver Nov. 18, 1974 34 at Cleveland Oct. 30, 1977 Fewest Rushing First Downs Allowed, Season 52 1968 53 1969 67 1965 Most Rushing First Downs Allowed, Season 169 1977 162 1988 149 1975 Fewest Rushing First Downs Allowed, Game *0 vs. Houston Dec. 4, 1960 Dec. 3, 1967 0 vs. Buffalo Oct. 3, 1971 0 at Denver Dec. 3, 1995 0 at Oakland Dec. 7, 1997 0 vs. Oakland Dec. 8, 2002 0 vs. St. Louis Sept. 11, 2005 0 vs. N.Y. Jets 1 19 times; Last vs. Oakland Dec. 24, 2011 *NFL RECORD Most Rushing First Downs Allowed, Game 21 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 7, 1976 20 at Oakland Dec. 28, 2002 19 at Cleveland Oct. 30, 1977 Fewest Passing First Downs Allowed, Season 92 1982 (9 games) 95 1973 111 1969, 1970 Most Passing First Downs Allowed, Season 227 2002 209 2016 204 2017 202 2000 195 2008 Fewest Passing First Downs Allowed, Game *0 at Houston Oct. 9, 1988 Sept. 20, 1998 0 vs. San Diego

@CHIEFS


2 8 times; Last at Denver

Jan. 1, 2012 *NFL RECORD

Most Passing First Downs Allowed, Game 25 at Denver Nov. 18, 1974 25 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 25 at Pittsburgh Sept. 16, 2018 23 at Oakland Oct. 19, 2017 23 at L.A. Chargers Sept. 9, 2018 22 at Cincinnati Dec. 6, 1987 22 vs. Philadelphia Oct. 2, 2005 Fewest Penalty First Downs Allowed, Season 9 1982 (9 games) 11 1964 13 1980 Most *56 40 36 34 33

Penalty First Downs Allowed, Season 1998 2004 1993, 2017 2015 1987 *NFL RECORD

Most Penalty First Downs Allowed, Game 7 2 times; Last N.Y. Jets Dec. 11, 2011 6 11 times; Last at Pittsburgh Sept. 16, 2018

Net Yards Allowed Passing and Rushing Fewest Yards Allowed, Season 2,733 1982 (9 games) 3,163 1969 3,575 1973 3,667 1970 3,749 1965 Most Yards Allowed, Season 6,291 2008 6,248 2002 6,211 2009 6,037 2004 5,896 2016 Fewest Yards Allowed, Game 89 vs. Seattle Dec. 24, 1995 91 vs. Houston Oct. 12, 1969 93 vs. Oakland Dec. 7, 1997 100 at Boston Sept. 21, 1969 105 vs. Boston Dec. 14, 1963 105 vs. Boston Oct. 11, 1970 Most Yards Allowed, Game 563 vs. Houston 542 at N.Y. Jets 542 at Tennessee 541 at L.A. Chargers 539 at Oakland 539 vs. Oakland 535 vs. Denver

Dec. 16, 1990 Oct. 2, 1988 (OT) Dec. 13, 2004 Sept. 9, 2018 Nov. 3, 1968 Oct. 3, 1977 Dec. 1, 2013

Fewest Plays Allowed, Season 556 1982 (9 games)

36

808 1969 813 1971 Most Plays Allowed, Season 1,159 1984 1,126 1985 1,102 1981 Fewest Plays Allowed, Game 39 vs. Houston Oct. 22, 1967 39 vs. Oakland Dec. 7, 1997 40 vs. Cincinnati Oct. 13, 1968 40 at Boston Sept. 21, 1969 Most Plays Allowed, Game 97 at N.Y. Jets Oct. 2, 1988 (OT) 95 vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 91 vs. Chicago Nov. 8, 1981

Rushing Fewest Rushing Attempts Allowed, Season 279 1982 (9 games) 316 1969 343 1967 Most Rushing Attempts Allowed, Season 634 1977 609 1988 601 1978 Fewest Rushing Attempts Allowed, Game 9 at Oakland Dec. 5, 2004 11 at New Orleans Sept. 4, 1994 11 at Oakland Dec. 3, 1995 11 vs. Oakland Dec. 10, 2017 12 at N.Y. Jets Nov. 27, 1966 12 at Seattle Nov. 28, 2010 Most Rushing Attempts Allowed, Game 65 at Buffalo Oct. 29, 1973 62 at Tampa Bay Dec. 16, 1979 61 at Oakland Dec. 8, 1973 61 vs. Chicago Nov. 8, 1981 Fewest Rushing Yards Allowed, Season 980 1960 1,066 1982 (9 games) 1,091 1969 Fewest Rushing Yards Per Game Allowed, Season 70.0 (980 in 14 games) 1960 77.9 (1,091 in 14 games) 1969 82.9 (1,327 in 16 games) 1995 Most Rushing Yards Allowed, Season 2,971 1977 2,861 1976 2,712 1975 Most Rushing Yards Per Game Allowed, Season 211.8 (2,971 in 14 games) 1977 204.4 (2,861 in 14 games) 1976 193.7 (2,712 in 14 games) 1975 Fewest Rushing Yards Allowed, Game

@CHIEFS


-27 vs. Houston 3 at San Diego 8 at Oakland

Dec. 4, 1960 Nov. 19, 1961 Dec. 3, 1995

175 1977 186 1972, 1975 195 1970

Most Rushing Yards Allowed, Game 351 vs. Cleveland Dec. 20, 2009 332 vs. Tennessee Oct. 19, 2008 330 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 7, 1976 322 at Cleveland Oct. 30, 1977 300 vs. Oakland Sept. 14, 2008

Most Pass Completions Allowed, Season 403 2002 350 2016 348 2008 349 2015 334 2013

Fewest Individual 100-Yard Games Allowed, Season 0 1960, 1969, 1971, 1981, 1995

Fewest Pass Completions Allowed, Game 1 vs. San Diego Sept. 20, 1998 2 vs. Denver Nov. 13,2011 3 vs. Houston Oct. 22, 1967 3 at N.Y. Jets Nov. 7, 1971 3 vs. Oakland Dec. 8, 1974 4 at San Diego Nov. 2, 1986 4 at Houston Oct. 9, 1988

Most Individual 100-Yard Games Allowed, Season 9 2003 8 1976, 1977, 2007 Fewest Rushing Touchdowns Allowed, Season 4 1968 5 2016 6 1969, 1971 7 1982 (9 games), 1995, 2013, 2015 Most Rushing Touchdowns Allowed, Season 25 2008 24 1975, 1976 23 1977, 1988 Most Rushing Touchdowns Allowed, Game 5 vs. Pittsburgh Nov. 7, 1976 5 at Denver Dec. 7, 2003 4 6 times; Last vs Tennessee Oct. 19, 2008

Passing Fewest Pass Attempts Allowed, Season 262 1982 (9 games) 324 1973 325 1975 333 1977 Most Pass Attempts Allowed, Season 616 2002 607 2015 598 2016 596 1995 592 2013 Fewest Pass Attempts Allowed, Game 8 vs. Denver Nov. 13, 2011 9 at N.Y. Jets Nov. 7, 1971 9 vs. Oakland Dec. 8, 1974 10 vs. L.A. Raiders Sept. 16, 1973 10 at San Diego Dec. 18, 1988 Most Pass Attempts Allowed, Game 65 vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 61 vs. Seattle Sept. 29, 1985 61 vs. Jacksonville Oct. 7, 2018 60 at Oakland Oct. 5, 1980 60 at Pittsburgh Sept. 16, 2018 Fewest Pass Completions Allowed, Season 155 1982 (9 games) 157 1973

37

Most Pass Completions Allowed, Game 39 at New England Sept. 22, 2002 39 at Pittsburgh Sept. 16, 2018 37 vs. San Diego Dec. 22, 1985 37 vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 37 vs. New Orleans Oct. 23, 2016 35 vs. Oakland Oct. 27, 2002 34 vs. L.A. Raiders Sept. 12, 1985 34 vs. San Diego Dec. 14, 2008 34 at. L.A. Chargers Sept. 9, 2018 Fewest Net Passing Yards Allowed, Season 1,619 1973 1,667 1982 (9 games) 1,942 1973 2,010 1970 Most Net Passing Yards Allowed, Season 4,203 2004 4,181 2002 3,962 2013 3,958 2016 3,952 2017 Fewest Net Passing Yards Allowed, Game -19 vs. San Diego Sept. 20, 1998 9 vs. N.Y. Jets Nov. 7, 1971 12 vs. Oakland Dec. 8, 1974 Most Net Passing Yards Allowed, Game 505 vs. Houston Dec. 16, 1990 472 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 469 at Oakland Nov. 3, 1968 Fewest Individual 300-Yard Games Allowed, Season 0 1962, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1988, 2000 Most Individual 300-Yard Games Allowed, Season 8 2002 Fewest Passing Touchdowns Allowed, Season 10 1969 11 1971, 1973 12 1982 (9 games), 1988

@CHIEFS


Most Passing Touchdowns Allowed, Season 32 2004 29 2012 27 2002 25 1964, 1976, 1980, 1987, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2015 24 1999 Most Passing Touchdowns Allowed, Game 5 vs. Indianapolis Oct. 31, 2004 5 at Denver Nov. 14, 2010 5 vs. Denver Dec. 1, 2013 5 at Green Bay Sept. 28, 2015 5 at Pittsburgh Oct. 2, 2016 4 16 times; Last at Detroit Sept. 18, 2011

Sacks Most Seasons Leading League 4 1960, 1965, 1969, 1990

Most Consecutive Games, One or More Interceptions By 23 1967-69 18 1966-67 16 1982-83 Most Yards Returning Interceptions, Season 596 1969 578 1967 567 1986 Fewest Yards Returning Interceptions, Season 119 2012 124 2006 140 1987

Most Touchdowns Returning Interceptions, Season 6 1992 5 1972, 1974, 1999, 2013 4 1960, 1967, 1986, 1997, 2015, 2016

Fewest Sacks, Season *10.0 2008 15.0 1982 (9 games) 22.0 1976, 2009 23.0 1988

*NFL RECORD Sept. 30, 1984 Sept. 6, 1998 Nov. 2, 1969 Nov. 11, 1990 Oct. 13, 2013

Most Opponents Yards Lost Attempting to Pass, Season 439 1968 Fewest Opponents Yards Lost Attempting to Pass, Season 62 2008 120 1982 (9 games) 137 2009

Interceptions By Most Consecutive Seasons Leading League 5 1966-70 Most Passes Intercepted By, Season 37 1968 33 1966 32 1960, 1962, 1969 Fewest Passes Intercepted By, Season 7 2012 11 1987 12 1982 (9 games), 1994 Most Passes Intercepted By, Game

38

Dec. 8, 1968 Sept. 25, 2016

Most Yards Returning Interceptions, Game 188 vs. N.Y. Titans Dec. 17, 1961 162 at Oakland Dec. 6, 2015 142 vs. L.A. Raiders Oct. 28, 1991 136 vs. Seattle Dec. 11, 1977

Most Sacks, Season 60.0 1990 54.0 1997 51.0 2000 50.0 1984, 1992

Most Sacks, Game 11.0 vs. Cleveland 10.0 vs. Oakland 9.0 at Buffalo 9.0 vs. Seattle 9.0 vs. Oakland

7 at San Diego 6 8 times; Last vs. New York Jets

Most Touchdowns Returning Interceptions, Game 2 vs. N.Y. Titans Dec. 17, 1961 2 at Denver Oct. 1, 1972 2 at Denver Dec. 19, 1982 2 vs. San Diego Oct. 19, 1986 2 vs. Denver Dec. 27, 1992 2 at Baltimore Oct. 21, 1999 2 at Denver Jan. 3, 2010 2 at Oakland Oct. 23, 2011 Most Touchdowns Returning Interceptions, Both Teams, Game *4 Kansas City (0) at Seattle (4) Nov. 4, 1984 3 Kansas City (2) vs. San Diego (1) Oct. 19, 1986 *NFL RECORD

Opponents Interceptions Most Yards, Interception Returns Opponents, Season 688 1984 Most Yards Interception Returns, Opponent, Game *325 at Seattle Nov. 4, 1984 *NFL RECORD Most Touchdowns Returning Interceptions Opponents, Season 7 1984 Most Touchdowns Returning Interceptions Opponent, Game *4 at Seattle Nov. 4, 1984 *NFL RECORD

Punting Most Opponents Punts, Season

@CHIEFS


102 1995 98 1999 94 1969 Fewest Opponents Punts, Season 38 1982 (9 games) 50 2008 55 1962 Lowest Opponents Average Distance, Season 37.0 1986, 1990 38.6 1982 (9 games) 38.9 1981 Highest Opponents Average Distance, Season 47.6 2011 46.8 2012 46.6 2013 45.7 2005 45.2 2010 Most Opponents Punts Blocked, Season 6 1990 4 1986 3 1963, 1982 2 1966, 1979, 1980, 1989, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2006 Most Opponents Punts Blocked, Game 3 vs. Denver Dec. 8, 1963 2 at Seattle Sept. 30, 1979 2 vs. Cleveland Sept. 30, 1990

Punt Returns Most Opponents Punt Returns, Season 60 1984 55 1974, 1976 54 1983 Most Opponents Punt Returns, Game 9 at Cincinnati Nov. 24, 1974 Fewest Punt Return Yards Allowed, Season 157 2016 164 2017 170 2015 179 2005 190 1991 Most Punt Return Yards Allowed, Season 702 1977 634 1974 572 1986 Most Punt Return Yards Allowed, Game 170 at San Diego Sept. 26, 1965 Lowest Punt Return Average Allowed, Season 5.23 (30-157) 2016 6.37 (46-293) 1981 6.43 (49-315) 1979 6.47 (38-246) 2013 Highest Punt Returns Average Allowed, Season 15.36 (22-338) (9 games) 1982 14.93 (29-433) 1965

39

14.04 (50-702)

1977

Most Punt Returns Touchdowns Allowed, Season 2 1982, 1990, 2004, 2012

Kickoff Returns Fewest Opponents Kickoff Returns, Season 25 2011, 2017 27 2012 35 2016 40 1973 42 1982 (9 games) Most Opponents Kickoff Returns, Season 88 2002 87 2003 85 2004 84 1966 Fewest Kickoff Return Yards Allowed, Season 486 2017 605 2011 690 2012 794 1982 (9 games) 843 2016 958 1977 Most Kickoff Return Yards Allowed, Season 2,053 2005 2,045 1966 2,043 2003 1,908 2004 1,880 2002 Most Kickoff Return Yards Allowed, Game 289 at Denver Sept. 7, 1963 278 vs. Cleveland Dec. 20, 2009 Lowest Kickoff Return Average Allowed, Season 17.17 (81-1,391) 1990 18.00 (71-1,278) 1986 18.57 (23-427) 2017 18.80 (64-1,203) 1992 Highest Kickoff Return Average Allowed, Season 25.78 (40-1,031) 1973 25.56 (27-690) 2012 25.37 (54-1,370) 1974 Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns Allowed, Season 2 1988 2 1989 2 2009

Blocked Field Goals Most Blocked Field Goals, Season 6 1960 5 1966 4 1962, 1965, 1973 3 1963, 1967, 1996 2 1982 (9 games), 1986, 1992, 1993, 2003 Most Blocked Field Goals, Game 3 at San Diego Oct. 15, 1967

@CHIEFS


2 2 2 2 2 2 2

vs. Buffalo at Oakland at Oakland at San Diego at Green Bay at San Diego at San Diego

Dec. 18, 1960 Nov. 3, 1963 Sept. 18, 1966 Oct. 15, 1967 Oct. 4, 1973 Oct. 17, 1993 Nov. 30, 2003

Fumbles Fewest Opponents Fumbles, Season 16 1971 18 1984, 2011 19 2000, 2012, 2015, 2017 Fewest Opponents Fumbles Recovered, Season 6 2011, 2012 7 1971, 2015 8 1966, 2004, 2007 9 2010 10 1982 (9 games), 1996, 2017 Most Opponents Fumbles, Season 42 1981 40 1975 39 1977 Most Opponents Fumbles Recovered, Season 26 1994 25 1990 23 1977

40

Turnovers Fewest Opponents Turnovers, Season 13 2012 21 2004 22 1982 (9 games), 2007 23 2010 26 2001, 2011, 2017 Most Opponents Turnovers, Season 51 1983 49 1962, 1968, 1986 Most Opponents Turnovers, Game 9 vs. Houston Oct. 28, 1962 9 vs. Houston Oct. 12, 1969 9 vs. St. Louis Oct. 2, 1983 Best Turnover Ratio, Season 26 (45 takes/19 gives) 22 (49 takes/27 gives) 21 (45 takes/21 gives) 18 (49 takes/31 gives) 18 (39 takes/21 gives) 18 (36 takes/18 gives)

1990 1968 1999 1962 1992 2013

Worst Turnover Ratio, Season -24 (13 takes/37 gives) -13 (28 takes/41 gives) -11 (22 takes/33 gives) -8 (33 takes/41 gives) -8 (33 takes/41 gives)

2012 1987 2007 1965 1989

@CHIEFS


Single Game Pass Attempts (All 50+) 61 Blake Bortles, Jacksonville 60 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh 58 Mark Hermann, San Diego 56 Kyle Orton, Denver 55 Rich Gannon, Oakland 54 Steve DeBerg, Tampa Bay 54 Tom Brady, New England 52 Jim Plunkett, Oakland 52 Derek Carr, Oakland 51 Philip Rivers, L.A. Chargers 50 Brian Griese, Denver

Oct. 7, 2018 Sept. 16, 2018 Dec. 22, 1985 Jan. 3, 2010 Oct. 27, 2002 Oct. 28, 1984 Sept. 22, 2002 Oct. 5, 1980 Oct. 19, 2017 Sept. 9, 2018 Oct. 20, 2002

Pass Completions (All 30+) 39 Tom Brady, New England 39 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh 37 Mark Hermann, San Diego 37 Drew Brees, New Orleans 35 Rich Gannon, Oakland 34 Jim Plunkett, Oakland 34 Philip Rivers, San Diego 34 Philip Rivers, L.A. Chargers 33 Drew Bledsoe, New England 33 Donovan McNabb, Philadelphia 33 Blake Bortles, Jacksonville 32 Jay Cutler, Denver 32 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh 32 Kyle Orton, Denver 31 Jim Zorn, Seattle 31 Rich Gannon, Oakland 31 Marc Bulger, St. Louis 31 Jeff Garcia, Tampa Bay 31 Derek Carr, Oakland 30 Dan Fouts, San Diego 30 Tony Romo, Dallas

Sept. 22, 2002 Sept. 16, 2018 Dec. 22, 1985 Oct. 23, 2016 Oct. 27, 2002 Sept. 12, 1985 Dec. 14, 2008 Sept. 9, 2018 Dec. 4, 2000 Oct. 2, 2005 Oct. 7, 2018 Dec. 7, 2008 Nov. 22, 2009 Jan. 3, 2010 Sept. 27, 1981 Sept. 9, 2001 Nov. 5, 2006 Nov. 2, 2008 Dec. 6, 2015 Oct. 14, 1984 Sept. 15, 2013

Passing Yards (All 400+) 527 Warren Moon, Houston 472 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis 452 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh 445 Charley Johnson, Denver 431 Kyle Orton, Denver 430 Blake Bortles, Jacksonville 426 Billy Volek, Tennessee 424 Philip Rivers, L.A. Chargers 417 Derek Carr, Oakland 413 Pete Beathard, Houston 410 Tom Brady, New England 403 Peyton Manning, Denver 400 John Elway, Denver

Dec. 16, 1990 Oct. 31, 2004 Sept. 16, 2018 Nov. 18, 1974 Jan. 3, 2010 Oct. 7, 2018 Dec. 13, 2004 Sept. 9, 2018 Oct. 19, 2017 Sept. 9, 1968 Sept. 22, 2002 Dec. 1, 2013 Dec. 6, 1998

Touchdown Passes 5 George Blanda, Houston 5 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis 5 Peyton Manning, Denver 5 Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay 5 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh 5 Deshaun Watson, Houston Interceptions Thrown 6 John Hadl, San Diego 6 Ryan Fitzpatrick, N.Y. Jets

41

Oct. 24, 1965 Oct. 31, 2004 Dec. 1, 2013 Sept. 28, 2015 Oct. 2, 2016 Oct. 8, 2017 Dec. 8, 1968 Sept. 25, 2016

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

George Blanda, Houston John Hadl, San Diego Babe Parilli, Boston George Blanda, Houston Pete Beathard, Houston Marty Domres, San Diego Alan Pastrana, Denver James Harris, San Diego Jim Plunkett, Oakland Jim Zorn, Seattle Dave Krieg, Seattle John Elway, Denver

Oct. 28, 1962 Dec. 16, 1962 Dec. 14, 1963 Oct. 4, 1964 Oct. 12, 1969 Nov. 9, 1969 Dec. 6, 1970 Nov. 26, 1978 Oct. 5, 1980 Nov. 9, 1980 Dec. 9, 1984 Dec. 14, 1985

Long Pass (All 80+) 90 N. Johnson to R. Upchurch, Denver 89 J. Kemp to E. Dubenion, Buffalo 87 S. McNair to M. Clayton, Baltimore 87 M. Hasselbeck to B. Obomanu, SEA 82 J. Lee to A. Denson, Denver 82 D. Lamonica to F. Biletnikoff, Oakland 82 B. Griese to S. Sharpe, Denver 80 J. Lee to B. Groman 80 S. Wyche to B. Trumpy

Sept. 21, 1975 Oct. 13, 1963 Dec. 10, 2006 Nov. 28, 2010 Nov. 1, 1964 Nov. 3, 1968 Oct. 20, 2002 Oct. 22, 1961 Sept. 28, 1969

Pass Receptions 16 Troy Brown, New England 14 Kellen Winslow, San Diego 14 Jabar Gaffney, Denver 13 Joe Washington, Baltimore 13 Terrance Mathis, Atlanta 13 Tim Brown, Oakland 13 Steven Jackson, St. Louis

Sept. 22, 2002 Dec. 11, 1983 Jan. 3, 2010 Sept. 2, 1979 Sept. 18, 1994 Oct. 27, 2002 Nov. 5, 2006

Receiving Yards (All 200+) 250 Miles Austin, Dallas 245 Haywood Jeffires, Houston 233 Drew Bennett, Tennessee 232 Lance Alworth, San Diego 214 Shannon Sharpe, Denver 213 Jabar Gaffney, Denver 210 Amari Cooper, Oakland 203 Don Maynard, N.Y. Jets

Oct. 11, 2009 Dec. 16, 1990 Dec. 13, 2004 Oct. 20, 1963 Oct. 20, 2002 Jan. 3, 2010 Oct. 19, 2017 Sept. 15, 1968

Touchdown Receptions 4 Eric Decker, Denver 3 Bob Chandler, Buffalo 3 Kellen Winslow, San Diego 3 Shannon Sharpe, Denver 3 Drew Bennett, Tennessee 3 Antonio Gates, San Diego 3 Randall Cobb, Green Bay 3 DeAndre Hopkins, Houston

Dec. 1, 2013 Oct. 3, 1976 Dec. 11, 1983 Dec. 12, 1993 Dec. 13, 2004 Oct. 30, 2005 Sept. 28, 2015 Oct. 8, 2017

Rushing Attempts 39 O.J. Simpson, Buffalo 39 Ricky Bell, Tampa Bay 39 Marion Butts, San Diego

Oct. 29, 1973 Dec. 16, 1979 Dec. 17, 1989

Rushing Yards (All 200+) 286 Jerome Harrison, Cleveland 220 Tiki Barber, N.Y. Giants 218 Clinton Portis, Denver 217 Gary Anderson, San Diego 214 Greg Pruitt, Cleveland 207 Curt Warner, Seattle

Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Nov.

20, 2009 17, 2005 7, 2003 18, 1988 14, 1975 27, 1983 (OT)

@CHIEFS


Rushing Touchdowns 5 Clinton Portis, Denver 3 Jon Keyworth, Denver 3 Greg Pruitt, Cleveland 3 Pete Banaszak, Oakland 3 Walter Payton, Chicago 3 Curt Warner, Seattle 3 Marcus Allen, L.A. Raiders 3 Rodney Hampton, N.Y. Giants 3 Terrell Davis, Denver 3 Curtis Martin, N.Y. Jets 3 Clinton Portis, Denver 3 Onterrio Smith, Minnesota 3 Michael Pittman, Tampa Bay 3 Michael Turner, Atlanta 3 LenDale White, Tennessee 3 Jerome Harrison, Cleveland 3 Jeremy Hill, Cincinnati 3 Mike Gillislee, New England

Dec. 7, 2003 Nov. 18, 1974 Dec. 14, 1975 Dec. 21, 1975 Nov. 13, 1977 Nov. 27, 1983 (OT) Nov. 25, 1990 Dec. 19, 1992 Dec. 6, 1998 Nov. 11, 2001 Dec. 15, 2002 Dec. 20, 2003 Nov. 7, 2004 Sept. 21, 2008 Oct. 19, 2008 Dec. 20, 2009 Oct. 4, 2015 Sept. 7, 2017

Long Run (All 80+) 87 Paul Lowe, San Diego 85 LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego 80 LenDale White, Tennessee Total Touchdowns 5 Clinton Portis, Denver 4 Clinton Portis, Denver 4 Eric Decker, Denver Interceptions Made 4 Deltha Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal, Denver 3 David Fulcher, Cincinnati

Sept. 10, 1961 Dec. 17, 2006 Oct. 19, 2008

Dec. 7, 2003 Dec. 15, 2002 Dec. 1, 2013 Oct. 7, 2001 Oct. 1, 1989

101 Tony Greene, Buffalo 100 Speedy Duncan, San Diego Long Punt Return 95 Johnny Bailey, Chicago Long Kickoff Return (All 100+) 103 Joshua Cribbs, Cleveland 100 Nemiah Wilson, Denver 100 Joshua Cribbs, Cleveland Long Punt (All 80+) 83 Chris Norman, Denver 82 Paul Maguire, San Diego Long Field Goal (All 55+) 59 Matt Bryant, Atlanta 57 Sebastian Janikowski, Oakland 56 Sebastian Janikowski, Oakland 56 Matt Prater, Denver 55 John Kasay, Seattle 55 Kris Brown, Pittsburgh 55 Sebastian Janikowski, Oakland 55 Nate Kaeding, San Diego Times Sacked (All 10.0+) 11 Paul McDonald, Cleveland 10 Jeff George, Oakland

Oct. 3, 1976 Oct. 15, 1967 Dec. 29, 1990 Dec. 20, 2009 Oct. 8, 1966 Dec. 20, 2009 Sept. 23, 1984 Nov. 5, 1961 Dec. 4, 2016 Dec. 16, 2012 Sept. 14, 2008 Sept. 28, 2008 Jan. 2, 1994 Oct. 14, 2001 Nov. 25, 2007 Nov. 29, 2009 Sept. 30, 1984 Sept. 6, 1998

Touchdowns On Interception Returns 2 Dave Brown, Seattle Nov. 4, 1984 Fumbles 6 Dave Krieg, Seattle

Nov. 5, 1989

Long Interception Return (All 100+) 102 Marcus Coleman, Houston Sept. 26, 2004

42

@CHIEFS


Most Points After Touchdown, No Misses, Career 8 Jan Stenerud (5 games)

Service Most Games Played, Career 10 John Alt 10 Tim Grunhard 10 Dave Szott 10 Derrick Thomas 9 Dan Saleaumua 9 Tracy Simien 9 Neil Smith 8 Len Dawson 8 Jonathan Hayes 8 Nick Lowery 8 Johnny Robinson 8 Kevin Ross 8 Jim Tyrer 8 Jerrel Wilson 8 Will Shields

Most Field Goals Attempted, Career 17 Jan Stenerud (5 games - 17 Att.) 12 Nick Lowery (8 games - 12 Att.)

1984-96 1990-00 1990-00 1989-99 1989-96 1991-97 1988-96 1962-75 1985-93 1980-93 1960-71 1984-93, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;97 1961-73 1963-77 1993-06

Most Field Goals Attempted, Game 5 Jan Stenerud vs. N.Y. Jets Dec. 20, 1969 4 Nick Lowery vs. Miami Jan. 5, 1991 4 Jan Stenerud vs. Miami Dec. 25, 1971 Most Field Goals, Career 9 Jan Stenerud (5 games - 17 Att.) 8 Nick Lowery (8 games - 12 Att.) Most Field Goals, Game 3 Jan Stenerud vs. Minnesota 3 Nick Lowery at Miami 3 Ryan Succop at Indianapolis 3 Cairo Santos at Houston

Scoring Most Points, Career 37 Nick Lowery (8 games - 8 FGs, 13 PATs) 35 Jan Stenerud (5 games - 9 FGs, 8 PATs) 24 Cairo Santos (3 games - 6 FGs, 6 PATs) 18 Mike Garrett (6 games - 3 TDs) 18 Marcus Allen (6 games - 3 TDs) 18 Knile Davis (3 games - 3 TDs) Most Points, Game 14 Ryan Succop at Indianapolis 12 Abner Haynes vs. Houston 12 Mike Garrett at Buffalo 12 Ed Podolak vs. Miami 12 Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis 12 Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis 12 Knile Davis at Indianapolis 12 Cairo Santos at Houston 11 Jan Stenerud vs. Minnesota

1980-93 1967-79 2014-16 1966-70 1993-97 2013-15

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 23, 1962 Jan. 1, 1967 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 9, 2016 Jan. 11, 1970

Most Touchdowns, Career 3 Marcus Allen (6 games) 3 Mike Garrett (6 games) 3 Knile Davis (2 games)

1993-97 1966-70 2013-16

Most Touchdowns, Game 2 Abner Haynes vs. Houston 2 Mike Garrett at Buffalo 2 Ed Podolak vs. Miami 2 Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis 2 Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis 2 Knile Davis at Indianapolis

Dec. 23, 1962 Jan. 1, 1967 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 4, 2014

Most Points After Touchdown, Career 13 Nick Lowery (8 games - 14 Att.) 8 Jan Stenerud (5 games - 8 Att.) 6 Ryan Succop (2 games - 6 Att.) 6 Cairo Santos (3 games - 6 Att.) 5 Mike Mercer (2 games - 5 Att.) Most Points After Touchdown, Game 5 Ryan Succop at Indianapolis (5 Att.) 4 Mike Mercer at Buffalo (4 Att.) 4 Nick Lowery at Houston (4 Att.) 4 Morten Andersen vs. IND (4 Att.)

43

1980-93 1967-79 2009-13 2014-16 1966 Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

1967-79 1980-93

4, 2014 1, 1967 16, 1994 11, 2004

Longest Field Goal 49 Cairo Santos at Houston 49 Cairo Santos at Houston 48 Jan Stenerud vs. Minnesota 48 Cairo Santos vs. Pittsburgh 43 Ryan Succop at Indianapolis

1967-79 1980-93 Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

11, 1970 5, 1991 4, 2014 9, 2016

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

9, 2016 9, 2016 11, 1970 15, 2017 4, 2014

Rushing Most Rushing Attempts, Career 100 Marcus Allen (6 games) 61 Mike Garrett (6 games) 59 Barry Word (4 games) 51 Wendell Hayes (5 games) 41 Curtis McClinton (3 games) Most Rushing Attempts, Game 33 Barry Word vs. L.A. Raiders 24 Curtis McClinton vs. Houston 24 Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis 22 Wendell Hayes vs. Miami 21 Marcus Allen vs. Pittsburgh 21 Marcus Allen vs. Indianapolis

1993-97 1966-70 1990-92 1968-74 1962-69 Dec. 28, 1991 Dec. 23, 1962 Jan. 11, 2004 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 7, 1996

Most Rushing Yards Gained, Career 386 Marcus Allen (6 games) 1993-97 208 Wendell Hayes (5 games) 1968-74 197 Barry Word (4 games) 1990-92 186 Mike Garrett (6 games) 1966-70 176 Priest Holmes (1 game) 2001-07 Most Rushing Yards Gained, Game 176 Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis 130 Barry Word vs. L.A. Raiders 100 Wendell Hayes vs. Miami 94 Marcus Allen vs. Indianapolis 85 Ed Podolak vs. Miami

Jan. 11, 2004 Dec. 28, 1991 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 7, 1996 Dec. 25, 1971

Most Games, 100 or More Rushing Yards, Career 1 Wendell Hayes (5 games) 1968-74 1 Barry Word (3 games) 1990-92 1 Priest Holmes (1 game) 2001-07 Longest Run From Scrimmage

@CHIEFS


48 41 33 32 26

Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis Jamaal Charles vs. Baltimore Jack Spikes vs. Houston Ed Podolak vs. Miami Christian Okoye at Miami

Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 9, 2011 Dec. 23, 1962 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 5, 1991

Most Rushing Touchdowns, Career 3 Marcus Allen (6 games) 1993-97 3 Mike Garrett (6 games) 1966-70 Most Rushing Touchdowns, Game 2 Mike Garrett at Buffalo Jan. 1, 1967 2 Priest Holmes vs. Indianpolis Jan. 11, 2004

Passing Most Passes Attempted, Career 188 Len Dawson (8 games) 185 Alex Smith (5 games) 141 Joe Montana (4 games) 64 Dave Krieg (4 games) 54 Trent Green (2 games) 53 Steve DeBerg (3 games) Most Passes Attempted, Game 50 Alex Smith at New England 46 Alex Smith at Indianapolis 43 Joe Montana vs. Pittsburgh 38 Joe Montana at Houston 37 Joe Montana at Miami 37 Elvis Grbac vs. Denver Most Passes Completed, Career 120 Alex Smith (5 games) 107 Len Dawson (8 games) 85 Joe Montana (4 games) 33 Dave Krieg (4 games) 32 Trent Green (2 games) 31 Steve DeBerg (3 games) Most Passes Completed, Game 30 Alex Smith at Indianapolis 29 Alex Smith at New England 28 Joe Montana vs. Pittsburgh 26 Joe Montana at Miami 24 Elvis Grbac vs. Denver 24 Alex Smith vs. Tennessee

1962-75 2013-17 1993-94 1992-93 2001-06 1988-91 Jan. 16, 2016 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 16, 1994 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 4, 1998 2013-17 1962-75 1993-94 1992-93 2001-06 1988-91 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 16, 2016 Jan. 8, 1994 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 4, 1998 Jan. 6, 2018

Highest Completion Percentage, Career attempts) 64.9 Alex Smith (5 games: 185-120) 60.3 Joe Montana (4 games: 141-85) 56.9 Len Dawson (8 games: 188-107)

(100 2013-17 1993-94 1962-75

Highest Completion Percentage, Game (15 completions) 77.3 Alex Smith at Houston (22-17) Jan. 9, 2016 72.7 Alex Smith vs. Tennessee (33-24) Jan. 6, 2018 70.3 Joe Montana at Miami (37-26) Dec. 31, 1994 69.2 Len Dawson vs. Miami (26-18) Dec. 25, 1971 Most Passing Yards, Career 1,497 Len Dawson (8 games) 1,250 Alex Smith (5 games) 1,014 Joe Montana (4 games) 454 Dave Krieg (4 games)

44

1962-75 2013-17 1993-94 1992-93

Most Passing Yards, Game 378 Alex Smith at Indianapolis 314 Joe Montana at Miami 299 Joe Montana at Houston 276 Joe Montana vs. Pittsburgh Longest Pass Completion 79 Alex Smith at Indianapolis (to Donnie Avery) 63 Len Dawson vs. Miami (to Elmo Wright) 63 Alex Smith at Indianapolis (to Dwayne Bowe) 61 Len Dawson at N.Y. Jets (to Otis Taylor) Most Touchdown Passes, Career 9 Alex Smith (5 games) 7 Len Dawson (8 games) 6 Joe Montana (4 games) 2 Steve DeBerg (3 games) 2 Dave Krieg (4 games) 2 Trent Green (2 games) Most Touchdown Passes, Game 4 Alex Smith at Indianapolis 3 Joe Montana at Houston 2 Len Dawson at Buffalo 2 Joe Montana at Miami 2 Alex Smith vs. Tennessee

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 4, 1994

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 20, 1969 2013-17 1962-75 1993-94 1988-91 1992-93 2001-06 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 1, 1967 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 6, 2018

Most Passes Had Intercepted, Career 8 Len Dawson (8 games) 1962-75 4 Mark Vlasic (1 game) 1991-92 4 Joe Montana (4 games) 1993-94 Most Passes Had Intercepted, Game 4 Len Dawson at Oakland Dec. 22, 1968 4 Mark Vlasic at Buffalo Jan. 5, 1992

Pass Receiving Most Pass Receptions, Career 27 Otis Taylor (7 games) 27 J.J. Birden (8 games) 23 Travis Kelce (4 games) 21 Keith Cash (6 games) 19 Kimble Anders (7 games)

1965-75 1990-94 2013-17 1992-96 1991-00

Most Pass Receptions, Game 8 Ed Podolak vs. Miami 8 Stephone Paige at Miami 8 Andre Rison vs. Denver 8 Dwayne Bowe at Indianapolis 8 Travis Kelce at Houston 7 Keith Cash vs. Pittsburgh 7 Kimble Anders vs. Indianapolis 7 Dexter McCluster at Indianapolis 7 Knile Davis at Indianapolis 7 Tyreek Hill vs. Tennessee

Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 5, 1991 Jan. 4, 1998 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 9, 2016 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 7, 1996 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 6, 2018

Most Receiving Yards, Career 481 Otis Taylor (7 games) 363 J.J. Birden (8 games) 294 Travis Kelce (4 games)

1965-75 1990-94 2013-17

@CHIEFS


266 Keith Cash (6 games) 239 Willie Davis (5 games)

1992-96 1991-95

Most Receiving Yards, Game (All 100+) 150 Dwayne Bowe at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 142 Stephone Paige at Miami Jan. 5, 1991 128 Travis Kelce at Houston Jan. 9, 2016 117 Otis Taylor at Oakland Dec. 22, 1968 110 Ed Podolak vs. Miami Dec. 25, 1971 110 Andre Rison vs. Denver Jan. 4, 1998 104 Elmo Wright vs. Miami Dec. 25, 1971 103 Kimble Anders at Miami Dec. 31, 1994 Most Games, 100 or More Receiving Yards, Career 1 By eightplayers; Last, Travis Kelce at Jan. 9, 2016 Houston Longest Pass Reception 79 Donnie Avery at Indianapolis (from Alex Smith) 63 Elmo Wright vs. Miami (from Len Dawson) 63 Dwayne Bowe at Indianapolis (from Alex Smith) 61 Otis Taylor at N.Y. Jets (from Len Dawson)

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 20, 1969

Most Receiving Touchdowns, Career 2 Otis Taylor (7 games) 1965-75 2 Fred Jones (3 games) 1990-93 2 J.J. Birden (8 games) 1990-94 2 Tony Gonzalez (3 games) 1997-08 2 Albert Wilson (3 games) 2014-16 Most Receiving Touchdowns, Game 1 Numerous times; Last, Travis Kelce and Demarcus Robinson vs. Tennessee

Jan. 6, 2018

1993-97 1966-70 1968-74

Most Attempts, Game 34 Barry Word vs. L.A. Raiders 30 Ed Podolak vs. Miami 29 Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis

Dec. 28, 1991 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 11, 2004

Most Net Yards, Career 541 Marcus Allen (6 games) 481 Otis Taylor (7 games) 363 J.J. Birden (8 games) 350 Ed Podolak (4 games)

1993-97 1965-75 1990-94 1969-77

Most Net Yards, Game *350 Ed Podolak vs. Miami 227 Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis 208 Priest Holmes vs. Indianapolis 150 Dwayne Bowe at Indianapolis 142 Stephone Paige at Miami

Punting 45

1963-77 1990-93 2005-17 1994-98

Most Punts, Game 8 Jerrel Wilson at Oakland 8 Bryan Barker at San Diego

Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 2, 1993

Longest Punt 66 Dustin Colquitt at Indianapolis 62 Louie Aguiar vs. Denver 61 Jerrel Wilson vs. Green Bay 59 Jerrel Wilson vs. Minnesota 56 Jerrel Wilson at Oakland 56 Dustin Colquitt vs. Houston

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

6, 2007 4, 1998 15, 1967 11, 1970 4, 1970 9, 2016

Highest Punting Average, Career (20 punts) 46.9 Dustin Colquitt (7 games: 1,266-27) 2005-17 44.6 Jerrel Wilson (8 games: 2,005-45) 1963-77 42.4 Bryan Barker (7 games: 1,613-38) 1990-93 Highest Punting Average, Game (4 punts) 52.3 Dustin Colquitt at IND (314-6) Jan. 6, 2007 50.0 Dustin Colquitt vs. Tennessee (250-5) Jan. 6, 2018 48.5 Jerrel Wilson vs. Minnesota (194-4) Jan. 11, 1970 47.0 Jerrel Wilson at Oakland (302-6) Dec. 22, 1968 46.4 Louie Aguiar vs. Denver (232-5) Jan. 4, 1998

Punt Returns

Combined Net Yards Most Attempts, Career 147 Marcus Allen (6 games) 88 Mike Garrett (6 games) 63 Wendell Hayes (5 games)

Most Punts, Career 43 Jerrel Wilson (8 games) 38 Bryan Barker (7 games) 27 Dustin Colquitt (7 games) 11 Louie Aguiar (3 games)

Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 5, 1991 *NFL RECORD

Most Punt Returns, Career 11 Mike Garrett (6 games) 7 Danan Hughes (6 games)

1966-70 1993-98

Most Punt Returns, Game 4 Mike Garrett vs. Oakland 4 Tamarick Vanover vs. Indianapolis 4 Frankie Hammond Jr. at Houston

Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 7, 1996 Jan. 9, 2016

Most Punt Return Yards, Career 84 Danan Hughes (6 games) 73 Mike Garrett (6 games) 61 Frankie Hammond Jr. (2 games) 44 Tamarick Vanover (2 games)

1993-98 1966-70 2015 1995-99

Most Punt Return Yards, Game 42 Danan Hughes at Houston 37 Mike Garrett at Buffalo 34 Tamarick Vanover vs. Indianapolis 34 Frankie Hammond Jr. at Houston 31 Danan Hughes vs. Pittsburgh Longest Punt Return 35 Danan Hughes at Houston 27 Mike Garrett at Buffalo 15 Danan Hughes vs. Pittsburgh

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

16, 1994 1, 1967 7, 1996 9, 2016 8, 1994

Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 1, 1967 Jan. 8, 1994

Highest Punt Return Average, Career (10 returns) 6.6 Mike Garrett (6 games: 11-73) 1966-70 Highest Punt Return Average, Game (3 14.0 Danan Hughes at Houston (3-42) 12.3 Mike Garrett at Buffalo (3-37) 10.3 Danan Hughes vs. Pittsburgh (3-31)

returns) Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 1, 1967 Jan. 8, 1994

@CHIEFS


Most Touchdowns 0

Most Kickoff Return Touchdowns, Career 1 Dante Hall (2 games) 2000-06 1 Knile Davis (2 games) 2013-15

Kickoff Returns

Interceptions By

Most Kickoff Returns, Career 10 John Stephens (3 games) 10 Dante Hall (2 games) 7 Quintin Demps (1 game) 5 Bert Coan (2 games) 5 Noland Smith (1 game) 5 Tamarick Vanover (2 games) 5 Tyreek Hill (2 games)

1993 2000-06 2013 1963-68 1967-69 1995-99 2016-17

Most Kickoff Returns, Game 7 Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis 7 Quintin Demps at Indianapolis 5 Noland Smith vs. Oakland 5 John Stephens at Buffalo

Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 23, 1994

Most Kickoff Return Yards, Career 266 Dante Hall (2 games) 199 John Stephens (3 games) 196 Knile Davis (3 games) 187 Quintin Demps (1 game) 154 Ed Podolak (1 game)

2000-06 1993 2013-15 2013 1969-77

Most Kickoff Return Yards, Game 208 Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis 187 Quintin Demps at Indianapolis 154 Ed Podolak vs. Miami 106 Knile Davis at Houston 90 Knile Davis at New England

Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 9, 2016 Jan. 16, 2016

Longest 106 (TD) 92 (TD) 78 46 36 35

Kickoff Return Knile Davis at Houston Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis Ed Podolak vs. Miami Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis Dexter McCluster vs. Baltimore Bert Coan at Buffalo

Jan. 9, 2016 Jan. 11, 2004 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 9, 2011 Jan. 1, 1967

Highest Kickoff Return Average, Career (10 returns) 26.6 Dante Hall (2 games: 10-266) 2000-06 19.9 John Stephens (3 games: 10-199) 1993 Highest Kickoff Return Average, Game (3 returns) 51.3 Ed Podolak vs. Miami (3-154) Dec. 25, 1971 30.0 Knile Davis at New England (3-90) Jan. 16, 2016 29.7 Dante Hall vs. Indianapolis (7-208) Jan. 11, 2004 26.7 Quintin Demps at Indianapolis (7-187) Jan. 4, 2014 24.0 John Stephens vs. Pittsburgh (3-72) Jan. 8, 1994 23.0 Tamarick Vanover vs. Denver (3-69) Jan. 4, 1998

46

Most Interceptions, Career 5 Emmitt Thomas (7 games) 4 Johnny Robinson (8 games) 3 Jim Marsalis (4 games) 3 Deron Cherry (4 games) Most Interceptions, Game 2 Johnny Robinson vs. Houston 2 Jim Marsalis at N.Y. Jets 2 Emmitt Thomas at Oakland 2 Deron Cherry vs. L.A. Raiders 2 Ty Law at Indianapolis 2 Husain Abdullah at Indianapolis

1966-78 1960-71 1969-75 1981-91 Dec. 23, 1962 Dec. 20, 1969 Jan. 4, 1970 Dec. 28, 1991 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 4, 2014

Most Consecutive Games, Interceptions 3 Emmitt Thomas 1969 Most Interception Return Yards, Career 131 Johnny Robinson (8 games) 1960-71 101 Emmitt Thomas (7 games) 1966-78 65 Jim Marsalis (4 games) 1969-75 Most Interception Return Yards, Game 72 Johnny Robinson at Buffalo Jan. 1, 1967 69 Emmitt Thomas vs. Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 50 Johnny Robinson vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 Longest Interception Return 72 Johnny Robinson at Buffalo 62 Emmitt Thomas at Oakland 43 Ty Law at Indianapolis 37 Johnny Robinson vs. Houston

Jan. 1, 1967 Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 6, 2007 Dec. 23, 1962

Most TDs, Career 0 0

Sacks Most Sacks, Career 6.5 Derrick Thomas (10 games) 6.5 Neil Smith (9 games) 5.0 Aaron Brown (6 games) Most Sacks, Game 3 Aaron Brown at Oakland 2 Eight times; By seven players Last: Allen Bailey at Houston

1989-99 1988-96 1966-72 Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 9, 2016

@CHIEFS


Scoring Most Points, Game 44 at Indianapolis 31 at Buffalo 31 vs. Indianapolis 30 at Houston 28 at Houston

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

Most Touchdowns, Game 5 at Indianapolis 4 at Buffalo 4 at Houston 4 vs. Indianapolis 3 Four times; Last, vs. Tennessee

4, 2014 1, 1967 11, 2004 9, 2016 16, 1994 Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

4, 2014 1, 1967 16, 1994 11, 2004 6, 2018

First Downs Most First Downs, Game 30 at Indianapolis 28 vs. Pittsburgh 27 at New England 24 at Miami 24 vs. Indianapolis 23 vs. Miami Fewest First Downs, Game 7 at Indianapolis 8 vs. Baltimore 13 at Oakland 13 at Oakland 14 Threetimes; Last, at Buffalo

Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 16, 2016 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 11, 2004 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 9, 2011 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 5, 1992

Net Yards Rushing and Passing Most Net Yards, Game 513 at Indianapolis 451 vs. Miami 414 at Miami 408 vs. Indianapolis 401 vs. Pittsburgh Fewest Net Yards, Game 126 at Indianapolis 161 vs. Baltimore 204 vs. L.A. Raiders 207 at Oakland 213 at Buffalo

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 25, 1971 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 9, 2011 Dec. 28, 1991 Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 5, 1992

Rushing Most Rushing Attempts, Game 54 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 44 vs. Miami Dec. 25, 1971 41 vs. Minnesota Jan. 11, 1970 Fewest Rushing Attempts, Game 14 vs. Pittsburgh Jan. 15, 2017 16 vs. Tennessee Jan. 6, 2018 17 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 18 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994 19 vs. Green Bay Jan. 15, 1967 19 at San Diego Jan. 2, 1993 Most Rushing Yards, Game

47

213 199 196 151 150

vs. Miami vs. Houston vs. Indianapolis vs. Minnesota at Indianapolis

Dec. 25, 1971 Dec. 23, 1962 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 11, 1970 Jan. 4, 2014

Fewest Rushing Yards, Game 44 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 52 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 61 at San Diego Jan. 2, 1993 61 vs. Pittsburgh Jan. 15, 2017 67 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 28, 1968 Most Rushing Touchdowns, 2 at Buffalo 2 at Oakland 2 vs. Miami 2 vs. Indianapolis

Game Jan. 1, 1967 Jan. 4, 1970 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 11, 2004

Passing Most Passing Attempts, Game 52 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 50 at New England Jan. 16, 2016 46 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 44 vs. Pittsburgh Jan. 8, 1994 37 at Miami Dec. 31, 1994 37 vs. Denver Jan. 4, 1998 Fewest Passing Attempts, Game 14 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 14 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 17 at Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 17 vs. Minnesota Jan. 11, 1970 Most Completions, Game 30 at Indianapolis 29 vs. Pittsburgh 29 at New England 26 at Miami 25 at Buffalo

Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 16, 2016 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 23, 1994

Fewest Completions, Game 7 at Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 9 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 9 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 9 vs. Baltimore Jan. 9, 2011 Most Gross Passing Yards, Game 378 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 323 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 314 at Miami Dec. 31, 1994 299 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994 299 vs. Pittsburgh Jan. 8, 1994 Fewest Gross Passing Yards, Game 70 vs. Baltimore Jan. 9, 2011 88 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 79 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 107 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 Most Times Sacked, Game 9 at Buffalo 7 at San Diego 6 vs. Houston 6 vs. Green Bay

Jan. 1, 1967 Jan. 2, 1993 Dec. 23, 1962 Jan. 15, 1967

@CHIEFS


Most Interceptions Thrown, Game 4 at Oakland Dec. 22, 1968 4 at Buffalo Jan. 5, 1992 3 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 7, 1996 3 vs. Baltimore Jan. 9, 2011

Interceptions By Most Interceptions By, Game 5 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 4 at Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 4 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 4 at Houston Jan. 9, 2016

Penalties Most Penalties, Game 10 at Buffalo 8 vs. Tennessee 7 Three times; Last vs. Denver Fewest Penalties, Game 1 at N.Y. Jets 2 at Indianapolis 2 at Indianapolis 3 Twice; Last vs. Indianapolis

Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 6, 2018 Jan. 4, 1998 Dec. 28, 1986 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 7, 1996

Most Yards Penalized, Game 68 vs. Tennessee Jan. 6, 2018 65 vs. Denver Jan. 4, 1998

48

63 at N.Y. Jets 62 at San Diego

Dec. 20, 1969 Jan. 2, 1993

Fewest Yards Penalized, Game 5 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 28, 1986 13 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 15 at Miami Dec. 31, 1994 15 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 20 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991

Fumbles Most Fumbles, Game 5 at Oakland 3 Three times; Last, vs. Miami Most Fumbles Lost, Game 4 at Oakland 2 vs. Miami 2 vs. Baltimore Most Turnovers, Game 5 vs. Baltimore 4 at Oakland 4 at Oakland 4 vs. Miami 4 at Buffalo 4 vs. Indianapolis

Jan. 4, 1970 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 4, 1970 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 9, 2011 Jan. 9, 2011 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 4, 1970 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 7, 1996

@CHIEFS


Scoring Fewest Points Allowed, Game Jan. 9, 2016 0 at Houston 6 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 20, 1969 6 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 Most Points Allowed, Game 45 at Indianapolis 41 at Oakland 38 vs. Indianapolis 37 at Buffalo 35 vs. Green Bay 35 at N.Y. Jets

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 15, 1967 Dec. 28, 1986

Fewest Touchdowns Allowed, Game Dec. 20, 1969 0 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 28, 1991 0 vs. L.A. Raiders Jan. 9, 2016 0 at Houston Jan. 15, 2017 0 vs. Pittsburgh Most Touchdowns Allowed, Game 6 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 5 vs. Green Bay Jan. 15, 1967 5 at Oakland Dec. 22, 1968 5 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 28, 1986 5 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 11, 2004

First Downs Fewest First Downs Allowed, Game 9 at Buffalo Jan. 1, 1967 13 vs. Minnesota Jan. 11, 1970 14 at Houston Jan. 9, 2016 16 Three times; Last vs. Denver Jan. 4, 1998 Most First Downs Allowed, Game 30 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 29 at Buffalo Jan. 5, 1992 28 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 28 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 27 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 11, 2004

Net Yards Rushing and Passing Fewest Net Yards Allowed, Game 226 at Houston Jan. 9, 2016 233 at Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 235 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 20, 1969 239 vs. Minnesota Jan. 11, 1970 249 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 7, 1996 Most Net Yards Allowed, Game 536 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 454 at Oakland Dec. 22, 1968 448 at Buffalo Jan. 5, 1992 435 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 434 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 11, 2004

Rushing Fewest Rushing Attempts, Game 13 at Buffalo Jan. 1, 1967 14 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994 14 at New England Jan. 16, 2016

49

19 vs. Minnesota 19 at Indianapolis

Jan. 11, 1970 Jan. 4, 2014

Most Rushing Attempts, Game 46 at Buffalo Jan. 5, 1992 46 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 43 vs. Miami Dec. 25, 1971 Fewest Rushing Yards Allowed, Game 38 at New England Jan. 16, 2016 39 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994 40 at Buffalo Jan. 1, 1967 67 vs. Minnesota Jan. 11, 1970 Most Rushing Yards Allowed, Game 229 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 202 vs. Tennessee Jan. 6, 2018 192 at San Diego Jan. 2, 1993 188 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 180 at Buffalo Jan. 5, 1992 Most Rushing Touchdowns Allowed, 3 vs. Green Bay 3 at Buffalo 2 Fourtimes; Last, vs. Indianapolis

Game Jan. 15, 1967 Jan. 23, 1994 Jan. 11, 2004

Passing Fewest Passing Attempts Allowed, Game 19 vs. Denver Jan. 4, 1998 23 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 28, 1986 23 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 23 at San Diego Jan. 2, 1993 Most Passing Attempts Allowed, Game 46 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 45 at Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 45 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 43 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994 42 at New England Jan. 16, 2016 42 vs. Pittsburgh Jan. 16, 1994 Fewest Completions Allowed, Game 10 vs. Denver Jan. 4, 1998 12 at Buffalo Jan. 1, 1967 12 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 12 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 7, 1996 Most Completions Allowed, Game 32 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994 31 at Indianapolis Jan. 6, 2007 29 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 28 at New England Jan. 16, 2016 25 vs. Baltimore Jan. 9, 2011 Fewest Gross Passing Yards Allowed, Game 112 vs. Indianapolis Jan. 7, 1996 136 at Houston Jan. 9, 2016 140 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 153 at N.Y. Jets Dec. 28, 1986 160 at Buffalo Jan. 23, 1994 Most Passing Yards Allowed, Game 443 at Indianapolis Jan. 4, 2014 347 at Oakland Dec. 22, 1968 306 at Houston Jan. 16, 1994

@CHIEFS


304 vs. Indianapolis 302 at New England

Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 16, 2016

Most Passing Touchdowns Allowed, 5 at Oakland 4 at Indianapolis 3 Fourtimes; Last, vs. Indianapolis

Game Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 11, 2004

Sacks Most Sacks, Game 9 at Houston 5 at San Diego

50

Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 2, 1993

4 at Oakland 4 at Buffalo 4 vs. Baltimore

Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 1, 1967 Jan. 9, 2011

Interceptions Most Interceptions By, Game 5 vs. Houston Dec. 23, 1962 4 at Oakland Jan. 4, 1970 4 vs. L.A. Raiders Dec. 28, 1991 4 at Houston Jan. 9, 2016

@CHIEFS


Single Game Total Points 18 Fred Biletnikoff, Oakland 18 Thurman Thomas, Buffalo 18 Chris Boswell, Pittsburgh 15 Scott Norwood, Buffalo 14 Steve Christie. Buffalo Total Touchdowns 3 Fred Biletnikoff, Oakland 3 Thurman Thomas, Buffalo 2 Max McGee, Green Bay 2 Elijah Pitts, Green Bay 2 Warren Wells, Oakland 2 Freeman McNeil, N.Y. Jets 2 Andre Reed, Buffalo 2 Terrell Davis, Denver 2 Edgerrin James, Indianapolis 2 T.Y. Hilton, Indianapolis 2 Donald Brown, Indianapolis 2 Rob Gronkowski, New England Field Goals 6 Chris Boswell, Pittsburgh 3 Scott Norwood, Buffalo 3 Steve Christie, Buffalo 3 Adam Vinatieri, Indianapolis 3 Billy Cundiff, Baltimore 2 George Blanda, Oakland 2 Jim Turner, N.Y. Jets 2 Garo Yepremiam, Miami 2 Jeff Jaeger, L.A. Raiders 2 Al Del Greco, Houston 2 Pete Stoyanovich, Miami 2 Stephen Gostkowski, New England Pass Attempts (All 40+) 46 George Blanda, Houston 45 Andrew Luck, Indianapolis 43 Warren Moon, Houston 42 Neil Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell, Pittsburgh 42 Tom Brady, New England 40 Joe Namath, N.Y. Jets

Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 23, 1994 Jan. 15, 2017 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 23, 1994 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 23, 1994 Jan. 15, 1967 Jan. 15, 1967 Dec. 22, 1968 Dec. 28, 1986 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 4, 1998 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 16, 2016 Jan. 15, 2017 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 23, 1994 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 9, 2011 Dec. 22, 1968 Dec. 20, 1969 Dec. 25, 1971 Dec. 28, 1991 Jan. 16, 1994 Dec. 31, 1994 Jan. 16, 2016 Dec. 23, 1962 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 16, 2016 Dec. 20, 1969

Pass Completions 32 Warren Moon, Houston 31 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis 29 Andrew Luck, Indianapolis 28 Tom Brady, New England 25 Joe Flacco, Baltimore

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

Passing Yards (All 300+) 443 Andrew Luck, Indianapolis 345 Daryle Lamonica, Oakland 306 Warren Moon, Houston 304 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis 302 Tom Brady, New England

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 16, 2016

16, 1994 6, 2007 4, 2014 16, 2016 9, 2011

Long Pass 69 Jack Kemp to Elbert Dubenion, Buffalo

Jan. 1, 1967

Touchdown Passes 5 Daryle Lamonica, Oakland

Dec. 22, 1968

51

4 3 3 3 3

Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Pat Ryan, N.Y. Jets Jim Kelly, Buffalo Neil O'Donnell, Pittsburgh Peyton Manning, Indianapolis

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 28, 1986 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 11, 2004

Interceptions Thrown 5 George Blanda, Houston 4 Todd Marinovich, L.A. Raiders 4 Brian Hoyer, Houston 3 Joe Namath, N.Y. Jets 3 Daryle Lamonica, Oakland 3 Jim Kelly, Buffalo 3 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis 3 Andrew Luck, Indianapolis

Dec. 23, 1962 Dec. 28, 1991 Jan. 9, 2016 Dec. 20, 1969 Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 4, 2014

Rushing Attempts 33 Thurman Thomas, Buffalo 31 Freeman McNeil, N.Y. Jets 30 Le'Veon Bell, Pittsburgh 26 Edgerrin James, Indianapolis 25 Leroy Thompson, Pittsburgh 25 Terrell Davis, Denver 25 Joseph Addai, Indianapolis

Jan. 23, 1994 Dec. 28, 1986 Jan. 15, 2017 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 8,1993 Jan. 4, 1998 Jan. 6, 2007

Rushing Yards (All 100+) 186 Thurman Thomas, Buffalo 170 Le'Veon Bell, Pittsburgh 156 Derrick Henry, Tennessee 135 Freeman McNeil, N.Y. Jets 125 Edgerrin James, Indianapolis 122 Joseph Addai, Indianapolis 119 Marion Butts, San Diego 107 Nick Bell, L.A. Raiders 101 Terrell Davis, Denver 100 Thurman Thomas, Buffalo

Jan. 23, 1994 Jan. 15, 2017 Jan. 6, 2018 Dec. 28, 1986 Jan. 11, 2004 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 2, 1993 Dec. 28, 1991 Jan. 4, 1998 Jan. 5, 1992

Rushing Touchdowns 3 Thurman Thomas, Buffalo 2 Elijah Pitts, Green Bay 2 Freeman McNeil, N.Y. Jets 2 Terrell Davis, Denver 2 Edgerrin James, Indianapolis

Jan. 23, 1994 Jan. 15, 1967 Dec. 28, 1986 Jan. 4, 1998 Jan. 11, 2004

Long Run 54 Marion Butts, San Diego

Jan. 2, 1993

Pass Receptions 13 T.Y. Hilton, Indianapolis 10 Todd Heap, Baltimore 10 Julian Edelman, New England 9 Haywood Jeffires, Houston 9 Dallas Clark, Indianapolis 8 Charles Smith, Oakland 7 Max McGee, Green Bay 7 Fred Biletnikoff, Oakland 7 John Henderson, Minnesota 7 Paul Warfield, Miami 7 Jeff Graham, Pittsburgh 7 Joseph Addai, Indianapolis 7 Rob Gronkowski, New England

Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 9, 2011 Jan. 16, 2016 Jan. 16, 1994 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 4, 1970 Jan. 15, 1967 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 1, 1970 Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 16, 2016

Receiving Yards (All 100+) 224 T.Y. Hilton, Indianapolis 180 Fred Biletnikoff, Oakland

Jan. 4, 2014 Dec. 22, 1968

@CHIEFS


140 138 127 111 108 108 103 100 100

Paul Warfield, Miami Max McGee, Green Bay Bobby Burnett, Buffalo John Henderson, Minnesota Todd Heap, Baltimore Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh Dallas Clark, Indianapolis Andre Reed, Buffalo Julian Edelman, New England

Touchdown Receptions 3 Fred Biletnikoff, Oakland 2 Max McGee, Green Bay 2 Warren Wells, Oakland 2 Andre Reed, Buffalo 2 T.Y. Hilton, Indianapolis 2 Rob Gronkowski, New England Interceptions Made 2 Kirby Jackson, Buffalo

52

Dec. 25, 1971 Jan. 15, 1967 Jan. 11, 1967 Jan. 11, 1970 Jan. 9, 2011 Jan. 15, 2017 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 16, 2016 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 15, 1967 Dec. 22, 1968 Jan. 5, 1992 Jan. 4, 2014 Jan. 16, 2016

Long Interception Return 50 Willie Wood, Green Bay

Jan. 15, 1967

Long Punt Return 26 Russell Copeland, Buffalo

Jan. 23, 1994

Long Kickoff Return 52 George Atkinson, Oakland

Jan. 4, 1970

Long Punt 64 Reggie Roby, Miami Long Field Goal (All 50+) 58 Pete Stoyanovich, Miami 50 Adam Vinatieri, Indianapolis Sacks 3 Gerald Williams, Pittsburgh 3 Whitney Mercilus, Houston

Jan. 5, 1991 Jan. 5, 1991 Jan. 6, 2007 Jan. 8, 1994 Jan. 9, 2016

Jan. 5, 1992

@CHIEFS


TEAM 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Tony Gonzalez will never forget how he became a man in Kansas City (Kansas City Star) 2 Chiefs in the NFL Draft: second and third rounds have been good to Reid and Co. (Kansas City Star) 4 The 2026 World Cup is coming to the United States, and Kansas City might be next (Kansas City Star) 6 Behind the Scenes: Chiefs offer rare glimpse of concussion procedures (Kansas City Business Journal) 9 At long last, Chiefs great Johnny Robinson on verge of Hall of Fame (Kansas City Star) 11

EXECUTIVES/Coaches 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Meet the Chiefs coach who drills down deep with Patrick Mahomes (Kansas City Star) 13 With a new coach in charge of their position, Justin Houston and the Chiefs’ outside linebackers aim to be relentless (The Athletic) 15 Chiefs’ Emmitt Thomas wins lifetime achievement honor from pro football writers (Chiefs Digest) 17 Losing an arm helped make this Chiefs assistant coach who he is (Kansas City Star) 18 Straight talker, deep listener: Eric Bieniemy makes an impression in new role as Chiefs’ offensive coordinator (The Athletic) 23 Chiefs’ facelift is all Veach … with Reid’s blessing (Kansas City Star) 28 Runs in the Family: Kansas City Chiefs running backs coach Deland McCullough went searching for his biological parents. He found them where he never would have expected. (ESPN) 31 How the Chiefs finally found their franchise quarterback in Patrick Mahomes (Yahoo Sports) 40 Bill Belichick may be the NFL’s best modern coach, but Andy Reid is its most influential (The Washington Post) 44

PLAYERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Why Chiefs' Tyreek Hill chucked up the 'deuces' in '17 (Kansas City Star) 48 Chiefs see Sammy Watkins as another building block toward offensive juggernaut (Kansas City Star) 50 Andy Reid Believes the Best is Yet to Come for CB Kendall Fuller (Chiefs.com) 52 Spencer Ware on His Family’s Battle with Sickle Cell Anemia: “I Want My Mom to See Her Son Play” (Chiefs.com) 53 Leadership Personified: Reggie Ragland’s Remarkable Journey Has Built Him for This Moment (Chiefs.com) 55 Chiefs’ Chris Conley talks passions and preseason thoughts at charity bowling event (Kansas City Star) 69 Now more than ever, rookie Derrick Nnadi tapping into wisdom and drive of his true hero, his father (The Athletic) 71 Chiefs safety Eric Berry: ‘I just keep on trucking’ (Kansas City Star) 75 Chiefs broke a trend by drafting Patrick Mahomes, now hope he bucks another (Kansas City Star) 77 Good and lucky: How Patrick Mahomes wound up in Kansas City, quarterbacking the Chiefs (Kansas City Star) 80 ‘He only sees the end zone’: Tyreek Hill makes everyone on the field around him disappear (The Athletic) 88 Laurent Duvernay-Tardif, M.D.: How the Chiefs Guard Earned His Medical Degree While Protecting His QB (Sports Illustrated) 90 For hometown hero Xavier Williams, family played an important role in him achieving his dream (The Athletic) 97 Patrick Mahomes on Visiting The University of Kansas Health System: “It’s Inspirational” (Chiefs.com) 104

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(Team) Tony Gonzalez will never forget how he became a man in Kansas City TEREZ A. PAYLOR Kansas City Star February 24, 2018

As the airplane descended into Kansas City, just hours before the 47th annual 101 Awards, Tony Gonzalez allowed himself to reminisce, not only about his 41 years on this earth, but also about the 12 seasons he spent as a Chief. Gonzalez, the 13th overall pick in the 1997 NFL Draft and this year’s inductee in the Chiefs’ Ring of Honor, doesn’t get back here much, so he couldn’t help but marvel at how much he, and the city, has changed. For one, there’s way more to do downtown than there was back then, he said, back when he and his teammates celebrated the opening of chain restaurants like P.F. Chang’s and Cheesecake Factory. But his personal change, in retrospect, is stunning, he admitted. The former star tight end has come a long way since his rookie year, when he dropped 17 passes as a rookie, the most in the NFL, and was ripped by former Kansas City Star columnist Jason Whitlock in his uber-popular year-end grades. “He gave me a D-minus in the paper, and said that it was another bust by the Kansas City Chiefs,” Gonzalez reminisced with a laugh while at the 101 Awards banquet at the Westin Crown Center. But in retrospect, Gonzalez added, it was the best thing that ever happened to him. So was the booing at Arrowhead that year from fans fed up with his focus drops. “Talk about growth,” Gonzalez said. “When you hit the hard times in your life, that’s when you find out what you’re made of. And Iremember I made the decision I was never going to hear that sound (of boos) again, I would never be outworked. “Up until that point, I wasn’t staying after practice, I wasn’t showing up early. I wasn’t catching balls while the defense was going. I was doing what I was told to do, working hard, but nothing extra. And that’s what it takes. That’s what greatness is all about.” Gonzalez learned this by watching former Chiefs greats like Will Shields, Tony Richardson, Marcus Allen and Warren Moon, and after he embraced their ethos, a superstar was born. “It changed everything for me,” Gonzalez said. Gonzalez nearly doubled his receptions and receiving yards as a second-year pro, and officially took off in 1999 when he made the first of 14 Pro Bowls and first of six All-Pro teams during a killer 17-year career that was spurred by his newfound understanding of the essence of manhood once his career got off to a rocky start.

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“I became a man out here in Kansas City,” Gonzalez said. “The tough times, the storms are coming, but it’s what you do when you’re going through that storm, the decisions you make, that can change your life and make it unbelievable. Because the sun’s gonna come out and make it a great time.” Gonzalez’s tenure in Kansas City came to an end after the 2008 season, when Gonzalez — sick of the constant losing and, at 31 years old,entering the tail end of his prime — finally requested a trade. “I didn’t want to leave; I was scared,” Gonzalez said. “I was scared about the reaction from the fans, I was scared about the reaction from my teammates.” Still, he knew he needed to risk his comfort in Kansas City for a better situation. He found it in Atlanta, where he went to the playoffs and played in an NFC Championship game while the Chiefs used the second-round pick they got from the Falcons for Gonzalez on cornerback Javier Arenas, who played for six teams across a seven-year career. “If I would have stayed here … the Todd Haley years did not work out for them here,” Gonzalez said. “It worked out for me.” But Gonzalez still feels the love from Chiefs fans, which is all that matters to him. “I feel just as much as a Chief as if I’d stayed here my whole career,” Gonzalez said. “I still feel loved by the fans here, and I love them, and it’s good to be back here.” Though the club has not moved to retire Gonzalez’s number — the club has an overall shortage of numbers, as the Chiefs have already retired 10 jersey numbers, which is among the most in the NFL — Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt hinted that Gonzalez’s looming first year of eligibility for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2019 played a role in the franchise’s desire to honor him this year. “Since he’s going to have to get used to hearing Hall of Fame connected to his name over the next couple of years, it’s our honor to be the first,” Hunt said. Gonzalez’s Hall resume is strong. He set franchise records for receptions, receiving yards, receiving touchdowns and 100-yard games, and he also set NFL records for career receptions, receiving yards and 100-yard receiving games for tight ends. Gonzalez is also the first tight end in league history to produce 16 consecutive seasons with 50 or more receptions, and his 1,325 career receptions are the second-most all-time, at any position, only behind the great Jerry Rice. “He was always putting in extra time after practice, catching balls or running routes,” Hunt said. “His relentless drive helped him become the best tight end in the history of the game.” Gonzalez owes it all to that rough start with the Chiefs, a memory he embraces to this day due to all the ways it’s benefited him. “I wouldn’t change it for anything, honestly,” Gonzalez said. “It made the person I am now, and what I’m doing with my life with my wife and my kids. I owe it all to Kansas City, and being that 13th pick overall in 1997. “To be able to go up in that Ring of Honor and be listed with all those guys, whew, it’s amazing. Couldn’t ask for anything more.”

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(Team) Chiefs in the NFL Draft: second and third rounds have been good to Reid and Co. Blair Kerkhoff Kansas City Star April 26, 2018

The second day of the NFL Draft has been good to the Chiefs during the Andy Reid era. Without a pick in the first round this year, and no move made to trade up on Thursday, the Chiefs hope to keep moving in that direction when the second and third rounds unfold on Friday. The Chiefs have a total of three picks in those rounds, one in the second — No. 54 overall — and two in the third, Nos. 78 and 86. The first pick in the third round came from Washington in the Alex Smith trade. The idea in the early rounds is to find players who can start soon if not immediately, and the Chiefs have largely accomplished this over the past five years. Veach has been part of the process, coming with Reid from Philadelphia. Ten players have been chosen by the Chiefs on Friday’s draft day over the past five drafts. Six have started at least half of the team’s games. Tight end Travis Kelce, center Mitch Morse and defensive lineman Chris Jones are mainstays. Last year’s third-round pick, running back Kareem Hunt, became the NFL’s leading rusher. Wide receiver Chris Conley and cornerback Steven Nelson, third round picks in 2015, have started more than half of their games. One who hasn’t, cornerback Phillip Gaines, has battled injuries. Last year’s second-round selection, defensive lineman Tanoh Kpassagnon, appeared in 16 games, started one and falls in the project category. There has been one bust in the group. Two years ago, the Chiefs spent their third-round pick on cornerback KeiVarae Russell. He never picked up the defense and that September became the first player taken in the first four rounds of the 2016 draft to get waived. He has since appeared in 13 games as a member of the Bengals. Knile Davis, a third-round running back in 2013, couldn’t find many offensive snaps but delivered a huge moment for the franchise, his 106-yard kickoff return to open the only playoff victory in the Reid era, at Houston after the 2015 season. But with those Chiefs' draft classes contributing to five winning seasons, four playoff seasons and two AFC West titles, the Chiefs have been mostly correct on personnel matters.

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“The higher you pick certainly the more confident you feel in those guys stepping right in,” Veach said. “You get to (rounds) six and seven you kind of throw some darts on the wall and do a lot of homework on these guys. “Certainly when you’re picking in the top three or four rounds you’re looking for help right away.” Even the pre-Reid Chiefs found success in the third round. Of the 25 players on the roster who were drafted by the Chiefs, seven were taken in the third round, the most of any round. Before the arrival of the Reid regime, the Chiefs selected defensive lineman Allen Bailey, linebacker Justin Houston and punter Dustin Colquitt in the third. Players taken in the early rounds stick around longer, for obvious reasons. They’re perceived as more talented, they’re given more opportunities and teams have more money invested in them. So where will the Chiefs go when they’re on the clock? The defense appears to have more pressing needs than the offense. Many mock drafts have the Chiefs selecting a defensive lineman or defensive back with their first pick. Some players considered the best available Friday are Iowa cornerback Josh Jackson, Boston College defensive end Harold Landry and Penn State tight end Mike Gesicki. A trade to move up might be needed to land one of those players. But if the Chiefs hold their second round position, other possibilities like Georgia edge rusher Lorenzo Carter, Auburn cornerback Carlton Davis or Michigan defensive tackle Maurice Hurst could be available. “Once you get into the 10th, 11th pick of the second round, then it starts to get wild,” Veach said. Five years of drafting in the second and third rounds offer no clues. The Chiefs have split their 10 second- and third-round picks between offense and defense. “We’re going to continue to add to both sides,” Veach said. “The one thing that you have to protect yourself against is being too comfortable at any position.”

5


(Team) The 2026 World Cup is coming to the United States, and Kansas City might be next Sam Mcdowell Kansas City Star June 13, 2018

The United States won’t play a match in the 2018 World Cup, but it will play host to a flurry of international games within the next decade. A day before the World Cup commences in Russia — without the U.S. men’s national team, which failed to qualify — a FIFA vote Wednesday awarded the 2026 tournament to a joint bid led by the United States that also includes Canada and Mexico. And Kansas City could be a part of it. Sixty of the 80 games in the 2026 World Cup will take place domestically, including every match from the quarterfinals onward, with Kansas City in the mix to serve as a host for the largest sports tournament in the world, contested every four years. Arrowhead Stadium is on a short list of potential American venues released earlier this year by the United Bid Committee. During a press conference Wednesday among representatives from the Kansas City bid coalition, there was evident optimism about the stadium securing a spot on the final list, which is expected to be announced in 2020. “I feel very confident,” said Kathy Nelson, president and CEO of the Kansas City Sports Commission. “As a team, we feel great about our options.” “When you start to compile all these aspects of Kansas City, I think we feel very bullish about the opportunity,” Sporting Club president Jake Reid said. David Ficklin, the director for the local bid, said Arrowhead Stadiuim could host as many as five World Cup matches, including a potential quarterfinal game. Ficklin called Arrowhead an “ideal venue for a quarterfinal.” It is not in the running to host the championship or semifinal matches. The final is widely expected to be played in the New York area. The North American bid was awarded the 2026 World Cup by a 134-65 vote over Morocco, a surprisingly wide margin. Morocco had thrown itself into the mix on the last day possible last year and then tried to garner support by denouncing the United Bid and, more specifically, President Donald Trump and his immigration policies.

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“On behalf of our United Bid, thank you so, so very much for this incredible honor," U.S. Soccer president Carlos Cordeiro said after the vote in Russia was announced early Wednesday morning. "Thank you for entrusting us with this privilege.” U.S. Soccer has spent the past decade trying to return the World Cup to this country for the first time since 1994. It lost the 2022 bid to Qatar before FIFA bribery scandals became more publicly known. As part of the rehabilitation process, FIFA allowed every nation to vote on the 2026 location, whereas the prior process allowed the input of only the federation’s major players. Early Wednesday morning, after its 15-minute presentation to FIFA members focused on revenue and existing infrastructure, the vote fell to North America, which projected revenues of $11 billion for FIFA. Will the next major development include Kansas City? Arrowhead Stadium is one of 23 sites across the continent included in the joint bid’s official tendering to FIFA, including 17 in the United States. As many as 16 host cities will be selected across the continent. The United Bid Committee will take the onus of those final decisions. It is thought to be looking at MLSestablished cities and sites that can help grow the game. Location will also play a factor. No other potential landing spot is within a seven-hour drive of Kansas City. Absent its selection, a noticeable hole would remain in the center of the North American landscape. “They’re looking to make a legacy impact and to grow the game. I think you need a foundation for those things,” Reid said. “So I think all those things are really, really good for us.” The Kansas City bid is a collaborative effort that includes the Chiefs, Sporting KC, the Kansas City Sports Commission and Foundation and mayors and city managers and officials from both sides of the state line. Collectively, their submission includes a request for more than World Cup matches. It has offered to serve as a hosting site for international friendlies in the days leading up to the World Cup, games that would be played at Children’s Mercy Park. It remains in the mix to house the pool and bracket draws for the qualification and the tournament itself. More recently, the officials have used Pinnacle, Sporting KC's new state-of-the-art training center, as a tool for persuasion. The facility has the capability to host four national teams and perhaps even serve as a longstanding training ground for them. All of the sites have been approved by FIFA, though Arrowhead Stadium would likely need some adjustments to host the 2026 tournament, which will be the first World Cup to expand to 48 teams. Ficklin said Arrowhead Stadium would likely need to be trimmed to a rectangle shape rather than the existing curvature along the corners, requiring the temporary removal of some of the football stadium’s seats. “That’s absolutely in consideration,” Chiefs president Mark Donovan said. “This isn’t about changing the stadium for a match. It’s about changing the stadium and then changing it back. Clearly, in 2026, we’re going to have some preparation discussions with our season-ticket members who are in those seats that

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may be affected by it. There are a lot of discussions about stadium renovations as a whole. So all that will factor into it.” Donovan referred to the potential for Arrowhead Stadium to house a World Cup match a “legacy of Lamar Hunt.” The other American sites still on the short list are Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Cincinnati, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Nashville, New York/New Jersey, Orlando, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C. In order to join that group, Kansas City Major Sly James said the plans for a new, single-terminal airport were a necessity. During the bid process, James said the local committee encountered the question, “What about your airport?” James later added, “It is exactly for this reason that you needed to do that.” The most significant hurdle remaining figures to be public transportation, though FIFA gave Kansas City a passing grade for its proposal that includes shuttles hauling people from different areas of the city to games. Nelson said the Kansas City alliance expects to receive its next cue from the United Bid Committee in the coming months. It will likely include FIFA officials touring the city and its proposed sites. “We see this as a great day to celebrate,” Donovan said. “But we also see this as a step in the process. And we’re excited about the opportunity to convince the world that Kansas City and Arrowhead Stadium is the right place to host a World Cup in 2026.”

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(Team) Behind the Scenes: Chiefs offer rare glimpse of concussion procedures James Dornbrook Kansas City Business Journal June 15, 2018

With the National Football League coming off its worst season for concussions in recorded history, the Kansas City Chiefs offered a rare, behind-the-scenes glimpse of their medical procedures to address the problem. The NFL started recording concussions in 2012. Last season ended with more than 600 concussion protocol examinations performed and 281 concussions diagnosed. The previous record was 275 in 2015. The NFL now has a fairly complex system in place to address the safety issues related to concussions, and the league continues to work on improving it. Yet the NFL still has a poor reputation on the matter, thanks to a long history of denial. Denial to addressing The league created the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee in 1994 and appointed rheumatologist Elliot Pellman as chairman, even though he had zero experience in brain science. The committee then spent years denying every scientific report linking multiple concussions to dementia and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and avoiding taking serious action until 2009. Since then, the league has done a lot to address the problem. Today, the concussion identification, evaluation, treatment and recording system in the NFL is state of the art and being copied by other professional sports. Jeff Miller, the NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive vice president of health and safety policy, conducted a rare tour to show how the system works at Arrowhead Stadium. Previously, the system relied on referees and trainers to make decisions, but today it also includes five people hired by the league who work nine stories above the field. Two are trainers with binoculars, one for each team, watching for any signs of concussion or injury. Two are video technicians who have their own game feeds and study every play, tagging any play that results in injury. The fifth person in the booth is an unaffiliated central neurotrauma consultant who is a medical professional with experience in concussions. The booth can call down to the field and order a player to be evaluated and also has the power to contact the referee through his earpiece and call for a medical timeout to make sure a player is evaluated before returning to play. The booth can send video replays down to the field for trainers to see, allowing them to gain more information for making an evaluation.

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Players initially are evaluated in a little blue tent set up on the sidelines. If a doctor determines the need for further evaluation, the player is sent to the locker room. The Kelce incident Rick Burkholder, vice president of sports medicine and performance for the Chiefs, shared an example of how the system works by citing the concussion suffered by Travis Kelce during a playoff game against the Tennessee Titans in January. “In the Kelce play, when he went down and we ran out onto the field, one of the players whispered in my ear that he wasn’t talking right,” Burkholder said. “Head Coach Andy Reid, who has the best view of the field, said to me, ‘I know he’s done for the day.’ By the time I got there, he was communicating fine. But we already had several red flags. Then I saw the video, and I saw Kelce stagger. After Kelce came off the field, you might remember him skipping and waving his hands at the fans. None of that matters to us. There were four red flags through the system, the spotters, a teammate, the coach and video. So we took him straight into the locker room.” Still, the system has suffered breakdowns. The Seattle Seahawks-Arizona Cardinals game on Nov. 9 offers a prime example. Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson was sent to the sidelines by the referee for concussion evaluation. Wilson entered the blue tent but within seconds jumped out and went back into the game. It was a violation of the policy, and the team was fined $100,000. Burkholder said teams violated the procedure only three times last season. “The whole world knew about the three instances, but no one talked about the hundreds of others that worked properly,” Burkholder said. Once a player goes to the locker room for further evaluation, he is put into a special room with a door that can close to eliminate sound and control light, both of which exacerbate concussion symptoms. The team doctor then follows a checklist of procedures to determine whether the player can return to the game. The league also focuses on prevention, changing kickoff and tackling rules to eliminate the most dangerous plays. The league studies helmets to find the best ones for concussion prevention and started banning those that don’t measure up. “This was based on testing by engineers based on a variety of impact angles and speeds,” Miller said. “The helmets were then ranked by performance. A year ago, of the five highest-rated helmets, four were new entrants to the market. So the manufacturers are upping their game and making changes for the better and helping us out.”

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(Team) At long last, Chiefs great Johnny Robinson on verge of Hall of Fame Vahe Gregorian Kansas City Star August 17, 2018

Former Chiefs great Johnny Robinson is 79 years old, and he should have been in the Pro Football Hall of Fame decades ago. So it was perhaps appropriate that he and his family waited more than five hours by the phone on Friday in their home in Monroe, La., to learn if he was the veterans committee nominee for the Class of 2019. He was getting scared, not knowing if the long wait meant good news or bad, when the call came from Pro Football Hall of Fame president David Baker telling him he was the selection — and thus almost certain to be voted in when the full committee meets in February. “It was a glorious moment,” said his stepson, Bob Thompson, who has long figured it was part of God’s plan that this would happen later in life for Robinson to allow him to fulfill his calling of running a boys home for the last 38 years. Noting his stepfather was the only remaining player not in from a Hall of Fame-produced poster in their den depicting the best players of the 1960s in the AFL and NFL, he added, “He saved the best for last.” Robinson, a safety who was a crucial part of the only two Super Bowls in Chiefs history and played a pivotal role in their Super Bowl IV victory over Minnesota, was overwhelmed by the news. “What can I tell you other than that I’m just thrilled to death,” he said. Some minutes after he learned, he stepped out of the den and went to his wife, Wanda. “Poor Johnny, he came in here and put his arm around me and he just kind of boo-hooed,” she said. “It just built up inside of him.” Robinson still needs the approval of the full voting committee on the eve of the Super Bowl in Atlanta, something Baker reminded him of during the call. “I guess I’m in then, right?” Robinson said. To which Baker in a video smiled and clarified: “Well, here’s what it’s going to take; it’s not quite that easy yet.” But as the sole senior pick this year, precedent speaks to the likelihood: Every year since 1998, at least one of the submitted senior finalists has been received the 80 percent voting support by the entire 48member Selection Committee necessary for being in that year’s class.

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Per the Hall of Fame, the overall process “will consider 18 finalists, including a Senior (Robinson), two Contributors (to be named Thursday, Aug. 23), and 15 Modern-Era Finalists (to be determined from a preliminary list announced on September 13; trimmed to 25 semifinalists in November and to 15 finalists in January). Current bylaws call for a class no smaller than four or larger than eight. The Senior Finalist will be voted on for election independent of the other finalists.” According to Thompson, Baker assured the family he’d make it in and that they need to be in Atlanta when it becomes official. “He’s been the elephant in the room,” Thompson said. Or outside the room, in fact. If elected, Robinson will become the sixth member of the 1960s Chiefs defense to enter the Hall of Fame, joining linebackers Bobby Bell and Willie Lanier, defensive tackles Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp and cornerback Emmitt Thomas. Quarterback Len Dawson, kicker Jan Stenerud, coach Hank Stram and founder Lamar Hunt are the other Chiefs figures from that era who are enshrined. Robinson would likely join tight end Tony Gonzalez in the Class of 2019 as he is expected to be elected in his first year of eligibility. Other Chiefs already in Canton include guard Will Shields and linebacker Derrick Thomas. Starting when the Chiefs were the Dallas Texans, Robinson more or less was the defensive quarterback for three AFL title teams and a Super Bowl champion. He snagged 57 interceptions (only three players in NFL history had as many or more when he retired in 1971) and had a way of making them count (the Dallas Texans/Chiefs were 35-1-1 when he had an interception) and coming through in the most meaningful games. Robinson had two interceptions in the 1962 AFL championship victory over Houston, a pivotal one in the 1966 AFL title game against Buffalo and 11 solo tackles in the ensuing first Super Bowl against Green Bay. And in the 23-7 victory over Minnesota in Super Bowl IV, Robinson had an interception and a fumble recovery while playing with three broken ribs. Robinson was a six-time finalist but was passed over for a combination of reasons, including bias against players who had played most of their careers in the AFL and the notion that the Chiefs’ defense of that era already was well-represented in the Hall of Fame. Johnny Robinson on why he thinks he’s not in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Now, he says, he hopes he can “handle myself like a Hall of Fame football player.” He already has. It just took a while for the powers that be to properly recognize it.

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(Mike Kafka) Meet the Chiefs coach who drills down deep with Patrick Mahomes Blair Kerkhoff Kansas City Star June 01, 2018

It’s not accurate to call Mike Kafka the personal coach for Patrick Mahomes. After all, Kafka has worked with all of the Chiefs quarterbacks who have been on the roster in his two seasons with the team. But Mahomes is the only current quarterback who has been with the Chiefs both years, and with veteran Alex Smith needing little tutoring last season, Kafka was able to shower Mahomes with additional attention. They were often seen after practice working together. With a few more days of practices and three minicamp workouts later this month before training camp begins in July, Kafka has seen payoff from the extra work. “He’s made consistent improvement every single day and that’s what we’re looking for,” Kafka said of Mahomes. “He’s put in a ton of work. We’re working to fine-tune every single aspect of playing the quarterback position.” Expectations for Mahomes are unlike anything a Chiefs quarterback has encountered since perhaps the days of Joe Montana. The difference is, Montana had established himself as one of the game’s greatest quarterbacks when he arrived in Kansas City. Mahomes has one NFL game under his belt, albeit an impressive triumph in the 2017 regular-season finale against Denver. He passed for 284 yards, went to the bench with the lead and returned to march the Chiefs on a game-winning field-goal drive. “It goes to his competitive nature,” Kafka said. “Honestly, when he came back in we all knew we were going to go back down and win. ... And after something didn’t go right early — he threw an interception — he bounced right back and led the team down and led a field-goal drive. He operated and performed to win the game.” Mahomes also works closely with offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy, just as he and Smith did last season with Matt Nagy, who is now the Chicago Bears' head coach. And Andy Reid is an offensive mastermind. Mahomes regularly deals with them all. “We have open conversation between me, Coach Reid, Eric Bieniemy and Mike Kafka,” Mahomes said. “They see what I like, and if we all like something we try to put it in.” But Kafka drills down with the quarterbacks, as he did last year as a quality control coach and now this year as quarterbacks coach. 13


He was a standout at Northwestern, a second-team All-Big Ten quarterback in 2009 who passed for 532 yards in a bowl game against Auburn. Kafka was selected by Reid’s Eagles in the fourth round of the 2010 NFL draft and wound up spending time with seven NFL teams as a reserve. He got into coaching as a graduate assistant at Northwestern in 2016 and joined the Chiefs last year. Now, Kafka is the coach who closely works with the first quarterback the Chiefs selected in the first round since Todd Blackledge in 1983. He’s found a player willing to put in the work, which has been revealed with Mahomes’ improved footwork. “One big point of emphasis,” Kafka said. “I think that right now, where I’m most happy is where Pat’s at with his footwork.” And it’s not just his own game Mahomes has worked on. “That’s the best part,” Kafka said. “He’s going behind the scenes to work with guys individually. That’s one thing where he’s taken a big step, in that leadership role.”

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(Mike Smith) With a new coach in charge of their position, Justin Houston and the Chiefs’ outside linebackers aim to be relentless Nate Taylor The Athletic June 4, 2018

Smith knew if Houston, the team’s top pass rusher, agreed with his idea, its impact could be felt throughout the new outside linebackers meeting room — and perhaps on the field this season. During his seven-year career, Houston has terrorized opposing quarterbacks as the Chiefs’ left outside linebacker, bull rushing, spinning and bending his body to discard the opponent’s right tackle. But Smith wants Houston to try a new strategy. Still be a dominant presence, Smith told Houston, but do it from everywhere on the field. Doing so would make Houston — and, as a result, the entire Chiefs’ defense — less predictable. Smith desires for Houston to be matched up against the opponent’s worst offensive lineman this season, which he believes will create more opportunities for the defense to create havoc. Houston, eager to help reinvigorate the Chiefs’ beleaguered defense, has agreed to fulfill Smith’s request. “I want to be able to attack the weakest link,” he said last month, repeating Smith’s message to him. “Every team is different. Everybody’s left tackle isn’t All-Pro; everybody’s right tackle isn’t All-Pro. Wherever the weakest link — if it’s the guard, center or even tackle — I want to be on the weakest link.” Typical for many assistants, Smith said Thursday that the position he coaches — which features key players such as Houston, Dee Ford, rookie Breeland Speaks, Tanoh Kpassagnon and rookie Dorian O’Daniel — is the defense’s most important. Smith’s argument, given the circumstances surrounding the Chiefs’ remodeled 3-4 defense, is a convincing one. Smith referenced how defensive coordinator Bob Sutton uses his outside linebackers to do everything: rush the passer, set the edge against the run and provide support to the secondary with occasional zone coverage. Since his linebackers are already asked to do so much, Smith said it’s not unreasonable for players such as Houston and Ford to line up at different positions for different scenarios to give opposing offenses different looks. “That’s how you should be on defense, period,” said Smith, who is entering his third season with Chiefs. “If it’s a (defensive) coordinator, you break it down. But ask me, you just can’t get comfortable on one side. For Dee, it’s the same deal. If there’s a tackle that’s bigger and a little bit slower, Dee’s got one of the best get-offs in the league. Go line up on him. If there’s a tackle a little bit smaller, Justin, go tear him up a little bit. That’s kind of what we’ll do.” 15


Before becoming a coach, Smith was a linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens for four seasons. In 2012, Smith learned under Sutton when both men coached the linebacker positions for the New York Jets. Prior to his promotion, Smith began working more with the outside linebackers during the second half of last season. Coach Andy Reid shifted Smith into his new role, along with assistant Mark DeLeone being responsible for inside linebackers, to give players more individual attention. The goal is for Smith to help provide better film study meetings and in-game adjustments specific to the outside linebackers. “That’s a big position to just have one person doing, so we did split it up and it seems to be working fine,” Reid said Thursday. “The outside position in the 3-4 defense and the inside linebacker position are completely different spots.” Houston praised Reid for elevating Smith, and the Chiefs’ investment in the coach has already produced positive results since Houston’s attitude toward Smith’s coaching has influenced his younger teammates at the position. Beyond assisting Houston, Smith will be responsible for getting Speaks, who played defensive end at Mississippi, acclimated to his new position. “Things come natural to him,” Smith said of Speaks. “The thing with him, like a 4-3 end, they’re not used to dropping (in coverage). For him to pick it up this quick, and at least get a feel for, it’s pretty good. The thing I like about him is he can do it, especially the drop stuff.” Smith and Houston are both impressed with Speaks’ demeanor. Smith said Speaks carries himself in practice like a veteran instead of a rookie. Houston has been encouraged by how quickly Speaks has understood the Chiefs’ playbook and how he fits within Sutton’s scheme from his position. “He’s very smart to be able to play defensive end and then come in and learn outside linebacker,” Houston said of Speaks. “A lot of guys you see in the NFL struggle switching. He’s picking up the defense fine, and he’s looked good in coverage. I think he’s going to help us a lot.” Last year, sacks was a glaring statistic for the Chiefs. They recorded just 24 of them, which ranked 24th in the NFL. Smith knows his linebackers need to be playmakers to ensure Sutton’s defense is more potent. The Chiefs, though, will need more production from outside linebackers not named Houston and Ford. Smith hopes Kpassagnon, a second-year player, can become a reliable contributor after getting more snaps toward the end of last season. “He’s making big strides,” Smith said. “We all know T.K. is a little raw. He’s got long arms. He can scratch his ankles standing up. He’s just got to get better at using his arms and keeping people off of him. I truly believe he’s got a bright future. He’s just got to continue to learn.” As his conversations with Houston and other players continue, Smith said he will likely rely on one word to keep players motivated. Above all, he needs his linebackers, wherever they line up, to be relentless. “A lot of your sacks come off of second and third effort, especially at this level,” he said. “These tackles are big and good. Obviously you’ve got to have good technique but be relentless. I think one of the great things about Tamba (Hali), that’s what he was. Obviously his technique is good, but you just can’t stop.”

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(Emmitt Thomas) Chiefs’ Emmitt Thomas wins lifetime achievement honor from pro football writers Matt Derrick Chiefs Digest June 19, 2018

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Longtime Chiefs defensive backs coach Emmitt Thomas and former Washington offensive line coach Joe Bugel are the recipients of this year’s Paul “Dr. Z” Zimmerman Award, a lifetime achievement honor presented annually by the Professional Football Writers of America (PFWA). Thomas, also a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame as a player for the Chiefs from 1966 to 1978, started his coaching career in 1979 at Central Missouri State. He spent time with Washington, Philadelphia, Green Bay and Atlanta in various roles including assistant coach, wide receivers and defensive backs coach and defensive coordinator. He also served as interim head coach of the Falcons for four games in the 2007 after the resignation of Bobby Petrino. Thomas, 75, returned to Kansas City as defensive backs coach in 2010 under head coach Todd Haley, and remained a part of the staff for both Romeo Crennel and Andy Reid. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2008 Bugel spent five seasons as a head coach during stints with the then Phoenix Cardinals and Oakland Raiders but built his reputation as an assistant, most notably as offensive line coach for Washington from 1981-89. The team’s offensive line — known as the “Hogs” — carried Washington to three NFC titles and two Super Bowl wins. Bugel and Thomas spent four seasons together in Washington, during which time the team won Super Bowl XXII. Each coach holds two Super Bowl rings as an assistant, all coming from their time with Washington. Chiefs assistant head coach and special teams coordinator Dave Toub was also a nominee for this year’s award. Other nominees were the late Bobb McKittrick, a longtime assistant for Bill Walsh, and Jim McNally, former offensive line coach for Cincinnati, Carolina, New York Giants and Buffalo. The Dr. Z Award is presented by the PFWA for lifetime achievement as an assistant coach in the NFL. The award is named for Zimmerman, who covered the NFL for 29 years as Sports Illustrated’s lead pro football writer. Past winners of the Paul “Dr. Z” Zimmerman Award: 2014: Jim Johnson, Howard Mudd, Fritz Shurmur and Ernie Zampese 2015: Dick LeBeau, Tom Moore and Dante Scarnecchia 2016: Monte Kiffin and Wade Phillips 2017: Bud Carson 2018: Joe Bugel and Emmitt Thomas 17


(Porter Ellett) Losing an arm helped make this Chiefs assistant coach who he is Vahe Gregorian Kansas City Star July 30, 2018

ST. JOSEPH As senior assistant to the head coach for the Chiefs, Porter Ellett might as well be Andy Reid’s shadow. Maybe you’ve seen him nearby during practice or games and wondered about the guy Reid is apt to call his “left-hand man.” The joke reflects the nature of their relationship, a little-known aspect of Reid’s own life and what makes Ellett who he is: a man who had his right arm amputated as a teen, believes he’s better off for it and is distinguished most by his intelligence, zeal for life and sense of humor. It’s those personal traits that resonate with an admiring Reid, who calls Ellett “quite a person,” and make Ellett well-suited for his second year orbiting a coach whose brother Reggie has long-contended with an injury of a similar nature. If Ellett doesn’t quite bunk with Reid at training camp, he’s alongside virtually every waking moment to attend to … whatever: from the clerical stuff of building playbooks and call sheets to Reid’s administrative work to miscellaneous projects behind the scenes. “I can be rough on you a little bit in that position; he’s got a tremendous amount of responsibility,” Reid said. “And so when the best of my red hairs get to me, he handles it and smooths it out and just kind of calms the storm.” It’s grinding work but an incredible opportunity to absorb the profession. Previously in the same capacity, Reid employed current Chiefs general manager Brett Veach and Buffalo head coach Sean McDermott; Ellett has playfully jousted with each about who has performed better, and he could follow in either direction. There’s no way to know if his future holds those sorts of high-profile positions, but his presence here is momentous in itself: It’s testament to a special spirit forged when Ellett was 4 years old and might well have died in the accident on the family farm in Loa, Utah. It would have been challenge enough to land this NFL job with enormous growth potential coming from a remote rural town of about 600 and a high school that didn’t have enough kids for a football team. Making it with one arm was something else entirely, something that speaks to intense resolve and how his family navigated the aftermath of the mishap that day: In the back of a Ford F-150 with older kids

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after moving sheep to the summer range, Ellett crawled up on a motorcycle in the bed and was thrown out when the truck hit a bump. His skull was cracked and his head scalped, as he put it. That wasn’t the worst of it. Extreme nerve damage, known as a brachial plexus injury, was inflicted on his right arm, rendering it what he calls dead and ultimately compelling him to have it amputated when he was 16. By then, though, he had long since come to terms with his arm. So a day after the amputation, still bleeding some, he played pickup basketball. “It was kind of like when you get new cleats, or a new ball,” he said. “ ‘Let’s try this out, let’s see what this is like.’ ” That mindset reflected both his innate attitude and how his parents reacted to the trauma of the accident. His mother, Mary, remembers counting her blessings that he was simply alive with no brain damage, and they set about living what happens to be one of Reid’s mantras: roll with it. “They taught me, ‘It’s up to you,’ ” Ellett said. “There was no victim mentality ever. This is a super-bad pun, but it’s the hand life deals you, so you do what you can with it.” Painful as it was for them, that meant letting him struggle to find his way at times. “No one ever expected anything different from him than anyone else his age,” his father, Jan, said. Ellett has always loved sports, even when he was a small child growing up in Utah. Courtesy Ellett family Still bearing stitches in his head from the accident, for instance, Ellett tried in vain to climb a fence with his friends. Seeking help, he turned to his mother. She said, “No: If you want to do it, figure it out.” “And I got over it,” he said, later adding, “I’d say it was real love. I think we have a misconception of what love is today. Love isn’t giving people what they want. It’s giving them what they need. “I didn’t have, like, ‘I’ll lift you over the fence.’ (But) you could say, their love lifted me over.” Thanks to a strong support system, including five sisters who never coddled him, Ellett became a really good athlete. Having one functional arm somehow became an afterthought. At one of his baseball games, his mother remembers thinking, “There’s a boy out there with one arm. … Oh, it’s Porter.” In fact, he mastered the ability to bat with one hand and flip the ball from his glove to throw it. Except, that is, when he pitched. Then he’d leave the glove on the ground before him for throws back from the catcher. But there was no time to use it to field. It seems telling that he relished that challenge. “There’s nothing quite like the rush of pitching with no glove,” he said, smiling. “If you make a mistake and they hit it back at you, that’s on you. So it was always like, be unhittable, right?” 19


Basketball led to the decision to amputate. His atrophied right arm had become increasingly problematic. And not just because it had gotten to the point where he might accidentally slap somebody with it when he was dribbling or getting called for pushoffs. “I’d look at the ref (and say), ‘My arm doesn’t move, so I’m not really pushing off,’ ” he said, laughing. Ellett was an accomplished baseball player into his teens. Even with scant sensation in in it, though, he’d felt the excruciating pain of it being broken several times. Then one night his sophomore year at Wayne High, he was sandwiched between defenders going for a rebound. His shoulder was dislocated, his elbow dislocated and broken. For a while, he had wondered if something could be done to fix his arm. But he realized he knew how to do everything he wanted even without being able to use it. So on the long ride to the nearest hospital, he turned to his mother and said “Ah, let’s cut it off; I’m not doing this anymore.” He tells this story with a laugh, and his mirthful way is infectious and ever-present. Every Halloween, for instance, Ellett and his wife, Carlie, have created costumes themed to the loss of an arm. Once, he played Chubbs to Carlie’s Happy Gilmore. Another time, he played “Soul Surfer” Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack. So what if his female impersonation left something to be desired? “I made for a mean shark,” Carlie said, “so that probably made up for it.” Last year at the Chiefs’ team Halloween party, they went with a Toy Story 2 theme. Ellett played Woody with his lost arm, Carlie was Jessie and Buzz Lightyear was played by now-14-month-old son Brigham. (The Mormon couple met at Brigham Young University, Reid’s alma mater.) “Might as well have fun with it,” Ellett said. “If people see you smiling and enjoying life, it gives them hope.” Hope is why the modest Ellett consented to have his story told. When he asked Carlie about the idea, she said it would be worth it if even one kid contending with a perceived impediment reads about him. “Porter’s always been kind of this go-to (guy) to show people that just because something bad happens to you, and you don’t physically look like everybody else, it doesn’t mean your life’s over,” Carlie said. “You can overcome whatever faces you.” None of which should be confused with the idea that anything came easy for Ellett, 29. It’s just that he accepted he’d have to work twice as hard to do everything … then he did it. Porter Ellett lost his arm when he was young, and he has some fun with that fact these days. He and his family dressed up as characters from the film Toy Story for a recent Halloween. As much as he was loved in the community, he also had to come to terms with ridicule. “When you’re a kid and you’re really different, it’s hard, life’s pretty rough,” he said. “So I went through a time when I, like, legit hated people. I hated going out, and I hated being stared at and I hated being pointed at and I hated (hearing) comments: ‘He’s got one arm,’ or ‘he’s a freak,’ things like that. …

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“You go to, like, a dark place in life. I think you find out who you really are then.” Faith, friends and family helped. Including even the simplest gesture from Grandmother Shirley, who once gave him a picture frame with the words “Don’t Quit” and DO IT. At first, he kept it prominently displayed on his dresser just so maybe she’d see it and get him a better gift next time around. Over time, though, the words came to mean something to him. Especially during a rough period when he felt to blame for everything going wrong, including his father being fired as the basketball coach. He thought about quitting the team to “make them all happy.” Distraught, he lay on his bed and looked up at those words and had a revelation. He couldn’t worry about what others think, couldn’t keep them from staring. But when they did, he wanted them to see something special. “That was a turning point, I think,” said Ellett, who keeps that picture frame on his dresser to this day. With that mentality grew the capacity for pursuing what might seem a far-fetched opportunity that came in a circuitous way. From working in the BYU football equipment room, he fell in love with the game and decided to do whatever he could to work in it in some capacity. After his mission in Los Angeles teaching Spanish, by chance he became friends with Devin Woodhouse, who taught Spanish at BYU’s Missionary Training Center. Woodhouse is married to Reid’s daughter Drew, and became a strength and conditioning assistant with the Chiefs. Long story short, when Ellett was working on his master’s degree in sports management at Baylor and came to a wedding here in 2016, that connection led to an invite to the Reid home after a game. When Reid arrived, Ellett remembers some initial awkwardness because he was sitting in Reid’s chair. Turns out Reid doesn’t exactly see himself as having his own chair, Reid said, smiling, but “we made (Ellett) feel like I did.” After they got talking, Ellett told Reid, “I’d pay money just to follow you around and see how you coach. I want to learn from the best.” Reid told him to send a resume and a few months later called Ellett, who said he was shaking with nerves as he hoped for a short internship. Instead, Reid told him he had a full-time job available as his senior assistant and “for some reason you just keep coming to mind.” So Porter soon became Reid’s “left-hand man,” and there’s more to the joke and chemistry that they share between them: Reggie Reid years ago lost the use of an arm in a motorcycle accident but didn’t have it amputated. He went on to become accomplished in the martial arts — among other ways of his life that defied the gravity of the accident. That understanding of his brother’s ability to thrive despite the same sort of loss helps account for Reid seeing something in Ellett beyond his smarts and composure and energy.

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“They just make it happen; that’s what Porter does,” he said. “The way he carries himself, you don’t even notice” he’s missing an arm. With Carlie eight months pregnant, Ellett got the job offer on the Friday before the 2017 Super Bowl and started work two days later. Not easy for her. And for the second time, she left a good online marketing job (she soon found another here) to follow his dream. But you could say her feeling about it was encapsulated in this moment: When Porter walked out of the Arrowhead Stadium tunnel with Reid for the preseason opener against San Francisco, she struggled to stay composed because of the joy she felt over his improbable journey. The near-death experience cost him an arm, and you’d never wish that on anyone, yet in some ways it made him something more. He’s a better person for the accident, he has told his father, and his mother knows he considers it a blessing — whatever the “odds” might say. “I think it’s important that kids understand that they should be the oddsmakers,” Ellett said. “Like, you always hear, the odds, the chances, of doing this are one in a million. “Well, why not be the one that does it? Why not set the odds for everybody else?”

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(Eric Bieniemy) Straight talker, deep listener: Eric Bieniemy makes an impression in new role as Chiefs’ offensive coordinator Nate Taylor The Athletic August 6, 2018

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. — As an orator, Eric Bieniemy loves his new job. One task Bieniemy enjoys about his new requirements as the Chiefs’ new offensive coordinator is that he gets to move around even more on the practice fields during training camp. Among coach Andy Reid’s staff, few assistants are as skillful as Bieniemy when it comes to spreading a message. During a recent practice, Bieniemy roamed to every position on the offense as players went through drills — the very drills that, at times, can become dull. For Bieniemy, nothing about football is uneventful. He began with the running backs and fullbacks, the positions he previously coached. Bieniemy shouted the same word — “Finish! Finish! Finish!” — as each ball carrier burst through the line of scrimmage, imploring them to complete the drill at full speed. With the receivers, Bieniemy looked at each in the face from a few yards away before they started their route. His persuasive message for Tyreek Hill, the dynamic and speedy third-year player, was simple: “The great ones don’t take days off.” With the offensive linemen, Bieniemy quizzed the group about each protection adjustment they went over the day before in a meeting. When the team began scrimmaging, Bieniemy, with a walkie-talkie in his right hand, voiced the play calls from Reid to quarterback Patrick Mahomes through his helmet. Each play call was followed with Bieniemy quickly giving Mahomes encouragement or motivation. The phrase most used was “be aggressive.” Reid has relished watching Bieniemy in his new role. He appreciates how Bieniemy doesn’t waste words. “He’s an unbelievable communicator, someone who can get his point across clearly and can take the complex and make it simple,” Reid said. “He’s teaching, and that’s the important part. He’s been great for everybody, from the quarterback all the way down through the offensive line.” Throughout an offseason full of changes to the roster — including the biggest, at quarterback — Bieniemy has challenged himself to understand the various personalities on offense. He wants his voice to have an impact, whether in film sessions, in position meetings or just one-on-one conversations during the few free moments available in camp. He enters and leaves each practice asking himself one question: How can I help bring better unity?

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“It’s a great honor to have this opportunity,” Bieniemy said last week. “Now I just want to make sure that we do a great job working together, but doing it the right way.” Perhaps what has mattered most to Bieniemy in his entire football career is his ceaseless pursuit to execute every objective in the correct manner. This is the biggest theme behind every intense lecture Bieniemy shares with the Chiefs. You don’t need to relearn or do something twice if you pay attention to all the details the first time. The fastest way to improve and advance your career, Bieniemy says, is to treat each assignment with the care and respect it deserves and demands. “Every play,” he said, “is by far the most important.” Bieniemy, 48, understands the value of such an approach, which he knows has led him to one of the most coveted jobs in the NFL. *** Entering this season, Bieniemy knew the statistic. Among the league’s 32 teams, he, as an AfricanAmerican, is the lone offensive coordinator who is a minority. Many African-American assistants on offense, in the past decade, haven’t been given the opportunity to become either a coordinator or a quarterbacks coach, the usual top two offense-related positions on a staff under the head coach. Along with data, the perception throughout the league is that minority coaches have a better chance of becoming a coordinator or head coach by being, or switching to, a defensive assistant. From 2007 to 2017, just 13 of the 147 offensive-coordinator openings in the league went to AfricanAmericans, according to The Denver Post. Hue Jackson, the coach of the Browns, accounted for three of the 13 hirings, as he was the coordinator for the Falcons, Raiders and Bengals. Nine teams — the Chargers (George Stewart), Eagles (Duce Staley), Falcons (Raheem Morris), 49ers (Jon Embree), Jets (Mike Caldwell), Packers (Winston Moss), Seahawks (Clint Hurtt), Steelers (John Mitchell) and Texans (Romeo Crennel) — have minorities who are assistant or associate head coaches. Just three of the league’s quarterbacks coaches are minorities: Marcus Brady with the Colts, David Culley with the Bills and Byron Leftwich, a former 10-year NFL quarterback, with the Cardinals. “If you’re not the quarterback coach or if you’re not the coordinator calling plays, how do you get elevated to become a head coach?” Jackson said on ESPN radio in January 2016. “In order for you to have that opportunity, you have to be put in that position to have a chance to ascend.” In the same interview, Jackson said he felt some minority assistants are fearful when pursuing a coordinator position because of where their careers may go if they fail with such responsibilities. A second opportunity, Jackson said, may never be given. With knowledge of the league’s hiring record, Bieniemy wants to be a success, not only for the Chiefs but for other minority assistants who have the potential and knowledge to be high-quality coordinators and head coaches. “I’m making sure I’m making the very most of it — studying, looking at tape, viewing (play) scripts,” said Bieniemy, the second minority offensive coordinator in the Chiefs’ history. “I’m asking questions to Coach (Reid). I’m trying to get as much information as I can milk out of him.” 24


Bieniemy also knows his career path to becoming a coordinator was not conventional. For nine NFL seasons, Bieniemy was a ferocious running back who lengthened his career by being smart and versatile out of the backfield. He began his coaching career in 2000 as an assistant at Thomas Jefferson High in Denver. He coached running backs in college for six years before joining the Vikings in 2006. With Adrian Peterson as the Vikings’ star running back, Bieniemy helped him gain 5,782 rushing yards and score 52 touchdowns in four seasons. In 2011, Bieniemy was hired by Jon Embree to be Colorado’s offensive coordinator. Both men returned to their alma mater to help rebuild the school’s program. In Bieniemy’s first season, Colorado’s offense ranked 92nd in the nation. The team went 4-20 in two years, which prompted the school to fire Embree and his staff. Reid, when first building his staff after arriving in Kansas City, hired Bieniemy in 2013. Since then, the fiery Bieniemy has helped improve every featured running back for the Chiefs. Jamaal Charles led the league in touchdowns (19) in 2013 and averaged a franchise-best 5.5 yards per carry. Spencer Ware became a reliable player under Bieniemy in 2016, and Kareem Hunt, as a rookie, led the league in rushing last season. “He pays attention to everything,” Ware said of Bieniemy. “The biggest thing Coach Bieniemy will bring to our offense is his intensity. Take a look at his résumé or the players he’s coached and the way they play football. Having the entire offense with that same mentality is pretty exciting.” For a man who loves talking, Bieniemy tried to be a better listener this summer after his promotion. He called Embree. He spoke with Rip Scherer, the Chargers’ tight-ends coach who was Colorado’s quarterbacks coach from 2011-12. He chatted with Darrell Bevell, the former Seahawks offensive coordinator, and Tom Cable, the Raiders’ offensive-line coach. Each man congratulated Bieniemy and offered advice. “They’ve given me a lot,” Bieniemy said, smiling. “Most of them said, ‘Hey E.B., you can’t work yourself to death. You’ve got to step back and take a couple deep breaths. Enjoy the process.’” Embree made sure to tell Bieniemy that he was more than capable of succeeding. “A lot of times, people think you have to be a quarterback to be an offensive coordinator, and that’s not the case,” Embree told The Kansas City Star in January. “I’m glad he’s getting a chance to show that that doesn’t necessarily have to be the case.” Eric Bieniemy says it’s a privilege to work for and learn from Andy Reid, above. “A football genius,” Bieniemy says. (Photo by Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports) Every assistant, at some point, needs a mentor, someone who will give them guidance and significant support. One of first men who became a coaching mentor for Bieniemy was Reid. In 1999, Bieniemy played the final season of his career with the Eagles, who were led by Reid, then a first-year coach. The more the men worked together, the more Bieniemy was amazed by what he learned from the complexities of Reid’s West Coast offense.

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Reid felt Bieniemy could be a productive coach after his playing career, and both men were thrilled to be reunited in 2013 after building their relationship through the years. In January, when the Bears hired Matt Nagy, the Chiefs’ former offensive coordinator, Reid promoted Bieniemy the next day. “A football genius,” Bieniemy said of Reid. “We just sit there and we talk about ball and all the different things that can present itself throughout the course of a week or a game. I couldn’t ask for a better situation to be in.” Several people during camp — owner Clark Hunt, team president Mark Donovan and plenty of players — have noted that Reid has been energized by the newness of his team after so much roster change. Reid acknowledged his excitement and said Bieniemy was a large reason for it. “He’s my right-hand man,” Reid said of Bieniemy. “He has a tremendous work ethic. You appreciate his energy every day. He’s positive. I’ve got full confidence that he can take the offense and roll with it if I can’t make it to something. He can take it and go.” For the past five years, Bieniemy observed how Reid treated his players, designed innovative plays and handled conflict in the locker room. Bieniemy’s latest experience, especially during camp, has been bringing his knowledge and perspective to the quarterback room. In the regular season, Reid, Bieniemy, Mahomes and Mike Kafka (the quarterbacks coach) will study and develop the weekly game plan. As a first-time starter, Mahomes has spent most of his time on the practice field standing next to Bieniemy when not taking his snaps. “If I screw it up, my job is to have Patrick fix it,” Bieniemy said. “When Patrick screws it up, it’s my job is to help Patrick fix it. We’re working in cahoots together.” Through mistakes and effective plays, Bieniemy has pushed Mahomes to complete all of his presnap reads and adjustments before using his aggressiveness and strong arm to push the ball down the field. “It’s been awesome,” Mahomes said of learning from Bieniemy. “He’s someone who is good with the protections, good with pretty much every nuance of the offense, of the little details, which is something I need to work on every single day. Having him and being able to ask him questions is something I’ve really tried to utilize as this camp has gone on.” In his 19 years as a head coach, Reid has produced 13 winning seasons. He has won with several quarterbacks, from Donovan McNabb to Michael Vick to Alex Smith. And with those victories, Reid has worked with coordinators who have become head coaches. Brad Childress, Doug Pederson and Nagy were all hired to lead teams after working next to Reid. Dave Toub, the Chiefs’ assistant head coach and special-teams coordinator, said Bieniemy has the respect of players and the leadership traits to potentially be the next offensive assistant under Reid whom owners consider hiring for a head-coaching job. “Eric has certainly paid his dues, and he’s definitely deserving of this position,” Toub said. “It’s like getting a PhD. It puts him in a spotlight, which is great.”

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The Chiefs’ offense this season could be explosive. The team is confident in Mahomes’ playmaking ability, Kareem Hunt and Ware could be a strong duo, and receivers Travis Kelce, Sammy Watkins and Hill are all Pro Bowl-worthy players. The offensive line features several veterans, too. Bieniemy is aware of what might be possible, both for the team and his career, if the Chiefs become legitimate Super Bowl contenders. But Bieniemy didn’t allow himself to think of the future too much. His next task after a recent practice needed to be handled with the proper amount of attention. “The only thing I want to do,” he said, “is correct this tape, make sure we get the corrections right and move forward.”

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(Brett Veach) The Chiefs’ facelift is all Brett Veach ... with Andy Reid’s blessing, of course Vahe Gregorian Kansas City Star August 16, 2018

ST. JOSEPH If anything was clear about the state of the Chiefs after last season, it was that they had plateaued under coach Andy Reid. In five seasons, Reid had gone 53-27 in the regular season to restore dignity, competitiveness and hope to the franchise in turmoil when he took over after the 2-14 fiasco in 2012. Sterling work, in fact. But with another playoff cave-in, this time a 22-21 loss to Tennessee sprinkled with bizarre officiating but most notable for a botched 21-3 lead, the Chiefs fell to 1-4 in the postseason under the former Philadelphia Eagles head coach. With exasperation seeping into expectations, the Chiefs suddenly were at a different sort of crossroads. Meanwhile, if anything was unclear about the willingness and ability of not-yet-40 general manager Brett Veach to engage meaningful changes in his first year on the job, that’s been answered emphatically in the months since. Forty of the 90 men on the preseason roster were acquired in the offseason. Average age: 25.2. And that only starts to tell the story of their facelift. “You look at the roster, and you go, ‘He’s putting his stamp on it now,’ ” Reid said. With the boldness of someone Reid jokes still “looks like he’s about 14” but judgment and diligence that he figures is well beyond his years. “He’s relentless … (and) that energy isn’t coming out of a can or something,” Reid said. “That’s real, and he is that way 24-7. He goes and goes and goes.” So does the trust between them, built on a long-term, day-in, day-out relationship since Reid hired Veach in Philadelphia. And it’s imperative in the Chiefs’ operation. While Reid and former GM John Dorsey had known each other for years, spoke of wanting to work together and collaborated on the formula for the turnaround here, it’s hard to believe Dorsey would have been fired in mid-2017 if Reid had objected to it. But despite some superficial initial skepticism about the reason Veach was hired, it’s also significant that Reid didn’t want him in place as a mere “yes man.” 28


He knows Veach has a special eye for talent, including being a major voice advocating for Patrick Mahomes in his previous job as co-director of player personnel, but also the disposition to be his own man. “If he puts you in that position, it’s because he believes in you,” Veach said. ”And believing in somebody doesn’t mean, ‘I want to cross-check every single thing.’ “It means, ‘I believe in you, and you go do it.’ And I think that motivates me more than anything.” So Veach was motivated to engineer a major makeover of a vulnerable defense — on which Veach deployed his first five draft picks — and to make key changes on offense. Gone in the process are aging mainstays Derrick Johnson and Tamba Hali, volatile cornerback Marcus Peters and underappreciated quarterback Alex Smith. In one swoop that signaled Veach had the makings of something special in him, the trade of Smith cleared the way for the Patrick Mahomes era to begin in earnest. It also brought in cornerback Kendall Fuller and a draft pick and freed up some funds for an offseason that featured the signings of receiver Sammy Watkins, linebacker Anthony Hitchens and defensive tackle Xavier Williams. Part of the Chiefs’ massive turnover, which can’t be officially quantified until the cut-down to a 53-man roster on Sept. 1, also was about a change in culture — a term that everyone from Veach to owner Clark Hunt has mentioned in the last few weeks. No one has spoken out in that context about Peters, who was traded to the Rams after a season of observable on-field tirades, squabbles with coaches and aversion to tackling. Publicly, the Chiefs have remained vague about why they dealt him away, though Veach in March called it “a football decision” that had nothing to do with Peters not standing for the national anthem or some assumed mandate from Hunt. What has been stressed instead is who has been added. Culture and character are “something that’s very important to Brett Veach, and as he brought in players both in free agency and in the draft, he wanted to make sure that each of those players was going to be a positive contributor in terms of the character of the football team,” Hunt said. Or as Veach put the job of shaping the team: “We’re going to infuse some youth in this roster, and we need guys who can fly around and play hard. And within those specific skills we’re looking for, also look for guys who are grown men who do things the right way.” On one side of the ball, the effect will be a replenished defense likely featuring more than half its starting lineup changed. Whether that makes for winning football, particularly in the postseason, remains to be seen: Another wobbly defensive season could indicate that a change is, and was, needed as much or more at defensive coordinator than in personnel. Coordinator Bob Sutton is still in charge of the defense. But at least theoretically, a group anchored in the middle by another Veach acquisition from last year, linebacker Reggie Ragland, figures to be stronger against its past nemesis, the run. 29


On the other side, depending on the pace of Mahomes’ development, an offense that was among the most prolific in the NFL last year could be even more potent with Watkins as an added dimension beyond Tyreek Hill, Travis Kelce and Kareem Hunt. “If you are an offensive coordinator with the mind that (Reid) has and the creativity that he likes to bring to this game — that gets you excited,” Chiefs president Mark Donovan said. “And that goes back to Brett and what he has done and how they work together.” In the most practical sense, how they work together goes something like this: After they have what Veach calls “kind of a generic blueprinting dialogue,” Reid expects Veach and his staff to go “crank tape and crunch numbers and come up with ideas.” The potential solutions don’t come from “trying to reinvent the wheel, or pull out some formula that no one knows about,” Veach said. They stem from obsessive homework that includes keen attention to the sort of salary-cap ramifications that plagued Dorsey. By the time something is brought to Reid, he will know the case has been fully exhausted and vetted and more often than not will say, “Let’s do it.” “That’s what makes him special,” Veach said. “He’s not a guy who’s a control freak.” Veach is mindful of the meaning of that approach himself, saying his trust in others is as significant as his own instincts. “I know that I’m able to bring a lot to the table,” he said. “But at the same time, I know that when I come to the table I don’t have every answer to every problem that we have. “So you surround yourself with really good people, and you’re going to go in there and talk about things. I bring my knowledge and my energy to the table, but at the same time I defer to the people around who have other solutions to some problems that we’re having. “Then we kind of just work things out together.” Just over a year into the job now, Veach knows he still is growing into it in some ways and figures there are “probably still some scenarios I haven’t encountered yet.” But he also knows he had excellent grounding from Dorsey and Reid, a former GM himself, each of whom allowed him strong input in the past and exposed him to so much to prepare him for this. So there’s been no hesitance to put his stamp on the team and aggressively try to jolt the Chiefs through the ceiling they’ve hit. However it plays out, that’s what this franchise needed rather than basically staying status quo and just hoping for better days ahead.

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(Deland McCullough) Runs in the Family: Kansas City Chiefs running backs coach Deland McCullough went searching for his biological parents. He found them where he never would have expected. Sarah Spain September 2, 2018 ESPN

Carol Briggs placed her newborn son on the bed and removed all of his clothes. She tried to find herself in his face, searching his mouth, his nose, his eyes. "Not yet," she thought. She saw only his father. She looked him up and down, making a mental note of each of his 10 tiny toes, chubby legs, puffy belly and two little arms reaching up at her. "In my mind," Briggs says, "that was probably going to be the last time I ever saw him." It was Dec. 1, 1972, and a big snowstorm had hit the greater Pittsburgh area that week. Briggs had gone sledding with some of the other girls the night before, dragging a cardboard box up and down a big hill that emptied out right at the Zoar Home for Mothers, Babies and Convalescents in Allison Park, Pennsylvania. She woke up in labor around 2 a.m., and just 32 minutes later, she was a mother. She named her baby Jon Kenneth Briggs. Her parents and older brother drove the hour from her hometown of Youngstown, Ohio, to be with her at the hospital. After cleaning out her room at the maternity home and signing some papers, she was back in Ohio the next day, ready to resume her life as a 16-year-old high schooler and National Honor Society member. No one outside of her immediate family and her cousin Robin knew about the baby. Only when she was preparing to sign the adoption papers did Briggs consider sharing the news with the father, a teenage fling who had gone off to college before she discovered she was pregnant. She ultimately decided against it. "He was a kid too," she says. "He was off at college on a scholarship. I think I may have felt that I kind of got myself in this, I'm gonna do what I need to do to work my way through it." With her parents' blessing, Briggs had decided that when the child was born, she would put him up for adoption. "My mother was still cleaning up my room for me once a week," she says. "I wasn't in a position to be anybody's mother. I thought this was best for him, that I allow him to be placed with some family that would be able to give him all the great things that I had coming up because I had a mother and a father. I just didn't want him to get cheated out of anything." In her last interaction with the adoption agency, Briggs was told that baby Jon had been placed with a doctor and his wife in Columbus, Ohio. 31


In early 2017, now-Kansas City Chiefs running backs coach Deland McCullough signed on to coach the running backs at USC, having spent the previous six years in the same position at Indiana University. A few months before making the move to southern California, he and his wife, Darnell, welcomed their fourth son into the world. For the fourth time, the couple provided doctors with Darnell's medical history but couldn't do the same for Deland's side of the family. At 44 years old, McCullough knew nothing about where he came from. Growing up in Youngstown, his adoptive mother, Adelle Comer, could tell him only that he was adopted at a very young age and that she had no information about his birth parents. For a long time, that was enough. McCullough wasn't interested in finding them anyway. There was enough trouble in Youngstown those days, and he didn't want to burden anyone who might have bigger things to worry about. Things changed when he had his first child, and as his family grew, so too did his desire to know of his past. He wanted to know who gave him his deep voice and his muscular build and to whom he owed his pensive nature and quiet intensity. He wondered where son Dason got his height and which grandfather or uncle his bespectacled son, Daeh, might favor. He was so hungry for information that he never questioned whether the search might lead him to answers he couldn't handle. "I didn't know what was going to happen," McCullough says. "I didn't know how people would receive things one way or another. I didn't have a plan. I just knew I wanted to find out." New laws in Ohio and Pennsylvania had called for the unsealing of adoption records, giving McCullough new hope that he might find his birth parents. In November 2017, more than a year after filling out the requisite paperwork and years after his search began, he finally received his adoption files in the mail. For the first time, he saw his original birth certificate, complete with his name, Jon Kenneth Briggs, and the name of his mother, Carol Denise Briggs. There was no information about his father. Adelle Comer was living in a three-bedroom house on a cul-de-sac in Youngstown with her husband, popular local radio host A.C. McCullough, and their young son, Damon, when she got the call. It was a social worker reaching out to see whether she and A.C. would come see an infant at an adoption agency in Pennsylvania. Not long after the tragic death of their second son, Alex, who died of an intestinal birth defect after just 28 days, the young couple had started serving as foster parents, and they were looking to adopt. In January 1973, they met 6-week-old baby Jon. "He was asleep in a bassinet," Comer says. "And she put him in my arms, and when he woke up, his eyes were looking straight at me. It was instant connection. Love. Mother-son." By March of that year, Jon Kenneth Briggs had been renamed Deland Scott McCullough, and he was living at home with his new parents, Adelle and A.C. "We were still in love, a good couple," Comer says. "We went to church, partied, went to cookouts. We were working together and doing this together and wanting to make a home for our children. We knew that God's hand was in it. Deland came so fast to us. We knew that it was meant to be. Both of us."

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But things changed quickly. Comer's father had a stroke, and though A.C. wanted to put him in a nursing home, Comer brought her dad to live with the family in Youngstown. Their marriage deteriorated, and when Deland was just 2 years old, A.C. moved out. "They went through a lot of hurt and disappointment, but they took it," Comer says of her sons. "I said, 'God gives you an example of what to be and what not to be. You have to make the choice.' And that's all I had to say, and they got it." When Deland was in elementary school, Comer came home to find that he had cut three gashes into the couch for which she had just finished two years of layaway payments. Kids at school had been teasing him about being adopted, and he accused Comer of loving him less than her birth son, Damon. She explained that she loved the two boys differently, one because he had been in her belly and the other because she had chosen him. After that, Deland McCullough rarely spoke of his adoption. He got good at pretending to be whole. "The void was there," he says. "I wish that it wasn't, but I think I did a good job of hiding it." After the divorce, Comer had relationships with a few other men, some of whom were combative and abusive. "Some men don't understand what respect is," she says. "I've got two sons, and I'm not gonna allow my children to grow up with this type of lifestyle, this drama." Damon sometimes tried to physically defend her, but then he left for college, and Deland felt too small, physically and emotionally, to step in. His response to the violence was to try to tune it out, become emotionless, put blinders on and dream of a way out of the house and out of Youngstown. Comer acknowledges that she contributed to the chaos in her own way as well. "Biggest drama queen in the world, OK?" she says. "They called me Ma Barker because I'd shoot you and ask questions later." Comer took Deland with her to therapy for a while, hoping to make things at home a little less turbulent. New boyfriends came and went, but she mostly settled into life as a single mom, taking on multiple jobs to support her sons, including as a switchboard operator at the Cuyahoga County Department of Human Services, a waitress, a social worker and a short-order cook at the local bowling alley. She did her best to rear the boys on her own, but they moved a lot, and she struggled to pay the bills, sometimes having to choose between electricity and a working phone. But Comer stressed the importance of an education, insisting that she see the boys' homework to make sure they were taking it seriously. She taught them the value of a dollar and the importance of faith, demanding that they use a portion of their monthly child support for Sunday school and tithes at church. And she was always shuttling them to activities, from the theater program at the Youngstown Playhouse to football, basketball and track practices. Deland was a bit of a late bloomer in terms of talent, but the passion for football was always there. Early on in pee wee, he heard his name over the loudspeaker and a light went off in his head. He fell in love with the game and started carrying a football with him everywhere he went, even to bed. "It was an escape," he says. "When I was out there practicing, you didn't think about the electric is off, you know? You didn't even think about anything like that. You were just out there balling, doing your thing and competing and bonding with your friends." 33


Comer was a one-woman cheer squad, bringing multiple signs to Deland's games and running up and down the sideline rooting him on. One night when her ride didn't show up, she took her son's moped to the game. He looked up in the stands and saw her, still wearing his moped helmet, hollering and screaming for him: "D-MACK! D-MACK!" As a junior defensive back, Deland saw himself playing football at a small school or enlisting in the Navy, but an opportunity to show his talent at the running back position his senior year drew the eye of college recruiters. Suddenly, he was being pursued by the likes of Jim Tressel, then the head coach at Youngstown State; Bob Stoops, then the defensive backs coach at Kansas State; and Sherman Smith, then the running backs coach at Miami of Ohio. Deland McCullough looked out the window of his third-period English class at Campbell Memorial High School and saw a tall man emerge from a candy apple red Mercedes-Benz with tan interior and trickedout gold rims. A few minutes later, he got a pink slip message to leave class and go to the office, where the tall man stuck out his hand and said, with a firm handshake, "I'm Sherman Smith, the running backs coach at Miami University." A former star quarterback at Miami, Smith was a second-round draft pick at running back for the Seahawks and went on to play eight years in the NFL. He had a booming voice, thick arms and broad, square shoulders. He walked and talked and carried himself like a former pro; McCullough was immediately drawn to him. "It was just something about his personality," McCullough says. "The way he presented himself. He had things that I hadn't seen out of a man or mentor. He was on top of his details. He was successful. He had played in the NFL. He got his degree. I wasn't around that type of person. "The Mercedes was nice, too, you know?" he laughed. "That was slick." As a Youngstown native himself, Smith thought guys from the area were tough, but the coaches told him McCullough was special -- a thin kid, but when he couldn't run around people, he'd go through them. McCullough was serious that day in the office, offering few smiles and answering with a lot of "Yes, sir" and "No, sir," but he was also intelligent and expressive. Smith thought he'd very much like to work with him. The feeling was mutual. Despite interest from other schools, the decision to attend Miami University was easy for McCullough, especially after the home visit, during which Smith charmed Comer as well. "Well, Coach Smith was hard not to love," Comer says, laughing. "I fell in love with him the first time. He was just a gentleman. And he was very attentive and respectful to me." Smith drove them to visit the school and was back at Campbell Memorial a few months later for signing day, when McCullough signed his letter of intent to play at Miami. When McCullough arrived on campus, the coaches tried to turn him into a wide receiver, but he pushed for an opportunity to work with Smith and the running backs, accepting a redshirt freshman year to pursue the position he believed he was meant to play. "I would tell the players, 'You may not be looking for a father, but I'm going to treat you like you're my sons,'" Smith says. "And so I just looked at every guy like my son. I just wanted to be a positive role model for Deland and exemplify what I thought my father exemplified for me."

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"He was everything," McCullough says. "If anything was going on, I was going to talk to Coach Smith. Everybody in that room gravitated towards Coach Smith just because that's the type of person he was. What he's about rubs off on you, so I always wanted to be around that." Smith left Miami University after that season to be the tight ends coach at the University of Illinois, but he and McCullough stayed in touch. He watched from afar as McCullough put together a Hall of Fame career in Oxford, rushing 36 touchdowns and setting a school record with 4,368 rushing yards. McCullough was surprised when his name wasn't called in the 1996 draft, but he was invited to a few workouts and ended up signing with the Bengals. He was leading the NFL in preseason rushing before he suffered a season-ending knee injury in Cincinnati's final exhibition game. After a few more looks in the NFL, a couple of seasons in Canada, several more knee surgeries and a brief flirtation with the XFL, McCullough finally accepted in 2001 that the dream of pro football was over. A few years later, married and the father of one son, McCullough took a job teaching communications and coaching football at Harmony Community School in Cincinnati. Despite rising to the ranks of principal and making a good salary, his first taste of coaching gave him the itch to coach full time, and he reached out to his alma mater about an opportunity to join the staff. Smith had followed a similar path, first teaching and coaching high schoolers, then working his way up the ranks from Miami University to the University of Illinois, the Houston Oilers, the Washington Redskins and, finally, the running backs coach for the Seahawks. He was with Seattle when he got a call from McCullough, asking for advice as he started his new job at Miami University. By 2014, McCullough was coaching at Indiana University, and the two were reunited on the field, as Smith welcomed McCullough to Seattle for a coaching internship. He saw firsthand that his former player had a real future on the sideline. He had no idea that off the field, McCullough was consumed by the search for his family. A few days before Thanksgiving 2017, Carol Briggs got home from work, sat down on the couch and opened a Facebook message from an unfamiliar man: "Did you have a baby in 1972 in Allegheny County that you placed for adoption?" "Luckily, I was already sitting," she says. Briggs had thought often of baby Jon. Every year, she wished him a "Happy Birthday" on her Facebook wall, and she regularly searched adoption websites to see if he might be looking for her. Briggs could still hear her mother's voice, saying more and more often in the years before she died, "You need to find that boy." Never married and without any other children, Briggs would joke to her cousin Robin that one day baby Jon might show up at her door and walk in to find her home alone, dancing around the house to Funkadelic. She called her older brother, who warned her that the message might be from someone trying to bribe or extort her. She responded anyway, and after a few short messages, she agreed to speak to McCullough on the phone that night after he got out of practice. In the hours before the call, she Googled his name and read every article she could find. She stared at his pictures and tried to find herself in his face. It wasn't hard to see it now: the mouth, the nose, the eyes. McCullough called Briggs from a hallway at USC as he awaited the start of a football family dinner.

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They spoke as if they'd known each other for years, an easy back and forth as they shared where life had taken them in the 44 years since she'd laid him down on that bed and let him go. She learned that he had never gone to live with a doctor in Columbus, that in fact they had been just a few miles away from each other in Youngstown for all of McCullough's childhood. She likely shopped at the same grocery store as Adelle Comer, perhaps even passing young McCullough in the aisles. She was certain that her sports-fanatic father, now deceased, had read about McCullough's high school exploits in the paper. McCullough was overjoyed to find his birth mother, though a mother had never been what he was missing. "Within probably the first five or six minutes, he says, 'Who is my father?'" Briggs says. She took a breath. She had probably told only three people the man's name. After making the decision to not tell the father all those years ago, she had been determined to never let him learn of the baby years later because of careless gossip. She hesitated but decided McCullough had a right to know. "Your father's name is Sherman Smith," Briggs told him. McCullough, leaning against a wall in the hallway, felt as though he might pass out. He started flashing back to all of his memories with Smith and all the times people had joked about him being a carbon copy of his coach. Throughout college, when he returned to coach at Miami University, during his internship with the Seahawks. "'Man, you and Coach Smith look alike.' 'Man, you all walk alike.' 'Y'all this, y'all this,'" McCullough says. "There's no reason to connect those dots because you weren't even thinking about them. A sense of pride that went through me, like, 'Wow, that explains these things.' And then I also start thinking about all the similarities of our path. That just blew me away." Not only had he known his father for 28 years, but Smith was also his mentor, the man he had looked up to since he was 16 years old. McCullough thought of a photo of him and Smith at Campbell Memorial High, both beaming as he signed his letter of intent to play at Miami University. The same photo he had pinned to the corkboard that hung in his college dorm room. The same photo that was at that moment sitting in a Ziploc bag in the drawer of his nightside table, a bag that had traveled with him through every job and every move. "If you would have told me to pick who my father was, there's no way I would have picked him because I might have thought I wasn't worthy for him to be my father," McCullough says. "I felt like my blessings came full circle because I'd always wanted to be somebody like him." "I could hear him take a big breath," Briggs says. "And I could kind of hear him choke up a little. And finally he says, 'Well, I've known Sherman my whole life.'" The next morning, McCullough texted Smith asking if they could talk about something important. It was November, and Smith assumed that McCullough had gotten a coaching opportunity he wanted to discuss. Instead, McCullough began by talking about his search for his birth parents, how he had found his biological mother, and she was from Youngstown, just like them. "Praise the Lord!" Smith recalls saying. "What a blessing!" 36


"And then he said, 'I asked her who my biological father was, and she said you.'" Smith was quiet. Sixty-three years old, he had been married to his college sweetheart for 42 years and had reared a grown son and a daughter. He hadn't heard the name Carol Briggs in more than four decades. He never knew she was pregnant, never knew there was a baby. He knew he couldn't deny the possibility that he was McCullough's father, but he wanted proof. Even more, he wanted time to think. He asked McCullough if he could call him back later. Stunned and a little hurt, McCullough agreed. Smith sat in his office. Guilt washed over him. Even though he hadn't been told about the baby, he couldn't shake the feeling that he had let Briggs and McCullough down. He felt awful that he had left Briggs in such a difficult position and regretted all the years he had missed out on being a father to McCullough. He had built a life making a difference in young men's lives. He had spoken to his athletes and his kids about being responsible, being accountable. "Being irresponsible is not neutral," Smith says. "When you're irresponsible, someone becomes responsible for what you've been irresponsible for." He thought about what this would say about him as a man and found himself hoping that a paternity test would show that he wasn't McCullough's father. It was a thought that brought him only more guilt. He asked to speak to Briggs. Briggs cried her way through work the day she was set to talk to Smith. "I hadn't talked to Sherman in 45 years. And after 45 years, this is probably not the icebreaker conversation that you want to have with the guy that you used to fool around with. 'Hey, we've got a 45-year-old son. And how are you?' So, no, I wasn't looking forward to that at all. Not at all." There was no need to worry. Smith was calm and kind, and the two settled into a nice conversation, catching up for a long time before they even got to talking about McCullough. Smith apologized to her for her having to make such a difficult decision at such a young age, and Briggs explained why she had felt it was best to not tell Smith about the baby. She said that over the years, she just wanted to know that McCullough was OK, and Smith reassured her that her son was a good man. Briggs hung up full of emotion but relieved that Smith wasn't angry with her. Smith hung up feeling much more certain that McCullough was his son. Smith talked to his wife, Sharon, and his brother, Vincent. He talked to his children, Sherman and Shavonne. He thought about McCullough's coaching internship a few years earlier, how Seahawks assistant offensive line coach Pat Ruel hadn't stopped cracking jokes about Smith and his protege acting like a father-son duo. McCullough sent Smith an old article from his days in the CFL, and Smith couldn't believe his eyes. "I'm looking at this thing and thinking, 'I don't remember taking this picture. I don't remember doing this article,'" Smith says. "I'm looking at Deland, and I'm thinking it's me. That got me. "I called my aunt in Youngstown, and I told her about it. And she'd went on YouTube and pulled up some pictures of Deland, and she called me back. She said, 'Nephew, I can save you the money on the DNA tests.'"

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The more Smith thought about it, the more he realized the story wasn't about him and his guilt. It was about McCullough and what he had been through. It was about a life without a father, about the years McCullough had spent looking for his birth parents, hoping to fill a void, wanting to know where he'd come from. "It was said that humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less," Smith says. "I started thinking about Deland." Sometime in the weeks between that first phone call and the test results, Smith realized that he was hoping he was McCullough's father. That, in fact, he would be devastated if the results came back otherwise. When the test came in, it showed a 99.99 percent chance that Smith was, indeed, McCullough's father. Both were elated. "I look at it, and I just say it's a God thing," Smith says. "It's grace. It's undeserved. And that's what's made it great for Deland and for all of us, how everyone has embraced this and is excited about our new family." McCullough understood why Smith had been so curt at first. McCullough had spent his whole life wondering about his birth parents. Briggs had spent her whole life wondering about her child. Smith had gone from zero to a 45-year-old son in one phone call; he needed time. A few weeks after the paternity test came back, McCullough had a recruiting trip near Nashville, where Smith and his wife had relocated after his retirement. McCullough made a special trip to see the man he now knew as his father. "I'm pretty sure he was nervous," Smith says of that day. "I laugh because I'm looking out the window because I know he's supposed to be coming. I'm standing there, and I see he parks at the corner down there. And he's parked there for five minutes. I said, 'What's he doing?' He finally pulls up and gets out the car." As McCullough walked up the steps to the house, Smith greeted him with open arms and said, "My son." It was the first time in McCullough's life that anyone had called him that. "For so many years that I was around him, the embrace was, 'Hey, Coach, how you doing?'" Smith says. "But this is, 'Man, my son.' Maybe I was doing it for me, to help me really, fully understand." "I know he was saying it from a place of 'I'm proud. This is my son,'" McCullough says. "I'd never heard that. I'd never been referred to like that before -- period. It really hit me hard emotionally. When I sit here at this point, and I'm looking at the things that I've done, I'm happy that I'm able to be somebody that he's proud of." At first, McCullough was concerned that his adoptive mother might be upset by his relationships with his birth parents. But as soon as he heard that Briggs and Comer had hit it off in their first phone call, he knew everything would be fine. "All I can say is, 'Are you serious?' Over and over again. 'Are you serious?'" Comer says of McCullough's journey leading to Smith. "It's just a miracle that his birth father's been in his life since he was 16, 17 years old. That's my son, and I want nothing but 100 percent best for him. He needed that, and God gave it to him, and it's in God's time." 38


Both Smith and Briggs are endlessly grateful to Comer for raising McCullough with the wisdom they didn't yet have. "She did what I couldn't do," Briggs says of Comer. "She was an adult, she was married at the time, so you know she brought him into a family structure. That was what I wanted for him. I wanted him to have what I had, and she gave him that. She gave him all the tools that he needed in growing up to be the successful man that he is right now." "Now I know who I am and where I'm from," Deland McCullough says of finding his biological parents, Sherman Smith and Carol Briggs. This past June, the two Miami University Hall of Famers, Smith and McCullough, were back on campus to witness the verbal commitment of McCullough's son, Deland McCullough II, to the RedHawks football team. The younger McCullough is a defensive back, just like Smith's son, Sherman, who played the position at Miami as well. In July, a huge family reunion in Youngstown brought McCullough, Briggs, Smith and Comer together for the first time. All of McCullough's parents in one place, reflecting on nurture versus nature, what is inherited versus what is taught and the many different forms of parenthood. It was both the culmination of a journey and the start of something new for the families that the journey had introduced. A man found his parents, a mother found her child, and a father discovered a son he never knew he was missing. There is no jealousy, no resentment and no regret. There is just gratitude for the winding paths that brought them all together. "When I look at Deland, the type of guy he is, it was a gift to us," Smith says. "And to think -- Deland felt we were a gift to him." "Now I know who I am and where I'm from," McCullough says. "I got all of the pieces to the story. I got them all now."

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(Brett Veach) How the Chiefs finally found their franchise quarterback in Patrick Mahomes Terez Paylor Yahoo Sports September 21, 2018

A few days before the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl in January 2017, Chris Cabott and Brett Veach huddled in a quiet hallway outside of a Los Angeles hotel ballroom. The discussion they’d have that day — about a quarterback prospect out of Texas Tech named Patrick Mahomes II — would shape the direction of the Kansas City Chiefs for years to come, though no one would have guessed that at the time. Cabott, who co-represented Mahomes with Leigh Steinberg, was trying to convince NFL teams and draft pundits that Mahomes was more than a reckless gunslinger, someone who should be a first-round pick in the coming months. This was long before Mahomes became one of the hottest quarterbacks in the NFL entering Sunday, sporting a 143.3 rating with 10 touchdown passes, 582 passing yards and zero interceptions after two games. Veach, the Chiefs’ co-director of player personnel, was a mere lieutenant for general manager John Dorsey. But he had long earned the trust of head coach Andy Reid, who was given the same power as Dorsey within the Chiefs’ organization, and held significant sway. And that mattered because Reid never forgot Veach’s strong — and endearingly overbearing, he’d tell you — recommendations to draft DeSean Jackson, Fletcher Cox and LeSean McCoy, way back when Reid was the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles and Veach was a scout there. So as Cox, Jackson and McCoy all blossomed into Pro Bowlers in Philly, Reid came to value Veach’s opinion more and more. And Veach, who was eager for his next score after following Reid to Kansas City in 2013, was convinced he’d found his next gem in Mahomes. He grew infatuated with the strong-armed Texan over the previous 12 months, when the Chiefs were tasked with finding a gifted young quarterback to develop behind incumbent starter, Alex Smith. So when Veach bumped into Cabott that day, he had an agenda. He wanted to start a running dialogue about Mahomes with Cabott, another ambitious, fast-talking East Coaster in his late 30s. The two bonded easily over big dreams and a love of football, which was a prime reason Veach wasn’t too worried about showing his cards, even though another agent might have used his interest in Mahomes as a means to drum up more curiosity from other teams. “Oh yeah, you’ve got Mahomes,” Veach said, prompting Cabott to answer in the affirmative. “We’re really serious about Patrick.”

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Veach did not know that the latter sentence was music to Cabott’s ears. Everyone loved Mahomes’ gun, gusto and improvisational ability, but prognosticators still had him pegged as a second- to third-round pick, largely due to his raw footwork and the fact that an air raid quarterback had never made it big in the NFL. But now, finally, someone else believed. Cabott grinned. “Good — and I’m serious about him, too,” Cabott said. “I think he’s special, a once-in-a-decade type talent.” “Agreed,” Veach said. Rallying the troops around Mahomes At that very moment, the two reveled in their shared understanding, and began talking candidly about the rifle-armed kid they both believed would be a star, and how he’d be a perfect fit for the Chiefs. So if you want to know the Mahomes origins story involving the Chiefs, this is as good a place to start as any. Over the next three months after that meeting in L.A., Cabott says that without fail, he’d hear from Veach, who always wanted to know the latest on his guy. “For like 94 straight days, we literally communicated in some way, shape or form,” Cabott told Yahoo Sports. “We established a rapport where Brett was like, ‘anything about Patrick, I want to know.’” Cabott respected Veach’s aggression and persistence. He wanted to know how Mahomes did in workouts. He wanted to know how his injured wrist was healing. He wanted to know the details of Mahomes’ passing script for his pro day workout at Texas Tech. “Some of these calls with Brett were at midnight, 1 a.m. in the morning,” Cabott recalled with a chuckle. “It was clear to me that Patrick was the guy in Brett’s eyes, the guy that he wanted them to take. But it would be more than his call.” Indeed. But Veach was on that, too, as he was the first one to introduce Mahomes to Reid, the quarterback guru with a tremendous amount of organizational sway. For months, Veach hounded Reid, telling him: check out Mahomes, check out Mahomes, check out Mahomes. Reid did, and grew to love him, too, for all the reasons Veach did. Dorsey held his cards much closer to the vest than Veach did, but Cabott could tell he was into Mahomes, too, given the way Dorsey acted at the Senior Bowl – another college all-star game that the NFL descends upon for scouting purposes — which was held a few weeks after his meeting with Veach at the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl. “Hey, I want to talk to you about our guys,” Cabott remembers saying when they bumped into each other. “OK, who do you got?” Dorsey asked, somewhat mischievously. “Oh, I know who you got.” 41


Turns out Dorsey — who Cabott remembers winking and walking away — was as easy for Veach to sell on Mahomes as Reid was. Prior to joining the Chiefs, Dorsey put in 20-plus years with the Green Bay Packers as a scout and front-office executive. The bulk of his time there was spent with Hall of Famer Brett Favre, and Dorsey grew to revere Favre’s combination of toughness, arm strength and ability to make impossible throws. Privately, he began telling folks that Mahomes had a little Favre in him. With the two men at the top of the Chiefs’ organizational football chain on board with Mahomes — and area scout Willie Davis’ background work on Mahomes coming out clean — the decision was made to place Mahomes atop their quarterback board for the 2017 NFL draft. That put him above Clemson’s Deshaun Watson and North Carolina’s Mitchell Trubisky, both of whom were viewed internally as having late first-round value. That means the Chiefs, who tagged Mahomes as a top-10 selection, would not have given up the same capital to move up for either player that they would eventually use to snag Mahomes, a notion backed up by the fact that Veach skipped Watson’s and Trubisky’s pro days, but didn’t miss Mahomes’. “Brett said in a recent interview that if the Chiefs had the first overall pick, they would have taken Patrick – and I believe him,” Cabott said. “Brett was pretty sincere and genuine in his interest the whole time.” NFL draft night: The QB sneak To get Mahomes, Dorsey, the man in charge of actually working the phones, had to get creative. The Chiefs were selecting at No. 27, and thanks to the league-wide connections of Reid, Dorsey and Veach, they knew a handful of other teams were just as interested in Mahomes as they were. The New Orleans Saints, picking at No. 11, brought Mahomes in for a pre-draft visit. The Cleveland Browns (at No. 12) and the Arizona Cardinals (at No. 13) worked him out. The Houston Texanswere picking 25th and sniffed around about a trade-up for him. Cabott and Steinberg were careful to never reveal the Chiefs’ intense interest in Mahomes, lest they screw up the chance for their player to land in what they deemed an ideal situation, with a quarterback guru in Reid, stable ownership in the Hunt family and a plethora of offensive skill players. “They seemed pretty laser-focused on Patrick,” Steinberg said. “We were more than happy to encourage their interest, and we kept their confidence and never said a word publicly about it because had we said anything, it would have put them in a compromised position to make a trade. If other teams knew they really, really wanted Patrick, they would make a trade difficult.” So Cabott and Steinberg kept their secret, and by the time the first night of the draft rolled around, the Chiefs had already signaled to both of them that they intended to move up and select Mahomes. Veach did it in an amusing way, by texting Cabott an image of a Texas Tech Red Raiders logo along with the words “good luck.” And when pick No. 9 rolled around, and Veach sent Cabott the same image again, Cabott grew excited. “Does this mean what I think it does,” Cabott wrote back. “Yup,” Veach replied. “When,” Cabott asked. 42


“Now,” Veach wrote. And sure enough, the Chiefs traded two first-round picks and a third-rounder to Buffalo for the right to move up from No. 27 to No. 10 and snag Mahomes. Kansas City, a town that had not seen its Chiefs select a first-round quarterback since 1983, rejoiced. So did Reid and Dorsey, for that matter. While Reid finally had a premium young quarterback to develop, Dorsey — who was about two months away from being replaced by Veach as the Chiefs’ general manager after four seasons — had outmaneuvered at least four teams (New Orleans, Cleveland, Houston and Arizona) that he believed would take Mahomes. And he hadn’t panicked by moving up further, as others might have done after the Chicago Bears shocked everyone by trading up a spot to snag Trubisky at No. 2. But no one was happier about the move than Veach and Cabott, the two men whose initial conversation in January — as two of the only true believers on the initial Mahomes bandwagon — spurred hours and hours of talk and texts about how good of a fit he’d be in Kansas City. “I about jumped out of my skin and started yelling — we got it done! We got it done!” Cabott said with a laugh, when asked to recall draft day. The next thing Cabott remembers doing on draft night reveals how clear the Chiefs were about their interest in Mahomes as their No. 1 guy. After Cabott and Steinberg got word of the trade, someone at Mahomes’ draft-day party fetched a Chiefs hat from behind a nearby banner and slipped it to Mahomes so he could put it on quickly for the cameras that were stationed to watch the ensuing celebration. Shortly after the NFL Network broadcast went live, Mahomes was shown grinning widely, with a bright red Chiefs hat on his head. Cabott was caught smiling next to Steinberg, only a few feet away, while Veach beamed on his own in the Chiefs’ war room alongside Dorsey and Reid. For months, this was what they all had wanted. And now, finally, it was a reality. “Let’s say this,” Cabott concluded with a laugh, “we only had a few hats behind that banner.”

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(Andy Reid) Bill Belichick may be the NFL’s best modern coach, but Andy Reid is its most influential Adam Kilgore Washington Post October 12, 2018

The 10 of them met for dinner two years ago at the NFL combine in Indianapolis, an impromptu gathering during a week of February drudgery. In a private room, the members of the 1999 Philadelphia Eagles coaching staff swapped stories about working under head coach Andy Reid: late nights, career lessons and epic steakhouse dinners when Reid would order every appetizer — and then every dessert — on the menu. At the end, the nine former assistants huddled around Reid for a picture. Of the nine coaches standing, seven of them had been NFL head coaches. They all owed something to the man who remained seated. The night had started as a reunion, became a roast and concluded as a tribute. “We paid homage to Coach,” said Carolina Panthers Coach Ron Rivera, who started as a linebackers coach under Reid. “We really did, because he’s been such an influence on all of us.” On Sunday night, Reid will take his 5-0 Kansas City Chiefs into Gillette Stadium for a showdown against Bill Belichick and the New England Patriots. The two coaches have defined their era, with obvious domination in Belichick’s case and with subtle impact in Reid’s. Belichick is the greatest coach in modern football. Reid may be the most important. In his 20th season as a head coach, Reid, 60, has become one of the most influential figures in the NFL. Seven former assistants are current head coaches, including reigning Super Bowl champion Doug Pederson of the Philadelphia Eagles. That means a quarter of the league’s franchises are coached by Reid or somebody who learned under him. A greater share have been shaped in some way by his offensive outlook. Reid is an acolyte of Mike Holmgren, who learned the West Coast offense from Bill Walsh. As that style predominated, few ran it better than Reid. But he has also been at the vanguard of how the NFL is changing, seeking new concepts from the college game, implementing them into his system and, along the way, reshaping offensive football. And still, in popular opinion, Reid stands a rung below the all-time greats. Only four — Don Shula, Tom Landry, Belichick and Paul Brown — have been to the playoffs more than Reid. Just eight have won more regular season games, but Reid has never claimed the league’s ultimate prize. “People can say what they want about head coaches and Super Bowl trophies,” former Reid assistant Steve Spagnuolo said. “We know it’s all about trophies. But there’s not a better head football coach/CEO 44


in this league than Andy Reid. Had we won in ‘04, you’d be talking about Andy Reid and Bill Belichick in the same breath. The only difference is Super Bowls. Now, it’s a big difference.” Perhaps his last best chance This season may be Reid’s best chance to erase the worst parts of his reputation, to lessen the gap between him and Belichick, to win an elusive Super Bowl. Quarterback Patrick Mahomes, the rocketarmed quarterback for whom Kansas City traded up to pick in last year’s draft, has become an ideal centerpiece in Reid’s innovative attack and an MVP candidate. The Chiefs started last season 5-0, too, but if Mahomes can be the upgrade over Alex Smith that he seems to be, Reid may finally fill the lone hole in his career. Belichick has coached in eight Super Bowls and won five. Reid has an 11-13 career playoff record and lost the only Super Bowl he reached — to Belichick, by three points, after the 2004 season. In popular perception, Belichick is a hoodie-clad savant with a grim visage, and Reid is a clock-botching doofus with a walrus mustache. While Belichick has collected rings and accolades, Reid may claim a more profound impact and legacy. Two former assistants from his coaching tree (Pederson and John Harbaugh) have won Super Bowls as head coaches, and another (Rivera) coached in one. With his years-long experimentation and sudden overhaul of the West Coast offense, Reid has shaped modern NFL offense perhaps more than any other coach. Belichick will leave a narrow mark beyond his own individual greatness. The eight NFL head coaches he produced have failed with staggering uniformity and depth. They have combined for a 160-233 regular season record (.407), no Super Bowl appearances and only one playoff victory, which came after the 2016 season when Bill O’Brien’s Houston Texans beat an Oakland Raiders team forced into starting a third-string rookie quarterback. Those Texans lost the next week — to Belichick’s Patriots. Reid’s coaching tree has grown so expansive for several reasons. First, he identifies coaching talent well. Coaches who worked under Reid say his meticulous organization and work ethic rub off. “I can rarely remember a time when I didn’t drive in and his car wasn’t there already, or drive out and his car had left,” said Brad Childress, a former Reid offensive coordinator who became the Minnesota Vikings' head coach. A few months after Rivera started working for him, Reid called Rivera into his office and recommended he read Walsh’s “Finding the Winning Edge,” considered a bible among coaches. Rivera dove in and realized Reid had borrowed many of the book’s teachings, particularly about how to schedule. Today, Rivera uses the lessons to map out Carolina’s entire year, from minicamp practices to when coaches get vacation. Harbaugh, the Baltimore Ravens coach, handled special teams under Reid for years in Philadelphia. When Harbaugh would visit Reid in his office, he noticed a message written on a three-by-five card behind Reid’s desk. It read: “Don’t Judge.” Harbaugh never asked Reid about it, but it stuck with him each time he saw it, and he understood the importance. “The point of the whole thing was, as a coach, you don’t bring all your stuff into the thing,” Harbaugh said. “Take people for who they are and for where they’re at in their life — as football players, as 45


coaches, whatever — and let them be who they are. Help them along the way where you can. Give them good advice.” Rivera said Reid empowered assistants, giving them opportunities that would help prepare them to be a head coach. He said Reid cherishes the coaching tree he has created. “All of us took meticulous notes so as not to miss anything that he was doing or sharing or expressing in hopes we could use it someday for ourselves,” said Spagnuolo, who went on to coach the St. Louis Rams. “It didn’t take too long to figure out this man was born to coach football.” “In a never-ending battle to find unique ways to score points, I think [Reid has] really kind of invented his own offense right now,” one former assistant said. (Don Wright/Associated Press) Staying current As Reid built a perennial contender around quarterback Donovan McNabb in Philadelphia, taking the Eagles to four consecutive NFC title games, he constantly sought innovation. He gave assistants research projects on, say, the best teams at running screen passes or red zone plays. He wanted to stay current and looked anywhere to ensure he was. When the Eagles drafted Kevin Kolb out of Houston in 2007, Reid studied the offense Kolb ran under then-coach Art Briles, one of the earliest adopters of run-pass options, even if the term “RPO” had yet to be coined. Even back then, Reid started blending the concept into his West Coast scheme. “These colleges and high schools have been doing it a lot longer than what we have,” Reid said this week during a conference call with reporters. “So we’ve just kind of grown with it, and these kids know how to do that.” In 2012, Reid went 4-12 and got fired by the Eagles. The experience accelerated his desire to update his offense, to ensure he remained ahead of how rules changes and college offenses had affected the NFL. “He saw that there was a change in our sport, especially offensively,” Spagnuolo said. “And he made sure he brought in an influx of youth so that he could stay up with that. I think you’re seeing that now. He was always good at creating formational stress on the defense and mismatches, but I just think he’s taken it to a whole new level.” When Reid acquired Smith to be his quarterback in Kansas City, he and then-quarterbacks coach Matt Nagy studied decade-old film of Smith at Utah, where he played for Urban Meyer. They realized the zone-read plays, jet sweeps and run-pass options would not only suit Smith but also fit into where the league was headed. The West Coast offense is built on getting the ball to fast players with space around them, using balance between runs and passes to create that space. Reid’s new offensive system accomplishes the same objectives, but in wholly different fashion. “I don’t know if Bill Walsh would recognize this offense anymore,” said Steve Mariucci, who coached with Reid in Green Bay and now is an NFL Network analyst. “Andy loves being the mad scientist.” “In a never-ending battle to find unique ways to score points, I think he’s really kind of invented his own offense right now,” said Childress, now a head coach in the new Alliance of American Football.

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In many ways, Reid is a link between the way NFL teams played offense for nearly three decades and the way they’ll play it in the future. “He’s over the course of time been able to modify some of the traditional West Coast principles,” Belichick said this week. “The RPO certainly fits into that category, but he’s done a great job incorporating that, probably as much as any team we’ve seen — probably more than any team we’ve seen.” “All of us want to leave a legacy,” one former Reid assistant said. “You want to see positive outcomes for people you care for. And Andy has done that.” (Justin Edmonds/Getty Images) ‘On the cutting edge’ Already, Reid’s strategic influence has spread around the league. Reid and Nagy overhauled their offense to fit Smith’s strengths, and now Nagy is implementing those concepts in Chicago. Pederson won a Super Bowl in Philadelphia, and his offensive coordinator, Frank Reich, took his scheme to Indianapolis. Reid’s impact is not limited to coaches who worked under him. Last year, Childress worked for the Chiefs as an offensive analyst, which included studying other teams. Sometimes, when watching the Los Angeles Rams, he would spot one of the Chiefs' plays. Childress would text Rams Coach Sean McVay, “Hmmm, seems like I saw that before.” McVay would jokingly acknowledge the theft, a common practice that signifies respect among coaches. “[Reid] is on the cutting edge of offensive football year after year with different offensive coordinators, and they go out and they do the same thing around the league,” Harbaugh said. “So he’s the top coach in football, in that sense.” In another sense, the one coaches crave most, Reid has never been the top coach in football. That may finally change this season, but it’s far from assured, or even probable. Whether the Chiefs win or not matters, but it can’t change how Reid shaped his sport. Reid may or may not be remembered as a Super Bowl champion, but he will be remembered. “All of us want to leave a legacy,” Spagnuolo said. “You want to see positive outcomes for people you care for. And Andy has done that.”

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(Tyreek Hill) Why Chiefs' Tyreek Hill chucked up the 'deuces' in '17 Terez A. Paylor Kansas City Star January 27, 2018

ORLANDO, FLA. Throughout the course of the Chiefs’ 2017 season, it became an amusing and customary sight — receiver Tyreek Hill, streaking untouched into the end zone, middle and index fingers spread in a “V” shape toward the next closest defender, always several yards away. Make no mistake about it, Hill’s touchdown celebration — the chucked “deuces” — is a nod to his rare 4.24 speed, and the fact that no one can catch the self-proclaimed “Cheetah,” though Hill loves to have fun with those who quiz him on the meaning on the gesture. “I’m just trying to promote world peace with that,” Hill said at the Pro Bowl this week. “I’m not saying ‘bye,’ man. I’m not trying to be disrespectful like that ... I think.” He added the last part with a hearty laugh, just to make it clear he was joking. But honestly, it’s hard to blame Hill — who regularly uses the “deuces” emoji on Twitter and is increasingly adding it to his personal brand — for coining the celebration and having some fun with it. Because after an offseason in which the Chiefs’ unceremoniously dumped veteran Jeremy Maclin and elevated Hill, the 5-foot-10, 185-pound second-year pro, to the No. 1 wideout spot, there’s little doubt he rose to that challenge in 2017, as he proceeded to catch 75 passes for 1,183 yards and seven touchdowns. What’s more, while Hill made the Pro Bowl for the second straight year as a returner, it speaks volumes about his ability as a receiver that he was also named a first alternate at that position, as well. Hill, a fifth-round pick in 2016, doesn’t take the respect he’s garnered around the league for granted. “It’s amazing, absolutely a blessing just being around all these great guys, being around this amount of talent,” Hill said. “I just want to thank the Chiefs organization for giving me this chance.” Hill’s selection in the 2016 NFL Draft caused plenty of angst in Kansas City, as the club selected him after he had pleaded guilty to domestic abuse by strangulation of his then-pregnant girlfriend in 2014 and received a three-year suspended sentence. Since then, however, Hill insists he’s put the negative energy from that situation into positive fuel. “I just feel like I came in, and a lot of people just doubted me, a lot of people wrote me off because of my past and because of me not doing much in college,” said Hill, who has apologized for his actions. 48


“But I was always taught to never let another man write your destiny. So I came in, and I used that as fuel. I’m motivated by my family each and every day. “My son, my parents ... I can see how happy they are, and I want that same happiness for myself. They always taught me to work hard, so I want that.” Now, the focus for Hill is to continue to work on his craft. Despite his dynamite athleticism, the 23-year old knows he still has much work to do to fully draw the most out of his talents, though he added that receivers coach Greg Lewis is doing a nice job helping him do just that. “With me, I’ve got to be a good listener,” Hill said. “I sometimes take constructive criticism the wrong way. But I feel like with G-Lew, he came in and he challenged me and our other receivers to get better. And I liked it. So as the year progressed, I got better.” Specifically as it relates to his route-running. “Early in the season, I wasn’t as good at route-running — I was just running by guys,” Hill said. “But as the season went on, I was using the technique I was taught and my fundamentals and I was getting open more. So yeah, I still feel like I’ve got a long way to go as a receiver.” Hill also impressed with his toughness. The best ability for any football player is availability, and despite his size — and the absorption of a few massive hits along the way — Hill still played 15 regular-season games, only missing the meaningless regular-season finale so he could grieve the death of a beloved family member. “I’ve got a running-back profile, so I kind of understand the mentality of it all,” Hill said of his ability to take punishment. “I’m in the business for a reason; to get tackled and also make plays that look good.” Hill increasingly made those plays in 2017, as he not only established himself as one of the league’s best receivers, but did it with a little style, thanks to the increased usage of a brand-boosting gesture he actually broke out a year ago first. “I kind of did it when we played Denver my rookie year,” Hill said. “I just raised it up fast and I put it down.”

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(Sammy Watkins) Chiefs see Sammy Watkins as another building block toward offensive juggernaut Terez A. Paylor Kansas City Chiefs March 15, 2018

In an increasingly pass-happy league, the Chiefs are pinning their hopes for the future on building an offensive juggernaut reminiscent of some of the all-time great NFL offenses: the early 2000s Colts or Chiefs, late '90s Rams or even the early-'90s Cowboys. Dead serious. How else can you explain their decision to pay a receiver, Sammy Watkins, $18 million per season for the next three years when they had one of the league’s worst defenses last season and just traded away one of the league’s best young corners in Marcus Peters? Indeed, while the Chiefs’ defense will continue to get younger and faster, coach Andy Reid and general manager Brett Veach figured their best bet to keep winning, at least for the near future, was to doubledown on offense. It' a fun proposition, one that not only sells tickets but also has the practical purpose of ensuring that second-year quarterback Patrick Mahomes, the man Reid and Veach have essentially staked their jobs on, has all the tools he needs to realize his vast potential. Neither man, Reid nor Veach, could stop smiling during news conferences on Thursday as they introduced Watkins to the media. The enthusiasm was particularly notable from Reid, who has seen and heard it all in his 20 years as an NFL head coach but smiled and joked more with reporters on Thursday than he has in a good, long while. Fact is, Reid couldn’t be more excited about handing the keys of his offense to Mahomes, who served as an apprentice under five-year starter Alex Smith last season and shined so regularly that reports of his prowess were constantly leaking out of the Chiefs’ typically info-stingy building. During the week of the Super Bowl, when the Chiefs moved quickly to trade Smith to clear salary-cap space, it was hardly a surprise. “If (Alex) had to leave here, we wanted him in the best possible situation that he could be in,” Reid said. “(Washington coach) Jay Gruden is one of the top offensive minds in the National Football League. I’m close to that family. I know he’s in good hands.” The trade would not have been possible, however, if Reid didn’t believe his offense was in equally good hands with Mahomes.

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Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt demands a competitive team, and the decision to hand the offense to Mahomes is an indication that leadership believe he at least gives them a shot to defend their AFC West crown. The way the Chiefs go about scoring points under Mahomes figures to be a little different, though. “We will try to utilize his strengths,” Reid said. “One of the things as a coach, that is what you do. You exploit their strengths and you work on things they need to get better at. Will the offense change a little bit? Yeah, it will. It will change a little bit, but that is fitting around his talents.” Mahomes came from a Texas Tech offense that featured four wideouts on practically every play and was accustomed to chucking the ball 50 times a game or more. In the Chiefs’ win over Denver in their regular-season finale —Mahomes’ only appearances of the season as a rookie — they used a ton of shotgun and three- and four-wide sets, along with plenty of route combinations he was comfortable with from his college days. “For that game, we molded that game plan around him,” Reid said. “(New quarterbacks coach) Mike Kafka spent a lot of time with him when everybody else was kind of working on the playoff game. We were able to get in there kind of mold it with what we had in the package at that time, mold it around him." Mahomes’ final stat line of 22 of 35 for 284 yards and an interception in the Denver game was not fully indicative of his performance, as he repeatedly made difficult throws from various platforms — the kind of throws that caused defenders to literally throw their hands in the air. The hope now is that when the Chiefs throw the ball next season, whoever's in single coverage, be it Watkins, Tyreek Hill, Travis Kelce or someone else, will be faster than the man covering him. “We feel like our short and intermediate game, we feel like we aren’t going to decline in that area,” Reid said. “We have guys that can go down the field.” This will also have a tangible effect on the Chiefs’ downfield passing game. A big reason for the Chiefs’ five-game losing streak during the middle of last season was their inability to complete the deep ball against combinations of zone and press corners. Defenses might be foolish to defend them that way this year. While Hill’s 4.24 speed discourages teams from pressing him, Watkins’ combination of size (6 feet 1, 214 pounds) and speed (4.34) should, too. Not that Reid would mind if teams want to give it a go. “We’d invite that,” Reid said with a laugh. Reid said Watkins will play the “X” receiver position in his West Coast offense, the spot previously manned by Chris Conley, whose 2017 season ended prematurely because of a torn Achilles. Receivers at that spot often align right on the line of scrimmage, as opposed to a yard off (like Hill at the “Z” position). With a quarterback who relishes opportunities to throw deep, the Chiefs believe their new-look offense will pose problems for opposing defenses. Hence the radiant mood of Reid and Veach on Thursday. “This is a great thing for the Kansas City Chiefs, most of all, and it’s exciting,” Reid said. “The energy in this building is unbelievable right now.” 51


(Kendall Fuller) Andy Reid Believes the Best is Yet to Come for CB Kendall Fuller Matt McMullen Chiefs.com March 29, 2018

The Kansas City Chiefs pulled off a true blockbuster of a move earlier this month, acquiring cornerback Kendall Fuller and a draft pick from the Washington Redskins in exchange for quarterback Alex Smith. Bringing Fuller to Kansas City certainly came at a price, as Smith led the Chiefs to four playoff appearances in his five seasons, but with second-year quarterback Patrick Mahomes ready to take over under center, the 23-year-old Fuller was worth the gamble for General Manager Brett Veach and Head Coach Andy Reid – and for good reason. Fuller recorded four interceptions, 10 passes defensed and a forced fumble last season – all improvements from his rookie campaign in 2016 – but it was the advanced metrics that really demonstrated his effectiveness. In fact, according to the folks at Pro Football Focus, Fuller was the sixthbest cornerback in all of football last season. The vast majority of that work was done while covering the slot, where Fuller allowed a league-low 55.0 passer rating and just 0.74 yards per play in coverage. It was a performance that drew the praise from around the league, and now in Kansas City, the Chiefs are confident that Fuller can replicate those results while playing as an outside corner. “He’s got tremendous upside and I think he’s just tapping into that,” said Reid at the annual league meetings this week. “He developed, you could argue, into the best inside defender - pass defender - in the league. Now, he has an opportunity to step outside and do that also - just kind of add that to his repertoire.” Reid indicated that Fuller will see plenty of action as an outside corner in 2018 while occasionally bouncing back inside if the situation calls for it. The Chiefs dealt for Fuller with that plan in mind, and though it came at a cost, Reid believes the best is yet to come for the third-year defensive back. “We felt like we needed defensive and secondary help, so I thought it was a win-win for both sides, which doesn’t happen very often in this league,” Reid said. “I thought it was great for the Redskins and I think it’s going to be great for us, too.”

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(Spencer Ware) Spencer Ware on His Family’s Battle with Sickle Cell Anemia: “I Want My Mom to See Her Son Play” Matt McMullen Chiefs.com April 18, 2018

One in every ten African-Americans is a carrier of the trait and there's no known cure, though many people have probably never heard of it. It’s called sickle cell anemia - a blood condition that restricts the flow of oxygen in the body – and it’s an enormous part of Kansas City Chiefs’ tailback Spencer Ware’s life. “A lot of people in my family, most importantly my mom, have sickle cell anemia,” Ware said on Monday. “It’s something that’s affected people really close to me. I carry the trait and I know some other players that are dealing with it, too.” In sickle cell anemia, according to the Mayo Clinic, “the red blood cells become rigid and sticky and are shaped like sickles or crescent moons. These irregularly shaped cells can get stuck in small blood vessels, which can slow or block blood flow and oxygen to parts of the body.” Ware carries the trait, meaning he doesn’t have any medical issues himself, but he can pass along the disease genetically. His mom, along with others in his family, actually have the condition and have had to adjust their lives accordingly. His mom, for example, can’t travel to Kansas City because of the lack of adult treatment facilities in the area. “My mom can’t really come to games because there aren’t any sickle cell adult doctors in the Kansas City area,” Ware explained. “I just want my mom to be able to see her son play.” With that sentiment in mind, Ware decided to do something about it this offseason with the creation of the Spencer Ware Sickle Cell Anemia Foundation. “It’s in the early stages. I have my first event on April 26, the first day of the NFL Draft, and that will be to raise money for and to bring awareness to those with sickle cell,” Ware said. “I want to make people aware of the actual disease.” From there, Ware is hopeful that increased awareness will lead to a brighter future for those with the disease and other conditions that are largely overlooked.

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“The goal is to help people in this world,” Ware said. “The foundation not only wants to bring awareness to sickle cell, but also to be there for others and to be a backbone of support for other causes that most people may not know about.” To learn more about Ware’s foundation, check out its Facebook page and its website.

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(Reggie Ragland) Leadership Personified: Reggie Ragland’s Remarkable Journey Has Built Him for This Moment BJ Kissel Chiefs.com July 20, 2018

There were only a handful of people in the small coach’s office in the back of the locker room. It was the morning of a school day late in the spring of 2014, and Reggie Ragland—the former Bob Jones High School (AL) standout—returned to his alma mater to seek counsel from those who have known him since before he was the eighth grader playing Varsity basketball, or since before he was the five-star football recruit known by everyone living within a 50-mile radius. Reggie wasn’t a late-bloomer when it came to his athletic ability—he was always a step above his peers in that way, but in this moment, he wasn’t in a good place. He sat there in this small office, which can only be described as the quintessential high school football coach’s office—featuring concrete floors and cement blocks for walls, which here were painted red and white to represent the school’s mascot—the Patriots. There were a few work stations for the assistant coaches, plus a small couch, and a few lockers in the back. He was headed into his junior year at the University of Alabama, and was, at the time, dealing with an amalgamation of adversities that were testing the resolve of a person who—from an outsider’s perspective—had been the man his entire life and therefore shouldn’t have any reason to doubt himself. The guy who possessed an admittedly quiet but genuine and reserved soul had always been the rock for his family, friends, fellow classmates, and even his teachers, but in this moment, that same guy needed others to lean on and confide in. Reggie had just recently lost his best friend in a car accident, found out that both his mother and father were dealing with serious health issues, and football, which was always one of his saving graces, wasn’t the same escape it had been in the past. It became another 45-pound weight added to the bar on his back, and he was doubting whether or not Alabama football was a part of his future. Reggie in the stands of Bryant–Denny Stadium at the University of Alabama. He hadn’t been playing much in Tuscaloosa for the nation’s top program—tallying just 25 tackles in his first two years combined, and he didn’t understand his role or what he was being asked to do in their defense.

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Reggie was tagged by those around him as a future professional athlete before he turned 14 years old, and now he was in jeopardy of being left behind by a program that brings in the country’s best players and recruits in every year. Consequently, when you add in the personal tragedy and family health issues he was dealing with that were out of his control—the pressure all came together and got to a place where he knew something had to change. “I remember him sitting in the coaches’ office and thinking he wasn’t where he thought he should be at the time,” Bryan Styles, Reggie’s high school defensive coordinator at Bob Jones in Madison, Alabama, explained of that day. “This was his ‘make or break,’ and I feel like he was at that point of, ‘I’m either fixing to come home or I’m fixing to grow up and decide I’m a man.’ Ragland's former Defensive Coordinator at Bob Jones, Bryan Styles “I was worried,” Styles, who remembered being in that office with a couple of Reggie’s former teammates and some other coaches, added. It’s not hyperbole. This was a time in Reggie’s life where his journey hit a fork in the road. It was up to him on which path he wanted to take. “I was worried about myself because of all the stuff that was going on,” Reggie explained. “That really messed with me a lot. I knew I had to go and do something—either put up or shut up.” In that moment, Reggie accepted his own challenge to dedicate himself solely to the game—nothing else mattered after that, and he soon began to demonstrate the same leadership traits the people of Madison had already come to know about him. Robbie Clark didn’t always have the easiest time in school. He was autistic, which meant he saw and learned things differently, and that didn’t always jive well with his classmates. There was teasing, laughs at his expense, and plenty of teachable moments for the kids who didn’t know what being on the “spectrum” meant. Many of the lessons learned by Robbie’s classmates over the years came at the hand of his friend— Reggie, who was never shy about letting the other kids know what he thought about their actions. The two friends first met in the third grade at Challenger Elementary school before they eventually moved on to middle school together, and Reggie, who was always bigger than everyone else, looked out for his friend. At 10 years old, Reggie also already understood some emotional dynamics. Reggie and Robbie at their 8th grade graduation “The day the boys had their 5th grade graduation—we were talking about them going into middle school together, and of course being the parent of an autistic child, I was scared to death,” Maggie Clark—Robbie’s mother, recalled. “But then Reggie looked me in the eyes and said, ‘Don’t worry Ms. Clark, nobody’s gonna mess with Robbie, I’ve got him.’

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“Even today, Reggie doesn’t remember saying those words,” she added. “But I will never forget them or the comfort they brought me. Reggie will always be family to us.” Robbie ultimately wrote a book specifically for autistic kids to help them get through school. In the book, In My Words: Stories of an Autistic Boy, Robbie shared several stories of situations in which he was picked on in school, and who was there to help him. "After PE class, everyone was changing back into their clothes,” he wrote. “I was trying to hurry up so I would not be late to class. I did not like being late… One day, some boys were in the locker room when everyone was getting changed, and they took my clothes from me. They kept throwing them back and forth and wouldn’t give them back. I tried to stop them. They were laughing at me. I got so furious and wanted to cry. They finally gave me my clothes back. I told the coaches about it, but a couple of days later, they did it again… Other kids told me (later) that Devin (another friend) and my other friend Reggie made sure those boys didn’t bother me again." It was true. Those boys didn’t bother Robbie anymore. It was a cycle that happened with a number of kids over the years, and it only happened with each of them one time. They learned their lesson quickly. When recently asked about their relationship, Reggie simply said “that’s my dude” about Robbie and didn’t go into any of the details of the times he had Robbie’s back, or vice versa as Robbie always made sure Reggie was on top of his schoolwork as well. Reggie and Robbie a couple years ago But it’s a consistent thing about Reggie—he’s not going to pat his own back about all the times he did something for a friend. He’s not wired that way. “It’s about right and wrong,” he explained. “That’s it. Be a good person. Believe in others and try and make the world a better place.” Reggie protecting and being a good friend to Robbie isn’t the only example of him displaying leadership characteristics not normally seen of kids before they’re teenagers. He was never afraid to speak his mind and stand up for anyone who needed it, and that carried on in high school. It helped that everyone knew Reggie. He was the best athlete in the area and everyone knew him, and he had a certain standing amongst his peers because of that. He could affect the dynamic of any room he was in at any given moment. Reggie’s graduating class at Bob Jones, which was one of the bigger schools in the area, wasn’t the easiest to teach. They had plenty of issues with kids getting suspended and causing other various problems. Reggie sought to be a positive influence with the standing he possessed as an athlete, and it was noticed and appreciated by his teachers.

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“If somebody had a joke, he might look up but he wouldn’t laugh, and I think the other student’s respected that,” Demarius Anderson, Reggie’s Algebra teacher his freshman year, explained. “I feel like his class got better—the behavior was better as a result of how Reggie carried himself. “I really feel like he helped me…it was like I had a bodyguard.” Reggie may have been a natural athlete, but he wasn’t a natural when it came to math, although he did earn the “Most Improved Student” Award out of a class of more than 500 students. He had raised his grade from a D to an A. Mrs. Anderson stayed in touch with Reggie after he graduated, and she clearly remembered one visit he made to the school in March after his last year at Alabama. It was right in the middle of all of the workouts he was doing to try and impress teams leading up to the NFL Draft that year. He was getting ready for his Pro Day and all of the team visits he had—basically the biggest interviews of his life. She was having problems with her class and confided in Reggie that she had a standing offer to leave education after 13 years to return to an old job with a telecom company. She was going to take that job on Friday. Reggie came to the school on Monday. He came in and spoke with her students, took the time to meet and talk with them individually— explaining the importance of education and why it mattered in the bigger picture that’s often lost among teens who are constantly thinking of only the here and now. For the kids, this message was coming from a legendary alum who was on the verge of being drafted to the NFL just months after winning a National Championship at Alabama, and one who was named the SEC’s Defensive Player of the Year that season. He had the status and the aura for those kids to hang on every word he said. “That was everything to me,” Mrs. Anderson explained. “The whole class changed after his visit. He really made a difference for those kids. I mean, those students were struggling.” Mrs. Anderson decided to stay in education that day after she was reminded by Reggie of the impact education has on the kids’ lives she’s working with every day. Another one of his teachers, Mrs. Roberts, who teaches English and is still very close with Reggie, explained that over the years she’s had a lot of the football players in her classes at Bob Jones, and she still does, and if she sees one that needs help or is really struggling, she knows exactly what to do. “Any time I see a kid like that—in that position—I text Reggie because he’s immediately on it,” she explained. “Reggie was one of those kids that never got involved in all that stuff—the drugs and alcohol, and he’s so good now about stepping up and mentoring these young kids and getting them on the right path.” Mrs. Roberts also remembered not only how crazy Reggie’s graduating class was, but how his presence around them always seemed to help her out.

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“It was kind of insanity in there,” she recalled. “But [Reggie] would always set the tone for how to respond and how to act. When he spoke, people listened. He wasn’t overly talkative or loud or anything like that, but if he had something to say, people stopped and they listened. “He could just command a room with little effort.” Reggie and Mrs. Roberts on the day Reggie was announced as an Under Armour All-American In all of her years of teaching, Mrs. Roberts said she’s never had anyone else who could do that. “Nobody has ever had his maturity or his ability to lead a group and command that kind of respect,” she added. “Nobody has even come close to that, honestly.” On the football field, Reggie was the kind of player who doesn’t come around often as well. Kevin Rose, who is the head football coach at Bob Jones, recalled one particular game Reggie had against Decatur his sophomore year. To him, it stood out above the rest. Bob Jones hadn’t beaten Decatur—a local rival—in 14 years, and they were facing a key fourth-and-4 late in the game, which was close at the time. “They’re like what do you want to do here? And I’m like, ‘Just throw it to Reggie,’” Rose laughed. “We ran a Y-Cross and [Reggie, who also played tight end] caught it and ran about 45 yards down the field to inside the five-yard line, and we ended up scoring and went on to win the game.” Since that day, Bob Jones has won eight-straight over Decatur. During Reggie’s three years (2009-11) as an All-State outside linebacker, Bob Jones amassed a record of 27-5. In the previous nine years before that, they had just two winning seasons. Rose credits a lot of their success—even to this day—to Reggie’s leadership and character. He was the guy who showed up early, held his peers accountable, and never made anyone feel inferior. “For you to be a great team, your best player has to be that guy,” Rose explained of Reggie, who he explained never said anything but ‘Yes, sir. No, sir,’ to him during those days. “We’re still feeding off what he did here because he helped us take our program from a very mediocre 5-5 one, to one of the best in the state year in year out for the last ten years. “I think he’s always been extremely humble, and to receive the national attention he’s gotten since he was 12 or 13 years old and remain that way—it’s special,” Rose added. “It wasn’t unusual for us to come in at 7-7:15 in the morning and Reggie was in there sweeping the locker room. “Nobody asked him to do it, but he was there and it needed to be swept, so he swept it up. I think that says a lot about him.” Reggie recently held a free football camp for hundreds of kids who live in the area.

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“He’s not some far away character that you just see play on TV,” Rose explained. “Reggie is in our locker room, our weight room, on our field and in our community. When he gets off time, he comes here. He’s not in the Bahamas. He’s at Bob Jones High School.” That school is part of Reggie’s foundation—almost a defining character in his journey. Another one of those defining characters is his best friend Dez, who always made sure Reggie was on the right path, particularly when anyone was tempting him to go the other direction. There was always a lot of attention on Reggie, so Dez was always busy. “I’ll never forget the first time I met Dez,” Reggie, who showed up to high school a week late because he was at an AAU basketball tournament in Orlando, laughed. “He walked up on me and said, ‘Man, I don’t like you.’” “I’m like, ‘Man, what do you mean?’” Reggie, who was taken aback, responded. “Because you big as hell,” Dez laughed. It was the start of a friendship that helped guide Reggie through years of notoriety, accolades and temptations that could have otherwise put his journey on a different path. “After that we just got real cool, and I got real close with his family,” Reggie noted. Even if Dez wasn’t always doing the right things, he never wanted the same for Reggie. “He’d always tell me, ‘If anyone has a chance of making it, you’ve got that chance,” Reggie said, explaining Dez’s point of why Reggie shouldn’t be hanging around him at certain times. “Ever since then, I knew he was a real friend of mine,” Reggie noted. Dez played football, too. He wore No. 9 while Reggie wore No. 19. They were a pair—always together. “Dez was the glue of that football team,” Rose explained. “He wasn’t the best football player on the team, matter of fact we probably made some packages to make sure we could get him on the field, but he was the glue that held everybody together. “He and Reggie just had an outstanding relationship.” That relationship continued on after Reggie left for Alabama as a five-star player with a character and work ethic that should have made for an immediate impact in Tuscaloosa, but he’d soon learn it wasn’t going to be that easy. The first two years at Alabama weren’t exactly what Reggie had expected. He had played only sparingly—amassing just 25 total tackles over that time, which was tough for a player who had always been the best player on whatever team he was on. There were zero issues with his work ethic, character, or ability. He had quickly made the switch from outside linebacker to inside, per the request of Alabama head coach Nick Saban. It just hadn’t clicked for Reggie yet.

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“It’s the first thing Coach Saban tells everyone, especially the freshman,” Reggie recalled. “All those stars you got, excuse my language, but that s**t is gone. Like, this is my world, this is my house, you’re going to do what I say. You’re either going to get with it or get gone.” That kind of approach was exactly what Reggie needed, but it took time to get there. “I think it’s pretty typical when guys come in that they have sort of this one set of standards that are created and set by external factors, which are expectations,” Saban, who has guided Alabama to six National Championships and won two National Coach of the Year Awards, explained. “They don’t really understand fully what it takes to be a great college player, but they have those expectations of what they want to accomplish. “I think in their first two years, and sometimes longer, it takes guys a little more time to realize what they need to do to be a good player.” Alabama head coach Nick Saban (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) “He’s going to put you in the perfect position to be successful on the field and off the field,” Reggie explained of playing for Saban. “The guys who understand that early are the ones who are very successful. Like a Julio Jones, Mark Ingram, Amari Cooper, or Landon Collins, a bunch of those guys, they all knew that. It took me a little bit longer to understand that because I get frustrated really fast.” Early in his career, Reggie studied and knew what to do, but when he got on the field, his mind would go blank and it frustrated him. Those mistakes led to other players, who were also five-star or highly-recruited players—guys like C.J. Mosely, Nico Johnson and Trey Depriest, getting on the field ahead of Reggie early in his career. “If I was [Saban], I wouldn’t have believed in me either because off the field I was doing the right thing, but on the field, I wasn’t accountable and I wasn’t up to the standard he wanted,” Reggie added. “I think in his first two years at Alabama he probably considered doing something else,” Rose explained of watching his former standout go through such a tough time early at Alabama. “Life is difficult and we all wish we could wake up and it’s 72 degrees and you’re walking downhill with the wind at your back, but we know that’s not true—there’s an obstacle every day. “I think after two years, he was kind of not knowing what he was going to do.” The problems soon hit home, too. Around that same time, Reggie found out his mother, Ann White, was a diabetic, and that his father, Reggie Ragland, Sr., had suffered a stroke. His mother was the rock of the family—the one who always preached that if he was going to start something, he was also going to finish it. “My mom made sure that I kept my head right in school,” Reggie explained, “but my dad made sure I had that mental toughness on and off the field.” Reggie’s father helped instill the passion and drive for whatever Reggie was going to end up doing in life. 61


His dad was the one to always keep him grounded, going through the mistakes Reggie made in the game that night back in high school, while everyone else was busy singing his praises. “My dad was always being hard on me and making sure that people were never going to give me nothing in life, basically,” Reggie noted. “He always meant well. Me and him bump heads like that all the time, but that’s my dog though. I love that man.” Reggie remembered one day when he was seven years old that his father took him out to work with him. His dad had worked as a laborer—doing whatever he could, whether it was painting houses, cutting grass, or whatever—to support his family. “He was like, ‘Man, do you want to do this type of work or do you want to be able to do what you want to do?” Reggie recalled of the conversation with his dad that day, which has stuck with him. Now, two of the most influential people in Reggie’s life were struggling with their health and he was a few hours away at college—also struggling. And all of this came after being destined for greatness since he was a kid by those who were now wondering what had happened. Then, it got even worse. Reggie received a phone call the day before the LSU game his Sophomore year that changed everything. “My cousin called me and was like, ‘Hey, have you heard about Dez? He got in a car wreck and died.’” Reggie’s best friend—the one who had been real with him from the day they first met and who had always gone out of his way to make sure Reggie was on the right path—even if he, himself, wasn’t—was now gone. Just like that. “I’ll never forget I had a test that day, too,” Reggie, whose tone went from cheery and playful to dark and reflective immediately, explained. “Everything in my room, I just threw it against the wall, broke my door, punched a hole in it, then went and took the test, left, and then just really sat in silence for a long period of time. “That was really my friend. I could truly say that man was a friend of mine.” For Reggie, the adversities were piling up. “It was crazy because like a year before, I had another real close friend of mine who also died in car wreck,” Reggie noted. “That was the day of the Tennessee game. I mean, losing two people I grew up with and that I was actually close with, it really hurt me.” It was a lot to deal with. “All of it can either make me or break me,” he recalled telling himself. Between the struggles his mother and father were going through health-wise, the personal loss of his best friend, and the fact that football wasn’t going well, Reggie needed help, and he knew where to go to find his answers—the same place he had always gone.

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Reggie sat in that coach’s office at Bob Jones for a few hours, talking out his goals, plans, and how he was going to change his approach to everything. Those who were around him that day were worried because they’d never seen this side of him, but they also knew the character and work ethic of the person they were dealing with. He had always been there for others and now it was their turn to be there for him. Reggie’s mother and father told him they were going to be alright and that they wanted him to concentrate on football, as did his godmother, Roslyn Barbee, who is another instrumental figure in his story. He often stays at her house when he’s back home. He says it’s quiet there and allows him to relax, at least when he’s not playing with his six-year old niece over there. Reggie's Godmother (left) and Mother (right) During this transition in Reggie’s life, he grew closer to his faith and shut out most-everyone who wasn’t directly involved with helping him achieve his football goals. He became singular-focused on being the player he was destined to become. “I locked myself away from everyone,” he explained. Then, it just clicked for him. He decided to step back and “just play football.” He credits former Alabama linebackers coach Kevin Steele for helping him flip that switch. Steele is now the defensive coordinator at Auburn. Reggie used everything he had gone through over the previous year for motivation. “I feel like it made me mentally tougher and stronger as a man and as a person,” Reggie explained. “I’m not happy at all that happened, but I’m glad I went through it to make me even better man and better person to really understand values of life and loving people, and since that happened, I’m loving people even more now. “My mom didn’t ever drop the rope, my dad ain’t drop the rope, and God ain’t never dropped the rope on me,” Reggie explained using a motto they used one year at Alabama. “He brought me this far and not to let me go. I’m a firm believer in that and I’m going to keep going—always going to keep going.” It didn’t take long after that attitude change that Reggie saw a difference in his role on the Alabama defense, and he naturally became more assertive. “It wasn’t two weeks later from when he went back to practice that I started hearing stories about how well he was doing,” Rose explained. “And from the moment he stepped back on Alabama’s campus that year, he was the starting linebacker.” Reggie started 13 games for Alabama as a junior and finished with 93 tackles (10.5 for loss). He was becoming the player everyone had always expected him to be. He returned to Alabama for his senior year and passed on the NFL because, for one, he promised his mother he’d get a degree, which he accomplished as he graduated with a degree in Consumer Affairs. He was also a finalist for the Senior CLASS Award, which honors student-athletes who make a difference on and off the field. He was a part of Alabama’s leadership council and dedicated more than 50 hours of his time to community service—visiting hospitals, churches, and schools. 63


But he also returned for his final year because he had to leave the last game of his junior season with a concussion, and he didn’t want that to be the last memory he had of playing in college. Alabama’s head strength and conditioning coach Scott Cochran remembers the day Reggie first started running with the first-team defense as a junior. He said it was the first time he really noticed a change in him, and the leadership everyone who had ever known Reggie knew about really began to manifest itself. “He took the team over one time,” Cochran explained of one summer conditioning session heading into Reggie’s senior year. “I literally could have just walked off the field because in the summertime—it’s the players and the strength coaches—there’s no other coaches around during that time. It’s just us. “We run together as a group and he didn’t like one of the reps,” Cochran explained. “He didn’t like the 110’s we were running. It was like the fourth or fifth rep and he yelled, ‘Start it over.’ “And I’m like, ‘Huh? So, we’re going to run 16 of these and you want to start over after 5? The bigs might kill you,’” Cochran recalled saying to Reggie that day. “I’m a big too though, so let’s go,” Reggie answered. “We started over, and that’s when I said, ‘OK, we’re good. You got it. It’s your team,” Cochran recalled. Cochran added that it’s rare for a player—even at Alabama—to ever do anything like that, and that Reggie had never been on a team with someone who had done that before. “That was all him on his own,” Cochran noted. That’s the same year Alabama ultimately won one of their 17 National Championships in the program’s rich and storied history. That’s also the year Reggie was named the SEC’s Defensive Player of the Year and a consensus First-Team All-American. It was all connected. Reggie crouches next to a plaque honoring Alabama's 2015 National Championship outside Bryant– Denny Stadium at the University of Alabama. “If the player isn’t taking over than the coach has to, and if the coach has to then he has more investment in the team than the players do,” Cochran added of Reggie’s leadership and what it meant that day, and all of the other days he had done similar things. “It’s not a jerk coming off, it’s a humble guy who wants to win and he’s going to do whatever it takes to get there, and you just have to give him permission. “You have to give him permission to take the team over.” Reggie got permission, and he succeeded with that responsibility—both on and off the field. He won the local media’s “good guy award,” which is given to the player who was voted the best and most-friendly by the beat writers who cover the team on a daily basis. “He always came up with a big smile on his face,” Charlie Potter, who works for 247 Sports and covers the Alabama football program, explained of Reggie. “He always asked how everyone was doing and it 64


seemed genuine—a lot of that can seem forced or fake, but Reggie always seemed like a guy who really cared about other people.” “I tried to be real and be the same towards everybody,” Reggie said. Reggie speaks during the media day for the NCAA Cotton Bowl college football game Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2015, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero) “He’s going to keep it real with you,” Cochran added. “I don’t think he tries to put on a front or a fake, which is hard these days with that generation you’d think that that’s the first thing they’re going to do, but he was very genuine in everything he did.” Saban—the guy at the forefront of Reggie’s football makeover—couldn’t have been happier to watch the development over the years of someone who became one the best players to ever go through the program, which is the most-dominant one in the history of college football. “He was the signal-caller on defense, so everyone looked to him for direction,” Saban explained. “Not only in what we were going to play, but how we were going to play it. I think he was really a good leader for us, he cared about his teammates. He always set a good example. He was somebody that other people could emulate, and I think it showed in not only how he performed, but how the players around him performed. “I think he represents the epitome of what we’d love every player to be—not only for when they’re a player here, but also when they leave here. They want to come back and they want to be a part of it.” Reggie left college on a high note. He had accomplished everything he wanted to after a rough couple of years to begin his time in Tuscaloosa. And heading into the NFL Draft that spring, he was considered the top middle linebacker available by most experts, and the majority of people had him mocked in the middle-to-late first round. Then just a few hours before the draft, there was a leaked report that claimed Reggie had an “enlarged aorta,” and everything he had worked for was put into flux. Teams had to go back and re-check their medical evaluations of him at the 11th hour, and some, reportedly, pushed him down their boards after that. Reggie has his suspicions on where the report came from, but doesn’t know, or won’t say, for sure. Ultimately, he fell to the Buffalo Bills in the second round and was taken with the No. 41 overall pick. Reggie Ragland poses for a photo on stage after being selected by the Buffalo Bills during the 2016 NFL Draft at the Auditorium Theatre on Friday, April 29, 2016 in Chicago. (Perry Knotts via AP) Then, soon after arriving in Buffalo, there was another setback. During training camp, Reggie suffered a torn ACL before he ever even took the field for a game. It cost him his entire rookie season. A year later, the Bills decided Reggie was expendable before he was even back to 100 percent, and that was to the tune of a future mid-round pick from the Chiefs. It was one of the first moves made by thennew Chiefs’ general manger Brett Veach. 65


“He came right in the midst of the whole thing, so you have no real foundation, no background in the system,” Chiefs’ defensive coordinator Bob Sutton explained of Reggie joining the team at the end of the preseason. “He was also coming off the injury, so there was a lot going on when he got here. I think credit goes to him and (inside linebackers’ coach) Mark DeLeone, who worked with him on the side outside of practice time, to bring him along.” Reggie didn’t see any action for the Chiefs’ defense for the first three games last year, but steadily saw an increase in playing time—leading to a career-high of 47 snaps played in Week 7 against the New York Giants. That’s where it all started. Reggie ended up starting the final 10 games of the season for the Chiefs’ defense and finished with 44 total tackles, including a dominant performance against his former team—the Buffalo Bills—in Week 12. He finished that game with a season-high eight tackles and helped hold Bills’ running back LeSean McCoy—one of the league’s top players and who finished fourth in the league in rushing—to just 49 yards on 22 carries. “Last year was only a little taste of what I can do,” Reggie smiled. “I appreciate the Chiefs giving me the opportunity to come back out and play football and do what I love to do.” This offseason, which is the first healthy one of his NFL career, Reggie has gotten himself into the best shape of his life, and that’s not just coming from Reggie, but from the guy who has been training Reggie since he was a freshman in high school. Andy McCloy, who owns BCI Performance and Fitness in Madison and has trained several current and former NFL players, probably knows more about Reggie the athlete than anyone out there. “From the minute I first met him, there was just kind of this aura around him,” McCloy, who had pictures of Reggie from high school on the wall of the entry way of his gym, explained. “His abilities were always significantly different than his peers—call it God’s plan, call it destiny—something along those lines, but I think his potential is limitless. “I don’t think we’ve seen even close to the best version of what he’s capable of putting out there. He’s a next-level type of guy and I just think as he learns how to be a pro, gets integrated more in the Kansas City system, we’re going to see more and more of that come out.” McCloy, who also trained Dez when he and Reggie were together in school, saw what happened when tragedy struck that group of friends. “That hurt a lot of people and there were a lot of people who went the wrong direction because of that, but Reggie stood tall and carried on and I think it’s been a huge motivator and driver for him over the years,” he said. “I think about Dez all the time. All the time,” Reggie added. “Any time I ride to go over and workout with Andy in the morning, I pass the graveyard and I always look and see Dez’s tombstone. I visited it for the first time in like two years a couple of months ago because it’s just hard going out there. “I just knew it was time to go out there. I’m always talking to him, thinking about him, but I needed to go out there and see him. But it’s tough, man. It’s very tough.” 66


Dez was one of the first people to not just believe that Reggie would find himself in the position he’s in today—because most people saw him as a future professional athlete, whether that was fair or not. But Dez was the one who was actively shielding Reggie away from things that could have jeopardized the course of this seemingly destined path. He was that friend. “I think he’d be proud of me,” Reggie noted. “I think he would.” Reggie, who began at Alabama wearing No. 18, decided to make the change to No. 19—the same number he wore in high school, to honor his friend, who had worn No. 9 when they played together. “My thinking is if I always have a “9” on my jersey—he’s always going to be there with me,” Reggie, who chose to wear the No. 59 with the Chiefs, explained. After finally seeing some NFL action last season, Reggie now heads into his second year with even more to prove—for his family, his fallen friends, his teammates, and for those who have always believed in him. He’s finally healthy and had an entire offseason to get stronger and faster, and he’s ready to take the next step as a playmaker and as another leader for the Chiefs’ defense, which isn’t short in that area. This offseason, when the Chiefs signed free agent linebacker Anthony Hitchens to start alongside Reggie, the first person Hitchens heard from was Reggie. They quickly developed a bond—hanging out at baseball games and spending time together away from the facility. “Those two are going to set the tone for our entire defense,” Chiefs’ general manager Brett Veach noted at a press conference earlier this offseason. Then, when the Chiefs took Ole Miss’ Breeland Speaks with their first pick of the NFL Draft this year, Reggie immediately reached out and welcomed him to the team. He did that with several of the rookies and other new additions to the team as well. “One thing about a leader—you’ve got to know your personnel,” Reggie explained. “I’m always talking to people because I just try to understand everybody because I want this thing to go great. I want everybody to be successful because if I’m successful and he’s successful, that means the whole team is going to be successful.” The Chiefs’ defense is filled with leaders at every level, and the voice of another guy in that room who has demonstrated elite leadership qualities throughout his entire life is only a good thing. Simply stated: Reggie personifies leadership. He spent his childhood sticking up for people like Robbie Clark—then going as far to assure Robbie’s mother that she didn’t need to worry about her autistic son going to middle school because Reggie, who was still only 11 years old at the time, would take care of him. He helped teachers like Mrs. Roberts and Mrs. Anderson control classes full of students who had a history of behavioral issues. He’d sweep the locker room before school as a five-star recruit and one of the top high school players in the country—not because he was asked to, but simply because it was needed. 67


In college, he demanded the best football players in the country start a summer conditioning session over one day in the heat because “it wasn’t good enough.” Basically, that’s the journey of Reggie Ragland. It’s a documented trail of humble leadership, earned success through adversity, and determination. He’s been challenged and he’s overcome. He’s never bought into the hype or let success change him— even when he had every reason to. He’s everything you want in a football player, a member of your community, and a face of your franchise. And based on his story, the best is still yet to come. “One thing I’ve always tried to do is be great by people because you never know who you’re going to need in life,” Reggie, who is beginning a foundation to help disadvantaged people, explained. “I’ve always tried to be the best person I can be towards people, and I want to keep being a good role model on and off the field—giving people chances, giving them a senseof hope.” While a lot of fans might see Reggie Ragland as a reason for hope for the Chiefs’ defense next season, the people of Madison, Alabama and Bob Jones High School see a lot more than that. They see the example of what you’re supposed to aspire to become. They have the answer because they know the man and they know the story. And now the rest of us do, too.

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(Chris Conley) Chiefs’ Chris Conley talks passions and preseason thoughts at charity bowling event Shaun Goodwin Kansas City Star July 24, 2018

The Kansas City Chiefs’ Chris Conley may have reported for camp earlier this week, but that hasn’t stopped the wide receiver from finding time to film a movie or go bowling over the past couple of days. Driving straight from the Chiefs’ training camp in St. Joseph, Mo., to Blue Springs, Mo., on Tuesday evening, Conley was present to attend his second-straight DollarDays Strikes For Kids Backpack Giveaway. Hosted at Lunar Bowl by Strikes for Kids, the two-hour event is designed to get school supplies and backpacks into the hands of kids for the upcoming school year. “You take the time, you find the time and you make it. Having an opportunity to change lives, it’s not trivial, it’s not small,” Conley said. “This is just as, if not more, important than what we do on the field.” The event comes just days after Conley spent the weekend filming a movie in downtown Kansas City. The movie, called “Love Color,” focuses on showing different ways to love other people. “It’s basically a short film about loving your neighbor. It involves a little bit of music, some dance, things like that. Really the whole plot is by loving your neighbor, you can literally change the world around you,” Conley said. “We kind of take that, and we boost it, crank it up to 10 in this world that’s kind of otherworldly, but it still exists in the now.” Both activities were passions of Conley’s during his time as a student-athlete at Georgia. He volunteered for the Boys and Girls Club throughout the year, and spent time writing and producing short films. But once Conley was drafted by the Chiefs in 2015 as the 76th overall pick, he had to drop his passion of writing and filmmaking in order to focus on his football. “I took a little break from that when I got drafted to Kansas City because you’ve got to establish yourself, let the organization know that you’re serious about your job,” Conley said. “But now I had a little bit of a break, and I’ve been writing, and it’s about time to get back behind the camera.” As the season kicks back into gear, Conley’s passions may have to take a backseat once again as he claimed the Chiefs won’t stop until the Super Bowl. Conley missed the majority of the 2017 season after succumbing to an Achilles injury in Week 5 against the Houston Texans. Conley had picked up 11 receptions for 175 yards before the injury.

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“Feeling great. We’ve had a month off, I was spending it in Atlanta — training, being around family, just getting prepared mentally for the season because the season is a long haul,” Conley said. “Once you get up there, and you get started in camp, you don’t stop until February.” The Chiefs’ training camp will continue through to Aug. 14, with their first preseason game coming against the Texans at Arrowhead Stadium on Aug. 9.

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(Derrick Nnadi) Now more than ever, rookie Derrick Nnadi tapping into wisdom and drive of his true hero, his father Nate Taylor The Athletic July 28, 2018

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. — Every day, Derrick Nnadi talks to his father for encouragement, and every morning, Fred Nnadi tries to think of just the correct words to share with his son through text messages. With the help of his father, Derrick has successfully navigated every level of football he has played in life. The defensive tackle arrived at the Chiefs’ training camp Sunday and began his rookie season by asking his father for more wisdom. Fred reminded his son of the NFL draft in April, and how being selected by the Chiefs was his gateway to prove himself in the league. Throughout their chats this week, Fred has asked one question to motivate his son: Have you done your job? When it comes to inspiration, Derrick is speaking with the right man. Fred, a 63-year-old Nigerian immigrant, has become an American citizen, made a successful career in engineering and has raised seven children into adulthood with his wife, Christy. “My father is probably the hardest-working person I’ve ever met in my life,” Derrick said Tuesday. “He’s told me tons and tons of stories.” Each story holds a lesson, a reminder of how success is developed from determination. Derrick, listed at 6-foot-1 and 312 pounds, wants to become an immediate contributor for the Chiefs, a player strong enough to help improve the team’s run defense. He has spent hours learning the playbook. He has taken notes during meetings when defensive coordinator Bob Sutton goes through the plays. Derrick wants to play as many snaps as he can in practice to polish his techniques. He plans to earn his way into the Chiefs’ defensive line rotation. Before camp, Derrick, 22, wondered what gesture he could do for his father to demonstrate his appreciation. When Fred learned of Derrick’s intentions, he explained to his son that he didn’t want anything material. “In this career, there are going to be a lot of people that are going to call, and every time they call you, they’re going to want something,” Fred told Derrick. “As your father, if I call you, the only thing I want you to do is be a better you.” When he was young, Fred said the biggest attribute he learned from his father was courage. John Nnadi was a tribal chief in Nigeria who had several wives and many children. 71


“My father was a very wealthy man,” Fred said in a telephone interview Thursday. “When I was growing up, we were privileged.” Nigeria, however, changed in 1967 when the country broke into a civil war to become an independent nation from the United Kingdom. As the government’s conscription increased, Fred, a teenager at the time, wanted to join the army to fight in the war. Fred was grateful his father didn’t discourage him, and from that moment on, he wanted to improve his life. Fred arrived in America with his brother in 1978 and became an engineering student at Old Dominion. He grew to love the country, even though the culture was completely different. In 1980, Fred made Virginia Beach, Va., his home. Christy followed Fred from Nigeria, and the family grew; Derrick became the couple’s youngest child on May 9, 1996. Derrick was big from the start. He wanted to run on the track and field team in middle school, but the school didn’t have a uniform that fit Derrick’s large frame. The team that could give him a proper uniform was the football team, so as an eighth grader, Derrick began to understand and enjoy the sport. So did his father. “I love football, and I always have an opinion,” said Fred, who grew up playing soccer. “I’m just like every person who watches the game.” Fred attended every game Derrick played at Ocean Lakes High in Virginia Beach. As one of the biggest players on the field, Derrick was encouraged by Fred to dominate his opponent at the line of scrimmage. Together, the father and son created a mantra for Derrick to remember on the field: “When you get to the field, nobody is better than you, nobody is bigger than you, nobody is stronger than you.” “I would say, ‘You have to remember you are better than anybody else, and you have to be,’” Fred said. “I went on and on, and I didn’t know if he would pick it up.” Derrick did. He become one of the best defensive linemen in the country during his senior year when he recorded 20 sacks and 71 tackles while receiving scholarship offers from several powerhouse programs. Derrick learned the nuances of the game quickly, and though he has a gentle personality, he became a fierce competitor both on the field and in the weight room. “He’s one of the most talented athletes I’ve had here, but also one of the hardest-working,” Ocean Lakes coach Chris Scott told The Virginian-Pilot in February 2014. At Florida State, Derrick impressed his coaches with his willingness to accept criticism and listen when being taught something new. Fred would advise Derrick that the player’s voice didn’t matter when it came to the coaches, the men who controlled his playing time. In his four seasons at Florida State, Derrick played in 48 games and collected 165 tackles to go along with eight sacks. He was one of the most consistent defensive players on the field — and he became one of the toughest and strongest. As a junior, Derrick benched 525 pounds and squatted 750 pounds. All of his teammates, in amazement, agreed, listing him as the strongest player on the team in a poll on Rivals.com. More importantly to Fred: Derrick graduated in December with a bachelor’s degree in social science.

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“You want to be the best of the best of the best of the best of the best,” Derrick said, repeating the phrase his father used to tell him. “You’ve got to say it five times.” Once Derrick shifted his focus toward the NFL — with the potential to earn millions — Fred shared a personal story from a time before his youngest son was born. In 1992, Fred was pursuing his master’s degree in engineering. In order to have a better career, he had to quit his job to go back to school. Christy, who had three children at home at the time, couldn’t work, either. For almost a year, Fred and his family had to live on just $2,000. He took a loan for his education and bought used clothes for his children. The meal Fred remembers his family eating the most back then was rice and bread. “My first daughter used to say, ‘When are we going to eat meat in this house?’” Fred said. “She was very, very young. I said, ‘Don’t worry, it will come some day.’” In 1993, Fred earned his master’s degree. He started a new job soon thereafter and paid back his student loan debt in three years. “I thank God,” Fred said. “It was the worst year. I don’t know how we survived, but we did. I remember filling the refrigerator (after that). We had meat.” No matter how much money Derrick makes in his NFL career, his father’s story teaches him that what matters most is how well he manages his priorities. Beyond the financial struggles his father once went through, Derrick is most proud that the biggest attribute he learned from his father is perseverance. “All my siblings are having wonderful lives right now,” he said. “It’s all thanks to him and my mother being great parents.” Since the draft, the color red has become a dominant one inside Fred’s house. He has placed the Chiefs’ emblem in several rooms. A Chiefs flag flies in the front yard. Fred is eager to see his son play in his first NFL game. “This is Chiefs Kingdom,” Fred said of his home. “We are very, very happy for Derrick. He’s a good kid, but the good kid doesn’t just stop. I’m going to continue talking to him.” Fred admits he talks to Derrick these days a bit more often than his older children. The next task he wants his son to focus on is the correct business approach he must have off the field. Everything in camp, Fred tells his son, matters. How are you talking to people? How attentive are you in meetings? If an issues arises, how will you help resolve it? Derrick hopes his positive attitude and commitment to improve will be noticed by his coaches and older teammates. “In this business, how I see it, you get what you put in,” he said. “If you want to play, you can put in as much as you want to get on the field. If you don’t really care about it, you’re not going to do as much as studying film, you’re not going to care as much when you’re on the practice field, you’re not going to care about what food you put into your body. You’re not going to worry about how much sleep you’re getting. It’s about how much you really want to get on the field.”

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When Derrick talks with his mother at night, he can hear her smile and joy on the phone, which at times has made him emotional. His father, though, remains steady. On Thursday morning, Derrick received his daily text message, the one that’s always meant to motivate him. “Prove yourself every day,” Fred wrote to his son. “Have you done your job?”

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(Eric Berry) Chiefs safety Eric Berry: ‘I just keep on trucking’ Brooke Pryor Kansas City Star July 28, 2018

ST. JOSEPH Sometimes, Eric Berry’s mind wanders to the what-ifs. What if he didn’t have two season-ending injuries? What if he never got cancer? What if he didn’t spend nearly half of his NFL career on the mend? But before the five-time Pro Bowl safety can escape too far down the rabbit hole of alternate realities, he pauses and remembers the positives that came from those negatives. “You really can’t wonder where you would be,” Berry said. “There’s no telling. Because I learned so much throughout all three of those processes — including this one — and I just keep growing. I can’t really tell you where I would be without them.” Saturday morning, Berry pulled on pads for the first time since he exited the season-opener against New England with a torn Achilles in the fourth quarter. Right before he went down, Berry felt like he was finally close to peaking. He was in excellent shape and primed for a big season. He had the same feelings in 2011 and 2014 when his seasons were cut short by an ACL tear and a Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis, respectively. It would be easy to feel cheated by the cruel timing of those maladies, but Berry doesn’t. “I learned so much,” he said. “The whole cancer deal was actually a privilege, to be honest with you. It was a blessing at the same time because I learned so much. I helped so many people and so many people helped me as well and inspired me, just being able to connect with them through that common thread of having cancer and being able to overcome it.” His experience recovering from the ACL tear and the cancer fueled him through his latest rehabilitation, and he tried to follow the same blueprint he used then to get ready for this season. But at nearly 30 years old, Berry knows his body can’t take the physical beating the way it used to. So much of his preparation now is mental. He relies on putting in work in the film room and in walkthroughs instead of banging bodies during extended 11-on-11 scenarios.

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“You can’t overdo it physically,” he said. “You’ve got to make sure you prepare mentally because you only get a few opportunities on the field to be like, ‘OK, this is the situation, this is the down and distance. Let’s see if we can make the play or make sure we are perfect on this play, make sure we get it done.’ Because you only going to get so many reps on the field where you get a game-like situation.” After three catastrophic setbacks, it would be easy to get discouraged. But Berry’s support network doesn’t let that happen. Before Berry departed for training camp, his dad gave him the same advice he’s given him during each of his rehabilitation journeys. “Sometimes I might tend to overthink things at times instead of just doing it,” Berry said. “He’s always been the person to ground me and keep me humble, and also put things in perspective for me. ... He’s always been there to be like, ‘Look, just take care of business. And you’ll be fine.’” Berry’s journey isn’t lost on his teammates. Entering his ninth year with the organization, Berry is the unquestioned leader of the young group, and his status as the comeback king only builds his legacy in the locker room. “Eric’s our leader,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. “We appreciate when he’s out there going. The guys feed off him. It’s the whole story. It’s not just that it’s Eric Berry, It’s the whole story, the whole thing that he went through. The fact that he does everything out here and works his tail off. It’s a phenomenal story.” Berry doesn’t know what this season will bring. He doesn’t know if he has another comeback in his system. But he’s not worried about what he can’t control. “I just keep on trucking,” Berry said. “I don’t know what life is going to throw at me. That’s just period. You never know what’s going to come your way. However it comes to you or whatever it is, you just roll with the punches and keep pressing forward.”

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(Patrick Mahomes)

Chiefs broke a trend by drafting Patrick Mahomes, now hope he bucks another Blair Kerkhoff Kansas City Star August 15, 2018

Patrick Mahomes is beginning his role as his franchise’s quarterback in a different way than many, and not because of his arm strength, hairstyle or love of his pit bull. No, this involves other factors, like his scant time under center in the NFL, and suggests that lofty expectations for the second-year pro may be out of whack based on recent history. But the idea in the short term, as the Chiefs prepare for a season in which a fourth-consecutive playoff appearance is the objective, is that his inexperience will be offset by advantages the Chiefs have created for him. And that those benefits will help Mahomes defy the odds of career success of quarterbacks selected in the first round. How inexperienced is Mahomes? When he was selected with the No. 10 overall pick in the 2017 draft, he became the 28th quarterback taken in the first round since 2007. The 29th went three picks later when Houston took Deshaun Watson. Every one of those quarterbacks played more in his first year than Mahomes. One, Jamarcus Russell, started only once as a rookie in 2007, the same as Mahomes last year, but he appeared in three other games. Another, Jake Locker in 2011, didn’t start as a rookie, but wound up taking more snaps for the season. So much is expected from someone who has played so little, but that’s where we are with the 22-yearold Mahomes, the quarterback Kansas City can call its own and has waited decades to embrace. “I get it,” said former Chiefs quarterback Trent Green. “This is a different situation from what the Chiefs have had.” Green then hit the reverse-chronology button on Chiefs quarterbacks: Alex Smith, Matt Cassell, Damon Huard, Green, Elvis Grbac, Steve Bono, Joe Montana, Steve DeBerg ... The Chiefs’ era of importing quarterbacks began with DeBerg, who arrived in 1988. After that season, Marty Schottenheimer took over and every coach since then started the season with a plan centered around a quarterback who launched his NFL career elsewhere. 77


Before DeBerg, the previous decade had seen a run of Chiefs-drafted signal callers: Steve Fuller, Bill Kenney and Todd Blackledge. One might call that period the second era of homegrown Chiefs quarterbacks, with Len Dawson and Mike Livingston representing the first. Mahomes begins the fourth era, and the fact that he and the team are standing at the doorstep of something new and fresh helps explain the fervor around him. It also helps that he’s embraced this popularity, endearing himself to fans in the offseason by attending Royals and Sporting KC games and various concerts ... and showing up for a race this spring at Kansas Speedway wearing a pair of jorts. He’s an original Kansas City quarterback, and the organization is banking on offsetting his inexperience with advantages. Consider this: Many teams drafting quarterbacks in the first round are either filling an immediate need or creating a competitive situation. Also, in many cases, that team is in a state of flux or instability with its coaching staff or front office. “Most of the first round picks went to teams that weren’t very good at the time and maybe an unstable environment,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. “Then you look and see if it was an offensive (minded) head coach or a defensive coach.” Teams that select a quarterback high in the draft must plot out how to handle the succession plan at the position. Taking a quarterback in the first round usually means drafting a future leader with the intent of replacing an incumbent. But young quarterbacks are often thrown into fire of competition too soon, costing those teams in the win-loss department. That wasn’t the case for the Chiefs when they selected Mahomes. It was never the intent to have him battle Alex Smith in 2017, who was starting his 13th NFL season. In that way, Mahomes was like Aaron Rodgers, who apprenticed three years behind Brett Farve before becoming the Packers’ starter. No first-round quarterback in this century has waited as long as Rodgers to make his starting debut. In both cases, a young quarterback had the luxury of time through organizational patience. They joined winning teams with veteran quarterbacks, and although it wasn’t the job of Smith or Rodgers to groom his successor, the understudies got to observe how successful veterans went about their business. “It was tremendous amount of value there, with Pat being able to observe Alex,” Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy said. “Not just what he did on the field, which was a great deal, but in the classroom and just showing how to be a professional.” The Chiefs are banking on their plan bucking another trend. Stretching the timeline of quarterbacks selected in the first round to 2000, their batting average in terms of career success is well below .500. From 2000 to 2017, 48 quarterbacks were selected in the first round. The list starts with Chad Pennington, taken by the Jets in 2000. He was the only quarterback chosen in the first round that year. Michael Vick was the only one the following year.

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All of those quarterbacks since 2000 have started at least one game — Mahomes’ one game to date is the fewest — and only 19 have posted winning records. Twenty-seven have losing records, and two are even in terms of wins and losses, including Watson, who went 3-3 before last year’s season-ending injury with the Texans. For every Ben Roelisthberger, Phillip Rivers and Matt Ryan, there’s a Patrick Ramsey, Kyle Boller or EJ Manuel. The Cleveland Browns have fared the worst of any franchise in this area. Starting with Tim Couch, the overall top pick in 1999, the Browns have drafted five quarterbacks. Baker Mayfield, taken first in April, is the latest. The Browns’ picks that have played — Couch, Brady Quinn, Brandon Weeden and Johnny Manziel — have a combined record of 34-78 as starters. Not even being the overall top pick guarantees success. Twelve quarterbacks have been taken first since 2000. Six have winning career records. “I’ve wondered that before,” Reid said. “How many quarterbacks would have been (more successful) if they were in the right environment?” The Chiefs believe they have created conditions that will put their young but promising quarterback in a position to succeed, not only with their patience but by surrounding him with players such as tight end Travis Kelce, wide receiver Tyreek Hill, running back Kareem Hunt — all Pro Bowlers — and a key newcomer, wide receiver Sammy Watkins. “That kind of goes with the stability,” Reid said. The Rams’ Jared Goff is an example of someone whose trajectory changed with the conditions. Things couldn’t have gone worse in the 2016 top draft pick’s rookie season. He lost all seven of his starts that year. The Rams changed coaches, bringing in Washington offensive coordinator Sean McVay, and Goff’s production changed dramatically. He lead his teams to 11 victories and a playoff spot while earning a Pro Bowl selection. “There are a lot of factors that go into this,” Reid said. “You hope for Pat this is the right situation. Then he’s got to go out and play. That’s what it comes down to.”

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(Patrick Mahomes) Good and lucky: How Patrick Mahomes wound up in Kansas City, quarterbacking the Chiefs Sam Mellinger Kansas City Star September 04, 2018

TYLER, TEXAS Everything the Chiefs think they can be is dependent on Patrick Mahomes being everything they believe him to be. He is too important to fail, the Chiefs making the grandest single bet in its tortured history without a safety net. This is a desperate franchise putting its future on a man who only became a full-time football player three years ago, one of the great offensive minds of the 21st century handpicking him for a potential ride to the Hall of Fame, a region of fans attaching their hopes to a viral, no-look passing, record breaking college football freak show — who nearly quit the sport. Twice. “Crazy to think about now,” Mahomes said. “But it’s true.” His story has been told in parts, but always just in parts, a series of snacks without the main course. You probably know some of the outline. Son of a big-leaguer. Hung out with A-Rod as a kid. Eventually a potential pro himself, then a prolific quarterback at Texas Tech. Then a draft curiosity, then a draft obsession, then the first quarterback taken by the Chiefs in the first round since 1983. But when a story is done in bits, the details are always left out, which is a shame because the details make the biggest plot line of Kansas City sports’ next decade so tantalizing. Like, did you know football was his third-best sport two years into high school? That he chose it over the others largely because he had so much to learn? That he became so good and so daring so quickly that he and his best friend essentially ad-libbed the playbook, without practice and without asking their high school coach for permission? That he has a photographic memory, and that teams with Hall of Fame quarterbacks wanted to trade up for a kid who only became a full-time football player two years earlier? Randi Mahomes always had a four-year plan for her first child, and that plan never included any of this. A dream is now reality, but even that might be misleading because it implies Patrick or anyone around him dreamed it before three years ago. 80


He is now in a delicate place. When he came to Kansas City, he did not know of the pain and angst of a giant institution in a small market that hasn’t won a Super Bowl since before his parents were born. Those around him deploy mental gymnastics to mesh what they see with the odds. They say the hype is too much, but the general manager calls him the best college player he’s ever evaluated. They talk about his need to improve, but the head coach giggles at some of the throws. Mahomes did not ask for any of this. He is to be not just a star, but a wildly entertaining one — substance and style. Decision makers inside the organization are convinced this is ground zero for a new chapter in one of pro football’s historic franchises — there was Before Mahomes, and now there is With Mahomes. It’s an absurd weight. So far, Mahomes’ life has been a string of lucky breaks made good through supernatural talent and confidence and work. That’s been enough to get him here, but he’s never gone against something like this. “He was meant to do this,” said Pat Mahomes, Patrick’s father. “You’re going to see some stuff this year you’ve never seen before.” Lucky break No. 1 The first lucky break defined his childhood. Born to a father who pitched 11 years in the major leagues, dragging him through clubhouses and having him catching fly balls before the World Series at age 5, Patrick’s grade-school years served as something like a PhD-level class in how to be an athlete. “He learned how it works,” said LaTroy Hawkins, a retired 21-year major-leaguer and Patrick’s godfather. “How to gain those guys’ respect, how to deflect credit. Walking the walk. That came at a very young age.” Raised by a single mother whose job as an event coordinator meant loads of nights and weekends, Patrick had to help raise his younger brother and saw an up-close and real-time model for hard work. “Stable, always there,” he said of his mother. “Always there for us. Showed us you have to work hard to get what you want.” Surrounded by a core group of a half-dozen best friends, all sports-obsessed and most eventual college athletes, Mahomes’ childhood was in some ways the perfect blueprint for a future in sports. Even now, those guys talk the same, with the same inflections, the same chuckle that begins many sentences, all on the same text thread making fun of each other and asking about Patrick’s last highlight. “I knew he’d be a professional athlete when he was 7,” Randi said. “I’m serious. There was never a question to him, and I knew he had the talent.” Soccer, baseball, karate, basketball, ping pong, golf. Patrick was obsessed with all of it, and better than most of his peers, too. He’d watch, study, listen. By age 8 or so, he’d call pitches in the big-league games he watched, and nailed it more times than not. By 10 or so, he could diagnose a golf swing on TV. Everything was sports. Sports was everything. Once, when Patrick was 4, a teammate of his dad’s asked Randi how she got him to play catch so much. 81


“How do I get him to stop?” she replied. He was competitive, too. Wanted to throw the farthest. Run the fastest. Make the most shots. Spell the most words correctly. He never cared much about the result of winning. Just the process, the feeling. He’d win a tournament, get home, and hear mom ask about the trophy. “Oh,” he’d say. “I don’t know.” Pat and Randi — they separated when Patrick was 6; he and his younger brother lived with mom — can only remember one time Patrick didn’t want to play a sport. Pop Warner football. Patrick wanted to play quarterback. Coach put him at linebacker. Patrick wanted to quit. Mom and Dad made him finish the season. He did, but it wasn’t the last time Patrick wanted to quit football. Lucky break No. 2 The second lucky break defined Mahomes’ adolescence. It came just after the second time he nearly quit football. We’ll get to that story in a second, but let’s begin with Mahomes in an incredibly awkward quarterback competition during his junior season at Whitehouse (Texas) High. The other guy: Patrick’s best friend, Ryan Cheatham. They were both pitchers, too, and damn good ones. When they played together in the summer, Patrick would pitch the semifinal, and Ryan the championship. Patrick stayed at Ryan’s house so much he was like family. And now, they faced each other for one of life’s great privileges — starting quarterback at an East Texas high school football powerhouse. “A little awkward,” Ryan admitted. Big, strong, reliable — Ryan did his drop, made his reads. If the throw was there, he made it. If not, he ran forward for a respectable gain. Patrick never had a private coach in any sport and didn’t do 7-on-7 camps. His footwork may be a little loose because of it, even now, but the upshot is that his creativity was never coached out of him. He was a lightning bolt. “Ryan could’ve been a (Division I) quarterback, no doubt in my mind,” said Adam Cook, Whitehouse’s offensive coordinator that year. “He’d do what you needed, and he’d get you those five yards. Well, Pat’s trying to take 95 on every play.” The coaches were split between the more gifted Patrick and the more dependable Ryan. Cook made the decision at halftime of the second game. The plan was to rotate Patrick and Ryan, but at halftime Cook changed the plan. Ryan was heartbroken, and the next week coach and player cried together. But Ryan remained happy for his friend and is still proud the stress never touched their bond. 82


“Once he started making those big plays,” Ryan said, “I was like, ‘Yeah, OK. I don’t know if I can do that.” Mahomes was a star, and right away. Cook, the offensive coordinator, had walked on at Texas Tech, so Whitehouse ran all the same plays the Red Raiders did. Mahomes’ highlight reel from high school looks a lot like what he eventually did in college — just wilder. Two playoff games in a row, he made the same scramble-right, scramble-left, scramble-right-again, chuck-it-60-yards touchdown pass. College football recruiters were slow to come around. Some didn’t know about him. He started late, didn’t take part in many camps, wasn’t plugged in with a specialty coach — wasn’t on what some college coaches call “the circuit.” Mahomes and childhood friend Ryan Cheatham were on-field teammates (and competitive adversaries) for years. They remain friends. East Tennessee Sports Network screen grab The coaches who did know worried about wasting their time. Patrick threw baseballs in the mid-90s, with good off-speed stuff. Everyone knew about his dad, too, so do the math. Recruiting classes are often built around quarterbacks. The risk was real, because even Patrick thought his future was baseball. That’s why he nearly quit football before all this happened. Texas was among the schools recruiting him as a safety, a position Patrick only tolerated, so if football brought an injury that compromised his real professional future, what was he doing? He thought about this a lot before his junior season. Even told his mom he’d made up his mind. That was it. Quitting. No more football. She would’ve been happier that way. Football always scared her. Still does. But she loves her son, and knows her son, so she told him she didn’t see him happy watching his friends play from the stands. Maybe that’s why, six years ago this fall, Patrick decided to give football one more season. Baseball had one more shot at Patrick, in the draft after his senior year. He told teams he wanted $2.5 million to skip his football scholarship, a number he now calls “ridiculous,” something he came up with because he didn’t want to say no. A sample of scouts who watched Mahomes back then projected his talent would be worth anywhere from a second- to third-round pick. That could’ve been worth up to a $1.6 million bonus, maybe more if Mahomes got the so-called multi-sport bump. But he was consistent. One scout who talked with him still remembers that Patrick drove the meeting — rare for a high school kid, particularly the son of a big leaguer. The Tigers took him in the 37th round, the scout telling Patrick he just wanted him to be able to say he was drafted, and that he looked forward to talking again in three years. Patrick wanted to play football, even though at the time he figured he’d go back to baseball. Everyone did. He was a seven-figure baseball talent. As a football player, he began his college career behind a sophomore starter with an NFL future of his own, third on the depth chart in Lubbock. 83


Lucky break No. 3 The third lucky break defined Mahomes’ three years at Texas Tech. Lots of folks back home didn’t understand why Mahomes went to Tech in the first place. Davis Webb was the Red Raiders’ starter, good enough that Baker Mayfield transferred away, and just a sophomore. Classically trained, too — 6-foot-5, strong arm, a graduate of the famed Elite 11 camp. He was thought to be one of the Big 12’s best quarterbacks when Mahomes signed. “If those other guys are better, then they should play,” Patrick told his father. Then Webb got hurt. First a shoulder, then an ankle, and once Mahomes played the decision was easy. He threw 16 touchdowns and just four interceptions as a freshman. Webb transferred to Cal, where he was good enough for the New York Giants to take in the third round of the NFL Draft. The combination of Mahomes’ talent, Tech’s wide-open offense and, um, wide-open defense made for plays and numbers that look made up. There’s the 50-yard, sidearmed flick against his body for a touchdown against Louisiana Tech. The no-look pass in the last 2 minutes of a crucial drive against Oklahoma State. The NCAA-record 819 total yards in a single game against Oklahoma. It all happened so fast. Mahomes played baseball his freshman year but found himself late to practices and even games because of a football workout, or sometimes just being buried in video. He’d only been a quarterback for two and a half years, so pro baseball still made the most sense as a future. He was, literally, years behind anyone he was theoretically competing against for an NFL job. Plus, Tech had a lousy track record of producing good pro quarterbacks. But, dammit. Patrick really loved playing quarterback. When he wanted to quit, it was never about football. It was about playing quarterback. That’s what he wanted. Baseball began to bore him. He’s unfailingly polite, so he won’t say it that bluntly, but it’s the truth. Baseball is routines. It’s the same basic matchup — pitcher vs. hitter — over and over and over. Football is different. Football can be anything. Each play is its own, each defense unique, the math of 11 humans on each side creating infinite possibilities. Patrick’s always been a thinker, always been attracted to a challenge. “Baseball, I felt like I almost already peaked,” he said. “I felt like I knew everything about baseball. In football, I’m still learning something every single day.” So, as a college freshman, and less than two years before the Chiefs would use two first-round picks to bet their future on him, Mahomes finally became a full-time football player. Who does that? Who quits the sport they definitely have a seven-figure future in for the one they might be able to make work? You hear the story and it’s easy to see a young man with house money. He can do the unorthodox — in both how he plays quarterback and that he plays quarterback — because he has a million or more from baseball to fall back on. It’s a theory, anyway.

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“I see what you’re saying,” said Coleman Patterson, one of Mahomes’ best friends from Tyler and a teammate at Tech. “But I don’t think he played fear-free because he had baseball. Honestly, I just don’t think he ever thought he’d fail.” Patrick’s sophomore season changed everything — 4,653 yards, 36 touchdowns and 63.5 percent accuracy. He led the Big 12 in most passing categories. Scouts swarmed. Wasn’t just the obvious, either. After the Baylor game, Patrick had dinner with his dad. Ran through an interception, everything from what his receivers did to how each defender reacted. It was the linebacker. Patrick lost track of the linebacker. “But now I’ve seen it so I know what to do,” Pat remembers his son saying. “I promise you,” Pat said at the memory. “He hasn’t made that mistake again.” Mahomes left Tech following his junior season, just four months after his 21st birthday. Draft season was bonkers. At first, they projected him for the third round. Then the second. Then late in the first. He went to ESPN and, wearing a shirt and tie, threw a ball over a walkway and into the lap of a dummy on a bench on the other side. Jon Gruden called Patrick his favorite quarterback in the class. Seventeen teams met with him in person. Leigh Steinberg, Mahomes’ agent, cited the Chargers, Giants, Saints, Steelers and Cardinals among those with the heaviest interest. Which brings us to Patrick’s fourth and final lucky break — when the Chiefs traded three picks, including two in the first round, to select him 10th overall so that Patrick could define their future. Lucky break No. 4 Quarterbacks fail all the time. Some of them simply can’t hack it. But good ones fail, too. They fail because they were in the wrong place, with the wrong coach, surrounded by the wrong people. Or, maybe the right coach was fired, and the new coach is the wrong coach. “I’ve studied that,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. “How many quarterbacks could have been if they’d had the right environment?” Reid is the Chiefs’ most powerful football man, one of the league’s highest-paid coaches, and now his top priority is making sure Mahomes has the right environment. He’s had good quarterbacks before, but never quite like this. The Chiefs finished fourth in points last year, sixth in yards, and believe speedy receiver Tyreek Hill is not only a perfect fit for Mahomes’ arm but getting better overall. They spent $48 million on receiver Sammy Watkins. Tight end Travis Kelce remains in his prime. Running back Kareem Hunt led the league in rushing last year as a rookie. Mahomes is the most emphatic piece now, the lightning bolt from Tyler replacing the predictable Alex Smith, and one of the NFL’s most starved fan bases is buried in possibility. Kansas City has never seen a quarterback like this. He’s the youngest starter in franchise history, with almost certainly the best arm. He sends practice highlights to friends back home over Snapchat. He sits in the front row at Kauffman Stadium, wears a kit to Sporting Kansas City games, and jorts and a sleeveless Kansas City T-Bones jersey to a NASCAR race. 85


There’s a story behind that, too. Gehrig Dieter, the Chiefs receiver and one of Mahomes’ closest friends on the team, wore “regular” clothes the year before, and fullback Anthony Sherman wore him out about it. As Mahomes tells it, he’s from Texas, so obviously he had jorts and decided to “give Sherm what he wanted.” Is it exaggerating to say no Kansas City athlete has done anything more popular since Eric Hosmer’s mad dash home in New York during the 2015 World Series? “No regrets at all,” Mahomes said. “I loved it.” When it comes to sports in KC, Mahomes has become THE man about town, especially now that former Royals stars like Eric Hosmer and Mike Moustakas have moved on. He is a star, in other words, already the most visible quarterback the Chiefs have had since Len Dawson anchored the 10 o’clock news after practice. At least at the moment, that status is based entire on potential. He’s on billboards, his jersey a top seller, all before his first season as a starter. How often has this much been expected from someone with so little history? The Chiefs chose Mahomes over Deshaun Watson, the former Clemson star who beat Alabama in the last minute for a national championship. “What makes this difficult is that Deshaun Watson made it look so easy that first year,” Steinberg said. Mahomes’ football success, then, depends largely on how quickly he can play catch-up. His physical gifts are obvious, but he’s wicked smart, too — the 2016-17 Big 12 Scholar-Athlete of the Year in football, blessed with the type of mind that not only recalls facts from a book, but can remember where the words were on the page. That’s terrifically advantageous now, flashes of film and past snaps scrolling through his mind as he approaches the line of scrimmage. “I was a good student and stuff like that,” Mahomes said. “But this is like my favorite class.” Quarterbacks soar or fail based largely on what they make of adversity, and for all the talk of his inexperience under center, his most glaring inexperience is against obstacles. He just hasn’t had many. Throughout the reporting for this story, many of those closest to him — from childhood friends to his parents to Reid — were asked about Mahomes’ greatest challenge. “Oh, Lord, that’s a good one,” Randi said. “We never had to face a lot of adversity,” Patterson said. “He hasn’t done it yet, so it’s uncharted territory,” Reid said. Eventually, they all took guesses. Growing up with a single mom wasn’t easy. Pat’s history as a big leaguer produced outsized expectations from the jump. Choosing football over baseball wasn’t easy, and neither was grinding against his best friend for the job in high school. So, you can come up with stuff. But nothing like this. Careers and reputations are on the line, from the jobs of assistants to Reid’s case for the Hall of Fame to the franchise itself wiping away five decades of postseason failures. The stakes are clear, and unforgiving. 86


Vague plans are in place to set up scholarships and legacy foundations — first in Tyler, then Lubbock, finally in Kansas City. This is what legends do, and at this tender moment, when Mahomes has neither succeeded nor failed, when he has neither lived up to the hype nor disappointed, two facts are abundantly clear. Patrick Mahomes, relative quarterback neophyte, the hand-picked replacement for a Pro Bowler who had the season of his life in 2017, needs to be great and appears entirely unbothered by any of it. “I want to win Super Bowls here,” he said. Plural? “That’s the goal,” he said. “I want to be great. I’ll put that pressure on myself, so we can do it, so it’s not like I feel any pressure from anyone else. “I love this game. I love working, so being able to come in here every day is enjoying life. People before you have built the foundation, so you have to just go out there and finish it off.”

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(Tyreek Hill) ‘He only sees the end zone’: Tyreek Hill makes everyone on the field around him disappear Lindsay Jones The Athletic September 10, 2018

CARSON, Calif. — Tyreek Hill stood just a few yards outside of his own end zone, stared up at the rapidly descending punt, and everyone around him seemed to disappear. “Once I caught it, I was like, ‘Man, this is wide open,’” Hill said. When you’re as fast as Hill, the Kansas City Chiefs’ speedy wide receiver and punt returner, wide open has a different meaning. To get from the 9-yard line on the west sideline to the east corner of the far end zone, 91 yards away, Hill had to outrun the first Chargers’ coverageman (cornerback Craig Maker) and race laterally along the 10-yard line to the opposite hashmark before turning right to sprint down the far sideline. Once Hill made his turn, he had only the Chargers’ long snapper and punter to beat. That Hill scored untouched was a credit to his blazing speed, and maybe gives credence to a teammate’s theory about him: That when Hill has the ball in his hands, it’s as if no other players on the field exist. “It’s like everyone is invisible,” Chiefs receiver and fellow kick returner De’Anthony Thomas told The Athletic. “To him, he only sees the end zone.” And on Sunday, after reaching the end zone, Hill also saw no need to stop. So as he charged across the white C of the Chargers’ name in the end zone, Hill kept on running, Forrest Gump style, up the ramp and toward the locker room. That’s because, as any elite sprinter would tell you, it’s dangerous to just slam on the breaks. Somehow, Hill’s speed seemed to stun the Chargers. But it shouldn’t have. Since Hill’s arrival in Kansas City in 2016, he’s electrified the Chiefs offense and special teams units, and after Sunday’s punt return touchdown and 58-yard touchdown reception from Patrick Mahomes, he now has 13 career touchdowns of at least 50 yards. Just two players in NFL history, Hall of Famer Gale Sayers and former Bears returner Devin Hester, have that many 50-plus yard scores in their first 35 games. Hill also added a third touchdown Sunday with a 1-yard catch in the fourth quarter. He celebrated the hat trick by performing a standing back flip in the end zone. “I had to show my athletic ability,” Hill said. Yes, Tyreek, we get it. You’re an athletic freak.

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What’s quickly becoming clear is that even with a new starting quarterback in Patrick Mahomes — or perhaps even because of the arrival of the big-armed Mahomes — Hill is even more ingrained as the Chiefs’ most dangerous weapon. On Sunday in the Chiefs’ 38-28 win against the Chargers, Hill made it so the tight end Travis Kelce, running back Kareem Hunt and receiver Sammy Watkins were non-factors. That certainly won’t always be the case, and those other three players are far too talented to stay off the stat sheet for long, but Hill continues to prove that he should be in the discussion as one the league’s best receivers, not just its quickest. “Tyreek’s really worked on his route running and everything in order to make himself the best wide receiver in the league,” Mahomes said. “I think today has showed that he has improved in his part, and has the speed to bring it anytime.”

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(Laurent Duvernay-Tardif) Laurent Duvernay-Tardif, M.D.: How the Chiefs Guard Earned His Medical Degree While Protecting His QB Ben Baskin Sports Illustrated September 11, 2018

The doctor pulls a white Ford Fiesta across traffic and into the parking lot of a vacant store, calculating his options. The metered area is a bit of a trek, and this space is directly across the street from the hospital, which should save him at least 10 minutes, coming and going. And since the store isn’t open, he figures, no one should care that he’s violating the Customers Only signs. “You have to balance it,” says Laurent Duvernay-Tardif, who keeps a mental record of how often he gets ticketed—so far this month, only once—and how much time he’ll save by taking the risk. Then he grabs a notepad and a half-dozen bakery bags and hurries across the street to his 2:30 meeting. As he approaches the building, Duvernay-Tardif realizes he has a couple of minutes to spare, a rare luxury. So he walks into a nearby Dollarama in search of deodorant. Back on the street, he lifts his shirt and applies it in quick strokes, then he enters the Department of Family Medicine and rides the elevator to the third floor. It is mid-July in Montreal, two months after Duvernay-Tardif graduated from medical school and less than a week before he must return to Kansas City to begin his fifth NFL training camp. Ever since the Chiefs drafted him in 2014, he’s had to balance these two demanding careers. Yet becoming the first active NFL player to be a licensed M.D. was only the beginning. The question he hopes will be answered during today’s meeting is: What’s next? An assistant ushers Duvernay-Tardif into a glass-walled waiting room, where he squeezes his 6' 5", 321pound frame into a narrow cloth chair. He’s told that the two doctors—one, the department chair; the other, in charge of the postgraduate program—will be with him shortly. The six bags of bread and assorted goodies that he brought over from his parents’ bakery, where he helped knead dough earlier in the day, are placed on the table. He plans to pass them around the office. “You make more friends when you give out pastries,” he says in mellifluous English accented by his native French. His way of speaking, paired with his immaculately groomed beard and academic mien, makes it seem as if he’s always doing something important. As he waits, Duvernay-Tardif tries to recall the details of his NFL contract and begins to enumerate his various residency options, attempting to untangle their potential conflicts and accompanying unknowns. At 27, he doesn’t know how long his career as a right guard will last—or how long he wants it to. He understands the dangers of the sport all too well, and he’s constantly asking himself if it’s still worth it to play. 90


When he disrupted his medical school studies four years ago, Duvernay-Tardif faced long odds to make it onto an NFL roster from a Canadian university. He never considered the possibility that, once he graduated, he’d be a mainstay on a Super Bowl contender in the midst of a five-year, $42.4 million contract. But now he worries that he’ll have to wait until his NFL career is over to begin his residency. By then, he fears he’ll have forgotten everything he learned in med school. The assistant returns and escorts Duvernay-Tardif down the hallway. He turns a corner, enters an office and closes the door behind him. Laurent Duvernay-Tardif has always been comfortable in the unknown. When he was 12, his family embarked on a yearlong sailing trip, their 30-foot boat going up the St. Lawrence River from Montreal and then traveling down the East Coast—Boston, New York, Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Miami— before eventually taking the Gulf Stream to Turks and Caicos and the 700 islands of the Bahamas. It was a voyage that had been two decades in the making, ever since Laurent’s father, François Tardif, had mentioned the dream on his first date with Guylaine Duvernay, over coffee and tea. In 2003, with three kids and no sailing experience to speak of, François quit his job teaching agriculture and put to sea. Their youngest, eight-month-old Marilou, took her first steps on the boat, in the circumambient waters of the Atlantic Ocean. “You can have so many dreams,” François says. “But they don’t mean anything if you don’t do them.” Laurent, their eldest, steered the boat, interpreted tide charts and monitored the radar. They ate only what they caught, so Laurent would put on a wetsuit, fill his belt with lead to sink in the water, grab a scuba mask and spend four hours a day searching for grouper and tuna, teaching himself to spearfish. If he threw the spear too hard, it would go through the fish entirely and he’d lose the weapon; too soft and the fish swam on, taking the spear with it. Laurent quickly realized the importance of tide direction—fish blood flowing toward deeper waters could attract unwanted visitors. “Learned that after seeing a few 15-foot-long sharks,” he says. The children were homeschooled on the boat, with Dad handling the sciences and Mom the humanities. Sometimes they’d dock at an island for a day and the kids would be dropped off at a school where no one spoke French, just for the experience. On the beach, they’d collect palm tree branches, build a fire and grill what they had caught. At night they returned to the boat, where Laurent would open a latch in the cockpit and sleep in a box not much bigger than he was. Three years later they set sail again, a reprise of the first trip. Shortly after they returned, Laurent’s paternal grandfather passed away. Guy Tardif had been an intellectual, a professor, a politician, an entrepreneur. He received a master’s in criminology, lectured at the University of Montreal, did research for the Quebec Ministry of Justice, published articles on the penitentiary system and prison reform, and was elected as a minister of Quebec—running the departments of consumer affairs, planning and housing, and transport. “And he could hold a hammer and do electricity, too,” Francois says. In the late 1970s and early ’80s, Guy worked in the government of René Lévesque, the founder of the Parti Quebecois. After serving for nine years—and narrowly failing to achieve the party’s goal of winning Quebec its sovereignty—Guy left politics and bought a cornfield on the south shore outside Montreal. With no training, he spent years planting grape vines and apple trees; soon his winery-orchard became locally renown. 91


After his father died, François sold the winery and spent three months in France studying culinary arts. When he got back home, he and Guylaine opened a bakery in Mont-Saint-Hilaire, an hour east of Montreal. They called it Le Pain dans les Voiles, Bread in the Sails, and in 2011 they won second place at a world bread competition in France. “We are independent,” François says. “Do you see that?” Laurent has always embraced the family ethos. When he was 13 he planted basil, collected it in the fall, made bottles of pesto and sold them at farms. A year later, after watching a YouTube video, he bought 100 day-old chickens, built an enclosure, raised them, slaughtered the 70 that survived, calculated his costs and sold the poultry for $6 a pound. Wanting money to vacation in Italy after his freshman year of college, Duvernay-Tardif made, bottled and sold fruit jam and caramel in his parents’ bakery. He and his new girlfriend, Flo Dubé-Moreau, were able to travel for a month. During his first season in the NFL, Duvernay-Tardif taught himself woodworking and built Flo a desk out of pinewood. Last February, just weeks after the Chiefs lost in the first round of the playoffs, he fulfilled a lifelong dream of going to the Olympics—but he wasn’t a spectator in PyeongChang. Instead, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation hired him to report, write and produce 15 stories on the intersection of sports and science. “He needs to push his limits,” Flo says. “That’s really central, the core of who Laurent is.” Duvernay-Tardif began playing football when he was 14, but only because he’d gotten too big for hockey and a friend’s mother suggested he give it a try. He had never watched the sport before, knew nothing about it and quickly learned that he wasn’t very good. But he enjoyed the cerebral aspects of the game—the physics, the angles, the strategy—and played for his city’s team. His grades in high school were exemplary and earned him entrance to a CEGEP—a two-year program in Quebec that essentially combines senior year of high school with a focused undergraduate study. By then he had already decided on a life in medicine. There are four medical schools in Quebec, three French-speaking and one English. Because he entered the wrong date on his calendar, Duvernay-Tardif missed the entrance exam for the French schools and was forced to attend McGill. At the time his English was halting. When he first got to the school he had to watch recordings of his classes at half speed while flipping through a pocket dictionary just to keep up. On the advice of guidance counselors, he didn’t initially join the football team in order to focus on his studies. Away from the sport, he felt restive. His mind raced. His grades suffered. “I realized then I need football in my life to balance it,” he says. “If I stop one or the other, I am done.” A desultory month passed before he joined the team. He became a backup defensive lineman while also taking 30 hours of classes a week and dissecting cadavers. “You get there late at night, alone, 50 dead bodies on tables, it was a little creepy,” Duvernay-Tardif says. At the start of his sophomore year the team needed more offensive linemen and Duvernay-Tardif was asked to switch positions. He proved a natural. During his first practice Matthieu Quiviger, the team’s Oline coach and a former first-round pick in the CFL, told Duvernay-Tardif that he had a chance of playing in the NFL. Others on the staff laughed. “When the midget league coach saw Gretzky on the ice for the first time,” Quiviger says, “I’m sure he knew he had something special, too.”

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In his final two years at McGill, Duvernay-Tardif worked upward of 70 hours a week in the hospital, doing a different rotation every few months—family medicine, internal medicine, emergency, psychiatric, pediatric, surgery, ophthalmology. During the season, he selected a different day each week that he was able to attend practice. Sometimes he’d work the night shift at the hospital and sleep on the locker room floor afterward, scrubs still on, his head resting on a pile of pillows, until the team’s 6 a.m. meeting. With no time for meals at the hospital, Duvernay-Tardif would stuff his pockets with hardboiled eggs and crack them open against the elevator door on his way to see patients. Or he’d take Ziploc bags filled with protein powder, add water and squeeze the concoction directly into his mouth. Anytime Duvernay-Tardif encountered a challenging case—a patient needing water drained from his lungs, or one with pneumonia needing her vocal cords temporarily paralyzed in order to shove a tube down her larynx—he would invariably stay after his shift to witness the technique or procedure. When he finally left the hospital, the sky dark and his teammates asleep, he’d take off his scrubs and head to the gym to train. He won McGill’s Champions Award for combining athletic prowess with academic excellence, maintaining a GPA near 4.0, and also the J.P. Metras Trophy for being the most outstanding collegiate lineman in Canada. “He improved so fast,” Quiviger says. “Dominated people so badly.” Heading into his fourth season, Laurent realized there was a chance, albeit slim, that he could become the 10th Canadian university player ever drafted into the NFL. He wouldn’t have been a Duvernay-Tardif had he passed up the opportunity. In the winter of 2014, Duvernay-Tardif took four months off from medical school and stayed with trainer Charles Petrone in Knoxville, Tenn., working out at his Wood Gym with a small group of NFL hopefuls. There, Duvernay-Tardif prepared crepes for the house; slow-cooked a beef stew; baked a delectable cheesecake; studied his medical books; dominated everyone in Ping-Pong; chastised other players for not putting away their dishes; and displayed his vast but raw potential in the gym. “He’s a renaissance man,” Petrone says. “I was like, Jesus, Laurent, what can’t you do?” Not invited to the NFL combine in Indianapolis, Duvernay-Tardif hosted his own pro day at a soccer stadium in Montreal; nine teams showed up and watched him broad-jump 9' 6" (which would have ranked second among O-linemen at Indy), run the 40 in 4.94 (fourth), bench press 225 pounds 33 times (seventh) and post a 31 1/2" vertical (third). NFL interest began percolating, even though DuvernayTardif was still in medical school. He brought a packed suitcase to the hospital every day so he could hop on a flight when teams called, beckoning him for a predraft visit. At one point the offensive line coach from the Eagles pinged him for a Skype session, which he took in a bathroom stall during a break from seeing patients. Duvernay-Tardif had watched only a handful of NFL games—he bought his first TV after getting to the league and still doesn’t have cable—and his knowledge of the sport didn’t extend far beyond Tom Brady’s name. His agent and best friend, Sasha Ghavami, would send him Word documents containing the most basic information—the coach of the team he was visiting, its star players—that DuvernayTardif would study on the flights. On the second night of the draft Duvernay-Tardif didn’t show up to the house party that Ghavami hosted in his honor: He’d had a chance to scrub in during an emergency C-section, for twins no less. 93


Chiefs coach Andy Reid and general manager John Dorsey called the following day, informing DuvernayTardif that they were taking him in the sixth round. The team needed him in Kansas City the next day; Duvernay-Tardif had a pediatrics exam the next week. He was able to reschedule the test, establishing the blueprint that would allow him to spread his final year of medical school out over four NFL offseasons. That was the easy part. Now Duvernay-Tardif had to learn what amounted to a new sport. Canadian football is played with 12 men, three downs, wider fields and unlimited forward motion. Because the defensive line is required to play a yard off the ball, the footwork for offensive linemen is fundamentally different. And, of course, there were cultural adjustments to be made for a player who had practiced just once a week for the past two years. His position coach in K.C. would say things in meetings like, “O.K., if we are in a backed-up situation, this is what . . . ” and Duvernay-Tardif would raise his hand and ask, “What is the definition of backed-up?” Or, “This play is in the draw family . . . ” and a confused Duvernay-Tardif would say, “Draw family?” He was so lost by the end of his first training camp that Reid asked him if he had ever played football before. Duvernay-Tardif made the final roster, asking teammates to call him Larry because he was tired of them butchering Laurent, but he didn’t suit up for a single game that season. He had to learn not only whom to block, but also how. He spent practices off to the side working on basic footwork, repeating the steps over and over. He also watched film for the first time, breaking down technique and taking notes just as he would in medical school. Often he would take a piece of paper and scribble a half dozen lines of scrimmage on it, drawing different defensive fronts because he didn’t understand the difference between a base look and a sub look. He had to learn concepts like safety rotation and acronyms like EMOL (end man on the line of scrimmage). At the end of the season, the same day that he had his exit meeting with the team’s coaches, he drove back to Montreal, 24 hours straight, and switched lives. His shift in the psychiatric hospital was waiting. To transition, he spent the ride listening to erudite podcasts: Freakonomics Radio, The Economist and Aujourd’hui l’histoire, a French program that details the life of historical figures. “The hardest thing every year,” he says, “is to go from being a football player to being a medical student.” After two months in psychiatry, followed by a month each in gynecology and obstetrics, Duvernay-Tardif returned to Kansas City for his second season and quickly earned the starting right guard job. He hasn’t relinquished it since, becoming one of the best blockers on one of the league’s best lines. And his ability to get out in space and take on second-level defenders has proved to be an integral component in Reid’s multifaceted running game. As he ascended on the field, Duvernay-Tardif was still heading back to Montreal every offseason to continue his studies—internal and emergency medicine after his second season, geriatrics after his third. It was then that Kansas City made him the fourth-highest-paid guard in the league, and something of a celebrity back in Quebec. “But,” Duvernay-Tardif says, “in geriatrics everybody is too old to recognize you.” This past offseason, with classes finished and just the final exam left, he traded a bloody, game-worn Chiefs jersey to Quiviger for the use of his old coach’s cabin deep in the Val-Morin woods, 60 miles northwest of Montreal. For three weeks he woke up at six in the morning, flipped through a four-inchthick binder stuffed with some 1,300 pages of notes, did ladder work with elastic bands in the kitchen, 94


kettlebell lifts and medicine-ball throws outside in the snow, and then stopped to watch the sun set beyond the mountains. He passed the test on May 8, graduated from medical school on May 29, and was at Chiefs practice the next day. In the third-floor office of the Department of Family Medicine, Duvernay-Tardif and the two doctors attempt to put together a plan. The group decides that his best course is to enroll in the two-year family medicine program, since it will allow him the most flexibility. After he finishes, he’ll be a primary-care physician, able to start his own practice. If he wants to then add a year of emergency or sports medicine specialization, he’ll have that option, too. There are still several variables though. Most of family medicine focuses on “continuity of care,” meaning a doctor must treat the same patients consistently over an extended period of time; right now, Duvernay-Tardif is only able to work three or four months a year. But the doctors say the department would be willing to condense the eight months of “off service” work that do not require continuity of care—pretty much the standard hospital rotations that he did in medical school—over three NFL offseasons. Once complete, Duvernay-Tardif would have to become a full-time resident, effectively capping his football career. More variables. Duvernay-Tardif wants to ensure that he’ll be able to honor the contract he signed with the Chiefs, which runs through 2022, with guaranteed money fully paid out in ’20. The doctors inform him that he can wait up to four years before he is required to begin the residency program. But once he starts, he has only four years to finish it. He makes calculations—the years left on his deal, the odds that he might get cut early. Once his current deal is up Duvernay-Tardif will have played nine years in the league—a long, distinguished career, he notes. Still, he doesn’t want to rule out the possibility of signing another contract. But the longer he stays in the game, the less medical school knowledge he will retain. Frequently he says that the most important factor in all of this is being a competent and well-respected physician once he retires from football. An hour later, the three men exit the room; the department chair tells Duvernay-Tardif that he wants tickets to the Super Bowl should the Chiefs make it this year. Duvernay-Tardif laughs as he passes out the bags of pastries. But he doesn’t linger for too long; he still has a workout to fit in tonight. There is still much to debate and decide, but he feels encouraged. Will it be difficult? Of course. Impossible? That’s not a word the Duvernay-Tardif clan uses. For the past 5½ years, Duvernay-Tardif explains, his father has been building a 40-foot sailboat, by hand, in the family’s front yard, using plywood and epoxy, melting two tons of lead and pouring it into a sand mold to make the keel. Next week, Francois will take the boat out onto the water for the first time. At one point that may have seemed impossible, too. There is another factor in Duvernay-Tardif’s decision, of course, and that is the rather paradoxical concept of a healer playing football. He doesn’t deny or downplay the dangers of the sport, but he believes the league has taken positive measures to address the issue of head trauma. When he’s told that there’s only so much you can do to make an inherently violent game safer, he doesn’t disagree. Instead, he says that every time he sustains an injury—a left MCL sprain in 2017, a concussion the year

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before and another last month—he asks himself if it is still worth it. And every time, the answer has been yes. He has opportunities now—conversations with NFLPA doctors, the possibility of opening his own clinic and sitting on various boards—that wouldn’t have been possible four years ago. When he transitions to medicine full-time, he believes his profile as an NFL star will allow him to be more beneficial to society. “When I say it’s worth it,” Duvernay-Tardif says, “it’s all of that.” He crosses the street and unlocks the car, placing his notebook in the backseat while searching for his workout clothes. As he sits behind the wheel, he enters an address into his phone’s GPS to figure out how he can best get to where he is going next. He checks his rearview mirror and then looks toward the horizon. The road is open, the destination known. And on the dashboard, there is no ticket.

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(Xavier Williams) For hometown hero Xavier Williams, family played an important role in him achieving his dream Nate Taylor The Athletic Sep 23, 2018

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Xavier Williams walked into the cafeteria at Central Middle School with 10 of his new teammates. Awaiting the Chiefs players on Tuesday afternoon was a large group of teachers, tutors and students. As expected, the students emitted sounds of shock and wonder before they applauded the players, who were visiting on their designated day off. Williams, wearing his red No. 98 Chiefs jersey, responded to the students’ cheers and excitement by flashing his wide, welcoming smile, one that is accentuated by a slight gap between his two front teeth. The event, which focused on the significance of education, was the first of the players’ social-justice initiatives for this season. Each player sat at a round table with students to talk about school, career goals and, most importantly, dreams. Together, the players and students created vision boards to show the students’ interests and motivations. Williams sat with five students, all of whom had the typical, quick-release questions for someone 6-foot2 and 309 pounds. How much do you bench? How fast can you run? How much do you squat? “It’s almost like going to the (NFL) combine all over again,” Williams said while smiling.

Xavier Williams recognizes the importance of giving back to the community. (Photo taken by Nate Taylor/The Athletic) While shifting the conversation back to the activity, Williams felt nostalgic as he handed out various magazines for each student to cut out certain images or words that inspired them. Williams did such an exercise when he was young, even before he attended Grandview (Mo.) High, before he learned lessons from his older brother, before he conquered the odds he knows the students are facing. As the students asked more questions, Williams shared one reason he wanted to spend time with them. He too was born and raised in the Kansas City area. The fact surprised the students. Along with the 10 players Tuesday, everyone in the Chiefs’ organization understands Williams can best relate to children and students in the city whenever the team does community events. Williams, a defensive tackle who signed a free-agent deal with the Chiefs in March, will make his hometown debut at Arrowhead Stadium on Sunday when the team hosts the 49ers. The game will serve as a monumental, lifelong experience for Williams. 97


“I’ve been in the same shoes,” he said of the students. “It’s just something that hits really close to home with me.” As the students flipped through the magazines, Williams listed the objectives he wanted each of them to accomplish. He wanted them to attend a college and graduate. He wanted them to live in a nice home when they become adults. He wanted them to love people. Above all, Williams wanted to see each student’s vision board show their dream job. “I’ve been fortunate enough,” Williams said, “to have a lot of my dreams come true.”

Earlier this year, before the Chiefs began training camp, Williams got into a car with Ursula Copeland, his mother. With Copeland driving, Williams looked through the passenger-seat window at his hometown. The mother and her youngest child had made such a drive before in Williams’ four-year NFL career. Each time, though, Williams noticed something new about his city. He marveled at the ongoing improvements of the city’s downtown area. The trips always remind him of his childhood. “I see signs for Gates,” Williams said of his favorite barbecue restaurant. “That’s huge to me. My Mom still lives in the same place we grew up. It’s great to get reminded of where you’re from.” A few times, Copeland has driven through the landmarks in Grandview, a community south of the city. The car usually went past the fields where Williams, 26, began playing football. In his childhood, Williams followed Kristen Hardaway and Rodrick Williams, his older siblings. Copeland, a single mother, taught her children every sport she could to keep them occupied and energetic. All three children played in the South Suburban Junior Football Association. Everyone in the league labeled Williams the same way: Kristen’s or Rodrick’s little brother. “Kristen is actually, I think, the best athlete in the family,” said Andy Leech, who coached all three players at Grandview High. “She was incredible. She was our best offensive lineman her freshman year. She dominated.” Rodrick said he and his brother Xavier had an advantage over other players in their league. Kristen beat and bullied them for about a decade. As a high school freshman, Hardaway was a guard who finished the season as a starter for the junior-varsity team. While she didn’t keep playing for Grandview High, Hardaway continued her career as a linebacker for the San Antonio Regulatorsof the semi-professional Independent Women’s Football League. Each of Copeland’s children received her genetic gifts. As a star track athlete, Copeland loved football so much that she played quarterback for the Crunch, a Kansas City women’s team, with her children in the stands. “Her standards for her kids were about as high as any parent we’ve ever been around,” said Leech, now an assistant principal at Martin City Middle School, of Copeland. “She made sure that everybody around her kids was accountable. She had a bit of swagger to her. She’s a really cool lady, and her three unbelievable kids really stem from her.” 98


Williams played for the Chiefs in the South Suburban league. Instead of wanting to score touchdowns on offense, Williams was influenced by his older brother to be a defensive player. At home, Xavier and Rodrick watched NFL Films videos of prominent players in the 1990s. Derrick Thomas, the Hall of Fame outside linebacker for the Chiefs, was featured in many of those VHS tapes. “You don’t understand; he loves Derrick Thomas,” Rodrick said of Williams. “If you ask him who’s the best linebacker or the best football player of all time, he’s going to say Derrick Thomas.” From those tapes, Williams watched how Thomas showed a variety of moves to beat the best tackles in the league and garner sacks. One time, Williams told his older brother he was going to do one of those moves in his youth game to collect a sack, too. From that moment, Rodrick knew that Williams’ ability to comprehend the sport was at an advanced level. Despite their different defensive positions, Williams replicated Thomas’ moves and became a sack machine. In one joint practice, Williams and Rodrick were able to meet former Chiefs such as Tony Gonzalez, Tony Richardson and Priest Holmes. “You’ve got three goats there,” Rodrick said, “and this dude is still sitting here thinking, ‘Man, you’ll play for the same team that Derrick Thomas played for.’” Xavier went to plenty of Chiefs game with his family. He and Rodrick envisioned themselves on the field at Arrowhead Stadium. Similar to many Chiefs fans, they hated the Broncos and the Raiders. The game Williams remembers most, because of the electric atmosphere, was in the 2007 season, a game the Chiefs lost to the Raiders. “I don’t think either one of the teams that year was having a very good season,” said Williams, who at the time was a freshman at Grandview High. “But when that game came around, nobody cared. It was cranked up to the max. That was my all-time favorite.”

In high school, Rodrick wanted to be a quarterback or running back for the Grandview Bulldogs. The coaching staff, however, asked him to switch to the offensive line to add depth as his body developed. As a sophomore, Rodrick wasn’t expecting to be a starting tackle. His friend, senior Marlon Jackson, was ahead of him on the depth chart. But in the Bulldogs’ preseason jamboree, Jackson tore his ACL. Rodrick, to his surprise, started the season as the starting left tackle. The team’s quarterback: Josh Freeman, who went on to star at Kansas State and played seven seasons in the NFL. “Even I understood a quarterback’s blind side is his most vulnerable,” Rodrick said. “You’ve got this 16year-old kid who has never played the position before, but sure enough, they left me at left tackle. That year was the defining moment in my progression as a player, and it was the year I fell in love with playing on the offensive line.” Rodrick’s growth spurt increased his frame to 6-foot-2 and 250 pounds. As a dominant duo, Rodrick and Freeman led the Bulldogs deep in the Missouri state playoffs. Leech admired Rodrick for his aggressiveness and outspoken leadership in the locker room.

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“A natural athlete who was really, really smart,” said Leech, who then was Grandview’s offensive line coach. “He was amazing.” Rodrick wanted to prove to college recruiters that Kansas City could produce a talented offensive lineman. While many Division I schools noticed his skills, Rodrick said he cost himself scholarship opportunities because he was an egotistical hothead. He arrived at Northwest Missouri State, a Division II powerhouse, in 2008 and began to realize the impact of his decisions during his redshirt season. Throughout his high school career, Xavier, who is two years younger, got to watch his older brother play. “In retrospect, it was the biggest blessing that could have happened,” Rodrick said of playing at Northwest Missouri State. “My Mom had been telling me my entire life, ‘Your brother looks up to you.’ That’s one of the main reasons I stopped doing knucklehead things. You get out to the real world and you understand that you are a reflection of your family.” In 2008, Leech watched Xavier have his breakout season as the Bulldogs’ newest leader. But Williams led the team differently compared to his brother. With Leech, then the offensive coordinator, as his mentor, Williams proved to be a calm worker who set the example for his teammates as a captain. With Steven Brittingham as his defensive line coach, Williams disrupted opponents with his speed, technique and toughness. The following year, Xavier watched brother Rodrick and the Bearcats win the NCAA Division II national championship. In his college career, Rodrick was named a two-time All-American, which earned some attention from NFL scouts and a tryout with the Chiefs in April 2013. He also got to play at Arrowhead Stadium four times in the Bearcats’ annual rivalry game against Pittsburg State. “Sophomore year was the first year I started at Northwest,” said Rodrick, who felt goosebumps retelling the story. “I called everybody. As a Kansas City kid, playing in Arrowhead is the pinnacle.” After his unsuccessful NFL tryouts, Rodrick drove up to Cedar Falls, Iowa, with Copeland later that year for Xavier’s spring game as a member of the Northern Iowa Panthers. Rodrick felt goosebumps again watching Xavier, a junior, dominate the line of scrimmage. He turned to his mother and asked one question: “When did X become a man?” As a senior in 2014, Xavier was a first-team All-American who was a finalist for the Buck Buchanan Award, given to the top defensive player in the NCAA football championship subdivision. He collected a career-high 93 tackles, eight sacks and 14 tackles for loss. “I was just watching like, ‘Yo, this kid can flat-out ball,’” Rodrick said. “It wasn’t even, ‘Oh, that’s my little brother.’ It was just the realization that my little brother wasn’t my little brother anymore.” Rodrick knew the culmination of their football odyssey could be Williams landing in the NFL. The entire family watched the 2015 NFL Draft together in Copeland’s home. Although Williams wasn’t selected, soon after he got a phone call from Cardinals coach Bruce Arians, who offered him the opportunity to make the team’s roster as an undrafted free agent. Rodrick watched the moment with pride.

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“He had that big, cheesy grin, the signature gap [in his teeth],” Rodrick said. “I couldn’t have been happier to see somebody you love accomplish their dream. To have my brother go that extra step, it’s surreal.” Xavier’s play and production increased during his three-year progression with Cardinals. But he always kept his mind on the Chiefs, and would often text about the team with his brother. In March, as the NFL’s free agency period began, Xavier came to Kansas City without telling many people. Rodrick learned of Xavier’s arrival from Copeland. Rodrick knew nobody in their family was getting married and no holiday or event was upcoming. He exchanged text messages with his brother. On March 21, young Xavier told his brother he was coming home. “A lot of guys grow up dreaming about whoever their childhood team was and getting a chance to play,” Williams said. “Only a few guys get an opportunity to play in the NFL. Even still, rarely do they get an opportunity to really come home and enjoy home-cooked meals with seeing all the family. It’s amazing.”

Earlier this month, Williams arrived at the Grandview city hall for a ceremony. Mayor Leonard Jones, after months of corresponding, honored Williams with a proclamation that declared last Sunday to be “Xavier Williams Day” in Grandview, the day the Chiefs defeated the Steelers. Jones, who became the mayor in 2014, wanted to celebrate and recognize Williams for his positive impact. Before the event, the men talked in Jones’ large office. Williams expressed his desire to continue to give back to the community. Jones heard Williams’ stories of growing up in Grandview, what he learned from his teachers and coaches and how he was grateful for everyone, including his brother, who led him. Both men agreed to talk again later this year about how they could help produce more success stories for the next generation of students. When the proclamation began, Williams was greeted by Leech, former coaches and teachers and Kenny Rodrequez, the school district’s superintendent. “That tells you a lot,” Jones said. “If your upbringing was not one that was good, and the character wasn’t one that you want to pass on to somebody else, you’re not going to have old coaches or the superintendent coming back to say they remember this individual.” Jones called Williams a mentor. In the past, Jones said the same about Freeman and Alec Burks, a shooting guard for the Utah Jazz and a former Grandview standout. Yet what impressed Jones was Williams’ humility. Williams was comfortable signing his autograph on a red Chiefs jersey for Jones, which will be displayed in city hall next to jerseys from Freeman and Burks. He smiled throughout the event. “Wow,” he told Jones. “I’m still shocked that you guys are willing to do this.” Since he became a Chief, Williams has been one of the most active players in the city.

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In May, he spoke and was a judge at the annual Harry’s Hay Day parade to celebrate President Harry S. Truman’s birthday and legacy. He spent time and learned from Kansas City firefighters. He went through almost every practice in training camp reconnecting with someone from his childhood. He has visited Grandview High numerous times. “Just to know who he is is more important than what he does on the field,” Jones said. “That’s the key. We are more pleased with the fact that Xavier has graduated from Grandview High School and who he has become.” During his time coaching at Grandview High, Leech led the Bulldogs’ track and field teams to multiple state championships. One of Leech’s track athletes coined Grandview as “Dreamview,” the place where greatness could occur more often than many assumed. Leech loved that. He enjoyed the thought even more when he saw Williams do workout sessions with the school’s football players in July. Whether at practices or before games, Williams has been a steady voice for the Bulldogs this season. “We’re able to point to those guys and say it’s not a fairytale. It happens,” Leech said of Williams, Freeman and Burks. “That’s the greatest thing about high school sports. You don’t know what they’re going to become. You know what their potential is, and you want them to reach that potential in believing in them and getting them to believe in themselves.” In training with the Bulldogs this summer, Williams learned from the coaching staff that the team could use an additional coach, someone who could be another connector through communication and experience. Williams gave his brother’s phone number to coach Jeremie Picard. As a rookie assistant coach, Rodrick has been his alma mater’s offensive line coach. “My brother is the reason why I’m coaching,” said Rodrick, who works at symplr, a medical software company. “His maturation and the way he goes about using his platform to affect other people has inspired the community. He told me, ‘Rod, you’ve had too much success in football and you know too much about the game to not be coaching.’” Next up for the brothers is fulfilling a dream they began discussing a few months ago. The brothers hope to host a citywide camp for linemen, offensive and defensive, next year, and they want the camp to be held at Grandview High. “We’re both young, black men from Kansas City,” Rodrick said. “We want to speak to those same young, black men and show them that this game can take you to heights unknown.” At the end of Tuesday’s event, each student from Central Middle School presented their vision board to the group of Chiefs and their peers. With Williams by their side, three students from his table showed and explained their aspirations. One student, a boy, cut out and pasted images of basketball players with the hopes of being an accomplished player one day. Another student, a girl, took a page out of “Sports Illustrated” that featured outside linebacker Justin Houston. She also cut and pasted images of celebrities because of how different the glamorous women looked. She wrote on her vision board in pink marker that she hopes to become a cosmetologist. 102


Many people for weeks — including the students from the event — have asked Williams how he will feel living out his dream of playing at Arrowhead Stadium on Sunday. Williams anticipates that he will become emotional when he hears the roars from the expected sellout crowd. “When you come out of that tunnel, and it’s red and it’s loud. It’s a beautiful thing,” coach Andy Reid said. “I know the people in Kansas City love getting in [the stadium] and doing that [for the players]. We look forward to it.” Williams said he will experience the moment with every important person in his life. Leech will watch the game from the TV in his home. He plans to keep his eyes on Williams and the battles at the line of scrimmage, where he believes football games are decided. Copeland will watch her son from the stands with Williams’ 3-year-old daughter, Phoenix, along with his girlfriend, her daughter and her older son. Rodrick knows his brother will be nervous, anxious and elated, all the same emotions he felt playing in the stadium for Northwest Missouri State. This game, though, Rodrick understands the intensity of what Williams will experience — such as hearing his name spoken by the public-address announcer or seeing his player profile on the Jumbotron — might be 10 times bigger than what he encountered. Rodrick is not envious of the adoration his brother will receive from fans. Instead, he has wanted such a scenario to materialize for years. “Not a lot of things in life can you say somebody deserves something,” Rodrick said. “If it was anybody who deserved to run out of that tunnel as a Kansas City Chief in front of his friends and family, in his hometown, you couldn’t find a better person than X.”

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(Patrick Mahomes) Patrick Mahomes on Visiting The University of Kansas Health System: “It’s Inspirational” Matt McMullen Chiefs.com September 26, 2018

The three quarterbacks made their way down the hallway, clad in red, with a swath of media and hospital employees following close behind in their wake. There were cheers, gasps and countless smiles at seemingly every turn as Patrick Mahomes, Chad Henne and Chase Litton visited unsuspecting patients. This was not an ordinary day at The University of Kansas Health System. “It’s a cool feeling just to come here and lift their spirits a little bit, but you can see the determination that they already have,” Mahomes said. “It puts things in perspective and helps us realize how much [of what we do] – like playing football games – means to them.” The quarterbacks stopped by nearly a dozen rooms at the hospital, offering each patient an autographed flag and some words of encouragement along the way. “I talked to them just like I would anyone else in my family or on the team,” Mahomes explained. “They’re good people – they’re not looking for anything, they just want to know who you are as a person away from the football field.” It made for a series of truly unique interactions, from Mahomes signing one woman’s Chiefs-themed tattoo to a casual conversation about video games with a young fan. “It’s awesome. It’s more than just football - being able to see and meet people,” Mahomes added. “I talked to one kid about playing Fortnite, so it’s really cool just to be able to relate to people in ways [beyond] just football.” “For a couple of minutes, these people get to forget about what they’re dealing with,” said Bob Page, President and CEO of The University of Kansas Health System. “They get to really see what we have with the Chiefs and how important these guys are to us. It’s incredible.” The visit was an example of what both parties envisioned when the Chiefs and The University of Kansas Health System first teamed up back in 2012. The partnership has helped elevate the level of healthcare services offered to the team and fans while positively impacting individuals throughout the Greater Kansas City community.

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Just last year, the Chiefs and The University of Kansas Health System joined together with the V Foundation for Cancer Research to fund the diligent work of a young researcher at the KU Cancer Center. The announcement was broadcast on Monday Night Football, drawing the eyes of the nation to the work being done to defeat cancer right here in Kansas City. That partnership was at work yet again earlier this month, as representatives from all three entities were on hand when cyclists participating in a trek across the country to raise money for cancer research stopped by Arrowhead Stadium. It’s a collaboration that carries a significant impact – something that Mahomes, Henne and Litton certainly felt when coming down the escalator into the hospital lobby following the visit. Hundreds of patients and hospital employees were waiting there to greet them, letting out a roar synonymous with a Sunday afternoon at Arrowhead. It was a fitting conclusion to a special afternoon - and one the players won’t soon forget. “You can see the fight that these people really have,” Mahomes said. “That’s stuff that you can look up to and it’s inspirational because these people are laying it all on the line every single day. It’s good to know that what I can do [on the field] helps lift their spirits.”

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Profile for Kansas City Chiefs

Regular Season Game 7 - Chiefs vs. Bengals (10-21-18)  

Regular Season Game 7 - Chiefs vs. Bengals (10-21-18)