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15 01 2014

wednesday

Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Vol. 1, Issue No. 6, Pages 8

Monthly Edition

FITAG

Times

FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION - Editorial Dear Fitagians,

Wish you a very happy and a prosperous New Year 2014.

E

very magazine is publishing technology trends or future trends for the new year 2014. Everybody is one or the other way are focusing on few key factors those who are talked about since last year and will be talked for few more years, because our industry is in a big transition. We are facing huge changes, PC to Laptops to TABs and Smart phones, Cloud centric business development, Social technologies - not networking, 3D printing and BIG data are the main topics being discussed while waiting for this change. We have also tried to give you a broader picture of 10 best bold predict i o n s worldw i d e applicable to our industry. I personally feel that year 2014 and 2015 will be years of diversity and impeccable change. As far as Indian economy is concerned we will have a major change from half way of 2014 after completion of national polls. It seems new government will boost the economy with their positive and newer ways of looking and handling the country. Younger & efficient people will come in to power to drive the country, hopeful of taking right decisions at the right time. Specially for FITAGIANs we have incorporated business and general predictions for the year 2014 according to their sun-signs. I am sure more & more people are reading FITAG Times and this addition will attract many more to be a regular reader. I also wish all of you a very happy Uttarayan. May this transition of Sun from tropic of Capricon to Tropic of Cancer produces positive and vibrant impacts to you and your family in the coming days. Enjoy reading 6th edition of FITAG Times.

Mr. Kaushik Pandya Editor

For Space Booking in

FITAG TIMES fitagtimes@fitag.in Sejal: 98240 53863 Dhaval: 98240 66111

10 Bold Predictions for At the beginning of each year, it’s possible to make predictions about the future of the tech sector simply by extrapolating from data in the latest Mary Meeker Internet Trends presentation. It doesn’t require a crystal ball to realize that smartphones and tablets will replace PCs, big data will continue to grow at an exponential rate, and nations such as China will play an ever-greater role in the development of the Internet. Below is an attempt at thinking big, at imagining how a number of emerging trends may combine in unique ways to create disruptive trends in 2014.

< Google Glass becomes the must-have tech gadget of the year.

After flirting with wearable tech in 2012 and 2013, the consumer technology market is finally ready to embrace wearable computing as a full-on trend in 2014. And the biggest entrant in the wearable computing market is almost certain to be Google Glass. There’s been almost as much anti-hype as hype around Google Glass over the past 12 months, but it’s a safe bet that if Google Glass is cool enough for the runway models of DVF and the fashion spreads of Vogue, it’s also cool enough for the mainstream tech consumer who’s looking to move beyond the smartphone. Going forward, broad consumer acceptance around wearable computing — whether in the form of the latest Samsung smartwatch, Google Glass or any of the new fitness gadgets — will continue to open the door to radical innovation in the wearable computing segment. At this month’s CES event in Las Vegas, some of the most-hyped products of the year are related to “biometrics” – such as headbands, socks and bras that claim to be

able to measure your brain waves, heart rate and level of physical exertion. < Your next-door neighbor becomes a venture capitalist. The JOBS Act (aka the Crowdfunding Act) is set to go into full effect by mid2014, and that could lead to

anyone — not just a wealthy accredited investor — having the ability to invest in start-ups, anywhere in the country and in any industry. In short, it will soon be almost as easy to back a hot tech company on a new equity crowdfunding portal as it is to crowdfund a cool artistic project on Kickstarter or Indiegogo. In the process, expect to see a lot of “What’s the future of the VC industry?” articles. It’s only natural, since crowdfunding seems to have the potential to disrupt the traditional VC industry by creating an entirely new type of investor. And once it’s your temperamental next-door neighbor, and not a cooly rational Harvard MBA making the decision of where to allocate investment dollars, this could lead to some fantastic innovations being funded in coming years.

Fitag Times reaches to 21,000 retailers / dealers across Gujarat

2014

Consider the example of the Terrafugia flying car concept, which has raised more than $10 million on the crowdfunding site Wefunder. < A commercial drone company gets anointed as “the next Apple.” The excitement around the Amazon drones delivery concept is almost certain to inspire a number of copycat imitators. After the Jeff Bezos “60 Minutes” segment at the end of the year, there was a surge in stories about possible uses for

commercial drone technology, including the story of quadcopters being used by Deutsche Post. As drones transition from being used

to take out terrorist leaders to being used to revolutionize business models, we’ll inevitably hear talk about the first generation of drone start-ups that are “the next Apple” or the “next Google.” One early frontrunner is New York-based Flyterra, which is set to start testing drones in upstate New York, making it one of the first commercial drones companies in the nation. Six states (including New York and Virginia, both home to huge tech communities) have now been cleared to host dronestesting facilities. If the first rounds of testing go well, we could soon hear talk about other states vying to host their own drones test sites, in order to get a hand in any future economic goodies that come from having a vibrant drone innovation sector.

Contined on page 2...


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FITAGTimes FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION

Continued from page 1...

States might begin to woo drone tech companies, the same way they woo tech startups as part of a broader attempt to revitalize their economies. < Virtual reality becomes the next big science fiction technology to go mainstream. In many ways, 2013 was the year that science fiction became science fact, with Terminator bots, password pills and missions to Mars. In 2014, the one science fiction technology that is finally showing signs of going mainstream is virtual reality. Much of the innovation for now is being driven by the gaming market, where the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset for 3D Gaming is due to come to market by mid-2014. But gaming is just the tip of the iceberg. People are already thinking of ways that virtual reality could change everything from retail experiences to entertainment experiences. Ford automobile designers are even working on ways to use the Oculus Rift to design better cars. < Bill Gates amazes us again with another innovation for the developing world. Bill Gates continues to entice us with his vision for changing the future of the developing world, primarily by creating new innovations that can lower mortality rates. In just the past few years, as he reminded us last summer, Bill Gates has turned into a digital age Leonardo Da Vinci. It’s only a matter of time before he amazes us again with a simple, clever innovation for the world’s rising billions that addresses a basic need like clean sanitation. As the “developing” world starts to catch up to the “developed” world, it’s only inevitable that nations across Asia, Africa and Latin America will begin to attract more attention from the West’s top innovators. We’ve already started to see this in Africa, where inno-

vations in mobile banking and mobile health are occurring as fast — or faster — than in the United States. In a best-case scenario, there will be a virtuous circle, as innovations in health complement innovations in mobile and Internet. < Bitcoin revolutionizes politics. Insurgencies and uprisings around the world — especially in the Arab world — have been quick to use new technologies — everything from smartphones for rapidly organizing protests to Twitter for getting their message out to the world. So why not Bitcoin? Couldn’t sovereign states such as the United States use Bitcoin to fund rebel groups — say, the Syrian rebels — so as not to leave behind a paper trail for the media to follow. In other words, Bitcoin could help avoid another Iran-Contra Affair. Bitcoin, or any of the other emerging crypto-currencies, are perfect for insurgents — anonymous, hard-to-track and just as good as cash. For that matter, they are also perfect for mainstream politicians. It’s only a matter of time before politicians are able to accept Bitcoin, and that could lead to an awkward situation where you really don’t know who’s funding a candidate. In Texas, one Senate campaign could feature Bitcoin in 2014. And, if Bitcoin truly is anonymous (and there’s been debate about that), money could be theoretically funneled to mainstream political candidates to circumvent current campaign donation limits. < DIY biology becomes the next big tech hobbyist trend, replacing 3D printing. Just as 3D printing captured the public imagination by radically changing our notions of what it is possible to create in the physical world, DIY biology could have the same impact on the way we view the biological world. Thanks to Craig Venter’s pioneering efforts to map the human genome

more than a decade ago, the average person now has the potential to understand his or her own genetic destiny, and that’s leading to the arrival of new startups like 23andMe as well as new DIY biology hacker spaces. The only question, of course, is how the DIY biologists and geneticists cope with the legal, moral and philosophical questions of their work. As we’ve seen with 23andMe, it’s not always so easy to gain regulatory approval — and that’s even before the hackers get involved. In some futuristic scenarios proposed by Craig Venter, it’s also possible for biologists to hack the genetic code of some microorganisms, leading to radical new mutations and new forms of life. Most likely, in 2014, you’ll start to see more crowdfunding efforts of the type pioneered by the Glowing Plants project in 2013, which raised nearly half a million dollars

wednesday

15 01 2014

to make possible genetically modified glow-in-the-dark plants. < The world sees the first-ever 3D-printed organ. Organovo, a biotech company in San Diego, recently claimed that it would have a 3D-printed liver ready to go by the end of 2014. So far, organs have been too complex to print, but there have been limited successes with things such as human tissue and bone. It appears to be only a matter of time before 3D-printed organs become a reality, thanks to new high-tech “bioprinters.” This growth in 3D-printed organs will lead to a number of debates about a whole range of possible industries that may be possible in the future, such as cosmetic internal surgery, in which you receive brandnew organ transplants. It would be like the scenario in the science fiction film

2

“Elysium,” where the wealthy are never sick because they could presumably simply swap out unhealthy organs whenever needed. < The first MOOC is fully taught by a machine rather than a human. If you think about the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) as just a form of cheap distance education for people who can’t afford “the real thing,” then you’re not thinking far enough out of the box. Thus far, the traditional market leaders – elite universities such as Stanford, Harvard and MIT – have been at the helm of the MOOC movement. That could change in 2014, if the first artificially intelligent machine begins to fully teach a MOOC — lecturing, grading and engaging with students the way a human professor might, thereby opening the door to new educational start-ups to challenge the entrenched incumbents by demolishing the current cost structure of higher education.<


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FITAGTimes FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION

Fitag thanks all member associations to support antipiracy drive & authorize FITAG to deal in this regard in future.

FITAG exe. committee

wednesday

15 01 2014

3

FITAG Times Review Hello Fitag, Respected Fitag President & General Secretary, "FITAG" The Association is

helping to

the members and leaders of associations and all members of

in Gujara. FITAG is

one of the largest state level It federation of associations in India, with its presence acknowledged

in

all

the

circles

of

IT

Industry Associations.

Thanking You NITESH SENGHANI


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FITAGTimes FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION

IT Industry Lkwt

wednesday

15 01 2014

2014Lkwt hkþe ¼rð»Þ ßÞkurík»k:-

{u»k hkrþ (20 {k[o Úke 20 yur«÷)

4

ð]»k¼ hkrþ (20 yur«÷ Úke 21 {u)

©kurºkÞ ¼qÃkuLÿfw{kh

r{ÚkwLk hkrþ (21 {u Úke 21 swLk)

suLkk Ãkh MkqÞoLke yMkh ðÄw nkuÞ Au. yk ð»ko ík{khk {kxu nfkhkí{f rð[khku y{÷{kt {qfðk {kxu ©uc Au. ¾kuxe fÕÃkLkk yLku íkfoLkku ytík ykðþu. ðkMíkððkËe çkLke ykøk¤ ðÄe þfþku. ¾kuxe yf¤k{ý yLku r[tíkk{ktÚke çknkh ykðþku. «ríkfw¤ Mktòuøkku yLkwfq¤ çkLkíkk sþu. ykí{rðïkMk ÃkkAku {u¤ðe þfþku. LkkýktfeÞ heíku òuíkkt yk ð»ko ÃkkA¤Lkkt ð»ko fhíkkt ½ýwt MkkYt yLku «økríkfkhf hnuþu. VMkkÞu÷e W½hkýe ykðu. Lkðwt hkufký fhðk {kxu ©uc ð»ko Au. ykÃkLke ykE.xe. ©uºkLke fkhrfËeo MkkLkwfq¤ çkLku. «økríkLkku {køko ¾w÷u. fux÷ef Lkðe íkfku, Lkðe ykuVMko ykðu su ÷ktçku økk¤u VkÞËkfkhf Mkkrçkík ÚkkÞ. rðãkÚkeoyku {kxu yk ð»ko þw¼ Au. AíkktÞ yrík rðïkMk «økríkLke økrík {tË fhe þfu Au. ík{khu {kxu 23 MÃkxu. Úke 23 ykuõxku.Lkku Mk{Þ «ríkfq¤ nkuðkt íku Mk{Þu MkkðÄkLke ykð~Þf Au.

ykE.xe. ûkuºkLkk rs¿kkMkw yLku rðãkÚkeo {kxu yk ð»ko økík ð»koLke Mkh¾k{ýeyu yk ð»ko Úkkuzwt Lkçk¤wt sýkÞ, Ãkhtíkw {nuLkík yu ©uc WÃkkÞ Au. {nuLkíkLkwt Ãkrhýk{ htøk ÷kðu, yk÷þw yLku yrík ykí{ rðïkMk ÄhkðLkkh {kxu yk ð»ko Lkçk¤wt Ãkwhðkh ÚkkÞ. íkuLke íkfuËkhe hk¾ðe. fËk[ MkøkkE ÷øLk fu fkixwtrçkf «Mktøk yðhkuÄf çkLku, íkuLke MkkÚku r{ºkku ¾kMk fheLku †e r{ºkku îkhk yðhkuÄ Q¼ku ÚkðkLke Mkt¼kðLkk ðÄw Au. Mkt½»ko yLku yrík {nuLkíkLkk ytíku Mkw¾Ë Ãkrhýk{ {¤u. {kLkrMkf heíku òuEyu íkku {nuLkík îkhk {w~fu÷e, ËËo, Lkfkhkí{f rð[khku Ëqh Úkíkkt Lkðe íkksøke yLku swMMkku ykðu, suÚke {kLkMkef ®[íkk Ëqh ÚkkÞ. Mkfkhkí{f rð[khkuLku y{÷{kt {qfðkÚke Ãkrhýk{ þw¼ çkLke þfu Au. økwMMkk Ãkh fkçkq hk¾ðk sYhe Au. rçk{khe yLku nrhVkuLke ®[íkk{ktÚke çknkh ykððk «ÞíLk fhku.

yk Mk{Þu MkqÞo íkuLke r{ºk hkrþ çkwÄ{kt Ãkrh¼ú{ý fhþu. su ykÃkLkk {kxu Mkw¾Ë V¤ ykÃkLkkh Au. ykE.xe. ûkuºk{kt çkwÄ yLku MkqÞoLke Þwrík çkwrØ yLku «¼kð WÃkh ¾qçk s Mkkhe yMkh fhu Au. suÚke ykÃkLkk {kxu yk ð»koLke þYykík ½ýe Mkkhe hnu. Aíkkt ®[íkk yLku ykí{rðïkMkLkku y¼kð hnuíkkt yðhkuÄ ykðu. suÚke ¾kuxe ®[íkk fhðe Lknª. yufkøkúíkk yLku æÞkLkÚke «økrík MkkÄe þfkþu. {kLkrMkf ®[íkk{ktÚke {qõík Úkðk «ÞíLk fhþku íkku [ku¬Mk MkV¤ Úkþu. {kLkMkef ¼kh n¤ðku Úkíkku sýkÞ. LkkýktfeÞ Mk{Þ MkkLkwfq¤ nkuíkkt ®[íkk n¤ðe ÚkkÞ ík{kÁt ykŠÚkf ¼rð»Þ ykþkMÃkË çkLku Au. Aíkkt ¼rð»Þ ðÄw MkV¤ çkLkkððk ykÃkLku ðÄw Mkòøk yLku MkkðÄ hnuðwt ÞkuøÞ VuhVkh fhðkÚke ðÄw VkÞËku ÚkðkLke þõÞíkk ðÄe òÞ Au. ykÃkLke Äkhýk {wsçk Ãkrhýk{ {¤u Ãkhtíkw yuLkku yÚko yuðku LkÚke fu þu¾[Õ÷e suðe Äkhýk fu ykþk hk¾ðe.

ffo hkrþ (21 swLk Úke 22 sw÷kE)

®Mkn hkrþ (22 sw÷kE Úke 23 ykuøk.)

fLÞk hkrþ (23 ykuøk. Úke 23 MkÃxu.)

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ykE.xe. Lkk {wÏÞ yrÄÃkrík hknw-þrLkLkk þºkw MkqÞoLke hkrþ nkuíkkt yLkuf «&™kuLke Mk{MÞk MkòoÞ fkhrfËeo ûkuºk{kt Äkhe MkV¤íkk Lk {¤. ®[íkk{kt yfkhý ðÄkhku ÚkkÞ. yk¤Mk yLku ðÄw Ãkzíke E{kLkËkhe yðhkuÄf çkLku. yÇÞkMk{kt {nuLkík ðÄw fhðe Ãkzu. AíkktÞ ÄkÞwO Ãkrhýk{ Lk Ãký {¤u. Wã{e hnuðwt sYhe Au. yk ð»ko{kt LkkLke-{kuxe þkherhf íkf÷eVkuLkku Mkk{Lkku fhðku Ãkzþu. ykí{rðïkMk{kt f{e Lknª sýkÞ. ík{khe ®n{ík yLku ykí{ rðïkMk çktLku Mkkhk Au. ík{u Ãkkuíku ÃkkuíkkLkk Ãkh rLk¼oh Aku íÞkt MkwÄe MkkYt Ãkrhýk{ {u¤ðþku. yLÞLkk Mknkhu n¥kkþk rMkðkÞ ftE «kó Lknª ÚkkÞ yu ¾kMk ÞkË hk¾þku. †e r{ºkku Ëøkku ykÃku Lknª íkuLke íkfuËkhe hk¾ðe. ykŠÚkf heíku òuEyu íkku ÂMÚkríkLku Mk{íkku÷ hk¾ðkLkk «ÞíLk V¤þu. ¾hkçk Mk{ÞLku çkË÷ðk {kxu ¾[o Ãkh rLkÞtºký sYhe Au. òLÞw. 2015 çkkË MkV¤íkk {kxuLkk Ëhðkò ¾q÷þu. yLkuf íkfku Mkk{u ykðþu. Ãkhtíkw 2014Lkwt ð»ko MkkðÄkLke fqLkunÃkqðof þktríkÚke ÃkMkkh fhðwt.

ykE.xe. ûkuºkLkk yÇÞkMkwyku {kxu yk ð»ko r{© «fkhLkwt ÃkMkkh Úkþu. yk{uÞ ík{u Úkkuzk yk¤Mkw, ðkíkkuzeÞk yLku ÃkhkuÃkSðe Aku. yk Mð¼kðLkk Ëhuf ÔÞÂõíkLku {kxu yþw¼ Au. Ãkhtíkw WíMkkne ¾tíke÷k yLku yksLkwt fk{ yksu ÃkqYt fhLkkh {kxu ð»ko ©uc Au. ík{u ÷køkýe yLku íkfoÚke, Ë÷e÷çkkSÚke çkÄwt swyku Aku íku {kºk ¼ú{ Au. ðkMíkrðfíkk LkÚke. su ðkMíkrðfíkk{kt ykðþu íku [ku¬Mk MkV¤ Úkþu. ík{khu {Lk yLku íkLkÚke Úkkuzk {sçkqík çkLkðkLke sYh Au. ík{Lku «økríkLke økrík Äe{e sýkÞ Ãký íkuðwt Au Lknª.ykŠÚkf heíku òuíkkt yk ð»ko ík{khk {kxu [ku¬Mk ÷k¼ËkÞe Ãkwhðkh Úkþu. Lkðwt nfkhkí{f fkÞo MkV¤íkk ykÃkþu. Ãkhtíkw Lkf¤ðk¤wt fkÞo yMkV¤ çkLkkðu. suLkku hts ÷ktçkk Mk{Þ MkwÄe hnu. ykŠÚkf «økríkLkku økúkV Ÿ[ku sþu. Aíkkt ¾kuxk yLku yLkwfhýeÞ MkknMkkuÚke MkkðÄkLke ðíkoðe. «ðkMk{kt Ãký LkkLkk-{kuxkt rðÎLkku ykÔÞk fhu. yÇÞkMk{kt {Lk ÷økkððwt íkÚkk n¤ðku þkherhf ÔÞkÞk{ ík{Lku MðMÚk çkLkkðþu.

íkw÷k hkrþ (20 yur«÷ Úke 21 {u)

ykE.xe. ûkuºkLkk rs¿kkMkw yLku rðãkÚkeo {kxu yk ð»ko økík ð»koLke Mkh¾k{ýeyu yk ð»ko Úkkuzwt Lkçk¤wt sýkÞ, Ãkhtíkw {nuLkík yu ©uc WÃkkÞ Au. {nuLkíkLkwt Ãkrhýk{ htøk ÷kðu, yk÷þw yLku yrík ykí{ rðïkMk ÄhkðLkkh {kxu yk ð»ko Lkçk¤wt Ãkwhðkh ÚkkÞ. íkuLke íkfuËkhe hk¾ðe. fËk[ MkøkkE ÷øLk fu fkixwtrçkf «Mktøk yðhkuÄf çkLku, íkuLke MkkÚku r{ºkku ¾kMk fheLku †e r{ºkku îkhk yðhkuÄ Q¼ku ÚkðkLke Mkt¼kðLkk ðÄw Au. Mkt½»ko yLku yrík {nuLkíkLkk ytíku Mkw¾Ë Ãkrhýk{ {¤u. {kLkrMkf heíku òuEyu íkku {nuLkík îkhk {w~fu÷e, ËËo, Lkfkhkí{f rð[khku Ëqh Úkíkkt Lkðe íkksøke yLku swMMkku ykðu, suÚke {kLkMkef ®[íkk Ëqh ÚkkÞ. Mkfkhkí{f rð[khkuLku y{÷{kt {qfðkÚke Ãkrhýk{ þw¼ çkLke þfu Au. økwMMkk Ãkh fkçkq hk¾ðk sYhe Au. rçk{khe yLku nrhVkuLke ®[íkk{ktÚke çknkh ykððk «ÞíLk fhku.

ð]rùfhkrþ (20 {k[o Úke 20 yur«÷)

suLkk Ãkh MkqÞoLke yMkh ðÄw nkuÞ Au. yk ð»ko ík{khk {kxu nfkhkí{f rð[khku y{÷{kt {qfðk {kxu ©uc Au. ¾kuxe fÕÃkLkk yLku íkfoLkku ytík ykðþu. ðkMíkððkËe çkLke ykøk¤ ðÄe þfþku. ¾kuxe yf¤k{ý yLku r[tíkk{ktÚke çknkh ykðþku. «ríkfw¤ Mktòuøkku yLkwfq¤ çkLkíkk sþu. ykí{rðïkMk ÃkkAku {u¤ðe þfþku. LkkýktfeÞ heíku òuíkkt yk ð»ko ÃkkA¤Lkkt ð»ko fhíkkt ½ýwt MkkYt yLku «økríkfkhf hnuþu. VMkkÞu÷e W½hkýe ykðu. Lkðwt hkufký fhðk {kxu ©uc ð»ko Au. ykÃkLke ykE.xe. ©uºkLke fkhrfËeo MkkLkwfq¤ çkLku. «økríkLkku {køko ¾w÷u. fux÷ef Lkðe íkfku, Lkðe ykuVMko ykðu su ÷ktçku økk¤u VkÞËkfkhf Mkkrçkík ÚkkÞ. rðãkÚkeoyku {kxu yk ð»ko þw¼ Au. AíkktÞ yrík rðïkMk «økríkLke økrík {tË fhe þfu Au. ík{khu {kxu 23 MÃkxu. Úke 23 ykuõxku.Lkku Mk{Þ «ríkfq¤ nkuðkt íku Mk{Þu MkkðÄkLke ykð~Þf Au.

{fh hkrþ (21 zeMku. Úke 20 òLÞw.)

fwt¼ hkrþ (27 òLÞw. Úke 18 Vuçkúw.)

yk ð»ko ykE.xe. ûkuºkLkk rðãkÚkeoyku íkÚkk íkuLke MkkÚku òuzkÞu÷ ík{k{ {kxu yk ð»ko þw¼ hnuþu. fkhrfËeo ûkuºku Lkðk MkkuÃkkLk Mkh fhþku. fkhrfËeoLku [kh [ktË ÷køkðkLke Ãkqhe þõÞíkk Au. þYykík{kt {nuLkíkLkk «{ký{kt V¤ ykuAwt sýkÞ Ãkhtíkw yuftËhu MkV¤íkk íkku Au s Lkkufhe íku{s ÄtÄkLke Mk{MÞkykuLkwt Mk{kÄkLk Úkíkwt òÞ. fkuELke MknkÞ fu {ËË {¤u. su Lkðe rËþk ¾ku÷u Au. fkixwtrçkf ðkíkkðhý znku¤kíkwt òÞ. íkuÚke íÞktÚke {Lk nxkðe ÷uðwt. çkZíke-«økríkLkk Þkuøk «çk¤ Au. Lkðwt MkknMk ík{khk {kxu VkÞËkfkhf Au. ykŠÚkf ÃkrhÂMÚkrík MkwÄhíke òÞ. Ãkhtíkw ¾[o Ãkh fkçkw fu rLkÞtºký sYhe Au. swLkk r{ºkku VkÞËku fhkðu. 20 {k[oÚke 20 yur«÷Lkku Mk{Þ yþw¼ nkuíkkt íku Mkk[ðe ÷uðku íku rMkðkÞ ík{khk {kxu ½ýwt MkkYt Au.

yk ð»ko ykE.xe. ûkuºkLkk rðãkÚkeoyku íkÚkk íkuLke MkkÚku òuzkÞu÷ ík{k{ {kxu yk ð»ko þw¼ hnuþu. fkhrfËeo ûkuºku Lkðk MkkuÃkkLk Mkh fhþku. fkhrfËeoLku [kh [ktË ÷køkðkLke Ãkqhe þõÞíkk Au. þYykík{kt {nuLkíkLkk «{ký{kt V¤ ykuAwt sýkÞ Ãkhtíkw yuftËhu MkV¤íkk íkku Au s Lkkufhe íku{s ÄtÄkLke Mk{MÞkykuLkwt Mk{kÄkLk Úkíkwt òÞ. fkuELke MknkÞ fu {ËË {¤u. su Lkðe rËþk ¾ku÷u Au. fkixwtrçkf ðkíkkðhý znku¤kíkwt òÞ. íkuÚke íÞktÚke {Lk nxkðe ÷uðwt. çkZíke-«økríkLkk Þkuøk «çk¤ Au. Lkðwt MkknMk ík{khk {kxu VkÞËkfkhf Au. ykŠÚkf ÃkrhÂMÚkrík MkwÄhíke òÞ. Ãkhtíkw ¾[o Ãkh fkçkw fu rLkÞtºký sYhe Au. swLkk r{ºkku VkÞËku fhkðu. 20 {k[oÚke 20 yur«÷Lkku Mk{Þ yþw¼ nkuíkkt íku Mkk[ðe ÷uðku íku rMkðkÞ ík{khk {kxu ½ýwt MkkYt Au.

ÄLk hkrþ (22 Lkðu. Úke 21 zeMku.)

ykE.xe. ûkuºk {kxu økwY þw¼ nkuíkkt økwYLke hkrþ {kxu yk ð»ko þw¼ Mkq[f Au. fkhfeËeo {kxu yk Mk{Þ ©uc Au. Mk{SLku òu fkÞoLke þYykík fhþku íkku ½ýwt MkwtËh Ãkrhýk{ ÷kððkLke ûk{íkk ík{khk{kt Au. ûk{íkk Mk{SLku ykøk¤ ðÄþku íkku [ku¬Mk ík{u MkV¤ Aku. MkkLkwfq¤ íkfLkku WÃkÞkuøk fhe yxðkÞu÷kt fkÞkuoLku ykøk¤ ÄÃkkðòu. ík{khk fk{Lke fËh ÚkkÞ. {kLk-MkL{kLk ðÄu. sqLkkt ËËo yLku þºkwyku ÃkhkSík ÚkkÞ. ykÃkLkwt ð÷ý yLku ÃkrhÂMÚkrík çkË÷kíke sýkþu. ®[íkk, çku[uLke, ¼Þ, ystÃkku ðøkuhu Ëqh ÚkkÞ. ðuÃkkhkt ðÄw Ãkzíkwt òu¾{ ÷uðwt Lknª. økík ð»ko fhíkkt yk ð»ko MkkYt Au. LkkýktfeÞ íkf÷eVkuLkku WÃkkÞ {¤u yLku «økrík sýkÞ. ¼køkeËkh MkkÚku {Lk {wLkkð Lk ÚkkÞ íkuLkwt ¾kMk æÞkLk hk¾òu. s{eLk- MktÃkr¥k{kt rððkË sýkÞ Au. ðknLk ÷uíke ð¾íku æÞkLk hk¾ðwt. {eLk hkrþ (18 Vuçkúw. Úke 27 {k[o)

ykE.xe. ûkuºk {kxu økwY þw¼ nkuíkkt økwYLke hkrþ {kxu yk ð»ko þw¼ Mkq[f Au. fkhfeËeo {kxu yk Mk{Þ ©uc Au. Mk{SLku òu fkÞoLke þYykík fhþku íkku ½ýwt MkwtËh Ãkrhýk{ ÷kððkLke ûk{íkk ík{khk{kt Au. ûk{íkk Mk{SLku ykøk¤ ðÄþku íkku [ku¬Mk ík{u MkV¤ Aku. MkkLkwfq¤ íkfLkku WÃkÞkuøk fhe yxðkÞu÷kt fkÞkuoLku ykøk¤ ÄÃkkðòu. ík{khk fk{Lke fËh ÚkkÞ. {kLk-MkL{kLk ðÄu. sqLkkt ËËo yLku þºkwyku ÃkhkSík ÚkkÞ. ykÃkLkwt ð÷ý yLku ÃkrhÂMÚkrík çkË÷kíke sýkþu. ®[íkk, çku[uLke, ¼Þ, ystÃkku ðøkuhu Ëqh ÚkkÞ. ðuÃkkhkt ðÄw Ãkzíkwt òu¾{ ÷uðwt Lknª. økík ð»ko fhíkkt yk ð»ko MkkYt Au. LkkýktfeÞ íkf÷eVkuLkku WÃkkÞ {¤u yLku «økrík sýkÞ. ¼køkeËkh MkkÚku {Lk - {wLkkð Lk ÚkkÞ íkuLkwt ¾kMk æÞkLk hk¾òu. s{eLk- MktÃkr¥k{kt rððkË sýkÞ Au. ðknLk ÷uíke ð¾íku æÞkLk hk¾ðwt.


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wednesday

FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION

Creating

Pride In

Business Step

P

Positive Working Environment:

1

I

t is well known that climate alone can determine high versus low profits and growth. The business performance of the entire organization depends largely upon the working environment. In today's business world, keeping the employees satisfied is important. Flexibility is very important in the workplace environment. To keep the flexibility in the environment < We may reshape the rules, including the employees in the decision making. < We may add performance related , familyfriendly benefits. < We may provide tailor made trainings to our team members as per the Gap analysis. This enhances their confidence & pride for the work they do.

Step

R

Recognize & Reward program

2

Money /salary may seem to attract people but that’s not everything. Each one of us has a basic human need to feel appreciated i.e. recognized for our efforts & the results we produce. We may design a simple, transparent RRP (Recognize, reward program) within our company & implement it effectively. Please remember that we must include our customers, the family member

& the team in celebrations. Some Suggested ideas are……. < Employees’ children receive a gift voucher from the company when they bring their report cards. < Health check up camps for all the employees & their family members. < “A Switch the role day” – Once a month , each employee performs the role of an another employee. < Employee participation In a profit sharing plan.

Step

I

Involvement & Integrity

Step

D

5

We as , an IT Industry , are up to creating pride for who we are & not who we Think we are. We are one of the most dignified businessmen. Let's look at some of the ways We can do with ease & grace. = For us ….. whether we are the CEO , the HOD or the senior manager, Pride starts with us. We nurture our business & it is up to us to create a great place to work where people work with pride. It also requires ongoing training , Sharing about our achievements with all the employees , customers & family. The environment of pride matters ….. yes ……. It does. = For our team ……….. I , as your mentor suggest you a model - a 5 step model - "PRIDE" Let's look at each step ….

FITAG WiMentor Mantra

5

3

When we involve the ideas & suggestions of everyone , they experience worthiness & pride. We may have meeting , for a half an hour meeting, for sharing & suggestions. Each one of us display projects and ideas they work on. This creates an environment for innovation & creativity at all levels. Please remember to provide positive feedbacks & to appreciate forwarding ideas . It requires integrity i.e. respect, honour & pride for one another. Also, maintaining consistency in fulfilling the promises will play its part.

Development of each stake holder

15 01 2014

4

Whoever is with us, experiences pride when he/she is safe , taken care of and is assured about

his/her development. The mantra is "I" will grows when my company grows & My company grows when 'J' grow". It s critical to have a development plan for the company, the CEO & each employee. We may help everyone in creating the same for their people around. Here , I request you to create - Vision , Mission & Values ….. Please , do it without fail. Then , all of us will be equipped to deal with greater challenges & will have a designed, defined career path. Increase in productivity is for sure. Regular updates & training programs provide

us with an opportunity to develop.

Step

E

Empowerment to bridge the gap…

5

In today’s dynamic, rapidly changing business scenario, it is important that the employees are empowered fully. Ongoingly evaluate all the aspects ranging employee cost of turnover to employee attitudes. The respective department’s manager is accountable for this step. The whole team creates a new ‘Gap’ for each employee looking at the current circumstances

Irrespective of ‘boss employee’ relationship, they give feedback to each other & grade them. Healthy environment creates an environment of PRIDE all around. 03 For our clients / customers:We may use all various methods of communication & reach our customers to generate & elevate pride for what we offer, we do, we provide & for who we are as a ‘business’. We all know we can. Let’s promise ourselves that we will create an environment that’s healthy & inspiring to work & the natural result will be ‘PRIDE’<


FITAGTimes

NEWS CORNER

FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION

7

Things About

-by James Careless

F

rom the first day that you plug in a new piece of IT hardware, the clock starts ticking toward the day when it will be pulled out of service. When that day comes, responsible IT execs ensure that the now-surplus component is either repurposed, resold or recycled – with none of its toxic components ending up in an unregulated Third World dump. Fortunately, it is possible for proactiveminded IT departments to prevent this from happening, thus protecting the environment, people, and the valuable public image (and stock price) of the company.

1

Disposal costs should be built into hardware lifecycle budgets

Big corporations go through lots of IT equipment. “Akamai Technologies' global content distribution network is made up of 127,000 servers and is growing daily,” says Nicole PeillMoelter, Akamai’s director of environmental sustainability. “These servers are spread across 81 countries in 1,150 networks, and we refresh them on a four-year basis.” Every piece of IT hardware – be it a server, monitor, router, keyboard or mouse – has a value and costs associated with it throughout its lifespan. They include the cost of acquisition, installation, housing, maintenance, and ultimately disposal. Rackspace is a managed hosting and cloud computing company with nine data centers and 100,000 servers in use at any given time. Melissa Gray, Rackspace’s director of global sustainability says, “TCO includes the cost of responsible hardware disposal once it is past its operational lifespan.” She adds, “This means that the money is there in the budget to dispose of our surplus equipment responsibly, ensuring that Rackspace’s equipment does not cause any environmental issues.” The same approach is followed by Akamai. “We are committed to being environmentally and socially responsible, which means that we consider and include disposal costs in our TCO,” Peill-Moelter says. “In doing so, our goal is to budget for the ‘greenest’ equipment disposal, not the cheapest.”

2

Be sure to find a disposal company that’s certified

There are all kinds of IT equipment recycling firms promising to provide responsible equipment disposal to companies, institutions and individuals. The key to ensuring that the company you choose does what it promises is to select a recycler with strong credentials, Gray says. Fortunately, there are certification programs to verify such promises. One of these is eStewards, which is backed by the Basel Action Network non-profit waste watchdog group, and endorsed by corporate heavy-hitters such as

Alcoa, Bloomberg, Boeing and Wells Fargo. Another is Responsible Recycling ( R 2 ) Solutions. Both programs are endorsed by the Environmental Protection Agency. Once you know what to look for, certified hardware disposal firms are not that hard to find. For instance, Newport Computers of Rochester, N.H., is “a certified eSteward and R2/RIOS (Recycling Industry Operating Standards) Certified Electronics Recycler,” says Anne M. McKivergan, one of the company’s two vice presidents. “We find that many of our customers are requiring one or both of those certifications these days as proof of our commitment to responsible handling of the assets.” Companies such as Newport who have undertaken e-Stewards and R2/RIOS certification regularly open up their systems and procedures to an independent third party for auditing. McKivergan adds, “A reputable company who is handling the waste properly will be able to provide documentation showing the flow of the materials to their final destination and will not have a problem explaining where everything goes”. She cautions, “One of the clearest signs of a company who is merely dumping the electronic waste illegally and indiscriminately is anyone who says, ‘we’ll pay you for your e-waste’ before even asking what you’re trying to dispose of.”

3

Consider repurposing before recycling

Within two years of deployment, the best servers and routers are already showing their age -- at least in comparison to the newest IT equipment that has subsequently come to market. Think of it as being the Curse of Moore’s Law: With the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubling approximately every two years, IT equipment made and deployed in 2011 is now definitely behind the curve! Google is a major consumer of servers and routers; for security reasons, the search engine giant won’t say how many they actually have. However, Google is very public about its commitment to environmentally sustainable practices, including how it deals with aging IT equipment. “We're a carbon neutral company and have strong initiatives in place to reduce the environmental impact of our global operations,” says Google spokesperson Kate Hurowitz. “When it comes to equipment, our approach is to extend the life cycle of our equipment as much as possible, then dispose of it responsibly.” Specifically, “Before we buy new equipment and materials, we look for ways to reuse what we already have,” Hurowitz says. “As we upgrade to newer, higher-speed servers, we repurpose older machines either by moving them to services that don’t require as much processing power, or by removing and reusing the components that are still in good working condition. Since 2007,

wednesday

we've remanufactured and repurposed enough outdated servers to avoid buying over 300,000 new replacement machines.”

Hardware Disposal 4

What IT managers need to know about safe hardware disposal.

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Don’t forget data destruction

At Google, destroying data on surplus hard drives is an internal matter: “We completely erase any components that stored data, and then resell them into the market, giving the equipment a second life,” Hurowitz says. As a certified hardware recycler, Newport Computers provides data removal services to its clients. In fact, “a big part of what we do is data destruction,” McKivergan says. This is available in various strengths. Newport Computers can use software to overwrite the drive, removing data while leaving the hardware reusable. But in those instances where data destruction must be 100% certain, “we can bring out the big guns and either degauss the drives or shred them, making them unusable again,” she says.

5

Make charitable donations

In those instances where an IT department is disposing of equipment that had low-security applications – such as usage by customer service reps at a call center, or entry-level clerks in Administration – it may be possible to wipe it, and then donate this equipment to charity. Such donations can consist of complete machines and/or parts. Outdated software can also be a welcome gift, as long as donating it does not pose any licensing/ownership issues. Giving old equipment to charitable foundations such as TechSoup or Computers for Charity is both socially and environmentally responsible, and also good for one’s corporate image. So is

15 01 2014

6

making equipment donations to local schools, social agencies, and churches, whose IT needs are easily satisfied by CPU speeds that are inadequate by current business standards.

6

Make green computing a way of life

7

Weigh costs vs. rewards

The reason that companies such as Akamai, Google and Rackspace were able to make wellinformed decisions about equipment disposal is because all three have embraced environmentally sustainable practices as a way of doing business. “At Rackspace, we are a member of the Green Grid Association,” Gray says. “This means that we are actively involved in finding ways to improve green practices at data centers, including the development and adoption of the Electronics Disposal Efficiency (EDE) metric. The EDE is designed to allow companies to easily and effectively rate how well they are disposing of their surplus technology, with an eye to improving it over time.” Rackspace also governs its business practices in line with standards such as ISO14001 (Environmental Management Systems), OSHAS 18001 (Health and Safety), and ISO9001 (Quality Management) -- and requires the samestandards from its suppliers. By doing so, Rackspace is covering all of its bases when it comes to environmental and social responsibility.

Choosing an equipment recycler who does it properly and under audited certification is more expensive than using a fly-by-night company. Finding the right recycler will require a commitment of staff time and other resources, but the benefits justify the expense. “Being environmentally responsible does affect the bottom line, but so does being irresponsible,” Gray says. “In fact, when you add in the impact on the community, the planet, employee morale, and your firm’s reputation, the cost of being responsible is actually less than not doing the right thing.” <


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Articals

FLOURISH KNOWLEDGE NETWORKING POWER PROTECTION

www.fitag.in Sunday

15 12 2013

7

What you can do with “Google” When Google Drive first launched, it served as a place to store your files in the cloud so that they could be accessed anywhere. As Drive has evolved, it has assimilated the roles of Google Docs and now serves as the hub for all Google document creation and office tools. You can even install apps into Drive to expand its functionality even further. Get the most out of Google Drive by following this guide. Part 1 of 4: Accessing Google Drive

How to Use Google Drive stored. “Shared with Me” are documents and files that have been shared with you by other Drive users. “Starred” files are files that you have marked as important, and “Recent” files are the ones you have most recently edited.

1. Sign into the Google Drive website with your Google account. If you don’t have a Google account, you can create one for free. Google Drive will allow you to store your files in the cloud, as well as create documents and forms through the Google Drive web interface.

2. Add files to your drive. There are two ways to add files to your drive. You can create Google Drive documents, or you can upload files from your computer. To create a new file, click the CREATE button. To upload a file, click the “Up Arrow” button next to the CREATE button.

3. Change the way your files are displayed. You can choose to display files by large icons (Grid) or as a list (List). The List mode will show you at a glance the owner of the document and when it was last modified. The Grid mode will show each file as a preview of its first page. You can change the mode by clicking the buttons next to the gear icon in the upper right corner of the page. 4. Use the navigation bar on the left side to browse your files. “My Drive” is where all of your uploaded files and folders are

Click the check box to select multiple files and folders. You can then perform actions for these selected files by clicking the buttons at the top of the page. If you are using the large icon view, the check box appears when you hover your mouse over the document. There are more options in the “More” menu.

5. Search for files. You can search through your Google Drive documents and folders using the search bar at the top of your page. Google Drive will search through titles, content, and owners. If a file is found with the exact term in the title, it will appear under the search bar as you type so that you can quickly select it.

6.Download the app for your mobile device. You can download the Google Drive app for your Android or iOS device which allows you to access your files from your phone or tablet. The app can be downloaded for free from your app store. The app may not have all of the same editing features as the browser version.

Part 2 of 4: Creating and Editing Documents 1.Click the CREATE button. A menu will appear that allows you to choose what type of document you want to create. You have several options by default, and more can be added by clicking the “Connect more app” link at the bottom of the menu:

< Folder – This creates a folder in your My Drive for file organization. < Document – This creates a blank word processor document. You can adjust formatting and page setup using the tools and menus at the top of the document. You can export documents into Microsoft Word, OpenOffice, PDF, and other formats. < Presentation – This opens the Google Drive equivalent of Microsoft PowerPoint. Files can be exported as Microsoft PowerPoint, PDF, JPG, and other formats. < Spreadsheet – This creates a blank spreadsheet. Spreadsheets can be exported as Microsoft Excel, OpenOffice, PDF, CSV, and other formats. < Form – This allows you to create forms that can be filled out online. Forms can be exported to CSV files.

2. Create a new file. Once you’ve selected your document type, you will be taken to your blank document. If you chose Presentation or Form, you will be greeted by a wizard that will help

you configure the feel of your document.

3. Name the file. At the top of the page, click the italic gray text that says “Untitled <file type>”. When you click it, the “Rename document” window will appear, allowing you to change the name of your file.

4 Edit your document. Begin writing your document as you would in its commerciallyequivalent. You will most likely find that Google Drive has most of the basic features, but advanced features you may be used to are not available. < Your document saves automatically as you work on it.

5. Export and convert the file. If you want to make your file compatible with similar programs, click File and place your cursor over “Download As”. A menu will appear with the available formats. Choose the format that best suits your needs. You will be asked to name the file and select a download location. When the file is downloaded, it will be in the format you chose.

6. Share your document. Click File and select Share, or click the blue Share button in the upper right corner to open the Sharing settings. You can specify who can see the file as well as who can edit it. < Give the link at the top to the people you are sharing the file with. You can use the buttons below to quickly share via Gmail, Google+, Facebook, or Twitter. < Change who has access to the document by clicking the “Change…” link. By default, the document is private and you must invite people for them to have access. You can change this to allow everyone who has the link, or to open and searchable by the entire internet. < Invite people to edit your document by entering their contact information into the “Invite people” field. Invited users must sign in to Google Drive in order to access the document. < Change invited people’s access by clicking the blue link next to each to their names. You can allow them to edit the document or just be able to view it.

7.Publish the document. To publish your document, spreadsheet, or presentation, click File and select “Publish to the web”. Publishing a Google Drive document creates a copy of that document that anyone can see. The copy becomes a separate webpage that is not linked to your original document. This allows you to share the document with anyone you want without changing your sharing settings.[1] < A published document cannot be edited. You can still edit the original file that remains in Google Drive. <

Publisher : Gaurang Vyas, President, Fitag Editor : Kaushik Pandya Assistant Editor : Sejal Patel Designer : Hardik Pancholi Address : B/302, Rudra Arcade, Nr. Helmet Circle, Memnagar, Ahmedabad-380015. All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reproduced without the prior permission from the publisher.


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Fitag Times reaches to

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6th Edition of Fitag Times