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HDC TRAINING MODULE

HALAL ASSURANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

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HALAL ASSURANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Topics 1. Introduction to Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

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2. Definition of Terms Used in Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

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3. The Concept of Halalan and Toyibban

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4. Principle of Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

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5. Training

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6. Implementation of Halal Assurance Management System (HAS) 6.1 Management Commitment 6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team 6.3 Establishment of Halal Requirement 6.4 Establishment of Halal Policy, Objective and Scope 6.5 Describing the Product and Service 6.6 Constructing and Confirming Flow Diagram 6.7 Halal Threat Identification 6.8 Determining Halal Control Point (HCP) 6.9 Establishment of Criteria Limit for Halal Control Point (HCP) 6.10 Establishment of Monitoring System 6.11 Corrective Actions for Non-Conformance 6.12 Establishing Verification Procedures 6.13 Establishing Documentation System and Records

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7. Management of Product Recall and Complaints

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8. Traceability

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Conclusion

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Attachment for Terms of Reference

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23 - 24 25 - 32 33 34 - 36 37 - 39 40 - 41 42 - 47 48 49 50 - 51 52 53 54 - 55


HDC TRAINING MODULE HALAL ASSURANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM First edition Copyright Š 2014 Halal Industry Development Corporation Sdn Bhd (HDC) 5.02 Level 5, KPMG Tower, First Avenue, Persiaran Bandar Utama Bandar Utama, 47800 Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without permission in writing from the Publisher. Ž HDC and HDC Publication logos are registered trademarks of the Halal Industry Development Corporation, Malaysia Designed by H Media Printed by Maziza Sdn Bhd ISBN 978-967-11850-5-6


H D C TRA IN IN G MO D U LE H alal A ssurance Management System

1. Introduction to Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

Introduction to Halal Assurance Management System (HAS) Issues relating to halal products and services such as the detection of porcine DNA in processed meat products, fermented chilli sauce, egg powder, or even in butter has cause not just the consumer but the manufacturer to question the halal status of products and services available in the market. Non-halal contaminations not only occur in Malaysia but in other parts of the world too, thus making it the perfect time to implement a system that does not only aim to control non-halal contamination, but also assure preventive steps are taken throughout the halal supply chain to avoid any non-halal contamination of halal products and services. The Department of Islamic Development Malaysia (JAKIM) introduced the Halal Assurance Management System (HAS) – a systematic system which identifies non-halal contamination and control measures to ensure halal and safety status of products and services are maintained at all times. This system is translated into the six (6) principles as introduced in the Guidelines for Halal Assurance Management System for Malaysian Halal Certification by JAKIM. The implementation of HAS with reference to the ‘PDCA cycle’ (as shown in the table below) is beneficial for companies. This is because continuous improvement is required to ensure the integrity of halal products and services once the principles of HAS are implemented. P - Plan The main objective of implementing HAS is to produce genuine halal products or services for the consumer. In achieving this objective, commitment from the top management is an absolute must. The top management’s responsibilities not only cover monetary aspects, but also in providing sufficient manpower, premise, processing facilities, materials and training. Table 1: The PDCA cycle

P - PLAN

D - DO

• • • • • • •

• Identify halal threats • Determine Halal Control Points (HCPs)

Management commitment Establish an Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Establish the Terms of Reference for IHC Establish Halal Requirements Establish HAS Policy, Objectives and Scope Describe intended products/ services Construct and confirm the Flow Diagram for the intended products/ services.

A - ACT

C - CHECK

• Process verification

• Establishing Monitoring System for each HCP • Establishing Corrective Action for Deviation (nonconformity) that might occur • Establishing Documentation System and Management of Records.

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1. Introduction to Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

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One of the important elements in implementing HAS is manpower because HAS requires trained and competent personnel in order to establish, implement, monitor, control and verify it. These tasks are conducted by a group of personnel known as the Internal Halal Committee (IHC) as stated in the Guidelines for Halal Assurance Management System for Malaysian Halal Certification by JAKIM. In the industry, IHC is sometimes known as ‘Halal Personnel (HP)’, ‘Halal team’, and other names that portray their responsibility in managing halal. D - Do HAS emphasises on the identification of Halal Critical Points (HCPs) throughout the supply chain involved in producing halal products, and in conducting services. Identification of HCP is an activity to identify related points that require control, monitoring, and/ or implementation of corrective action if necessary. HCP can refer to processes, ingredients/ materials, utensils/equipment/machinery, and personnel. The identification of HCP is by using suitable tools, either established by the company or other available tool such as the Halalan-Toyyiban Risk Management Plan as stated in MS2400:2010. Controlling identified HCP requires the critical limit of each point to ensure no deviations occur. C - Check Based on the established critical limit, a monitoring programme is implemented, whereby monitoring frequency and method depends on the HCP identified. Personnel involved in HCP monitoring activities shall be trained on how to monitor, when and at which point to monitor and the ability to identify non-conformities and the corrective actions required. To assure that HAS implementation is in accordance to current halal requirements, a verification programme is conducted to validate and verify each identified hazards, halal control point and halal critical limit, required and implemented corrective action, calibration and references. A - Act Verification activities include reviewing and monitoring records, internal audit report, management review report,HAS manual, IHC or halal personnel competency. Once non-conformance to halal requirements is detected, an investigation is required to find its root cause in order to implement effective action to rectify it. These activities require sufficient information and verification prior to actual implementation of corrective action or continual improvement. Therefore, HAS requires cooperation not just from the top management and IHC, but also every personnel in the manufacturing premise that provides halal products or services. Team work is vital in ensuring the products or services offered are in compliance with current halal requirements, which can be the standard and manual procedures, rules and regulations, and customer/ client requirements.


H D C TRA IN IN G MO D U LE H alal A ssurance Management System

1. Introduction to Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

HAS implementation benefits both ends of the supply chain, i.e. the manufacturers and the consumers, as listed below: 1. Consumers or customers are • Offered with value-for-money halal products or services that are Shari’ah compliant, • Provided with trustworthy halal products or services through the integrated, stringent and systematic application of a halal control system; and • Served with products or services that complies with the halalan-toyyiban concept, which focuses on both the halal and the quality of products or services offered. 2. Manufacturers gain • Compliance to regulatory requirements for special category of products or services i.e. halal, • The ability to fulfil clients’ or customers’ requirement for halal products or services, • Customers’ confidence and trust for halal products and/ or services provided; • A marketing tool to attract customers and consumers toward their halal products and/ or services, • A tool that can facilitate trade within both the local and international market through recognition from implementation of a comprehensive halal assurance management system, • Ability to build strong cooperation and instil ownership towards halal products or services amongst their premise workers, and • The knowledge that enables them to eliminate and minimise the potential of halal hazards in the halal products and/ or services provided by the applicant.

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2. Definition of Terms Used in Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

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Internal Halal Committee (IHC) A committee established by the organisation to be responsible for developing, monitoring, and controlling the Halal Assurance Management System to ensure its effectiveness1. Internal Halal Committee Meeting A meeting involving all halal internal committee members to discuss issues relating to the development, implementation, maintenance and review of Halal Assurance Management System1. Documentation Any record of Halal Assurance Management System activity1. Control Measure Any action and/ or activity required to control and/ or eliminate halal threats1. Corrective Action Any action to be taken when the results of monitoring at the IHC indicate a loss of control1. Non-compliance The absence of and/ or failure to fulfil the requirement of any halal standards or guidelines1. Contamination A general term to describe the state of being contaminated, either by contamination or precursor, which affects the halal status1.

1. Guidelines for Halal Assurance Management System of Malaysia Halal Certification.


H D C TRA IN IN G MO D U LE H alal A ssurance Management System

2. Definition of Terms Used in Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

Traceability The ability to verify the history, location or application of an item by means of documented recorder identification. The elements of traceability include product, process and customer traceability1. Halal Critical Point (HCP) Control points in the whole halal supply chain, which if identified, controlled, and monitored can eliminate the possibility of halal non-compliance1. Verification Halalan-toyyiban quality process that is used to evaluate whether or not a product, service or system complies with regulations, specifications, or conditions imposed at the start of a development phase2. Non-halal Things or actions that are not permitted by Allah SWT. Non-halal products or services refer to products or services that are not in accordance with halal product or service definition as stated in the related Malaysian Standards for halal. Processing Aids Based on Codex Alimentarius3, processing aid means a substance or material (not including apparatus or utensils and not consumed as a food ingredient by itself) intentionally used in the processing of raw materials, foods or its ingredients to fulfil a certain technological purpose during treatment or processing, and which may result in the non-intentional but unavoidable presence of residues or derivatives in the final product. An example of a processing aid is the use of organic acid(s) (e.g., lactic, acetic, or citric acids) as part of a livestock carcass wash that is applied prior to chilling.

2. MS 2400:2010 Halalan-Toyyiban Assurance Pipeline. 3. Codex Alimentarius Commission, Procedural Manual, “Section 1: Definitions for the purpose of the Codex Alimentarius�

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3. The Concept of Halalan and Toyibban

Food is one of the necessities in life. Food does not only curb hunger but also provide energy and nutrients for the body. In order for the body to turn food into energy and absorb nutrients from food for the body to use, food consumption should be wholesome – good quality and rich in nutrients required by the body. In Islam, every food is permissible for consumption unless stated otherwise. The types of food prohibited are mentioned in the Qur’an in Surah Al-Mai’dah (verses 3 and 90) where it was outlined that every Muslim is forbidden to eat carrion, blood and pork, and what has been consecrated to other than Allah, and animals which have been strangled, killed by a blow, have fallen to their death, and have been gored, as well as animals which wild beasts have eaten (except those that was able to be slaughtered properly before its death), and animals which have been sacrificed on altars. Also prohibited is consumption of intoxicants. Besides having to eat permissible or halal food, the word toyyib is also mentioned in the Qur’an as in Surah Al-Baqarah (verse 172), where it was stated for Muslims to eat “good things” that have been provided to mankind. “Good things” or toyyib refers to wholesomeness, good quality, nutritional, safe, hygienic, and healthy. In today’s environment, toyyib refers to food that is suitable for human consumption by implementing a food safety system in food production. Food safety system is a systematic approach in controlling the safety of food being produced to eliminate or minimise potential hazards in preventing food poisoning. Halalan-toyyiban can thus be defined as allowable and permissible according to Islamic law (Shari’ah) and safe for consumption. This is the concept that is embedded into the Halal Assurance Management System.


H D C TRA IN IN G MO D U LE H alal A ssurance Management System

4. Principles of Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

HAS is an additional system that can be integrated into other existing quality control systems such as total quality management (TQM), and food safety system (e.g. good manufacturing practice or GMP, and hazard analysis and critical control points or HACCP), amongst others. The objective of implementing HAS is to assure the halal status of products and services produced by the company is sustainable throughout the halal certificate’s validity period. The halal status is maintained by complying to halal requirements as stated in the Malaysian Standard for halal products and services, and Manual Procedure for Malaysia Halal Certification. HAS is a system based on the following concepts: • Eliminating the presence of najs and non-halal materials used as ingredients/ raw materials for halal products or services; • Eliminating potential halal threats to products and services from personnel, premise, equipment, utensil, processing aid, and the environment; and • Eliminating and minimising potential food hazards to halal products or services throughout the supply chain. HAS is implemented as a systematic tool for the identification of halal threats specific to individual products or services, processes and measures for their control to ensure the halal status and safety of products or services. The system framework covers from source of materials to consumption or usage of products and services. HAS requires the implementer to practice the following principles:

• Principle 1

Determination of Halal Control Points

• Principle 2

Development and Verification of Flow Chart

• Principle 3

Implementation of Control Measures

• Principle 4

Development of Corrective Actions

• Principle 5

Documentation System and Management Records

• Principle 6

Process Verification

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5. Training

Requirements regarding Malaysia halal certification is becoming more stringent by the day due to the complex nature of halal issues that arise. The introduction of new standards for halal products and services, such as MS2424 on Halal Pharmaceutical, MS 2400 on Halal Logistic, and comprehensive control system for halal such as the Halal Assurance Management System shows that the requirements for halal certification is expanding and becoming more specific to target products or services. Some examples of halal issues that arise include the advancement of current modern processing technology in mechanical slaughtering, and a new stunning method using carbon dioxide. Technological advancement has also created the emergence of hazards in halal food products such as the use of blood plasma that function as a binding agent and inhibits enzyme reaction in surimi products. Therefore, the manufacturer or service provider must be equipped with sufficient and reliable knowledge and skills to filter these hazards and implement effective halal control system in ensuring compliance to halal requirements and producing halalan-toyyiban products and services. This requires investment in terms of manpower, time and money to build a capable team through sufficient and continuous training. Besides halal and food safety issues, training is the way to improve transfer and application of knowledge to all personnel, changing behaviour, reinforce proper behaviour and creating a sustainable facility culture, which enables the personnel to consistently execute a well-designed halal control system. Training is the acquisition of skills, concepts and attitude that results in improved performance within the job environment4. The knowledge and skills are gained from subject matter experts such as consultants, government agencies, third party auditors, educational companies, universities or other allied professional and trade organisations. In food manufacturing and food premise, training should not only be conducted for certain groups of personnel, but instead should be provided for every personnel involved in producing halal products or providing halal services5. Training is particularly important for personnel in the following departments: • Top management • Supervisor and management • Personnel in areas for production/ preparation, packaging and storage or warehouse • Maintenance • New Product Development • Sanitation • Purchasing • Sales • Marketing • Transport personnel


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It is best to include other shareholders in the training programme such as: • Manufacturer for raw materials • Manufacturer for packaging materials • Supplier for contract workers • Third party transporter Personnel to be trained may come from differing backgrounds, education level and work functions, therefore an effective training programme is one that considers the level of education and language skill of the targeted personnel population. Steps to be taken to ensure effective training are as follows: • Analyse training needs • Determine training’s objectives • Develop and prepare content • Content delivery • Evaluation Analysis of Training Needs Training needs analysis is the first step in creating the effective training programme as it identifies the gap between the actual current level of job performance and the expected level of job performance. Training needs analysis identifies those who need the training and what kind of training is needed. There are three levels of training needs analysis: organisational analysis, task analysis and individual analysis.

Organisational Analysis This level of analysis looks into the effectiveness of the organisation in achieving the organisational goal in producing halal product or service in compliance to the halal standards and requirements. The analysis should identify6: • The organisational goal in implementing halal policy. • Resources available, which refers to expertise in the organisation, physical facilities, material on hand, and money. • Climate and support for training, which refer to the top management support, personnel willingness to participate, and responsibility for outcome. Information on the current status of the organisation’s goal can be obtained from: • Organisational goal and objectives, mission statement and strategic plan; • Staff inventory: long- and short-term staffing needs; • Skill inventory: current available skills in-house, long- and short-term skill requirements; and • Changes in halal certification requirements (standards/ guidelines /circulars) and legislation.

4. Developing a Personnel Training Program, AHA 5. Manual Procedure for Malaysia Halal Certification, 2011. 6. Raining needs assessment by Janice A. Miller, SPHR and Diana M. Osinski, SPHR.

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Task Analysis Task analysis focuses on the task or job conducted to achieve the company’s goal. Task analysis is to determine the current level of task or job completed compared to the target achievement for the task or job. The analysis should identify: • The task for the designated halal personnel i.e. Halal Executive and Internal Halal Committee who are involved in establishing, implementing and validating the halal control system of the company; and • The task for other personnel who are involved in implementing and monitoring the halal control system. Information relevant for task analysis can be obtained from: • Job description which stated the major activities in performing the job and the condition under which these activities are performed, • KSA Analysis is a more detailed list of specified tasks for each job including knowledge, skill, attitude and abilities required for the job, • Performance standard of the job and the standards by which they will be judged, • Observing sample work, • Performed jobs, • Job inventory questionnaire – an evaluation on the task in terms of importance and time spent performing, • Review literature about the job, • Ask question about the job to the current personnel responsible, the supervisor or upper management, • Analyse operating problems, which refers to down time, waste, repairs, quality control. Individual Analysis Individual analysis refers to the individual or designated personnel conducting the task. This analysis is to identify and to determine which or whether the personnel is suitable for the task. The analysis also involves understanding the current level of knowledge and skills available and the required knowledge enhancement needed to perform the task given. This analysis should identify: • The related designated halal personnel as Halal Executive, chairperson and the members for IHC, • The current knowledge and skills possessed by designated halal personnel and what training is required to enable these halal personnel to perform their tasks; and • The knowledge and skills required for other personnel besides the designated halal personnel to enable themselves to implement and monitor halal requirements.


H D C TRA IN IN G MO D U LE H alal A ssurance Management System

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Information can be obtained from: • Performance evaluation of the personnel, • Performance problem, • Observation on the behaviour and results of the behaviour, • Work samples, • Interview the manager, supervisor, and personnel involved on the requirements needed to perform the task, • Questionnaires regarding the task given, to measure current knowledge and skills; and • Check list of training progress chart. Learning Objective Learning objective is an outcome statement that captures specifically what knowledge, skills and attitude the personnel should exhibit following instruction after the training session7 . The importance of learning objectives7 are: • Serves to connect the content and assessment around learning, • Guides selection of learning activities that will best achieves objectives, • Give learners a clear picture of what to expect and what is expected of them, • Form the basis for evaluating the training content. Learning objective should be specific, measurable/ observable, attainable for target audience, relevant, result-oriented and targeted to the learner and to the desired level of learning8. Result of the needs analysis will indicate the type of required training and depth to perform tasks, and related personnel suitable for the job. It also helps in identifying the number of training required. Level of training detail9 and depth necessary for specific jobs and tasks can be classified as follows: Expert 1. Individual who possess detailed knowledge, training, experience and understanding of the targeted area, including: • Shari’ah perspective relating to halal products and services, • Science and technical aspects, • Halal application and requirements; and • Related regulatory requirements relating to halal products and services. 2. Individual demonstrates their expertise through their previous training and ability to: • Develop company’s halal policy and objectives, • Establish halal control system by producing halal assurance management system manual, 7. Effective Us Of Learning Objectives For Learning And Assessment, Teacher And Educational Development, University Of New Mexico School Of Medicine 8. Training Material Development Guide, Swedish Civil Contingencies Guide 9. Current Food Industry Good Manufacturing Practices, American Frozen Food Institute.

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• Analyse halal contaminants for material, process, premise and equipment • Evaluate embedded best halal practices in the current product/ service safety system or quality system, • Guide, strategise and supervise the implementation of halal control system for the company, • Develop verification and validation procedures, • Organise and conduct training regarding best halal practices for related personnel; and • Advice the company on halal control system establishment, implementation and verification. 3. Position at this level would be employees with accountability for Shari’ah and technical leadership in areas of halal products and services, food and product safety, quality and sanitation, such as the Halal Executive and Chairperson for the IHC. Proficient 1. Individual who understands the key principles, and company policies in the production of halal product and services. These individuals should demonstrate the ability to: • Monitor and audit operation for compliance to halal certification through implementation of best halal practices and halal control system, • Guide and train others in halal products and services operation or activities; • Lead corrective action processes, • Develop procedures for implementing and consistent execution of expected practices in their functional area; and • Lead execution of verification and validation activities. 2. The position at this level could be the manager responsible for the whole manufacturing plant, production, supervisor and line leader. Also included are production workers who are engaged in critical work stream focused on the halal operation such as HAS, HCP monitoring, critical control point (CCP) monitoring, microbiological samples collection, ritual cleansing and allergen sanitation. Both IHC and HACCP members would be positioned at this level. Application 1. Individuals who understand the general principles of halal product and services and demonstrate their knowledge and ability in focused work activities: • Compliance with best halal practices and procedures, • Awareness of company’s halal policies and best halal practices, • Support corrective action procedures; and • Share knowledge with co-workers. 2. The position at this level are typically general production workers engaged in the halal production or preparation, transportation and warehouse personnel and maintenance personnel.


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Awareness Training content 1. Individuals who are not directly engaged in the halal product and services operation but may interact with operation on some periodic basis and demonstrate understanding of the company’s best halal practices required. These individual should be provided with guidance to understand where and when compliance is required. 2. Position at this level are office staff (finance, marketing and sales) and external visitors. Develop and Prepare Content Generally, training content refers to the identified training objectives. Therefore, the basis of the training content for compliance to Malaysia halal certification would be the Malaysia halal standard requirements, current national fatwa, local and international regulatory and customer requirements. The training content can be developed based on the competency level of personnel in the company. The content references are: • Shari’ah requirement for halal product and services. • Current related fatwa. • Malaysia standard relating to the product produced or services offered. • Manual Procedure for Malaysia Halal Certification. • Halal Control System i.e. Halal Assurance Management System. • Guidelines and Official circular related to halal certification from certification body i.e. JAKIM and JAIN. • Related regulatory requirement for the product and/ services locally and international. • Customer requirements. • Halal requirements for material, process, packaging and premise. • Quality base system implemented in the premise i.e. GMP. PIC/S, GDP, HACCP, ISO, and many others. Content Delivery Training content compact with comprehensive information may not be useful if the target audience are not ready to accept it. The acceptance of the training content depend on the type of learner and suitability of language and vocabulary used during training. Adult Learner In manufacturing environment, the participants are working adults who may be well experienced in the task to be trained and hold a significant position in the manufacturing premise. Therefore, adults learner learnt best when:

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Table 3:Method of Adult Learning

Adults learn best when…

Matching adult learning needs with appropriate methods

They feel valued and respected for the experiences and perspectives they bring to the training situation.

Elicit participants’ experiences and perspectives through a variety of stimulating activities.

The learning experience is active rather than passive.

Actively engage participants in their learning experience through discussion and a variety of activities.

The learning experience actually fills their immediate needs.

Identify participants’ needs; develop training concepts and learning objectives to these identified needs.

They accept responsibility for their own learning.

Make sure that training content and skills are directly relevant to participants’ experience so that they will want to learn.

Their learning is self-directed and meaningful to them.

Involve participants in deciding on the content and skills that will be covered during the training.

Their learning experience addresses ideas, feelings, and actions.

Use multiple training methods that address knowledge, attitudes, and skills.

New material relates to what participants already know.

Use training methods that enable participants to establish this relationship and integrate new material.

The learning environment is conducive for learning.

Take measures to ensure that the physical and social environment (training space) is safe, comfortable, and enjoyable.

Learning is applied immediately.

Provide opportunities for participants to apply the new information and skills they have learned.

Learning is reinforced.

Use training methods that allow participants to practice new skills and receive prompt, reinforcing feedback.

Learning occurs in small groups

Use training methods that encourage participants to explore feelings, attitudes, and skills with other learners.

The trainer values participants’ contributions as both learners and teachers.

Encourage participants to share their expertise and experience with others in the training.


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Adult learners have different type of learning. Basically there are three learning styles: • Visual learners o They need to ‘see’ something to understand and learn. This group benefits from visual, written instruction, written directions, graphics, illustration, props, flow charts, and others. • Auditory learners o They ‘hear’ to receive information. This group prefers discussion, tapes, lectures, question and answer panels and interactive role play. • Kinesthetic learners o They learn through ‘hands-on’ training. This group benefits from being physically and actively involved, engaged with hands-on activities, model making, role play, case study and others. The common modes of training are lectures, role play and simulation, computer assisted instruction, programed learning, audio/ visual methods, job rotation, and hands-on methods. Training Language Halal certification covers both halal and quality/ safety requirements for halal products and services. Therefore, it is a bigger portion of the pie to digest. In ensuring the training content is sufficiently understood, it is best to present the desired training in a language understood by the learner or personnel involved. For learners with limited English and Bahasa Malaysia will require more time and effort in delivering the information. The types of approach are: • The use of on verbal materials i.e. posters, drawings, photographs and videos may be required. The use of on-site identification is also effective i.e. colour coding. • Translating the training texts both presentation and notes to a language understood by all. Also, translation can be done for manual, instructions, posters, memo and many other information delivery media. • Use the help of a translator during training. Training Types Generally there are two types of training, either public classes training or in-house training. Public classes training is training conducted by a training provider attended by learners from various backgrounds either in terms of education, language proficiency, job and type of industry. Usually conducted in an outside location i.e. training centre, training room in other establishment i.e. hotel and seminar or conference facilities.

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In-house training is training conducted either by the internal trainer which refers to experts in the company, external trainer from training provider, subject matter experts, lecturers from universities and others. The training content are usually tailored to suit participants’ training needs and usually conducted in the manufacturing area or external premises. In-house training can be either on-the-job training or off-the-job training. Trainers for in-house training using the service internal personnel like managers and supervisors need to proof they are competent trainers. This is important to ensure effective training session, and that transfer of knowledge and skills have been conducted. In-house training can be conducted in formal or informal. Formal in-house training7 sessions are conducted during: • New hire orientation: o In-class setting and premise tour in introducing the working area. o In depth introduction to best halal practices and food safety procedure in the premise. o In audio or visual presentation. o Requires assessment in the form of oral or written test. • Scheduled Annual Training and Refresher Training o In classroom setting and conducted yearly basis o In depth training on halal certification requirements, best halal practices and halal contaminations. o Require assessment in the form of oral or written test. • Train-the-trainer for expert competence level personnel i.e. Internal Halal Committee, Quality/ Safety System Committee. o Trainer from subject matter experts either from experienced industry players, lecturers, consultants, related government agencies and related organisations. o It’s a knowledge exchange to other employees that shows aptitude in training peers and subordinates. o Typically done to provide consistency to delivery and content and to provide enough trainers for large facilities or across multiple facilities. o Assessment done through written test based on case study, problem solving, and theory application. • Plant-to-Plant Training o Employee will travel to another plant to share key learning and practices. o Involves classroom method and hands-on practices. o Training focus on new machine and equipment, new system, new technology, transfer of product. o Assessment based on attendance and ability to effectively apply key learning and hands-on demonstration.


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• Employee-to-employee training o Buddy or mentoring system. o Between new hire with experienced personnel/ transferred personnel and experience personnel o Involves information exchange and expertise sharing between employees. • Problem Solving Exercise o Formal session involving all levels of plant employee (management, supervisor, workers) across all applicable functional areas to work together to discern root cause and corrective action to manufacturing areas with challenges. o Assessment – Root-cause problem solving documented through modification of work instruction and monitor for improvement. • Cooperate sponsored or conducted o Annual meeting for all management levels of a multi-plant company where communicating the new procedures, technologies, changes in regulations, halal requirements and latest guidelines. o Assessment – attendance and dissemination and implementation of information at manufacturing facility. • Supplier conduct training o Suppliers for raw material, machinery, equipment and packaging material. o Provide training on proper usage, handling and maintenance of materials. o Classroom and may include hands-on training too. o Assessment – attendance and application on the usage of materials in the manufacturing premise. • Contractor training o Training for all related contractors which have direct impact to halal certification requirements in producing halal product and/ or services. o Focus on both halal and toyyiban requirements i.e. product/ service safety system requirements. • Plant meetings o Involves plant management level meeting. All personnel to offer important communications to impart knowledge, expectation or reinforce behaviour or skills. o Assessment – attendance and improved skills or behaviour through observation by learner’s superior. Informal In-House Training7 which can be implemented are: • Supervisor – directed during operations o Instruction from supervisor to production personnel.

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• Line or Team Meetings o Short meeting between supervisor and designated line/ team. o Discuss on the challenges/ changes in direction or instruction which is related to the designated line or team. • Departmental Meetings o Conducted by own department for all related employees. • Shift change meeting o Handing over information to another group of personnel after end of shift.. o Updating on the information regarding operation conducted. • Coaching o Occurs when there are arising issue or problem or preparing employee to move to a higher level of responsibility. • Job qualification o Jobs within the manufacturing facility which requires a qualified individual to complete the given task. o Assessment is required to ensure sufficient understanding of knowledge and skills. • Corrective action o When deviation occurs, training may occur if the initial training was insufficient or not fully understood. • Product reviews o Review of products produced with line personnel offer a visual method of training. • Employee-to-employee training o Informal information sharing session between co-workers.. Evaluation Evaluation on training is important as it is a tool used to identify if the training had been conducted and required knowledge and skills has been understood by the learner. Meanwhile verification is a process to identify the depth of knowledge and skill absorbed by the learner and his/ her ability to implement it in the working environment. Evaluation and verification of training are based on: • Establish yearly training schedule for every personnel. • Records of every training conducted the attendance and training content. • Records of the assessment on the level of understanding through: o Written test i.e. true-false format and multiple choice questions, fill in the blanks and essays on theory 7. o Oral test – interview, question and answer, true-false format using photos, graphic or process flow.


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o Hands-on demonstration by learners and observed by subject matter expert (manager, supervisor, supplier or experienced personnel for the designated task). o Presentation to subject matter expert regarding findings from the case study or problem solving question. Trending Results Tracking and trending results over time allow for continuous improvement of any training process and may be employed where feasible and appropriate. Personnel who are not benefitting from the exchange of knowledge can be identified and remediated. Ensure sufficient identification had been done to those who are showing progress or insufficient progress after training had been conducted. If the reason is inappropriate type of training, weakness in delivery of training content, and insufficient implementation, retraining should be conducted.

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6. Implementation of Halal Assurance Management System (HAS)

Establishing an effective HAS requires the company to implement HAS principles, whereby it may involve more than one step for each principles. The flow sequence for HAS implementation can be segregated into related stages: 6. Stages of Implementation for Halal Assurance Management System (HAS): 6.1 Management Commitment 6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team 6.3 Establishment of Halal Requirement 6.4 Establishment of Halal Policy, Objective and Scope 6.5 Describing the Product and Service 6.6 Constructing and Confirming Flow Diagram 6.7 Halal Threat Identification 6.8 Determining Halal Control Point (HCP) 6.9 Establishment of Criteria Limit for Halal Control Point (HCP) 6.10 Establishment of Monitoring System 6.11 Corrective Actions for Non-Conformance 6.12 Establishing Verification Procedures 6.13 Establishing Documentation System and Records Note: For the purpose of this training, the Halalan-Toyyiban Risk Management Plan (HTRMP) will be used as reference for the implementation of Halal Assurance Management System (HAS). HTRMP is applied in the MS 2400:2010 HalalanToyyiban Assurance Pipeline (Parts 1-3), which provide guidelines on management system requirements for halal logistics. The approach is in accordance with Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP).


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6.1 Management Commitment

The first step in implementing HAS is by obtaining the management commitment, which refers to the willingness of the company to implement HAS in producing halal products and services. This decision is made based on the benefits of implementing HAS mainly due to monetary benefits to the company, which refers to compliance to halal certification body requirements and fulfilling customer demand for halal products and services. Management commitment is further demonstrated through: • Ensuring the establishment complies with every regulatory and requirement pertaining to Malaysia Halal Certification, • Ensuring the establishment’s HAS complies with the Guideline for Halal Assurance Management System, • Ensuring halalan-toyyiban is fully embedded and implemented in every level of the establishment’s processing operation from the source of material to end user. The management commitments mentioned are demonstrated through: • Effective internal communication o Observed through HAS committee organisational chart which clearly indicates effective reporting structure of every department involved in HAS implementation. o Evidence of report to top management on compliance to HAS requirements through minutes of meetings should reflect halal requirement compliance as department’s key performance index and any needs for improvement. o Company’s halal policy and halal objectives are clearly outlined. o Training, briefing, memo, poster and circular created regarding importance of meeting the requirements of establishing HAS and regulatory requirement relating to halal certification, as well as importance of reporting arising problem to the identified person(s) for personnel, suppliers and certification and regulatory bodies. • Providing financial resources for the following to ensure compliance to the regulatory and HAS requirements, and to support the implementation and effectiveness of HAS: o Construction of premise o Premise internal fittings o Selection and installation of equipment o Maintenance of premise and equipment o Selection of material supplies o Required services involving in controlling and/ or eliminating hazards • Adequate human resource o Selection and appointment of competent personnel with sufficient knowledge as HAS committee member or Internal Halal Committee (IHC). o Defining the task and responsibility of each IHC member in implementing HAS for the establishment.

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6.1 Management Commitment

o Providing training and competency for IHC member to ensure IHC is abreast with legal requirements for halal certification, halal certification requirements, HAS requirements, and other related knowledge for halal certification. • Giving sufficient authority to IHC to enforce compliance of HAS procedures identified in the establishment for any person(s) entering or working in the premise. • Allowing continuous improvement of HAS to ensure its effectiveness through validation of control measures, changes to the system due to corrective action, and reassessment activities i.e. audit and HAS team meeting.


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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Formation In order to implement HAS, the management are required to appoint a group of personnel to establish, implement and monitor HAS effectiveness. The group of personnel can be identified as Internal Halal Committee (IHC) or halal personnel. Based on Guideline for Halal Assurance Management System by JAKIM, IHC shall consist a minimum of four (4) members: a. Two (2) of them shall be Muslim at management level. b. One (1) person shall be responsible for purchasing/ procurement. c. The employee responsible for managing halal matters for the company shall be the coordinator of the IHC. d. For slaughter house/ abattoir, the Halal Supervisor shall be a member of the committee. General criteria for these minimum IHC members as stated in the Implementation Manual Procedure for Malaysia Halal Certification 2011, revision two (2), and Guidelines for Halal Assurance Management are as below: Food Product/ Food Premise/ Consumer Product/ Cosmetics and Personal Care/ Pharmaceutical/ Logistics a. IHC chairperson shall be a Muslim from the management level. b. IHC Halal Executive (HE) shall be a Malaysian Muslim, educated in Islamic teaching or a holder of Halal Executive Certificate or shall be: i. Food product and food premise – trained in handling food, ii. Muslim consumer product – trained in related product produced by the establishment, iii. Cosmetics and personal care – trained in handling and processing related cosmetics and personal care products produced by the establishment, iv. Pharmaceuticals – trained in handling related products produced by the establishment; and v. Logistics – trained in related logistic activities such as transportation/ warehousing/ retailing. c. Malaysian Muslim supervisor with permanent position in the premise, and is competent in halal management system, and is at the production/ processing area at all times. d. Malaysian Muslim worker with permanent position in the premise, and is competent in halal management system, and remain at the production eliminate processing area all the time. e. The IHC members shall be knowledgeable and well trained in halal standards and halal certification requirements. Slaughter House a. IHC chairperson shall be a Muslim from the management level. b. Halal Executive or Supervisor of IHC shall be a Malaysian Muslim, with education background in Islamic studies, trained as a certified slaughterer by JAIN/ MAIN (State Religious Councils), and trained as Halal Executive or trained in halal management system.

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c. Checker shall be a certified slaughterer by JAIN/ MAIN, on duty at all times during the slaughtering process and trained in halal slaughtering processes. d. Slaughterer shall be a certified slaughterer by JAIN/MAIN and on duty at all times during slaughtering process and trained in halal slaughtering processes. e. The IHC members shall be knowledgeable ad well trained in halal standards and halal certification requirements. The general designated members for each type of product or services are as below: IHC Member

Food Product

Food Premise

Logistics

Consumer Cosmetic Product & Personal Care

Chairperson Halal Executive/ Supervisor (Halal Coordinator) Purchasing/ Procurement Representative from production/ operation Representative from certified slaughterer Table 4: Generic Internal Halal Committee (IHC) member for different products and services.

Chairperson

Halal Executive

Procurement

Production

Table 5:Generic organisational chart for the Internal Halal Committee.

Quality Assurance

Pharmaceuticals

Slaughter House


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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

Note: Ideally, IHC should consist of representatives from more than just operation and purchasing/ procurement department. It is advisable to have representatives from other departments such as Quality Assurance, Research and Development, Maintenance/ Engineering, Warehousing/ Storage, Security and Safety, Sales and Marketing, which can also make up IHC members. Competency of the IHC Eligibility of the company personnel to be the IHC members are based on trainings attended, working experience in related industry, and previous experience in managing halal issues. In order to ensure the competency of IHC members, they shall be trained and assessed on their level of understanding on halal-related matters. Competency for eligibility as IHC members: 1. • • •

IHC shall be trained on requirements for Malaysia Halal Certification: Concept of halal and haram in Islam for food, products or services Implementation for Malaysia Halal Certification Manual Procedure Revision 2 Related Malaysian Halal Standards – examples: MS 1500, MS2200, MS2400, MS2424 • Guidelines for Halal Assurance Management System • National and international acts and regulations relating to production of halal products/ services and use of the halal logo and certificate 2. Competency of IHC members shall be assessed through: • Written pre- and post-test/ interview session • Knowledge on current issues. Proof of browsing related website i.e. JAKIM halal website • External party audit • Effectiveness of the HAS Manual Procedure • Fulfil Halal Policy through achieving halal objectives • Assessment from the top management via the management review of HAS implementation. The management is also required to review the competency of IHC to ensure HAS is being implemented effectively. This activity shall be conducted at least once per annum. Review is also required if there are: a. Changes in members of the IHC b. Changes in the HCP monitoring programme; and/ or c. Changes in the operation and/ or supply chain.

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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

Terms of Reference (TOR) for Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Term of reference is defined as the purpose and structure of an organisation or a group of people who have agreed to work together to accomplish a shared goal. The TOR defines the vision and mission, goals, scope, structure including membership, and available resources and timeline of a project or programme. For HAS, IHC’s TOR refers to the group of selected personnel responsible in establishing, implementing, monitoring, and maintaining the integrity of halal products or services produced by the company. It also refers to the scope of roles and responsibility for IHC. General IHC roles and responsibilities in implementing HAS are as outlined below: Stage 1 • Establishing company’s halal policy and objective. • Establishing IHC and its organisational structure. • Establishing TOR for IHC. Stage 2 • Establishing HAS manual. o Scope of HAS o List of Products or Services involved in HAS o Analysis of halal threats and identification of HCP o Establishing control measures for halal threats at identified HCP o Establishing monitoring system and its corrective action for each HCP identified. o Establishing documentation system and records managements Stage 3 • Process verification on effectiveness of HAS established by: o Validating of HAS manual, focusing halal threats and its analysis, control measures, critical limits used in monitoring system and corrective actions for identified HCP based on reliable references. o Verifying the implementation of HAS by conducting internal halal audit. o Checking records relating to implementation of HAS such as HCP monitoring records, calibration records, and others. IHC roles and responsibilities can be segregated to designated members based on position and processing activities in the establishment as suggested below: IHC Roles and Responsibilities based on position in the IHC organisation chart: 1. IHC Leader/ Halal Executive • Gather top management commitment towards initiatives relating to HAS. • Assist in the development and communication of halal policy. • Ensure HAS is established, implemented and maintained in accordance with halal standards.


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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

• Supervise/ conduct HAS verification and validation activities. • Initiate corrective actions and controls to the process including product recalls and withdrawals until the non-conformity or the unsatisfactory condition relating to HAS requirements have been corrected. • Actively involved in approving or panel for approving new halal materials, suppliers, products and processes, as well as personnel in charge of maintaining the implementation of HAS. 2. Halal Executive (IHC Coordinator) • Responsible for the establishment’s Halal certification i.e. for new applications and renewal of halal certification. • Responsible for the Halal File. • Responsible for controlling and updating the establishment’s HAS Manual. • Organise and coordinate and/ or monitor HAS activities such as development of the establishment’s halal policy and objective, halal analysis for materials and processes, halal training, HAS verification activities (halal internal audit), IHC meetings, and management meetings amongst others. • Monitor HCP monitoring and supervise corrective action for related HCP deviations. • Involve in product recalls and withdrawals until the deviation or the unsatisfactory condition relating to HAS requirements have been corrected2. • Identifying internal and external experts to assist in the development of HAS knowledge and to conduct training. For other members of IHC, it is best their roles and responsibilities are based on the critical activities involved in producing halal products or services. Generally, the main critical activities in producing halal products or services are: 1. Selection and approval of ingredients/ material and supplier for the production of halal products and services for both current and new ingredients. a. Possible departments involved in conducting this activity are Research and Development, Quality Assurance, Quality Control, Production, Purchasing, and Maintenance/ Engineering, b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC member in selection and approval of ingredients/ materials for the production of halal products or services are to: i. Establish and implement new product development procedures based on halal materials only. ii. Establish and implement procedure for selecting new halal materials and suppliers and manufacturers i.e. for raw materials, and packaging materials. iii. Communicate to IHC coordinator on formulating development of new halal products and materials. iv. Establish and implement procedures for selecting halal materials for premise construction, premise internal fittings, chemicals for cleaning and sanitation, equipment, and additives or lubricants for equipment. v. Perform suppliers audit or review supply status where necessary. vi. Implement the monitoring of HCP and required corrective action (if

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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

required) for halal material selection for ingredients/ material, premise construction, premise internal fittings, chemicals for cleaning and sanitation, equipment, and additives/ lubricants for equipment. vii. Establishing current Approved Supplier List for IHC and other related department i.e. Purchasing, QA/QC, Warehousing, Production and Maintenance or Engineering. 2. Purchasing of ingredients or raw material and suppliers for the production of halal products and services a. Possible department involved in conducting this activity is Purchasing b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC member in this activity are: i. Provide current list of approved ingredients, materials and suppliers to the Purchasing Officer (those listed must comply to both halal and food safety requirements). ii. Approve purchase of ingredient(s) and/ or material(s) based on the ‘Approved Supplier List’. iii. Inform supplier to include a copy of recognised halal certificate during delivery of ingredients and/or raw material, especially for imported critical ingredients and/or raw material. iv. Ensure suppliers adhere to supply handling practices for both halal and food safety requirements. v. Communicate with the IHC coordinator in selecting new raw materials and/ or new suppliers for R&D of new product or enhancement of current products or cost-saving activities. 3. Receiving and storage of ingredients/ materials from supplier a. Possible departments involved in conducting this activity are Warehouse and QA/QC. b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC members in this activity are: i. Compare PO (procurement order) and DO (delivery order) or check contracts as per ‘Suppliers Specifications’ criteria. ii. Ensure any materials delivered are compatible with the ‘Approved Supplier List’. iii. Ensure delivery of ingredients/ materials is accompanied with a copy of recognised halal certificate and COA (certificate of authenticity). iv. Implement the monitoring of HCP and conduct corrective action if non-conformance occurs. v. Adhere to company policy on prohibition of bringing in non-halal materials. vi. Communicate any arising non-halal issue(s) to the IHC. vii. Check for any non-halal contaminations, receiving temperature, pest infestations, quality, packing conditions, and truck hygiene during delivery. viii. Observe unloading practices. ix. Handle incoming goods as per documented procedures. x. Ensure Good Storage Practices and FIFO (First-In-First-Out) rotation principles.


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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

4. Inspection and release of ingredients and/or raw material to processing area a. Possible department involved in conducting this activity is QA/QC. b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC member in this activity are: i. Ensure incoming ingredients/ material comply to the agreed product specification and halal requirements. ii. Ensure ingredients and/or raw material are as per in the Approved Supplier and Ingredients List through analysis in company’s laboratory or accredited external laboratory. iii. Release of ingredients and/or raw material which comply to halal and food safety requirements. iv. Establish ingredients and/or raw material identification for traceability purposes. 5. Usage of ingredients and/or raw material in the processing area a. Possible departments involve in conducting this activity are QA/QC, Production, and Maintenance or Engineering. b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC member in this activity are: i. Establish production system in compliance with Shari’ah requirements and prevent contamination from haram and najs sources. ii. Establish najs mughallazah cleansing procedures for any deviation which involves contamination from najs mughallazah. iii. Use only materials as listed in the Approved Supplier List. iv. Adhere to company policy on prohibition of bringing in non-halal materials. v. Communicate non-halal issues to the IHC. vi. Follow safe food preparation and handling practices. vii. Check environmental hygiene and safety. viii. Check equipment process performance and maintenance. ix. Check water quality and safety. x. Check availability of halal ingredients and/or raw material identification and traceability. xi. Maintain product recipes and characteristics. xii. Ensure recipes are not modified without approval from the top management. xiii. Follow safe food handling practices. xiv. Ensure adherence to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). xv. Follow cleaning and sanitation standards and procedures. xvi. Follow handling standards of raw and processed foods. 6. Storage of finished products a. Possible departments involved in conducting this activity are Warehouse and QA/QC. b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC members in this activity are: i. Ensure finished products are not stored with non-halal materials (haram). ii. Follow safe food handling practices. iii. Ensure adherence to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP).

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6.2 Establishment of Internal Halal Committee (IHC) Team

iv. Follow cleaning and sanitation standards and procedures. v. Follow handling standards of finished products. vi. Adhere to company policy on prohibition of bringing in non-halal materials. vii. Communicate any arising non-halal issue with IHC. 7. Transportation and distribution activities a. Possible departments involved in conducting this activity are Warehouse and QA/QC. b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC members in this activity are: i. Check for presence of any non-halal materials, loading temperature, pest infestation and transportation’s hygiene condition. ii. Ensure finished products are not placed in transport which contains non-halal materials (haram). iii. Monitor loading practices. iv. Follow safe food handling practices. v. Ensure adherence to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). vi. Adhere to company policy on prohibition of bringing in non-halal materials. vii. Communicate any arising non-halal issue with IHC. 8. Security and Safety a. Possible department involved in conducting this activity is Safety and Security. b. The roles and responsibilities of IHC members in this activity: i. Establishing security and safety procedures, which is in compliance to Shari’ah requirements and preventing contamination from haram and najs sources through available entrance and exit area in the establishment, for both the establishment’s internal personnel and external parties, such as visitors, suppliers, contractors, contract workers and others.


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6.3 Establishment of Halal Requirement

The halal requirements for Halal Assurance Management System (HAS), shall be established by the management and the IHC. HAS requirements are based on: • Local and international acts and regulations relevant to the products or services, • Food Hygiene Regulations 2009 or related hygiene or safety regulation relevant to the products or services, • Related Malaysian Standard for halal, • Manual Procedures for Malaysia Halal Certification, • Halal Assurance Management System, • Customer requirements; and • Related National Fatwa Consensus relevant to halal products/ services The elements for halal requirements are as follows: • Premise • Utilities • Equipment • Maintenance • Staff Facilities • Physical and Chemical Products Contamination Control – Raw Material Handling, Preparation, Processing, Packing and Storage Area • Housekeeping and Hygiene • Waste/ Waste Disposal • Pest Control • Storage and Transport • Product Control • Process Control • Personnel

Note: General examples of elements of halal requirements are as per Table 8: Details of Halal Requirement.

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6.4 Establishment of Halal Policy, Objective and Scope

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Halal Policy Halal policy is a statement that formally define an organisation’s direction and commitment to produce halal, quality and safe products or services. It express in general terms, what the top management intends to do about halal products and describe the direction the organisation wish to take. It is a statement expressing the organisation’s commitment to the implementation and ongoing maintenance of its halal control system, i.e. the Halal Assurance Management System (HAS). The halal policy should drive the establishment of the halal control system and should encourage personnel involved to update and improve its overall effectiveness. Halal policy consists of statement that portrays: • The company’s compliance to related Malaysian Standard for halal products or services, implementation of Manual Procedures for Malaysia Halal Certification, related acts and regulation in Malaysia for the halal products and/ or services. • The stakeholders’ or other related party’s awareness of their responsibility towards halal requirements. Stakeholders refer to client or customer, service provider and company’s personnel. • Emphasis on the company’s duty to abide by halal requirements and to exercise halal best practices at all times. • The aim of the halal control system and emphasis put on ensuring its continual improvement. • The scope of the halal control system by identifying the starting and end point. To establish a halal policy, the following should be taken into consideration: a. Halal policy focus • No presence of najs (najs Al Mughallazah and other najs as stated in the Malaysian Standard for halal products and services) as ingredients and/or raw material and possible halal threats from najs. • No customer complaints relating to presence of najs or contaminated with najs. • Increase customer satisfaction towards halal products or services. Example: The QSR Brands’ Guarantee QSR Brands guarantees that all the products it manufacture and sell in Malaysia are halal. The QSR Brands’ Shari’ah Advisory Council stringently oversees the whole chain of its halal food manufacturing processes to ensure halal compliance with JAKIM’s Halal Certification requirements. JAKIM’s halal logo is displayed on all our product packaging to show they have passed halal compliance tests.


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6.4 Establishment of Halal Policy, Objective and Scope

Halal Objective The halal policy should be supported with measurable objectives and when met will result in meeting the terms outlined in the company’s halal policy. Elements and focus areas mentioned in consideration for establishing halal policy may be rephrased to describe the company’s halal objective. Example A: Internal Control Apart from obtaining halal certificate for our operational premises, we operate stringent internal controls over raw materials procurement, manufacturing, packaging, storage, transportation and utensils, in order to ensure that all our products conform to halal requirements. Imported Products All imported products are certified halal by the Islamic food and nutritional certification body recognised by JAKIM in the products’ country of origin. To further verify the halal status of our imported products, officials from QSR Brands Shari’ah Advisory Council inspects the facilities of all our suppliers abroad. Example B: In order to achieve the company policy for halal, we shall ensure: • Every material (ingredient, raw material and packaging material) are free from najs and any haram materials as stated in the Malaysian Standard for Halal and Malaysia Halal Certification Manual Procedure; • Any material for utensils, equipment, machinery and processing aids shall be free from non-halal and najs contaminations; and • Processing methods and techniques used in producing products or services are free from any najs and non-halal contaminations either from workers, environment, equipment, raw materials or premise.

Scope for Halal Certification and HAS Scope for halal certification and HAS refers to the type of product or type of services to offer, processing premise, area and line involved in producing the product, facilities or area to use for providing services, and related services or activities in producing the said product or providing the said services. Example: The Halal Assurance Management System is built to cover activities from selection of suppliers, purchasing, delivery, storage, preparation, processing, and packaging to delivery to customers.

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6.4 Establishment of Halal Policy, Objective and Scope

Based on the categories for products available in the premise, the products are divided into: • Milk chocolate beads coated with colouring • Dark chocolate with variety of filling i.e. cereals, dry fruits, nuts and others


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6.5 Describing the Product and Service

Product or service description applies to documents that specify – ideally in a complete, precise and variable manner – the requirements, design, behaviour, or other characteristics of a component or system, and often, the procedures for determining whether these provision have been satisfied. Product or service specification is a document that explicitly states essential technical attributes for a product and procedures to determine that the products’ performance meet its requirements or attributes . Firstly, gather and compile every product being produced by the premise or services being offered by the premise. This product or services include both active and non-active products/ services. Then categorise the products or services based on their type. Prepare a product or service description consisting of the following components: • Product or service name o Identify and list generic or common name of products or services • Identify and list the brand name and/ or common name of the individual products • Technical characteristics o For products, this represents the criteria on halal, chemical, biological and physical. o For services, this represents the criteria of the service – nature of services included or offered for example ‘chill temperature storage with sufficient control of humidity, pest and other contaminant to the stored products’. • Process types o Identify and list related processes involved in producing halal products or providing halal services. o For halal product it starts from the selection of ingredients and/or materials and manufacturer for the products to the distribution of finished products. o For services, it starts from the point of defining the services offered to customers to completion of the service. • Storage and/ or temporary holding area for halal product o Identify and list the type of storage, the required condition of the storage, its control measures and the kind of material being stored. • Packaging material, design and packing size for halal product o State the type of packaging material used, from food contact packaging material to carton boxes. o The artwork for each packaging used is based on the available packing size (if applicable). o Packing size available for the products. • Shelf life for halal products o Indicate the appropriate shelf life for the halal product and its storage nature during distribution. Ensure appropriate action is taken to guarantee and demonstrate that the safety and quality of the products is retained throughout the maximum period specified. • Where the halal product will be sold o Identify the point of sale, for example retail outlets, hospitals, pharmacists,

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6.5 Describing the Product and Service

and general stores. • Traceability code o Identify the products or services by referring to the code used for tracking on the materials, processes, and finished products/ services. Ensure and confirm the criteria of the product or services are in compliance with relevant safety and quality requirements. Prepared lists need to be verified by the related department controlling the production or service provider. Developing a Complete List of Materials Associated with Halal Products/ Services. Materials for halal products or services are materials that have direct and indirect associations with the production of halal product or providing halal services. Determining permissible materials to use in the premise to be halal certified or has been halal certified is one of the major critical elements in halal analysis. Therefore, it is essential to include every possible material available. The material categorisations are as listed below: i. For halal products and services • Focus on the main ingredient, materials, and additives. This includes raw materials, ingredients, active ingredients, formulated materials, processed materials, as well as other finished products being used as part of the halal product in production. • Processing aids used in manufacturing halal product; with or without direct contact with the halal end product. • Packaging material that has direct contact with the halal product to the outer packaging of the product. • Care should be taken to ensure every material is listed for every product produced or services provided. ii. Supporting materials either with direct or indirect contact to the production of halal product or when providing halal services • Utensils, devices, equipment and machinery used (directly or indirectly) in producing halal product or providing halal services. Does not only focus on the production area but also include other areas and processes like warehousing, maintenance activity for the equipment and premise, calibration, waste/ sewage area, waste water treatment plant, boiler and cleaning and sanitation. • Materials used to enhance the performance of utensils, devices, equipment and machinery e.g. lubricant, grease, water and air. • Materials and reagents used in the laboratory for chemical, physical, biological and halal analysis or testing. • Cleaning and sanitation materials such as detergents, cleaning chemicals, sanitising agents, and others.


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6.5 Describing the Product and Service

Listing of both categories of materials, be it for halal product/ services or supporting materials, shall include: • Ingredient and material breakdown (for related materials) • Origin of materials • Name of manufacturer and its full address • Name of recognised and valid halal certification body

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6.6 Constructing and Confirming Flow Diagram

Flow diagram is a schematic representation of a process which provides a step-bystep solution to a problem or halal threats. Developing flow diagram for halal products or services should cover both diagram on process and plant layout or schematic plan of the premise. Process flow diagram should identify every step; from receiving to finished product, or from the point service is provided to the end; whereby, all these activities involved are under the control of the company and premise. The process flow diagram should cover from the beginning right up to the end, and should also include the steps before and after processing occurs in the premise. A process flow diagram should be clear, accurate and sufficiently detailed. Process flow diagram should include: • Sequence and interaction of every step in the operation from selection of raw material and supplier to the first level customer. • Introduction of materials (i.e. raw material, ingredient, formulated ingredient, material, active material or ingredients, and additives) and intermediate products into the process flow. • Introduction of product for reworking. The plant layout or plant schematic diagram provides information on potential area for cross-contamination due to non-halal, biological, chemical and physical elements in both the working and ancillary premises. Possible cross-contamination of the areas can be clearly, accurately and sufficiently identified from the plant schematic diagram, which shows information on: • Process – Flow of material and packaging material from receiving to storage of finished products. • Employee – Employee traffic pattern for the entire premise for both movement in processing area and other associate areas, for instance washroom, locker, canteen, praying area, and smoking area. • Waste – Flow of waste and inedible products, which could cause cross-contamination. • Hygiene and Sanitation – Location of hand and/ or boot washing as sanitising installation. • Zoning – Segregation of areas based on non-risk area and risk control area. • Equipment and Machinery – Layout and characteristics of equipment and machinery, including technical parameters of operation such as temperature, time and delays. • Pest Control – Location for traps and baits, and areas for designated type pest control services.


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6.6 Constructing and Confirming Flow Diagram

Both process flow diagram and plant schematic needs to be verified with the current actual situation in the premise. Both diagrams are verified by walking through the premise during operation hours to ensure every step, people, products, waste, zoning, equipment and pest control are included and documented. Note any possible areas for cross contamination during the verification process, and amend any missing or differing information detected. This should be done by IHC members together with the personnel responsible for the related areas. The verified process flow diagram and plant schematic should be endorsed by the IHC and related departments of the establishment.

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6.7 Halal Threat Identification

Halal threats for halal products or services can be identified by using any suitable method to confirms the halal status is genuine and can be proven with reliable and valid documentation. Halal Threats or Halalan-Toyyiban Potential Contaminants Halal threats or halalan-toyyiban contaminants refer to: 1. Mughallazah which is considered as severe najs i.e. dogs and pigs including any liquid and objects discharged from their orifices, descendants and derivatives. It can be used in the form of meat or any other product after going through related processing methods. 2. Mutawassitah which is considered as medium najs. Najs in this category does not fall under severe or light najs. i. Carrion • Carrion refers to halal animals which are not slaughtered according to the Shari’ah law whereby the slaughtering of a halal animal does not comply with the rukun of slaughtering. • Carrion also refers to carcass of non-halal animals. Non-halal animals are divided into land and aquatic animals. • All land animals are halal except najs al-mughallazah and predator animals with sharp teeth and tusk, predator birds, pests and poisonous animals, animals that are forbidden to be killed in Islam, repulsive creature, farmed animals but intentionally and continuously fed with najs, and donkeys and mules of domestic helper. • All aquatic animals are halal except those that are poisonous, intoxicating and hazardous to health, animals that live both in water and on land, and aquatic animals that are fed intentionally and continuously with najs. • Carrion can be in the form of meat or any other products produced after going through related processing methods. ii. Khamar • Khamar is alcoholic beverages. Khamar is either being used in its original form or mixed with other food ingredients or drinks in any amount, or further processed to produce other products such as wine vinegar, colouring and flavouring. • Alcohol produced from alcoholic beverages in brewery production is not permitted to be used as ingredients, processing aids, cleaning and sanitising agents. Note: Use of alcohol produced from non-khamar production is permitted in the production of halal products provided the finished products do not intoxicate consumers. The content limit is set for not more than 0.5% alcohol (v/v). This applies for food colouring and flavouring. iii. Any liquid and objects discharged from the orifices of both human being and animals. This refers to pus, vomit, blood, saliva, and many others.


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6.7 Halal Threat Identification

iv. Any part of human being such as hair, bone, placenta and ovum. v. Plants that are poisonous, hazardous, intoxicating and harmful to human health. vi. Mushrooms that are poisonous, hazardous, intoxicating and harmful to human health. vii. Chemicals and minerals that are poisonous, hazardous, intoxicating and harmful to human health. viii. Genetically modified organism (GMO) with recombinants from non-halal sources (plant or animal). ix. Microorganisms considered as contaminants are genetically modified microorganisms with non-halal organism, microorganism which is a by-product of khamar processing, and microorganisms cultivated from non-halal materials or non-halal additives in the culture broth. 3. Mukhaffafah, which is considered as light najs. The only najs in this category is urine from a baby boy at the age of two years and below, who has not consumed any other food except his mother’s milk. Identifying halal threats using halalan-toyyiban potential contaminants and / or precusor Contaminant means any non-halal or detrimental (mudhorat) substances that are intentionally or unintentionally added, which will render the halal product as nonhalal. Contaminated product means a product has tainted its halal status by a potential contaminant. Halalan stand for things or actions that are permitted or lawful in Islam. It conveys basic meaning and defines the standard of acceptability in accordance to Shari’ah requirements. Toyyiban represents wholesomeness. It complements and perfects the essence (spirit) of the basic standard or minimum threshold (of halal) i.e. hygiene, safety, sanitation, cleanliness, nutrition, risk exposure, environmental, social and other related aspects in accordance to situational or application needs. Halalan-Toyyiban denotes the assurance and guarantee that both aspects of halalan and toyyiban are integrated into a set of holistic and balanced requirements that fulfil the condition, situation or application needs. Identification of Halalan-Toyyiban Potential Contaminants and/ or Precursor Reasons behind identification of halalan-toyyiban potential contaminants and/ or precursor are as follows: • To identify halal threats associated with all stages of production from raw material and ingredient, processing, storage and distribution to the point of consump-

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6.7 Halal Threat Identification

tion for the said halal product. • To evaluate significant halal threats which are likely to cause the product to be non-halal or unsafe i.e. may cause injury or illness if not effectively controlled. Analysis of Halalan-Toyyiban contaminants is the process of collecting and evaluating information on non-halal contaminants and conditions leading to their presence to decide which are significant for halalan-toyyiban assurance and should be addressed in the HAS plan. Significant halal threat (contamination) is a halal threat that is of such a nature that its elimination, control or reduction to a significant level is essential in the production of halal and toyyib products or services. Analysis of Halalan-Toyyiban contaminants must be done on existing product or process type and for each new product, and must be reviewed if any changes are made in raw materials, product formulation, preparation, processing, packaging, and distribution or intended use. Identification of contaminants (halal threats) shall be divided into two (2) categories referring to material and processes. Identification of halal threats shall be based on: • Information collected for material (refer to list of materials) and processes (refer to list of processes in product description, process flow diagram and schematic plant diagram). • Employee knowledge and experience on practical aspect of the premise operation. • Documented production issues reflected on report for production rework, returns, and product complaints and recalls. • External information referring to reference texts, publications relating to halal products or services, national fatwas, halal issues from the Halal Hub webpage or other reliable media and government guidelines. Material Identification for Contaminants Material identification for contaminants (halal threats) shall be based on traceability of the material. Here the focus is on identification of possible halal threats in the main material/ ingredient, additive(s), processing aid and processing technologies involved in producing the material/ ingredient. Steps for identification of material or ingredient for halal products or services: • Identify the origin of each material listed. For formulated material or ingredient, list it based on the material or ingredient breakdown or listing, and identify the origin for each material or ingredient. • Using one material each time, use the appropriate decision tree for material (plant product, animal, microbial and/ or other material). Follow through the questions in the related decision tree. Please refer to Attachment 2.0 Identification of Halal Ingredients and Raw Material.


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6.7 Halal Threat Identification

• The decision tree will assist in identification of the ingredient/ material usage, to determine whether it is a critical point, or non-critical point, or haram. o Critical point – the ingredient/ material requires recognised halal certificate as proof of its halal status. o Non-critical point – the ingredient/ material requires product specification as proof of its halal state. o Haram – use of the ingredient/ material is not permitted and suitable replacement is recommended. • The IHC need to decide which necessary related documents are required to proof the halal status of the ingredient/ material. Related documents refers to either one or combination of these documents: o Halal certificate from local or foreign certification body recognised by JAKIM; o Product specification from original manufacturer detailing ingredient breakdown; o Process flow diagram from original manufacturer detailing information of the process and ingredient/ material used; and/ or o Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) from the original manufacturer detailing breakdown of the ingredient/ material. Process(s) Identification for Contaminants Identification for contaminants (halal hazards) in processes shall be based on the Halalan-Toyyiban Risk Management Plan (HTRMP)2. The halal threats are evaluated based on the likelihood and severity/ impact of occurrence of the potential halal threats and/or precursor. The analysis shall be recorded. Please refer to Attachment, Table 15: Example of Halalan Toyibban Control Point Analysis Worksheet. Steps for processes analysis are: a. List one process step in column 1. • Refer to the validated process flow diagram for related processes involved. b. List potential contaminant(s)/ precursor for halalan control point and toyyiban control point in column 2 in halalan-toyyiban control point analysis worksheet. • Consider every potential significant halal hazard related to the process in question. • The types of contaminant are non-halal, biological, chemical and physical. • Hazards may come from several sources, therefore the following needs to be considered: o Hazards from the ingredient/ material used o The severity and likelihood of their occurrence o The level that could cause adverse effect of halal and safety status o The condition that could lead to unacceptable levels • Note that: o Halalan control point refers to non-halal hazards. o Toyibban control point refers to chemical, biological and physical hazards

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6.7 Halal Threat Identification

similar to HACCP hazard analysis. If the company is already certified and implementing HACCP, then chemical, biological and physical hazard need not be checked again. c. Provide the rationale for inclusion or exclusion of a potential contaminant/ precursor in column 3. • The reasoning behind inclusion and exclusion is based on the evaluation regarding the extent of the hazard and its severity impact on the product to be produced for consumers. • Example: Process: o Glazing of cake/ bakery products Halal Threat: o Use of brush made of animal bristles to glaze cake/ bakery products Rationale: o To include as halal threats because use of brushes made of animal bristles are prohibited in the production of halal certified products. d. Identify the significant of the halal threats based on analysis on the likelihood and severity of the halal threats. • Likelihood refers to the reasonably likely probability for the occurrence of halal threats. Identification is based on experience, illness data, scientific report and other reliable information. • Severity refers to the magnitude of the halal threats/ degree of consequences (risks) that can result when a halal threat exist. o Consequences refer to probability of an adverse effect i.e. cause product to become non-halal and unsafe for consumption or use. Levels of severity are critical, moderate and low. • Using Table 10: Halalan Toyibban (HT) Control Point Likelihood Ranking for Likelihood, decide the level of occurrence for the listed process regarding halalan control point in column 4. Then use able 11 and Table 12 for Halalan and Toyibban Control Point Severity and Impact Ranking to decide the level of severity/ impact for the halalan control point in column 4. • Using Table 13 for Halalan and Toyyiban Control Point Risk Matrix, get the matrix number and refer to Table 4 for Halalan-Toyyiban Decision Rules for risk ranking in column 4.


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e. Identify and list possible sufficient control measures for the identified halal hazards in column 5. • Control measures refer to any actions or activities required to control safety and/ or eliminate halal threats. • Control measures are used to: o Prevent contamination o Prevent level increase o Assure adequate reduction o Prevent recontamination o Prevent dissemination (spread) • Control measures shall be monitored at intervals and documented, provide corrective action, validated and verified. • Halal threats are controlled through training, procedures, equipment cleaning, inspection, and others. • Example: o Measurable parameter e.g. level of voltage/ pressure for stunning and bleeding time for birds – monitoring shall be documented. o Subjective parameter that must be supported by standards e.g. for slaughtering process, checking of slaughtered animal and ritual cleansing process. f. Repeat the process for toyyiban control point.

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6.8 Determining Halal Control Point (HCP)

Halal Control Points (HCP) are points of control determined throughout the whole halal supply chain, which if identified, controlled and monitored can eliminate the possibility of halalan and toyyiban threats. The identified significant halalan and toyyiban threats may give rise to one or more HCP. Factors that may affect HCP in the halal supply chain if and when there are changes in the plant layout, formulation, process flow, equipment, ingredient selection and prerequisite programme. For example, from Table 15, column 6, the status of the identified significant halalan-toyyiban hazard (column 5) is determined whether or not it is a HCP, with reference to the Table 4.


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6.9 Establishment of Criteria Limit for Halal Control Point (HCP)

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Critical limit refers to the maximum or minimum value to which a halalan-toyyiban threats must be controlled at Halal Control Point (HCP) to prevent, eliminate or reduce the occurrence of the identified halalan-toyyiban threats to an acceptable level. In simpler explanation: • Critical limit is criteria which separates acceptability and unacceptability. • Critical limit is the tolerance range for the identified HCP. • If critical limits are exceeded, halal integrity of the product or service is violated may deem the product non-halal. • Applied at each HCP. • Critical limit is based on science, measurable and easy to monitor. Example: Measurable Critical Limit for animal stunning: Type of stock

Weight (kg)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Duration (s)

Chicken

2.40 - 2.70

0.20 - 0.60

2.50 - 10.50

3.00 - 5.00

Bull

300 - 400

2.50 - 3.50

300 - 310

3.00 - 5.00

NOTE: Electrical current, voltage and duration to be determined and validated by the organisation, taking into account the type and weight of the animal and other varying factors. • The limits and values must meet halal standards requirements, fatwas issued by the National Fatwa Council, legislations relating to the product, published data, actual experience or collected data from planned experiments conducted in-house or supplier data and expert advice i.e. consultant. • The limits and values must be validated. • Monitoring and action must be established for non-conformities.


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6.10 Establishment of Monitoring System

In order to ensure HCP are within the set limit, a monitoring programme shall be established. A monitoring system for HCP is important because: • It can be used to track system operation, process and trend • It is able to provide immediate feedback so that action can be taken efficiently • It allows corrective action to be taken to bring the process back under control before process non-conformance occur • If control limit is exceeded, action can be taken to identify the lot and also to isolate the lot • It produces accurate records for use in verification. A monitoring programme focuses on the ‘what’, ‘how’, ‘when’, ‘who’, and ‘where’ • What and where will be monitored? (some in the of form measurement, inspection or testing) o The team need to determine the parameters to be monitored, other specific information, and data analysis required to adequately measure compliance with critical limit. o The team also need to identify the location or point the monitoring should be placed. o Example: Purchase of every ingredient which has been identified as critical and semi critical shall be from approved halal supplier, and must include documents to verify the halal status of the ingredient/ material in question. • How to monitor? (by measurement through analysis, inspection on availability of halal verification document) o The team need to decide what method to use for monitoring. o This method must be able assessable based on reliability. o Determine what record to use for data recording to prove compliance to defined requirements. • When and what frequency to monitor? o The team need to determine if monitoring should be done continuously, noncontinuously or intermittently. o Sufficient monitoring frequency indicates that potential hazard is under control. The number of monitoring frequency decided must be assessed. • Who will monitor? o Clearly identify the person responsible who will be directly involved in the process. o The appointed person must possess required skill and knowledge. o The appointed person must understand the purpose and importance of monitoring. o The appointed person must be responsible to sign and date records. o The appointed person must be one who has been trained, is unbiased and diligent in performing the task. o The appointed person shall be provided with sufficient tools.


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6.10 Establishment of Monitoring System

o The appointed person shall immediately record data. o The appointed person shall still record data even when critical limit is not met, and able to take corrective action when non-conformities occur. Example with halal ingredients: What

Halal status of materials

How

Ensuring complete analysis is done (Halal Analysis Documentation) and sufficient halal documentation is received from the manufacturer or recognised Islamic bodies (i.e. JAKIM, JAIN, recognised foreign halal certification bodies)

When

Change of supplier, material, process and technology

Who

IHC Leader or Committee Member

Where

1. Selection of supplier/ material 2. Purchase of ingredients/ materials – normal and especially in emergency/ waived situations 3. Delivery of ingredients/materials at premise

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6.11 Corrective Actions for Non-Conformance

Corrective action is action taken to rectify and correct the deviation (loss of control) which occurs at HCP. Every corrective action shall be recorded. The aims of corrective actions are: • To readjust process to bring non-conformity back to normal state • To prevent halalan-toyyiban hazards product from reaching end users or consumers • To prevent reoccurrence of the event • Corrective action activities are as follows: o Use monitoring results to adjust process to maintain control o Deal with products of non-conformance o Identify and correct cause of non-conformance o Maintain and verify records of corrective actions taken • Preventive actions are actions taken to eliminate the cause of potential nonconformities (reoccurrence of deviation in implementing and monitoring HCP), which is appropriate to probable impact. Preventive actions are as follows: o Identify potential non-conformance(s) and their causes o Evaluate need for action o Determine and implement action o Record results and action taken o Review effectiveness of preventive action It is very important to have a person responsible for adjusting the process or informing the appropriate person (IHC) when non-conformance occur at HCP. This person should be a person with knowledge regarding HCP, and must be given the authority to make an immediate decision so that control of the line operation is maintained. Failure at a HCP may cause products to become non-halal and may also cause injury


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6.12 Establishing Verification Procedures

Verification is the use of methods or procedures in addition to those used in monitoring to determine if the halal assurance system is in compliance or if the system needs modification and revalidation2. Verification is required to: • Meet the purpose of HAS Plan, which is to prevent halalan-toyyiban hazards. • Check the implementation and effectiveness of HAS. • Provide assurance that the HAS plan is: o Based on Shari’ah and scientific principles o Adequate to control halalan-toyyiban hazards associated with the product and process o Being followed Verification is done on: • Significant halalan-toyyiban hazards and preventive or control measures; • Halal critical limits, which are sufficient to guaranty halal integrity • Monitoring procedures to confirm effectiveness • Corrective actions to ensure they are appropriate The activities relating to verification are: • Management Review • Review of HAS Plan • Spot check/ audit • Laboratory testing • Review of records • Calibration of equipment An internal verification process includes: • New halal non-compliance issues pertaining to materials or recognised Islamic bodies • Changes in process and equipment • Premise relocation. Verification process validates the following: • Technical data e.g. material production processes taken from reliable journals and scientific literature • History and trends of results and records relating to halal monitoring; • End-product testing • Complaints from customers

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6.13 Establishing Documentation System and Records

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Efficient and accurate documentation system and management of records is essential in ensuring the effective implementation of HAS. This is because documentation and records can be used as: • Reference to trace the production history of a finished product or service • Tools to alert the personnel in the processing area to the potential problems before it surpasses the critical limit • Evidence that proper procedures are being followed The type of documentation and records required for HAS are: 1. Supporting document for developing HAS manual o Information and data used in establishing HCP and its critical limits • Summary of halal threats analysis, including the rationale for determining the halal threats and control measures. • Data used to establish control measures to prevent product from becoming haram. • Data used to established the adequacy of critical limits in ensuring the halal status of the products or services. o The written HAS plan and system which support its implementation • List of IHC and IHC TOR. • Description of the food, its processes and equipment involved in producing it. • Verified flow diagram. • HAS plan summary table. 2. o o o

Records generated by the HAS system Monitoring records for all HCP. Deviation and corrective action records. Verification or validation records.

3. o o o

Documentation of methods and procedures used Description of the monitoring system for HCP identified. Description of record keeping procedures. Description of verification and validation procedures.

4. Records of employee training programme o Training schedule, content and assessment for IHC and personnel involved in establishing, implementing and monitoring HAS. 5. Other related documentation and records o Management Review and IHC Meetings.


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6.13 Establishing Documentation System and Records

Control of Documents Standardised documents and record forms must be established and utilised. Procedures need to be in place to ensure that: 1. Documents are adequate for use. 2. Relevant documents are available at point of use. 3. Document are legible and readily identifiable. 4. Complete documents are filed appropriately. 5. Documents are reviewed and updated necessarily. 6. Obsolete documents are not used. Review of records Records generated by HAS plan which is being used to monitor implementation of HAS should be reviewed on a routine basis. Personnel responsible to review these records shall be trained and must be a responsible individual. At the completion of the review and reconciliation of any deficiencies, this person will initiate the HAS records. The review is required to ensure completeness of halal threat control, meeting the critical limits and taking proper corrective action.

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7. Management of Product Recall and Complaints

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The halal market is expanding very rapidly and halal issues are a serious matter to Muslim consumers in choosing the right eating establishment. Halal food means food and beverages and/ or their ingredients that are permitted under the Shari’ah law and fulfil the certain condition as stated in (MS 1500). Complaints associated with halal food can occur when there are any criteria of the products or services provided did not follow the halal requirements and deviates any law and consumer right. There are many types of customer complaints apart from complaining about damaged and unsatisfactory goods. Consumer complaints might be about: • Halal issue – contains or contaminated with haram substances • Packaging problem • No expiry date • Delay in providing the goods • Poor taste, appearance, and texture • Unwanted materials found with product Classification of Complaint When a complaint is received, the key personnel (QA/QC/Halal Executive) shall investigate the complaint according to several classification. The following classification can be general guidelines. Some halal-related complaints can become serious depending on the nature of the product and the main root cause. Classifications Complaints Critical

• Containing any parts of animals that are non-halal or not slaughtered according to Shari’ah law. • Containing ‘najs’. • Unsafe, poisonous, intoxicating or hazardous to health. • Prepared, processed or manufactured using equipment contaminated with ‘najs’. • Containing human parts or its derivatives that are not permitted. • Food preparation, processing, handling, packaging, storage and distribution share the same facility and room that does not meet the halal requirements or any other things that have been decreed as ‘najs’ by the Shari’ah law.

Serious

• Improper equipment cleaning, dirty premise, use of broken and rusty equipment, presence of unknown materials on-site, delays in renewing halal certification

Not serious

• Quality issue – bad shape, uneven size, lack of information

Table 6: Classification of Complaint


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7. Management of Product Recall and Complaints

Handling Customer Complaints Complaint is part of the process of internal improvement. When a complaint is received, the person in charge shall follow procedure to handle the situation. The right approach to handling customer complaint is not only to calm the customer but also to provide good image to the company. Below are common steps how to react when receiving customer complaint: Receive and Classify Figure 1: Receiving Customer Complain

Acknowledge Investigate

Resolve and Confirm

Respond to Customer

Follow up

QA & Halal Leader Close Brief Step of Complaint Management Receiving Complaints and Acknowledgement • Key personnel, or their authorised representative, who received the customer’s complaint (by any means e.g. letter, e-mail, telephone, fax or in person), is required to record the complaint in the Customer Complaint Record and also acknowledge relevant department. • Complaints that are halal-related are channelled to the IHC while safety or quality issues are channelled to the Quality Assurance (QA) Department. • If the key personnel is unable to resolve the problems or complaints, he/ she shall refer the matter to the Managing Director for his attention. Investigation, Analysis and Corrective Action • The key personnel shall be responsible in liaison with the relevant Head of Department in investigating the root cause of non-conformance or complaint and record the root status. • Together, they are to analyse materials, all processes, work operations and system operations, raw materials, halal certificate, and distribution channels to de-

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7. Management of Product Recall and Complaints

tect the cause of non-conformances. • The key personnel shall initiate corrective/ preventive actions to deal with the non-conformity and record the corrective/ preventive action. • The relevant Head of Department shall be responsible in replying to the customer’s complaint immediately together with any corrective/ preventive actions taken. Resolve and Confirm • It is the responsibility of the IHC Chairperson to ensure that the final resolution is clear and fair. Also confirm the proposed action and resolution with another relevant department. • The completed Corrective Action Request Form is to be kept by the key personnel and filed in such a manner as to be easily retrievable upon request. • All corrective and prevenyive action stated by the related department especially halal department shall be adhered to and be reviewed by QA Executive. • Any changes resulting from the corrective and prevenyive action affecting the procedure shall follow the document changes and modification in the Document and Data Control Procedure. Respond to Customer • After the issue has been resolved, the key personnel shall provide the customer with the resolution within the timescales promised. • The details of the findings and proposed resolution should be clearly explained (in written or verbal form as appropriate) to the customer – within the agreed timescales. • If this cannot be done on time the customer should be contacted by telephone to request further time. Follow Up • Once the complaint is settled, it is advisable that complaints are followed up to confirm that customers are satisfied with the response given. • The follow up should identify the following: o Is the customer satisfied with the response? o Did they feel that their complaint was properly and fairly handled? Close • Outcomes from the follow up can be used for final decision to close the issue. • The status of the outcomes shall be kept properly and stored at a suitable place. Incident Management The concept of halalan-toyyiban is a combination of merely means allowed and permissible for consumption with relation to Shari’ah law as long as they are safe and not harmful. The Arabic word “toyyiban” can be described as good, hygienic and safe for consumption.


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Improper control of halal food production especially when incidents occur can change the halal status of a product to haram. Production under extreme condition, for instance during water shortage, blackout, fire or natural disaster may lead to the product being produced in low quality and unsafe conditions. It is part of the halal system to ensure element of ‘toyyiban’ remain under control to ensure the final product meets halal specification, is of high quality and safely produced. There are several incidents that may occur anytime during production hour. Because of this, companies shall have proper incident management procedure that can be implemented should the need arise. Normally incidents can be classifies into several issues as follows: No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Class of Incidents Fire Power Shortage Water Shortage Machine Breakdown Natural Disaster Vehicle Accident during Shipment Malicious Contamination or Sabotage Staff Availability Communication Breakdown

Brief procedure according to defiend class A. Fire • Stop all working process. Switch off all machineries, gas and steamers. Open all emergency doors, and workers must walk out of the building calmly according to designated emergency flow plan. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR, even if available. • Assemble at the gate near guard house according to department. • Extinguish minor fire incident with the fire extinguisher or equipment provided. At the same time, contact the Fire Department (BOMBA). • After the event, evaluate affected products. • Put aside affected or contaminated products. Record all necessary information concerning the products. All affected products shall be disposed of, while ambiguous products shall be evaluated (lab test) before use. B. Power Shortage • In the event of a power shortage, the supervisor shall take the responsibility to switch off all electrical equipment. Equipment or machines with emergency power supply shall also be switched off accordingly. • Maintenance personnel shall check the root cause of power shortage. If the power shortage cannot be identified or caused by problematic main cable, contact Tenaga National Berhad (TNB).

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• Make sure all doors to cold rooms, freezers and chillers remain closed during the power shortage to retain the temperature. • If power shortage lasts more than 24 hours, it is a must to rent an external cold room, and all products must be relocated to the new cold room within the next 24 hours. C. Water Shortage • In the event of a water shortage, the water reservoir in the premise is sufficient for two hours usage. • If water shortage lasts more than two hours, production must be halted. D. Equipment and machines breakdown • Equipment and machines that failed to operate or breakdowns are put aside for maintenance. Supervisor shall report the damages to Production Executive or Production Manager. Maintenance personnel (internal or external) will service/ or fix the affected equipment and machines. • Should the breakdown occur during production, the supervisor shall inform the Production Executive. If breakdown lasts more than two hours, all unprocessed products shall continue using different equipment, or on other production line, or be kept in the cold room in an airtight container. • If cold rooms and freezers breakdown for more than two hours all goods contained must be transferred to other available cold rooms or freezer. E. Natural Disaster • In the event of a flood, all goods from the ground floor shall be removed to higher level, and products will be evaluated. All affected products shall be disposed of, while ambiguous products shall be evaluated (lab test) before use. • In the event of other natural disasters, all workers must stop working. If possible, switch off all machineries, gas and steamers. Open all emergency doors, and workers must walk out of the building calmly according to designated emergency flow plan. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR. Assemble at the gate near the guard house according to department. Contact emergency numbers and wait for further instruction from the officials. F. Vehicle accident (during shipment) • Quarantine products from the vehicle upon return from the scene of the accident. • QA Executive to verify the condition of affected goods. • Damaged products must be disposed of. • Broken seal products shall subject to repacking. • Products still in good condition can be used as is. G. Cold truck breakdown: • If an equipment failure or other delay occurs, the driver should immediately call the 24-hour phone number provided by the transport company. • Ensure both consignee and consignors are notified of the problem, either personally or via appropriate company procedure. The consignors shall back up with other cold truck vehicle while vehicle breakdown is repaired. • Implement contingency plans and keep all parties informed of progress.


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H. • • • • • • •

Malicious contamination or sabotage Quarantine those suspicious products and keep away from production area. Identify affected goods clearly and secure from any unauthorised access. QA Executive to verify the safeness of goods by sending out for laboratory testing and/ or visual inspection. The Food Safety Team shall investigate the root cause of contamination or sabotage and determine the disposition method of affected goods. Goods deemed unsafe for consumption shall be disposed of immediately and appropriately. Discipline actions shall be taken by the top management against the culprit of sabotage. The Food Safety Team shall take corrective actions to prevent recurrence of such incident.

I. Staff Availability • In the event of key staff absence such as Production HOD, QA/QC, CCP or OPRP monitoring operators, there shall be arrangement for another staff to cover key staff’s responsibilities at the workplace. • Refer to the company’s organisational chart for backup staff arrangement, and job descriptions for detail of staff responsibilities. • Each staff is responsible to inform their superior on their planned and unplanned absenteeism from work in advance. J. Communication Plan • If the incidents and potential emergency situations are going to have impact on food safety, legality, regulatory compliance or quality, product recall is to be triggered. • Product recall shall be in accordance to procedure of recall plan set up by company. • Necessary information such as batch/ lot affected shall be communicated to customers, consumers and regulatory authorities in a timely manner by company’s Product Recall Team (PRT). Handling Non-Conformance Products The organisation shall ensure that product which does not conform to product requirements is identified and controlled to prevent its unintended use or delivery. A documented procedure shall be established to define the controls and related responsibilities and authorities for dealing with non-conforming product. Where applicable, the organisation shall deal with non-conforming product by one or more of the following ways: a) Take necessary action to eliminate the detected non-conformity b) By authorising its use, release or acceptance under concession by a relevant authority and, where applicable, by the customer c) Take action to preclude its original intended use or application d) Take action to appropriate to the effects, or potential effects, of the non-confor-

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7. Management of Product Recall and Complaints

mity when non-conforming product is detected after delivery or use has started Non-Conforming Products • Any non-conforming incoming material shall be immediately identified and segregated. The discrepancy shall be clearly documented and the cause investigated. • When non-conforming product is corrected it shall be subject to re-verification to demonstrate conformity to the requirements. • Records of the nature of non-conformities and any subsequent actions taken, including concessions obtained, shall be maintained • In-process products and finished products not meeting specifications shall be clearly labelled and held in a separate quarantine area until the discrepancy has been investigated and resolved. The results are documented in the Batch Records and other relevant forms or reports. Brief Step to Handle Non-Conforming Items 1. When non-conforming products are detected or found, the department supervisor shall inform their head of department immediately. 2. The non-conforming products shall be clearly identified and quarantined as appropriate. 3. The department supervisor shall investigate the root cause of the non-conformant. Depending on the magnitude of the problem, QA Manager shall shut down the production to ensure that non-conforming products are not produced or processed. 4. The supervisor shall be responsible in ensuring that the non-conforming products are segregated from those that conform to the requirements. 5. The QA Manager shall evaluate and confirm the non-conformance, investigate the causes and take steps to correct them. 6. With assistance from the Heads of Department, the non-conforming raw products or finished product shall be reviewed before deciding on the disposition. 7. Where required in the contract, the company shall report the disposition of nonconformance to the customer for concession. 8. Raw materials or packaging materials from sub-contractors shall be returned to them by the purchasing and store department. Normally, the sub-contractor will replace these items. 9. The functional Head of Department shall ensure that corrective action is taken to avoid similar occurence of the non-conformances. 10. They shall work together with the responsible department to check that the corrective action implemented is effective in improving the product quality, safety, legality and statutory compliance.


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7. Management of Product Recall and Complaints

Disposition of Non-Conforming Products Disposition of non-conforming materials and products shall be documented, and include the justification for the use or rework of any non-conforming product after cause of non-conformance is determined and the authorisation for use is approved. The decision to use, rework or reject a non-conforming material and product is made by the QA Manager. Standard operating procedure for rework, retesting and re-evaluation of the non-conforming product has been established to ensure that the product meets its current approved specifications. The disposition can be as follows: a. Reworked to meet specified requirements, b. Accepted with or without reprocessing by concession; or c. Rejected or scrapped. When non-conforming product is corrected, it shall be subject to re-verification to demonstrate conformity to the requirements. Records of the nature of non-conformities and any subsequent actions taken, including concessions obtained, shall be maintained.

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Purpose The purpose of the traceability provisions is to assist in targeted and accurate withdrawals and to give information to control officials in the event of food safety problems, thereby avoiding the potential for wider disruption. Traceability and the food industry can never be separated. Traceability promotes transparency along the supply chain which reduces the potential of product recalls as well as liability claims towards the manufacturers. Traceability is also a communication and tracking mechanism to ensure information is accessible along the supply chain especially when dealing with halal certified products. The traceability system being implemented in the food industry ranges from a basic manual documentation system which stores all the relevant information along the supply chain to a more complicated system using information technology software and tools. Maintaining halal traceability is a challenge faced by most of food manufacturer or foodservice operator who do not have any food safety systems in place. Some of the ingredients known as naturally produced might not have proper identification of halal status and it will create room for argument in case any issues crop up. Benefits By implementing a halal traceability system, it will benefit both the producer or foodservice operator and the consumer. The use of traceability system in the company will help reduce cost by reducing time spent if and when a problem occurs as time spent to trace and track the cause of the problem would be greatly reduced. It will also help save the producer’s cost, time and energy to withdraw product that has been sent to market. From the customer perspective, the company have taken responsibility to ensure products manufactured meets halal requirements and to take immediate action once any materials or practices that are non-conforming are identified. Consumers these days are more educated and are more concerned about the halal integrity of the products they buy, hence producers and service providers must take all the necessary precautions in order to safeguard their consumers’ needs. Traceability Chain Any traceability system normally involves several departments. The product itself went through several departments before reaching its final product stage, such as the purchasing, warehousing, production, quality assurance, and transportation departments.


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8. Traceability

Each department play important roles to ensure halal traceability system is in place and effective. Generally, every department has specific tasks relating to materials they handle, as elaborated below: Table 7: Roles in Halal Traceability System

Department

Function in Halal Traceability System

Purchasing

− Ensure raw materials are supplied by reliable supplier. − Request for halal certificate upon purchased materials. − Keep proper record of the supplier e.g. invoice, delivery order.

Storage/ Warehouse

− Ensure raw materials received are in good condition, clean, wand ithout any haram source or contaminated with najs, blood, and chemical. − Keep raw material products according to FIFO system, and clearly labelled with receiving and expiry dates.

Production

− Ensure the lot/ batch number of raw materials are recorded in the production checklist or lot traveller. − Ensure workers use raw materials according to FIFO system. − Ensure product labeling have complete information as required by the local authority, e.g. net weight, expiry date, ingredients, batch number, instructions for storage and use, etc.

IHC

− Lead all traceability system relating to halal. − Effectively communicate with all departments when any new products are introduced into the halal system.

R&D

− Ensure all materials used for R&D are halal certified. − Properly keep and label new raw materials used for R&D.

Halal traceability can be integrated with any existing systems that have a traceability system in place. This will help reduce the variety, increase effectiveness, save cost and materials of implementation. An effective traceability system in the halal food industry and supply chain needs to be reviewed periodically to ensure relevance to current situation. Traceability enables industry to trace and track important information at all stages of production and enables reduced product recalls and the number of non-compliance cases discovered by the authorities or internal monitoring team that could result in a negative impact to the growth of the industry. Implementation of halal traceability shall be in conjunction with other procedures such as withdrawal and recall procedures.

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8. Traceability

Procedure to Conduct Traceability System Incoming 1. The storekeeper shall receive raw materials from the vendor at the manufacturing establishment. 2. The storekeeper and purchaser shall confirm the quantity and correct items received against the document (delivery order or purchase order) as per the Inspection Plan and will acknowledge the receipt of goods in good condition by signing on the document. 3. Should there be any discrepancies, the storekeeper will either hold or send the material back to the vendor and issue a “Goods Return Notes”. 4. All incoming inspection results shall be recorded in Incoming RM/ PM Checklist for the following criteria: • Temperature (frozen and chilled materials only) • Appearance (packaging material: wording, colour, arrangement) • Weight • Expiry Date (raw materials only) • Batch Number • Characteristics • Valid Halal logo (recognised by JAKIM) • Clean and not contaminated with unlawful substances as precribed by Shari’ah law. 5. The storekeeper will then arrange the materials in the store. Their original packaging materials will identify the materials in the store. 6. The quantity of materials received will be updated to the individual stock card. 7. Where appropriate, the material shall be kept in their original packaging box/ bag and stored at their respective locations by the storekeeper. 8. If there is any discrepancy, the storekeeper shall submit their feedback to QA who will then liaise with the vendor for the next course of action. Meanwhile, the rejected material shall be put on hold. In-process control 1. Each production lot is accompanied by a Lot Traveller. 2. The raw material used for each lot can be traced on the Delivery Order number under “Raw Material Traceability” section of the Lot Traveller. 3. Upon receipt of materials from the store, the production personnel shall proceed with the processing of product. 4. The lot traveller (under In-process Traceability section) shall be filled up by the responsible supervisors. 5. All documentation will be done by the Production Executive. 6. At every process, the processed material and those awaiting for processing should be clearly segregated and identified as “Done” or “Not Done” respectively. Where the status “Done” or “Not Done” is obvious, identification is not required. 7. The person responsible for each process should complete all his work in a daily basis so as to avoid wastage. 8. At every process, rejects should be clearly segregated from parts.


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8. Traceability

9. Reworked goods are to be traced back to the original batch and indicated in the Lot Traveller. 10. Rework can only be done after confirmation that this does not affect the safety, regulatory or legal status of the finished product, e.g. ingredients declaration, allergy information or identity preservation, and nutritional labelling as required by regulations. 11. Non-conforming products shall be segregated in the container identified as “Rejects�. 12. Upon completion of every process, the rejected materials will be collected and the operators concerned shall record the quantity of rejects in the Lot Traveller. 13. The operators concerned shall then dispose of the rejected materials. Packing 1. The product will be packed according to procedure. 2. The batch number and expiry date will be indicated on the product packaging material for traceability purposes. Finished Goods Store 1. The finished goods shall be properly identified and segregated according to product types in the cold room. 2. Finished Products without any identification codes are not allowed to be released for sale and distribution. 3. New finished goods will be placed behind/ beneath older stock in cold storage. It will be based on a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) basis. 4. Periodic stock reconciliation should be performed comparing the actual and recorded stocks. All significant stock discrepancies should be subjected to investigations as a check against inadvertent mix-ups and wrong issues. Delivery 1. The marketing department will issue a delivery order to the storekeeper who will issue out the products from the storage according to the delivery order. 2. After issuance of the products, the store shall update the stock card for traceability purposes.

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Conclusion

There is no short cut in ensuring the halal status of product or services are maintained. Continuous effort from every involved personnel in the premise is required to ensure the effective implementation of the halal assurance management system, and thus requires effective identification of halal threats, and its controls and monitoring system and verification processes.


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Attachment for Terms of Reference

1. Elements for Halal Requirements

Table 8:Details for Halal Requirement

Elements

Halal Requirements

Premise

Location: • Away from processing plant / or premise processing non halal products • Effective control measure to prevent contamination from non halal, chemical, biological and physical. Premise Compound Area • Free from presence of non halal materials i.e. • Free from presence of pest and non halal animals Layout and Process Flow For Hotel’s Kitchen • No non halal contamination risk between halal certified and non halal certified kitchen • No sharing or cross process flow for halal and non halal kitchen facilities • Not facing toilets cubicle directly • Have two doors Segregation for Kitchen Hotels • Physically separated and proper segregated between halal and non halal kitchen process flow • Separated receiving, preparation, cooking, garnishing, serving and washing area for halal and non halal ready to eat food and/ or drinks • No premise in hotels serving porcine base dish or cuisine Working Area • Sufficient working area for workers at processing area Facilitation (structure) • Material not made of non halal material Religious Deity • Not in area involve in processing from incoming of material to finished product storage

Utilities (water, air, gas, compressed air, ice)

Design Construction And Maintenance of Equipment • Use of non halal ingredients for equipment or processing aids. • Example filter for water i.e activated carbon from animal base- bone charred

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Equipment

• Material made of no non halal material i.e conveyor belt of animal skin • Lubricant made of halal materials with sufficient supporting documents • In the case of contamination with naj al mughallazah : o To conduct a ritual cleansing procedure or known as de bargh o The process shall be supervised and verified by religious officer o Proper documentation of the cleansing ritual conducted o The cleansed processing line shall never revert to producing non Halal products

Maintenance

• Material and process do not introduce non halal materials into the premise. • Refer to personnel section on control of non halal materials for visitors and external contractors

Staff Facilities

• Providing special area for staff: o Praying area o Changing area o Eating area

Housekeeping And Hygiene

• Ensure premise / production area/ building are free from najs materials like pest dropping, body of death pest i.e. roaches, flies, ants • Ensuring all equipment are free from najs • Conducting ritual cleansing and its requirements are in place and properly documented

Waste/ Waste Disposal

• Efficient control as to prevent waste from contaminating materials, processes, equipment, personnel and finished products

Pest Control

• Prevent pest from contaminating products or services as pest are najs

Storage And Transport

• Personnel do not bring in non halal materials in the storage area • Storage area is dedicated for halal materials only

Product Control

• Handling requirement of material which are non halal to be used as ingredients and packaging • Established control of no conforming products for non halal contamination • Laboratory testing for halal material, packaging and finished products.

Process Control

• Established on maintaining halal integrity of products and / services through the entire process from receiving of materials to finished products


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Attachment for Terms of Reference

Personnel

Training • Training for IHC o Basic Halal and Haram in Islam, o Requirement of halal certification based on Halal standards, regulatory and customer requirements o Halal Assurance System: • Halal Policy and Objective • Halal Critical Point Analysis, Control Measures, Monitoring, Verification, Corrective Action and Validation • Halal Internal Audit • IHC Meeting • Management Review • Training for company staff o Implementation of Halal requirements o Company’s Halal Policy and Objective o Handling monitoring, corrections and corrective actions for HCP • Assessment shall be done for both group (IHC and Personnel) • Document shall be maintained for training material and training records attended. • Refreshing course shall be conducted : o Slaughtering house yearly o Halal Food and drinks, Cosmetic and Toiletries, Pharmaceuticals and Logistics once every 2 years

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2. Identification of Halal Ingredients and Raw Material Figure 2: Identification of Plant Product

PLANT PRODUCTS

Plant Products

Is there any further processing?

NO

Non Critical Point

YES

Does processing involved microbial cultivation?

YES

NO

Khamr Fermentation

Is there any addition of additives and /or Processing Aids?

YES

NO

NO

YES

HARAM

Critical Point

Non Critical Point

Are additives and /or Processing Aids associated with halal threats?

Non Critical Point

YES

Critical Point


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Figure 3: Identification of Animal Product

ANIMAL PRODUCTS

Animal Products

Milk, Egg, Fish

Meat & by Products (Fat, Bone, Skin,etc)

Any processing

Are meat and by products from halal animals?

YES

NO

HARAM

Critical Point

HARAM

NO

YES

Is slaughtering of animal in compliance with Shariah Law and have Malaysia Halal Certification?

NO

YES

Further Processing

HARAM

YES

Critical Point

NO

Non Critical Point


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Attachment for Terms of Reference

Figure 4: Identification of Microbial Product

MICROBIAL PRODUCTS

Microbial products

Critical Point

Figure 5: Identification of Other Materials

OTHER MATERIALS

Other Materials

Mining Minerals

Synthetics

Mixed

Non Critical Point

Critical Point Non Organic

Does it contain food additives?

Organic

Critical Point

YES

NO

Critical Point

Non Critical Point


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Attachment for Terms of Reference

Table 9: Halal Identification of Ingredients and Material.

Product Part 1 i. What is the source of the ingredient/ food additives/ processing aids in question? • Go to part 2 for animal sources • Go to part 3 for plant sources • Go to part 4 for microbiological sources • Go to part 5 for alkohol/ alcoholic beverages • Go to part 6 for mineral and chemical sources • Go to part 7 for Product Specification • Go to part 8 for Recognized Islamic Bodies Part 2 i. Is the animal source from Halal or Haram type of animal? A. Haram animal - Go to Question 2ii. B. Halal animal - Go to Question 2iii. ii. Is it a source from pig and / or dogs and other non halal animals? A. Yes - Not allowed to use in halal products. Change to halal animal. Proceeed to next new ingredients. iii. Is the animal being slaughtered according to shariah requirement? A. Yes - Must be supported with Halal Certificate from recognized Islamic Bodies. Go to part 8. B. No - change animal slaughtering method. Proceed with next ingredients. iii. Is food aditive or processing aids used to produce the ingredient? A. Yes - go to Part 1 for additive traceability. B. No- Proceed with the next new ingredient. Part 3 i. Is the ingredient made of hazardous, poisonous and intoxicating plant? A. Yes . Go to question 3ii. A. No. Go to question 3iii ii. Can and has the hazardous and or poisonous material or element been removed from the plant? A. Yes -Go to question 3iii. B. No - Change source of material . The material is not allowed to be used in halal products. Proceed to next new ingredient. iii. Is there any food additives and or processing aids used to produce the ingredients? A. Yes - Go to Part 1 for additive traceability. Need Supporting document - product specification stating the type of plant used. B. No - Need supporting document - Product specification stating the type of plant.Proceed to next new ingredient.

Materials

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Part 4 i. Is the ingredient source from microorganism? A. Yes. Go to Question 4 ii. ii. Is the microorganism (refers to yeast) is had been used in a brewery production for producing alcoholic beverages? A. Yes. The microorganism is not permitted to use. Change ingredient. Proceed to the next ingredient. B. No. Go to question 4 iii. iii. Is the microorganism had been through recombinant from Non Halal Animal or najs? A. Yes. The microorganism is not permitted to be used. Change ingredient. Proceed to next new ingredient. B. No. Go to question 4 iv. iv. Is the culture broth used for cultivation/ fermentation process is made of any najs or haram animal? A. Yes. The microorganism is not permitted to be used. Proceed to next new ingredient. B. No. Go to question 4 v. v. Is there any additives/processing aids being used during cultivating/ fermentation process? A. Yes. Go to Part 1 for additive traceability. The microorganism required supporting document - Recognized Halal Certificate & detailed process flow. B. No. Need supporting document - Recognized Halal Certificate. Proceed to next new ingredient. Part 5 i. Is the alcohol in the ingredient is made from Khamar or a brewery? A. Yes. The ingredient cannot be used. Change source of alcohol. Proceed to the next new ingredient. B. No. Go to question 5 ii. ii. Is the final content of alcohol in finished product is less than the standard limit set by FATWA? A. Yes. Need supporting document for the source of alcohol and final content of alcohol in finished product. B. No. Corrective Action need to be done to reduce to permitted level. Part 6 i. Is the source of mineral from animal? A. Yes. Go to Part 1 B. No. Go to question 6 ii. ii. Is the source of mineral from earth mineral/ chemical? A. Yes. Go to question 6 iii iii. The mineral hazardous, toxid or poisonous? A. Yes. The ingredient is not permitted to be use. Change source. Proceed to the next new ingredients B. No. Need support document stating the source of the mineral/ chemical. Proceed with the next new material.


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Attachment for Terms of Reference

Part 7 i. Is the product specification from the manufacturer of the ingredient? A. Yes. Go to question 7ii. B. No. Get product specification from the actual manufacturer. Proceed with the next document. ii. Does the product specification stated the breakdown of the ingredients used? A. Yes. Go to question 7 iii. B. No. Get the manufacturer to supplement with the ingredient break down.Proceed with the next document. iii. Does the ingredient list stated any ingredient from animal base? A. Yes. Need recognized halal certificate to support this document. Then proceed with the next document. B. No. Go to question 7 iv. iv. Does the product specification stated the source of plant being used? A. Yes. Good. Proceed to the next document. B. No. Need to request the manufacturer to stated the source of plant used. Part 8 i. Is the Halal certificate issued by recognized Islamic Bodies or authorities from JAKIM? A. Yes. Go to question 8 ii. B. No. The supporting document is not valid. Proceed to the need document. ii. Is the name of the ingredient and its manufacturer is the same as the one declared by applicant? A. Yes. Go to question 8 iii. B. No. The supporting document is not valid. Proceed to the need document. iii. Is the recognized Halal certificate is still within it validity date? A. Yes. This is a reliable halal certificate. Proceed to the next document B. No. The halal certificate is not valid as a supporting document. Need a new certificate. Proceed to the next document.

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3. Process Reference Tables For Determining Of Likelihood, Severity And Risk Ranking as stated in MS 2400: 2010 Table 10: Halalan Thoyibban (HT) Control Point Likelihood Ranking

Likelihood

Description

Likely

• The possibility of HT status affected EXPECTED to occur in most circumstances. • Common or repeated occurence, has happened before several times.

Moderate

• The possibility id HT status affected MIGHT occur sometimes. • Known to occur, happened before.

Unlikely

• The possibility of HT status affected COULD occur in exceptional circumstances. • Practically impossible

Table 11: Halalan Control Point Severity / Impact Ranking

Halalan Severity/ Impact

Description

Critical

• The potential contaminant (non halal or detrimental (mudhorat) substances ) affects the totality of halalan status of the good and / or cargo and the halalan status of the goods and / or cargo could not be salvaged. • Release of the good and / or cargo will result in loss from customers, public and authorities. • May cause great impact for future business transaction.

Moderate

• The potential contaminant (non halal or detrimental (mudhorat) substances ) affects the halalan status of the good and / or cargo and the halalan status of the goods and / or cargo still could be salvaged. • May result in delay of delivery or shipment and potential loss of future contracts, possible loss of public trust.

Insignificant

• No impact on the halalan status of the goods and / or cargo.


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Table 12: Toyyiban Control Point Severity / Impact Ranking

Thoyyiban Severity/ Impact

Description

Critical

• The results of activity (s) or halal substances (s) not intended as part of the goods and / or cargo that effects the thoyyiban status and intended use of the goods and / or cargo. • Release of the goods and / or cargo will result in loss of trust from customer, public and authorities. • May cause great impact for future business transactions.

Moderate

• The results of activity (s) or halal substances (s) not intended as part of the goods and / or cargo that effects the thoyyiban status of the goods and/ or cargo but did not affect the intended use of the goods and / or cargo. • However, this may result in delay of delivery or shipment and potential loss of future contracts, possible loss of public trust.

Insignificant

• No impact of thoyyiban status of the goods and/ or cargo.

Table 13: Halalan And Toyyiban Control Point Risk Matrix

Likelihood

Severity/ Impact Insignificant

Moderate

Critical

Likelihood

Moderate

4

Significant 7

High

Moderate

Low

2

Moderate

5

Significant 8

Unlikely

Low

1

Low

3

Moderate

9

6


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Table 14: Halalan Thoyibban Decision Rules for Risk Ranking

Ranking Level

Likelihood

Impact

Code

Risk Decision with regards to Halalan Thoyyiban Control Measures

9

Likely

Critical

High

• The organisation needs to review the incident in a detailed manner to find the root cause of the problem. • All precautionary measures shall be taken so resolve the problem identified. • Monitoring and verification activities towards control measures shall be conducted in accordance to the scheduled plans. • All staff shall be briefed to keep informed on the matter.

8

Moderate

Critical

7

Likely

Moderate

6

Unlikely

Critical

5

Moderate

Moderate

4

Likely

Insignificant

3

Unlikely

Moderate

2

Moderate

Insignificant

1

Unlikely

Insignificant

Significant

• The organisation shall take all precautionary measures to resolve the problem identified. • Monitoring and verification activities towards control measures shall be conducted in accordance to the scheduled plans

Moderate

• The organisation shall monitor and verify control measures in accordance to the scheduled plans

Low

• The organisation maintains the implementation of control measures in accordance to schedules plans.

Note: 1. The organisation means the top management, halalan toyibban leader, and all staff 2. The process step(s) with ranking of high and significant should be considered as Halalan Toyibban Control


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Table 15: Example of Halalan Thoyyiban Control Point Analysis Worksheet

Process step

List of potential Contaminant/ Precursor

Rationale for inclusion or exclusion as potential contaminant/ precursor

Evaluation of the likelihood and Severity/ Impact of Potential Contaminant / Precursor Likelihood

Severity

Prepared by:

Approved by :

Name & Position:

Name & Position:

Date:

Date:

Ranking

Control Measures

Halalan Thoyyiban Control Point /HCP Yes

No


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Attachment for Terms of Reference

Figure 6: Example of Process Diagram or Flow: Fruit Canning Process Flow

Sourcing of Materials & Supplier

Purchasing of materials

Delivery of Raw materials

Storage

Washing, Peeling, Cutting

Blanching

Filling in Can

Added boiled Syrup

Exhausting in water bath

Can Sealing

Sterilization

Cooling

Cartoning

Storage

Delivery


Profile for Kamarul Aznam

Halal Assurance Management System  

The Department of Islamic Development Malaysia (JAKIM) introduced the Halal Assurance Management System (HAS) – a systematic system which id...

Halal Assurance Management System  

The Department of Islamic Development Malaysia (JAKIM) introduced the Halal Assurance Management System (HAS) – a systematic system which id...

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