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DATA M AT T ERS

by Wendy Kekahio Strategy Consultant, KS Strategy and Innovation Group

Why Does Kamehameha Schools Need to Change?

T

he Native Hawaiian population is expected to increase to almost 250,000 by 2040. Many Native Hawaiian keiki face achievement gaps in kindergarten readiness and more. Kamehameha Schools has a long history of serving Native Hawaiians. Over the past 15 years, we have opened two new K-12 campuses and nearly 20 preschool classrooms; invested about $80 million in more than 100 community collaborators; provided professional development to public school teachers around culturally based education practices; supported the protection and restoration of ancient Hawaiian sites; and grown our endowment by more than $4 billion. So why do we need to change? For two main reasons.

Native Hawaiian Population Growth There are currently about 150,000 Native Hawaiians between ages 0-24 living in Hawai‘i.

Of these, 7,000 attend our campuses or preschools. Another 4,000 are served in Hawaiian-focused charter schools and another 7,000 through private schools. In total, 18,000 Native Hawaiians are touched in one of these ways, but 132,000 Native Hawaiians are not. Additionally, the Native Hawaiian population is expected to increase to almost 250,000 by 2040. If we continue doing what we are doing, even with a strong endowment, we would be reaching less and less of the population. In order to leverage our endowment to better reach and serve this growing population, we need to change.

Achievement Gaps Preschool enrollment and reading and mathematics proficiency rates have increased among Native Hawaiians over time; however, many Native Hawaiians still face achievement gaps. A little over half of Native Hawaiians are ready for kindergarten and 62 percent are reading at grade level or higher in

grade three. These percentages decline as keiki progress in their educational journey and the achievement gap for Native Hawaiians continues to grow.

New methods are needed to support the entire educational journey so that all Native Hawaiians can achieve postsecondary, career and life success. Just 14 percent of Native Hawaiians who graduate from high school go on to complete a postsecondary degree. Yet, 65 percent of jobs in Hawai‘i will require some kind of postsecondary degree by 2018. New methods are needed to support the entire educational journey so that all Native Hawaiians can achieve postsecondary, career and life success.

Native Hawaiian Population Growth

Continued Achievement Gaps

Projections for the future

Education

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Profile for Kamehameha Schools

I Mua Magazine: March 2016  

I Mua Magazine: March 2016