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KAI BIERIG


The built environment is composed of a rich infrastructure that must be carefully detailed through integrated design. It is my goal to express these systems in a holistic manner.


SOLVING THE WORLD’S WATER PROBLEM:

<1% OF THE EARTH’S WATER IS GROUNDWATER.

<1% OF THE EARTH’S WATER IS GROUNDWATER.

OF EARTH’S USABLE CENTER FOR WASTEWATER LIVING IN TUCSON, AZ 98% WATER FOR HUMAN USE IS

98% OF EARTH’S USABLE WATER FOR HUMAN USE IS GROUNDWATER.

95% OF WASTEWATER IS POTABLE WATER

GROUNDWATER.

WASTEWATER 4%

AS TUCSON’S POPULATION INCREASES, SO DOES . . . 250,000

98% OF 75%EARTH’S OF WATER THAT USABLE WATER ENTERS THE FOR HOME GOES HUMAN USETHE IS DRAIN DOWN GROUNDWATER

<1% OF THE EARTH’S WATER IS GROUNDWATER

95% OF WASTEWATER CAP IS POTABLE WATER (COLORADO RIVER)

GROUNDWATER 43%

32%

ACRE FEET OF WATER

98% OF EARTH’S USABLE WATER FOR HUMAN USE IS GROUNDWATER

RECLAIMED WATER

• ITS WATER CONSUMPTION 200,000

... THIS MEANS ALL OF THAT POTABLE WATER BECOMES WASTEWATER 150,000

... MAKING GROUND & SURFACE WATER

WASTEWA A GROWING POTENT ON RESOURCE

• ITS DEPENDENCE CAP WATER “FOREIGN” WATER IMPORTED FROM THE COLORADO RIVER 100,000

SURFACE WATER 21% groundwater.org

wikipedia.org

groundwater.orggroundwater.org

50,000

• AND ITS PRODUCTION OF

wikipedia.org

WASTEWATER 2000

Water Plan 2000-2050, Tucson Water

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2050

Water Plan 2000-2050, Tucson Water

HOW TUCSON AND THE U.S. SEES WATER

GROUNDWATER 30%

WASTEWATER 4%

WASTEWATER 55% SURFACE WATER 15% RECLAIMED WATER

WASTE

200,000

RECLAIMED WATER 150,000

GROUND & SURFACE WATER

100,000

50,000

DUMP

CAP

(COLORADO RIVER)

32%

GROUNDWATER 43%

ACRE FEET OF WATER

USE

TREAT

PUMP

TREAT

250,000

ACRE FEET OF WATER

250,000

TUCSON IS NOT CURRENTLY CAP WATER CONSIDERING WASTEWATER AS A LEGITIMATE RESOURCE.

200,000

GROUND & SURFACE WATER

0 2000

150,000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2050

CAP WATER 100,000

SURFACE WATER 21%

50,000

DOWNSTREAM FLOW 2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

Water Plan 2000-2050, Tucson Water

2035

2040

2045

2050

Water Plan 2000-2050, Tucson Water

HOW TUCSON AND THE U.S. SHOULD SEE WATER

WASTE

GROUNDWATER 30% WASTEWATER 55%

DUMP

SURFACE WATER 15%

ACRE FEET OF WATER

USE

TREAT

PUMP

TREAT

250,000

200,000

RECLAIMED WATER 150,000

GROUND & SURFACE WATER

100,000

50,000

CAP WATER

NO TREATMENT REDUNDANCY

0 2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2050

WHERE THERE IS WATER USE, THERE IS WASTEWATER, AND THE SONORAN DESERT IS THE PERFECT ENVIRONMENT TO CATALYZE SERIOUS CHANGE IN HOW WE SEE WATER.


385.15 ACRES

.04

AF

1.74 AF / DAY

.601 AF / DAY 56.31 AF

10 YR RAIN EVENT (3 hr) 135.43 AF

EVAPORATION 2.18 AF

TRANSPIRATION 1.87 AF

EVAPOTRANSPIRATION 1.56 AF

RUNOFF TO SITE 104.28 AF

STORAGE 1.25 AF

STREAM INFILTRATION SURFACE RUNOFF 16.21 AF

6.84 AF

SHORT-TERM STORAGE 1.25 AF

EVAPORATION 2.50 AF

Though Tucson receives low annual rainfall, it receives the bulk of its rainwater in a few major storm events. This particular site offered a huge opportunity to control and manage large-scale stormwater loads. The goal here was to create a series of pools to retain incoming stormwater via a culvert. The stormwater from the building is mitigated by a stormwater network that buffers the building from the nearby residences.


Opting to incorporate wastewater management with an occupable building is rarely done, so the challenge was to take large industrial tanks and find amenable adjacencies to human spaces that work. The tanks are strange objects by nature, so how they interact and occupy the space around them was crucial. They are paired with the research labs for ease of measurement and observation. Once the wastewater system gets to the later phases where plants and visable biological processes can be used, larger public spaces become a unique opportunity to get people to interact with their waste in a productive manner.

INTROVERTED (RESEARCH WING)

EXTROVERTED (OUTDOOR WETLAND)


RAW SEWAGE PUMP STATION

BLACKWATER TREATMENT DIAGRAM

10.77 AF / YR

.04

1.74 AF / DAY

.601 AF / DAY 56.31 AF

BLACKWATER WATERSHED AND LOADS

.052 AF/day

.057 AF/day

.033 AF/day

.046 AF/day .048 AF/day .037 AF/day

.088 AF/day

.048 AF/day

.048 AF/day .048 AF/day .038 AF/day.027 AF/day

.042 AF/day

.04 AF/day .04 AF/day .032 AF/day.53 AF/day

.038 AF/day

.035 AF/day

.067 AF/day

.066 AF/day

.265 AF/day

GRADIENT TOTALS .340 AF/day

.068 AF/day

.042 AF/day

.215 AF/day .788 AF/day

.07 AF/day .038 AF/day .034 AF/day

.058 AF/day

.357 AF/day

.046 AF/day

.022 AF/day

.364 AF/day .277 AF/day

TOTAL: 2.341 AF/day

.074 AF/day

.028 AF/day

.043 AF/day

.095 AF/day

ANAEROBIC DIGESTORS

BOILER ROOM

GRIT REMOVAL AND PRETREAT

BAR SCREENS

INFLUENT

EXPORT / REMOVAL

PRIMARY CLARIFIERS

ANOXIC TANKS

COVERED AEROBIC TANKS

UNCOVERED AEROBIC TANKS

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

EFFLUENT


CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

AEROBIC REACTOR (UNCOVERED)

AEROBIC REACTOR (COVERED)

ANOXIC TANKS

ANAEROBIC REACTOR

FLOW EQUALIZATION TANK

SOLID SETTLEMENT TANK

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

AEROBIC REACTOR (UNCOVERED)

DELIGHT CLEANSE REJUVENATE PURIFY

CLEANSE BUBBLING CALMING

AEROBIC REACTOR (COVERED) BUBBLING

ANOXIC TANKS

DIGEST SLIGHT STENCH

ANAEROBIC REACTOR

SETTLING COLD

FLOW EQUALIZATION TANK CONTROLLED MECHANISTIC NOISY

SOLID SETTLEMENT TANK COLLECT STENCH

reading space

computer space kitchen

stack space

map space

reception

DEBATE

meeting room

Water Conflict Transformation

break room

communal kitchen

classroom

LIVE/LEARN EDUCATE STUDY

classroom

computer space

Center for Wastewater Living

gift shop lecture hall

conference rooms

mediation / hearing rooms

gallery staff space

exhibition space

Workshops in Mediation and Facilitation Skills Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Database

business center service rooms

meeting rooms private work space

outdoor demonstration

server space

admin. offices

lobbies / foyers

cafe / restaurant

assembly room

reception / dining hall

board rooms

workshop

research labs

soil & water test lab

classroom

communal kitchen

outdoor demonstration

admin. office

reading space

assembly room lobbies / foyers

board rooms exhibition space

kitchen

administrative offices

map space

mediation / hearing rooms

admin. office

classroom

meeting room

reception

reception / dining hall

cafe / restaurant

break room

board rooms private work space

gallery

tool & equipment

stack space gift shop meeting rooms

server space

courtyardstyle house

gift shop staff space

rowhouse

cafe / restaurant

reception / dining hall

assembly room

gallery

lecture hall

stack space workshop

mediation / hearing rooms

meeting rooms

conference business center service rooms rooms

kitchen

soil & water test lab

admin. offices

single offices

tool & equipment administrative office

workshop

outdoor demonstration

conference rooms

research labs soil & water test lab

reception

INDIVIDUAL

server space

reading space

classroom

private work research labs space

single offices

COLLECTIVE

staff space

computer space

exhibition space

lecture hall

meeting room

admin. office

PUBLIC

map space

business center service rooms

detached single-story home lobbies / foyers

break room

PRIVATE

communal kitchen

classroom

single offices

admin. office

admin. office

tool & equipment


HUMAN SPACE

WATER SPACE

STRUCTURE

SYNTHESIS


TEEN OUTDOOR RECREATION CENTER SPRINGFIELD, OR

Springfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Millrace has been long abandoned by the city, and the existing building does little for taking advantage of its connection to the Millrace or its rehabilitation. The idea of my design for the rec center was to transition from the urban industrial side of Springfield to the natural side that engages the Millrace. This is carried through to the forms (rectilinear and organic), the materials (concrete, sheet metal, and wood) and the spatial organization (offices, warehouse, lounge, etc.), which are all oriented around the indoor climbing wall, the center of activity within the building.


REVITALIZING OLD TOWN CHINATOWN MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT IN PORTLAND, OR Portlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinatown and Historic Skidmore Districts have been working on rejuvenating their public life over the past decade. This project is located at the intersection of these two historic districts and aims to bring people back into the area albeit for work, living, or both. The program was mixed-use in nature to bring business and people back into the heart of Chinatown to live and work. After doing an analysis of the size and function of the buildings in a five-block radius, I decided that a large corner restaurant was critical for the location and to anchor the building. The remaining five floors are composed of residential units oriented around a central atrium that brings light into the building.


site plan

1st floor (retail)

2nd floor (commercial)


3rd floor (residential)

4th/5th floors (residential)

6th/7th floors (residential)

Four different programmatic functions are strung together in a sensible structural grid. The grid also picks up the bay pattern of the Italianate buildings in the Skidmore District. A central atrium organizes the building and provides a shared experience for all of those who enter the building. The main block has the characteristics of the Italianate prototype, with the setback portion incorporating balconies and a more abstracted geometry.


GREEN SCHOOL RETROFIT HOLLADAY ELEMENTARY IN GRESHAM, OR

Holladay Elementary is currently a lowsloping concrete box with little going for it with its beautiful tongue and groove wood roof being its only feature worth keeping. The focus of the studio was to reorganize and retrofit the school to improve the quality of the spaces as well as its environmental performance. Taking the cluster school model, there are three clusters of classrooms around a central gathering space. Each of the classrooms has an outdoor space for the kids to play as well as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;front porchâ&#x20AC;? where students and teachers can have one-on-one sessions or small groups can play or read.


EXISTING CONDITION areas of high glare and overall low daylighting

DAYLIGHT MODEL (DESIGN CONDITION)

even light levels

ACRYLIC VENTILATION MODEL

This studio was unique in that it actually included studies that began to evaluate the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance rather than staying at the purely thereothetical level. Above are two HDR photographs that compare the light levels of an existing classroom and one of mine. Although both photos appear violet and blue, the values are different, with the redesign having higher lighting values and a more even distribution of light that greatly reduces the glare in the existing condition. Also shown is a ventilation model that was tested to show how air would heat up and escape the classroom, which demonstrates the dual function of the lightscoop that was essential to my retrofit.


Evaporative Cooling: Calculations:

Fig. 8.18

Design DB/WB: 86/67 Fig. 8.18 assumes 2.67 cfm/ft2 cooler size: 2.67 cfm/ft2 (75 ft x 100 ft + 6 x 28 ft x 25 ft ) = 31,239 cfm 18.73 Btu/h ft2

31,239 cfm x 20.2 Btu/h ft2= 28,965.67 cfm

Summer Solstice Sun Band (Redesign) The building continues to do a good job of keeping out the hot sun during the summer solstice. The overhangs of the monitors were designed from the summer sun angle to minimize solar heat gain during the summer.

26 Btu/h ft2 Spring/Fall Equinox Sun Band

The building does not let a lot of the south sun in, which can be critical, especially during the fall equinox. The south classroom is the

For this particular strategy, the building’s heat gain does not need to be reduced in order for the strategy to only area with any real south light and at the occupant level. The central space requires large openings to let the sunlight to really come cover the building’s needs. However, the cooler size of just over 28,000 cfm may be a little big. Another issue is that Portland’s climate is marginal in terms of the functionality of a direct evaporative cooling down into the space, while the north classroom needs any sort of opening. The roof can begin to become a space where strategies such as photovoltaics and solar hot water can happen since the light monitors already have a slope to them. If the light scoops begin to take process, so there may be instances of discomfort as evaporation becomes more difficult. Another problem is a strategy one, in that evaporative cooling is not an entirely passive system in and of itself, so it may onbethat same quality, then they can also be utilized for solar heat rather than solely daylighting. better to rely on one of the earlier strategies explored in this exercise.

Cool Towers: Calculations:

DB - WB = 86 F - 67 F = 19F exit air temperature: 70 F cfm = 11,700 sf x 18.73 Btu/h ft2 = 19,922 cfm 1.1(80 F - 70 F) 19,922 cfm/8 = 2,490.24 cfm

ORIGINAL DESIGN

Design DB/WB: 86/67

Spring/Fall Equinox Sun Band (Redesign) Eight 32 sf towers @ 26 ft. tall are required to cool the entire the building.

The building manages to let more sunlight during the equinox due to the increased number of south-facing clerestories.

winter solstice sun band diagrams Winter Solstice Sun Band

REDESIGN

In Winter 2011, I had the opportunity to take a seminar on passive heating and cooling taught by John Reynolds, a coauthor of Mechanical and Electrical Equipment in Buildings, where I had the opportunity to further enhance its performance. Since the focus of the original studio was on daylighting and natural ventilation, my building suffered from a lack of south glass exposure that is essential for winter heating (as seen in the top sun band study). Each week, another set of hand calculations was performed focusing on another aspect of the building’s yearly performance, finally leading to a design that has southfacing clerestories and evaporative cool towers.

Now the building’s problems are evident. When the building is occupied and during the year’s coldest months, the building receives very little solar heat. The south classroom actually receives just under enough from eyeballing the graphic. Here the sloped surfaces begin to reveal themselves as viable opportunities for capturing solar energy and turning it into electricity or heat for the building. There hardly seems to be much solution to get south sun into the north classroom, especially at the occupant level given the building’s overall form. The northern light scoop may have to be removed in order for that side of the building achieve any passive solar heat ability. Again, the light scoops offer themselves to alterations to be come multi-purpose.


A SMALL TOWN LIBRARY FOR BROWNSVILLE, OR Brownsville, Oregon quietly resides at the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and has a rich historic character. Located downtown, the form and materiality of the library had to be respectful of its historic context and have its own unique character. Keeping brick as the front face of the building, it also serves to define the service side of the building in contrast to the timber frame construction of the reading room, making it an expressive space that celebrates reading.

B

A

A

B

N


DESIGN/BUILD RAINWATER SYSTEM FOOD FOR LANE COUNTY (EUGENE, OR)

designBridge is a student-run design/build organization at the University of Oregon. This was a rainwater catchment system for a community garden in west Eugene. One of my main contributions was the design of our first-flush diverter, an essential component to prevent dirty water from entering the cisterns. The original design had a dripper to allow it to drain into the planters that we had made, but we decided on a simple spigot. I participated in all phases of construction, from laying out the cisterns and plumbing system to digging the gravel bed and post foundations to the construction of the fence to the fabrication of the planters and finally the plumbing installation.


[ Submittal [

first-flush diverter

existing shed

Rule of thumb: For every 100 square feet of catchment area, divert 1 gallon of water. For this project we have 150 square feet of roof area, so we have to divert 1.5 gallons

SPECIALIZED FIRST FLUSH DIVERTER DESIGN

cistern


ANALYTICAL/TECHNICAL DRAWINGS LOUIS I. KAHN SEMINAR AND BUILDING ENCLOSURES

MATERIAL / CONSTRUCTION DETAIL

REFLECTOR DETAIL

My fourth year started with taking my last required subject course that involved detailing building enclosures. There were a number of projects that required drawings sets where I had to figure out and design facade details that were both functional and beautiful. Engaging buildings on a technical level became my new fascination, and I was able to follow up the course with a seminar on Louis I. Kahn taught by two of his former students and employees. Each week involved investigating another design concept present in Kahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s masterpieces. Here is a sampling of the technical and analytical drawings of his Kimbell Art Museum, exploring details, structure, and light. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS


Building enclosures proved to be a pivotal point in my education. It was illuminating how detailing a building can affect a buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organization, performance, and experience. Studying buildings at this level lead to a deeper appreciation for what is good design. Oftentimes, the strength of a design can be seen in simple, elegant details that provide a variety of pragmatic functions while also elevating the experience of a space.


TRAVEL ABROAD SKETCHES In spring 2011, I had the opportunity to study in Italy for a quarter. Having traveled around Rome, Florence, and Venice while being stationed in Vicenza, I was able to study the formal movements of the Romans, order and geometry of the Renaissance, and the advanced detailing of the modern. I absorbed whole building design and engaged how materials and joints were detailed.

VENETIAN WINDOW DETAIL, UNKNOWN (VICENZA)

PARCA DELLA MUSICA, RENZO PIANO

SAN GIORGIO / IL REDENTORE, ANDREA PALLADIO


EASEL, CASTELVECCHIO, CARLO SCARPA

HOSPITAL DES INNOCENTS, FILIPPO BRUNELLESCHI

PAZZI CHAPEL


COMMISSIONED WORK LUCIA DEVELOPMENT, STUDIO E

Along with two of my friends, I built a model for Studio-e Architecture in Eugene, Oregon for their proposal for a mixed-use development. The model was constructed from wood, acrylic, printed mylar, babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breath and spray paint.


KAI BIERIG EDUCATION 9.07 – 6.12

Portland, OR | p: (509) 953-5543 | e: pkaibierig@gmail.com BACHELOR of ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON – Eugene, OR • 3.80 cumulative GPA • Cum Laude • Dean’s List (5 terms)

EXPERIENCE 6.08 – 9.08 7.11 – 8.11

INTERN ARCHITECT CHRISTOPHER MORLAN ARCHITECT – Spokane, WA • Drafted remodel from SD to CD • Built 3D models for client presentations • Edited drawings for website/portfolio presentation • Produced as-built drawings

8.11

RENDERER ARCHITECTURE BUILDING CULTURE – Portland, OR • Generated renderings for local AIA awards using Revit and Photoshop

6.10 – 8.10

MODEL-BUILDER STUDIO – E ARCHITECTURE – Eugene, OR • Built large physical model of mixed-use development for promotional purposes • Worked with laser cutter, acrylic, spray-paint, wood, photoshopped mylar textures and materials

6.10 – 8.10

CAD DRAFTER GOODSPACE DESIGN – Eugene, OR • Drafted basic construction document set for a backyard chicken coop/rainwater collection system • Drafted drawing set to be used for patent submission for client’s rainwater collection system

3.10 – 8.10

BUILD LEAD designBRIDGE – University of Oregon • Student-run collaborative design/build group that goes through the planning and building a small-scale project • Worked with consulting fencing contractor and suppliers/manufacturers for donations • Drafted site plan, designed and built rainwater collection system • Created specialized first-flush diverter (product design)

1.11 – 3.11 1.12 – 6.12

STUDIO TA PROF. MELINDA NETTLES (2011) & PROF. TRAVIS MILLER (2012) • Reviewed students individually and in groups • Led model-making demonstrations • Held conversations about design/process/presentations

4.10 – 6.10

TA FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS PROF. IHAB ELZEYADI • Led group lessons/activities with graduate student • Performed building analysis with testing equipment

TECHNOLOGY

Fluent in both Mac OS X and Windows 8+ years experience of drafting in AutoCAD (v. 2004 – 2011) 5 years design with Adobe Creative Suite, i.e. Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign 5 years 3D modeling with Google Sketch-up Pro 1 year 3D modeling with Revit and Rhino Competent in Microsoft Office


NOTABLE COUREWORK

CENTER FOR WASTEWATER LIVING – ARCH 485-6

• My terminal studio that culminated my studies and design philosophy • The project took ideas of fostering communities and rethinking municipalities on a city, neighborhood, an building scale by creating wastewater neighborhoods that would manage their own wastewater reuse in Tucson, Arizona, an area in desperate need of bountiful clean water. • This project was archived by the University of Oregon for accreditation. • Other aspects of the project included connecting people with infrastructure (building and wastewater reclamation), creating comfortable space in an arid climate, providing an adaptable structural framework that can be modified over time

PASSIVE HEATING AND COOLING – ARCH 410

• An elective that expands upon the Environmental Control Systems series taught by MEEB co-author Professor John Reynolds • Weekly calculations and informed redesigns reevaluated old design projects • Sample of coursework can be found in the “Green School Retrofit” section of my portfolio

HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING EVALUATION – ARCH 407

• A weekly seminar led by researcher Dr. Ihab Elzeyadi investigating different environmental and performance based aspects of building analysis • Class culminated with journal-quality research paper investigating classroom thermal and daylighting performance of an elementary school in Bend, Oregon completed with colleague Garrett Kroll. • Data collection involved surveys and questionaires with teachers and dozens of HOBOs data collectors and MS Excel

STUDY ABROAD VICENZA, ITALY

• Courses in Town Form and Material & Detail gave a broad view of investigating Italian design from the ancients up through Carlo Scarpa • Handsketching was a primary means of investigation and presentation

LOUIS I. KAHN SEMINAR – ARCH 407

• Taught by two former students and employees of Kahn’s Masters class and office • I completed weekly dissections of Kahn’s Kimbell Art Museum with two other students investigating a different facet of design, from structure to services to program to detailing • Work included shifting through archival slides, construction documents, and countless journal articles • A book of hand-drafted technical drawings, informative diagrams, and images was produced as a definitive assessment of Kahn’s work.

LAND ANALYSIS – LA 361

• This class covered geology to geomorphology as I learned the basics of analyzing a real swatch of land for development and land preservation.

GREEN CITIES – PPPM 445

• Taught by former Cornell professor, Robert Young • Discussions covered the real meaning of “green cities” as well as a brief history as to how our urban environment came to be this way • Strategies and innovations were discussed in how to rethink existing models of development, economy, society, and environment to be more interactive, productive, and inclusive


Kai Bierig - Student Portfolio  

A selection of student work completed while attending the University of Oregon in Eugene from September 2007 to June 2012.

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