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The The

Blake Upper School

s pe c t r u m 511 Kenwood Parkway, Minneapolis, MN 55403

Billie Pritzker Managing Editor

own student directed play. “I jumped at the chance to be a director for Rumors. Directing really is the best of both worlds. Getting to look at the play abstractly and watch it evolve is a great experience for me, especially after being involved with theatre on so many different levels,” Ford explains. Landis, who worked closely with Ford on last spring’s production of Beauty and the Beast, had no qualms about offering Ford the job. “Ann has a great eye for directing,” she says, “She was the first person that came to mind when I considered having the second cast be studentdirected. She is both organized and capable.” Ann makes her directorial debut on the main stage on Saturday, November 17th at 1:30 p.m. According to both directors, the difference between the two productions of the play rests solely on each actor’s portrayal of his or her characters. Although the content of Simon’s masterpiece Rumors is hysterically funny, there is an important lesson to be learned from the plot and dialogue: Landis says, “The play is about the rumor mill and how things begin to fall apart when people tell lies.” The fall play promises to entertain, as director Ann Ford says, “It’s hilarious. Come ready to laugh.”

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here are few plays I’ve read in my career that I’ve laughed out loud while reading. Rumors was one of them. I knew right away that I wanted to do it with Blake students,” says Diane Landis, director of the Upper School Drama Department’s fall play, Rumors by Neil Simon. This farcical play about a dinner party gone wrong made its Broadway debut in 1988 and has captivated audiences ever since. “I like to provide the student actors with the opportunity to learn about a different genre of theatre during their four years with the program,” Landis says. “Rumors is an extremely funny comedy; its different from what we’ve done in recent years. Comedic timing is everything.” The other unique aspect about this year’s performance is the fact that it is being put on by two separate casts, which allows more students to be involved in the production. Two casts are also able to show two different interpretations of the script. Although the physical movement, or blocking, will be the same for both performances, the second cast is under the direction of Ann Ford ’08, and is evolving into “a very different play,” says Landis. Ford is not new to the stage, as she has been involved with Blake’s drama department since her freshman year. Her love of theatre has inspired her participation in numerous Blake productions as a crew member, an actress and most recently, the playwright and director of her

Recruiting for College Sports

Zoe Sponsler-Hoehn

Internships

06 VOLUME XXXV ISSUE 02

through Blake Connections

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M^2 answers your questions in the new advice column

“your voice in print”

Performance Dates: Thursday, Nov. 15 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 1:30 p.m. (student-directed cast) Saturday, Nov. 17 7:30 p.m.

Gossip Girl Comes to Life on CW

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14 November 2007


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spectrum opinions

Spectrum Staff Editor-In-Chief Kate Morton Managing Editors Lucy Litman Billie Pritzker Layout Editor Alfred Yeung Page Editors Claire Brown: A and E Chloe Browne: Opinions Kip Dooley: A and E Keegan Dubbs: Variety Ben Gitis: News Kelly Grant: Sports Ummul Kathawalla: Variety Zanny Lannin: Student Life Joy Lee: Opinions Thomas Wheeler: Sports Copy Editor Katy Marshall Business Manager Lauren Gellman Staff Writers Joe Ali Meredith Duff Seth Jurgens (Cartoonist) Camille Kroll Allie Malecha Laurie Peltola Michael Mestitz Kiley Naas Daniel Webber Ellie Alldredge Contributing Writers Alex Bakken Kasey Boyd Kyle Boyd Zoey Gold Senta Knuth Hannah Page Sarah Pomerantz Jo-Dean Seymour Hannah Tieszen Jimmy Yablonski Advisor Scott Hollander

nov 07

“Going Green” Becomes Cliché Camille Kroll Staff Writer

out and buy it. Some companies have taken advantage of the green movement n America the slogan “Go green” has by using its principles for progress. marketing coverage of become a repeated mantra. “Going Media and environmental issues is essential to green” is now trendy. The raise awareness new interest and initiative in and interest. More becoming environmentally people are becoming friendly is undeniably a good proactive because thing. Unfortunately, some environmentalists people publicly support are no longer seen environmental issues, but fail as just “tree-hugging to follow their own vocalized hippies.” However, ideals. Global warming the news media and has transformed seemingly marketers make overnight from activism to environmentalism commercialism. Unaware fashionable instead of the issues surrounding of portraying it as a the environment, people serious issue. eagerly buy into this green This raises movement because it has the question: Have reached the top of the cool www.urbanoutfitters.com American consumers list as one of the the hottest This graphic tee is sold become enthralled fashion trends. without any indication of with the concepts of How did environmentalism become donating part of the profit to environmentalism or its resulting products? embedded into American ‘green’ movement. pop culture? When did it gain its lofty Consumers believe buying eco-friendly place next to the hippest celebrities? products is a major step towards solving Some companies design products global warming. Buying these products related to environmentalism, get and reducing consumption may be a celebrity endorsement, and hope the good first step, but will not solely solve newly infatuated consumers will rush this issue. After purchasing a hybrid, you

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might want to band together politically to petition your state representatives to reduce fuel emissions. Next time you have an urge to “Go green,” think about your motives. Show your support through actions, rather than products. Walk, bicycle, or carpool rather than drive alone, conserve water and electricity, and recycle your paper, plastic, and metal waste. Think on a national scale. Start petitions, support an environmental group or ‘green’ politician, or attend an environmental rally. These concepts are not new. You know what you have to do, but do you really follow through? Global warming activist and Nobel Prize winner Al Gore employs a fitting cliché in his essay, “The Moment of Truth”: “The Chinese expression for ‘crisis’ consists of two characters…The first is a symbol for ‘danger’; the second is a symbol for ‘opportunity.’ The rapid accumulation of global-warming pollution in the Earth’s atmosphere is now confronting human civilization with a crisis like no other we have ever encountered…Just as we can no longer ignore this challenge, neither should we fear it. Instead, we should welcome it. Both the danger and the opportunity. And then we will meet it because we must.”

Staff Editorial: Homework at Blake

omework: the dreadful thing that students learn to tolerate. At what point does homework become intolerable? It’s common to stroll through the Blake hallways and find kids scrambling to finish a paper or filling in blanks for partial credit. There’s a vicious cycle that forces intelligent and hardworking kids to cut corners. According to Dion Crushshon, , teachers should assign and expect no more than forty-five minutes of homework per night. When students take up to seven classes, this can add up to over five hours of homework. To relieve this homework load, the school doesn’t encourage students to take seven classes, and there is a rotating block schedule with classes that only meet four times a week. However, this doesn’t seem to be enough. On any given night Blake students are not only doing homework, but also participating in extracurricular activities, which include sports,

rehearsals, and community service. Teachers assign what they may feel to be an forty-five minutes of work, but this work can quickly escalate to two hours when a student has trouble grasping the assignment or understanding the text. Thus, the cutting of corners commences. Skip a math problem here, an English reading there, and BAM, the most valuable part of homework has been eliminated: learning. These students may be getting along fine in terms of grades, but in terms of learning for the sake of learning, they are probably miles behind. There is a solution. Students, teachers, and parents must realize that students don’t have the time or energy to accomplish everything. There needs to be efficient and effective time management. You should dedicate extra time on difficult subjects, because in the long run it’ll benefit you more than any ten-point worksheet. If you are feeling terribly overwhelmed, you

should talk to your teacher or re-think your course load. There is an abundance of opportunities to meet with teachers, express concerns, or simply work on catching up. Thus, don’t let yourself get behind. School, and for that matter life, is all about finding a balance. We students have much of the year ahead of us and plenty of opportunities for growth and change. For the rest of the year, rather than working a little harder, let’s work a little smarter.

The opinions expressed in the paper are those of the writers and not those of The Spectrum or The Blake School.

Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor are strongly encouraged and should be emailed to spectrum@blakeschool.org. The Spectrum reserves the right to edit letters to the editor for length and content.


nov 07

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spectrum opinions

Dangerous Distraction or Harmless Diversion?

Zanny Lannin Page Editor

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o you’ve just signed on to AOL and the top stories are “Bomb kills 15 in Chechnya” and “Britney Spears loses custody of children.” Which one will you read first? Be honest. Personally, I would not only click to read about poor Britney, but also read the whole story thoroughly and visit people.com for more information. This new “celebrity and entertainment craze” has hit the U.S. hard in the past decade. For the same reason we love watching American Idol rejects and the cat fights on The Hills, the public is infatuated with those in the limelight because of their outrageous lifestyles and the drama that comes with them. Because of this increase in interest of entertainment news, and the decrease of newspaper sales in the past few years, newspapers, radio stations,

news stations have upped its dedication it because it’s my guilty pleasure. I like to entertainment news to the joy and dis- knowing who was seen stumbling out gust of the public. Bill Keller, executive of a club at 5 am or which movie star editor of The New York Times, said, “It was spotted canoodling with a famous [entertainment coverage] is part of a larger trend of newspapers responding to economic pressure by dumbing down, downsizing, and pandering to what they perceive as fredandma.blogs.com readers’ taste In Touch Magazine, a popular celebrity gossip resource. for amusemusician in New York. But wait, wasn’t ment rather than understanding.” Jeez he dating that girl from that one show Bill, that’s a bit harsh; I don’t read celast week? Oh the drama! Part of me just lebrity news because I’m dumb, I read wants to know, because their every day

Cartoon Corner

activities are just so incredible and unrealistic to nearly everyone in the US. Also, since their lives are so highly publicized, the public feels their highs and lows to the point where we feel as if we basically know them. I’m definitely not saying that war, genocide, starvation, destruction, politics, the environment, and death are not valid news topics. I believe that all these pressing issues are important, but after coming home from a full day of school and sports, I don’t immediately go to read about how another expert confirmed that our planet is going to die if we don’t do something about the emission of fossil fuels. Celebrity news is just a little amusement that I allow myself to have. Some people have Halo 3 or Grey’s Anatomy, and mine is perezhilton.com. So please, go ahead and feel no shame in reading about Britney, Jayden and Sean. I’m sure it’s going to be juicy.

America Aiding Censorship

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Seth Jurgens

Senta Knuth Contributing Writer

n the last couple of years, a controversy has arisen concerning the involvement of American companies in the Chinese government’s censorship of the Internet. By complying with Chinese censorship laws, these companies have reflected hypocrisy in American ideals. In 2006, Google elected to create a revised search engine, Google China, that was consistent with China’s censorship policies. A spokesperson for Google explained the company’s decision, stating: “While removing search results is inconsistent with Google’s mission, providing no information (or a heavily degraded user experience that amounts to no information) is more inconsistent with our mission.” Now, if you search terms like ‘1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre’ or ‘Tibetan Independence’ from a computer in China, you will come up with very few or no results. This kind of association with the Chinese government must be considered a tragedy. American companies like Google are blatantly flying in the face of American values of free speech and disregarding the basic human rights of Chinese citizens. In addition to complying

with China’s censorship policies, some American companies have even helped the Chinese government to track e-mails. In 2005, Shi Tao, a Chinese journalist, was arrested and imprisoned for sending a communist party document to a Chinese democracy website overseas. Tao was arrested and prosecuted by the Chinese government after one of Yahoo’s subsidiaries handed over his personal user information to Chinese authorities. Not only are these American companies denying Chinese citizens information, they are helping the Chinese government to unfairly prosecute and condemn innocent people who are trying to stand up for their beliefs. Sophie Richardson, Asian advocacy director for Human Rights Watch in Washington, says of Tao’s case: “This is comparable to what’s happened in a number of other cases where essentially the companies have been approached by public security bureau officials and asked to help identify particular individuals for their online discussions, for which those individuals have subsequently been prosecuted.” Given everything that American companies have done in recent years, we as citizens need to make sure that America upholds our belief in basic rights and freedom for all.


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spectrum news

nov 07

Sophomore Speaks to United Nations Allison Malecha Staff Writer

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n September 21, Taylor Reed ‘10 spoke to the United Nations about achieving peace. Taylor is involved with the program Peace Jam, which has allowed her to spread her views on achieving peace. Peace Jam approaches peace by connecting youth with adults and carrying out community service around the world. Peace Jam allows the young adults in the program propose ideas, plan ideas, and set those ideas into action with the adults guiding them. Founded in 1996 by Dawn Engle and Ivan Sujanieff, Peace Jam was created while Sujanieff spoke with gang members in Denver. He was surprised to learn that these violent gang members had heard the name Desmond Tutu, and that they respected his peaceful approach to change. From there he conceived the idea of connecting Nobel Laureates, to troubled youth across the world. Engle and Sujanieff then managed to peak the interest of the revered Dalai Lama who helped involve other Laureates. But besides having some incredible affiliates, what makes Peace Jam tick? “Not only are we telling people about peace but we’re doing it in a youth fun way, so it appeals,” says Taylor.

Originally from Texas, she got involved with Youthrive (the NW U.S. branch of Peace Jam) in 8th grade when she moved to Minnesota, after being recommended by her leadership teacher here. The first program she entered made quilts that were donated to Youth Link, a center for homeless youth. Currently Taylor’s main project in the program is called “Peace by Piece,” where she, among other Youthrive members, spend time at Brooklyn Center High School in Minneapolis with first time offenders. These include kids who indulge in theft or hack into computers, but instead of being sent to Juvenile Hall, they get to learn leadership skills and do community service through “Peace by Piece.” One of the places the program frequently makes field trips to Feed My Starving Children, where some of the food made at Legacy Day was donated. Returning to its roots, the annual international meeting for Peace Jam was held last year in Denver to celebrate a decade of accomplishments and growth. At this convention Taylor and her Brooklyn Center partner, Frederick Hubblua, had the chance to make a speech – a speech that caught the eye of a UN representative who happened

Students Dive Into Politics

Lucy Litman Managing Editor

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lthough it may seem long in the future, talk of the 2008 election surrounds us already. Whether it is on the news, at the dinner table, or on our favorite TV shows, it seems that we cannot escape discussion of the upcoming election. To accommodate the growing interest in students’ involvement with politics, two students Julia Vill ’08 and Paige Esterekin ‘08, have started a new club at Blake named “Students in Politics.” This group meets periodically on Wednesdays during the TASC period. So what does this group do? Founder Julia Vill says, “Members of the group usually come to meetings and offer up volunteer opportunities they’ve heard of. We are also brainstorming ideas of speakers to bring in for symposiums.

We also hope to sign people up to vote later this year.” The group is centered on a discussion style format, like English classes at Blake. The leaders of the club recognize the diverse opinions that Blake students have. The club is “open to all views. I lean more Republican, so when the Blake Democrats club was around, I wanted to be involved in politics at Blake, but there was really wasn’t a way for me to do this,” says Julia Vill about her personal experience and what inspired her to start the club. The founders believed that this group would “be a good idea to keep a political group at Blake, but create one that was open to all views and opinions no matter the party in which someone identifies themselves”. So if you are interested in politics, or just love to get into intellectual discussions about the world, stop by the meetings in Mr. Graham’s room.

Taylor Reed

Taylor Reed addresses the United Nations. to be present. The pair were then of- adults, as well as hundreds of others, via fered the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity webcast, from Sudan, the Congo, and so speak at the UN during ‘The Day of Lebanon. Peace.’ And from the sounds of it, they It’s people like Taylor, and promade quite an impact. Many people grams like Peace Jam, that inspire us have already shown interest in joining. to think that maybe “world peace” can “We’ve been getting calls off the hook,” be something more tangible than words says Taylor. bubbling from a beauty pageant contes Only a few weeks ago, Taylor tant’s mouth. If we all help out in our and Frederick took the stage at the UN own way, enough little pieces can be to speak about Peace Jam and their expe- built into something pretty big. riences in the program. They presented in front of a nerve-wracking 500 young

Forum Makes Stronger Effort to Recycle Ellie Alldredge Staff Writer

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his semester, The Blake School is making a stronger effort to recycle in the community. Forum, in particular, is promoting recycling. Ms. Lincoln, a teacher on Forum says, “I hope everyone does their part. If everyone takes the responsibility for his or her own stuff, Blake will be a better place.” Ms. Lincoln along with Junior Class President Ben Gitis ‘09, and Junior representatives Ben Jones ‘09 and Rachel Neil ’09 have been working to increase recycling. All of these people would be great contacts if you have any further questions regarding recycling. Forum explains that many reasons have prevented Blake from recycling. For example, paper often doesn’t get recycled because trash gets thrown

in the blue paper bin. The paper is then considered contaminated and is thrown in the trash. The school, itself, orders 30 cases of paper every four to six weeks. Each case has ten reams of paper and each ream has 500 pieces of paper. That means Blake goes through 900,000 to 1,350,000 pieces of paper during the nine months of school. That doesn’t even include paper that student use at home. Forum stresses that the blue bins are for paper only. Also Forum says the community has to recycle all the time. Ms. Lincoln points out, “It’s not like we can recycle this week and then go back to our bad habits after the week is done. It’s a lifestyle.” Ms. Lincoln and other Forum members are working on making Blake adapt to this lifestyle and begin to recycle more.


nov 07

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spectrum news

News in Brief

T-Shirt Tradition Becomes Controversial Alex Bakken Contributing Writer

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he senior girl shirt tradition became controversial this fall after rumors spread about the shirts having a double meaning. In past years, a tradition was established where senior girls made t-shirts for all the girls in their class. Many of these t-shirts displayed acronyms with double meanings that the administration considered inappropriate. This year the senior girls had shirts that display the acronym S.H.A.R.K.S. The day senior girls wore these shirts, rumors spread amongst students and faculty. The senior grade dean, Mr. Mahoney, took immediate action in response. Mr. Mahoney met with the senior girls who were wearing the shirts and explained why he thought the tshirts were inappropriate. Although the senior girls were disappointed, they agreed not to wear the shirts to school again. Afterwards, Mr. Mahoney took no other disciplinary actions. Jamie McLaughlin ‘08 ex-

Jo-Dean Seymour Contributing Writer

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pressed that she and “many of the other senior girls wanted to make shirts to continue an earlier tradition.” Many senior girls considered the shirts a joke, which didn’t really mean what the double meaning implied. Most agree that they didn’t want the shirts to be offensive. However, a few senior girls were offended by the Alfred Yeung t-shirts and did not particiThe controversial senior girl t-shirt. pate. The issue to Mr. Mahoney was decision. Mr. Mahoney said, “the imnot that they wore shirts that had an age of my seniors was better than what acronym on them, but instead that this the t-shirt said.” So in response, he acronym has a double meaning that banned the girls from wearing the shirts people who weren’t wearing the shirts at school. Although the senior girls no understood. He believes the senior girls longer wear these t-shirts, the controwere not representing themselves well. Mr. Mahoney was at first undecided as versy continues. Many consider it an isto what he should do, but after seeing sue about freedom of expression and beanother student who was not a senior lieve that the girls should be allowed to girl wearing the shirt and briefly meet- wear these shirts, while others consider ing with other grade deans, he made his the t-shirts inappropriate, offensive and unsuitable for our community.

Rumor of New Detention Policy is False

ecently rumors have spread amongst students that no work can be cone during detention. However, this rumor is false. Mr. Menge states that the changes are “a misconception” because a few faculty and students have been confused on what the students should be doing during their time in detention. Some faculty and students previously believed Students in detention. that the students were not allowed to do anything at all, including their schoolwork. This is untrue and has been corrected, but it is an ongoing misconception believed by some. The real rule is that students are permitted to study the entire time under the watch of a supervisor. They are not allowed to socialize or to use electron-

ics. The handbook reveals that a student may receive detention due to attendance or behavioral problems. The Director, Assistant Director, or a Grade Dean at Blake may assign detentions, which are served before or after school for the duration of one hour. Notices for detentions are posted one day in advance on the student message board and the Daily Bulletin. Detentions must be served before a practice, game, Ben Gitis or rehearsal for students participating in after-school activities. If a student fails to show up for detention, they are consequently assigned a Saturday school session. From 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. on selected Saturdays, students who do not attend their assigned detention or have acquired three hours of detention must attend Saturday school. If a student fails to attend, they may receive a suspen-

sion. Another contentious perception is that of the permanent record and whether detentions are documented. Mr. Menge says that the “permanent record is a very deceptive term,” meaning that different people understand it in their own way. The truth is that the Blake School does record when a student receives a detention, but it is a private matter. Issues similar to detention are not free to the public and are not represented on all high school transcripts. But the Upper school keeps a more detailed, but confidential, record of your high school career. Reasons for a student receiving a detention, when it is served, and relevant information to the subject matter can be found in the handbook. The Blake School Family Handbook is sent to families of the Lower, Middle, and Upper schools. Within the Upper School chapter, there is a clearly marked section on disciplinary responses with a subdivision of detention. It is essential to attain a decent attendance record to avoid detention this year. If assigned one, it is best to attend it promptly and to be productive during

Ben Gitis Page Editor

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ast quarter a petition to change the backpack policy with over 100 signatures was presented to Forum. Senior Class President Thomas Wheeler ’08 along with senior Forum representatives Kyle Boyd ’08 and Claire Goebel ’08 responded by giving an assembly announcement that stated Forum is not able to change the backpack policy until the students prove themselves trustworthy. Therefore the backpack policy will not change until the student body shows that they can follow the current backpack policy.

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his fall the new MCs kicked off the year with a successful first Open Mic Night. The new MCs are Eric Barry ’09, Britta Wangstad ’08, and Nico Peterson ’08. The goal of Open Mic Night is to create a comfortable atmosphere where students are able to perform in front of their peers.

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he first week of the second quarter began with two days of varsity soccer. Both the girl’s and the boy’s varsity soccer teams advanced to the State Tournament. Both teams earned second place in state. Students missed two days of school for the state games.

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ew art is being added to the hallway of the Social Studies wing on the second floor. The advanced drawing class is adding the art as a class project. The drawings will become permanent additions to the school.

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his year English classes began to teach students grammar. Many have received grammar practice books in their English classes. English teachers are hoping this will make students less reliant on the grammar check application on their computers and more reliant on their own editing abilities.

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ixty new iMacs were purchased for the upper school at $700 dollars each. The school was offered an attractive discount. The new laptops will save the school money on energy bills because they are more energy efficient.


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nov 07

spectrum sports

COLLEGE BOUND? Kyle Boyd Contributing Writer

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hen discussing life after high school with friends, how many have said, “I’m going straight to the pros, yeah I’m that good?” I’m guessing that most of them never said that statement. Instead, it is most Blake students’ dream to play their favorite sport in college. We can all see ourselves becoming campus legends while getting paid nothing. Anyone can become an instant celebrity: like the participants in the huge upset that started a losing streak that will forever be remembered in Indiana. For the average Blake athlete, Division I glory is a little harder to imagine, unless your name starts with “B” and ends with “irkholtz.” So for the rest of us, who are not going DI or straight pro like basketball stars LeBron “King” James or Sidney “The

Kid” Crosby, what are our options? The majority of Blake athletes will go on to play Division III sports because of the balance D3 sports can provide between your academic life and athletic life. Now, the question may be on your mind: how do I get recruited? The recruiting process usually starts during your junior year of high school. Recently committed Eric Olsen ‘08 says, “getting recruited is all about putting your name out there letting people know who you are and how well you play.” The first step is getting your name to coaches and recruiters. You can do this through specified recruiting camps, emails, and video. One assumption is that if you’re

really good someone will just show up and notice you, but this is not always the case. “The best way to find if coaches are even looking for athletes in your area is to contact them yourself,” says Dartmouth bound Kip Dooley ‘08. What separates the different programs from one another for the Blake high school recruit? Emily Moos ‘08 says, “The coaches play a huge part in deciding if a program is for you.” She says, “You want a coach that should be positive but willing to give constructive criticism and you should get to know the players.” Megan Gallivan ‘08 agrees and adds, “how well the program is playing

“getting recruited is all about putting your name out there letting people know who you are and how well you play.”

and their reputation is another factor.” Because Blake athletes have grown accustomed to rigorous academic work finding a school that is competitive in the sports arena and competitive inside the classroom is a main determinate for many of our athlete’s college choices. The top 5 things that Blake athletes would advise to the future recruits. 1) Play well, fact: you won’t get recruited if you are not playing your best. 2) Keep up academically–Bad grades can limit your choices of programs. 3) Pick a school that you would want to attend even if you couldn’t play there -you never know when you could get hurt. 4) Get to know different coaches –If you don’t like the coach, you probably won’t have much fun. 5) Remember that it is all supposed to be fun. –Pick someplace you can accept early morning practices; don’t just go because they are a little better than another team.

WHO IS THE MYSTERY ATHLETE? S

Kasey Boyd Contributing Writer

tanding at six feet and one inch and weighing in at 180 pounds, there is more to this Blake Mystery Athlete than his outward appearances. If you find him on World of Warcraft, his level 31 knight elf warrior may strike fear in you, as our Mystery Athlete does to his opponents. In his free time, Mystery Athlete is an avid crossword puzzler, and his first choice upon turning on the television is Nickelodeon’s “Legends of the Hidden Temple.” He is a humble soul, as he looks up to his hero, Senior Class President, Thomas Wheeler ‘08. Mystery Athlete calls Thomas, “the human form of God.” To the ladies at The Blake School, Mystery Athlete is a Taurus and on his dream date you would accompany him to Buffalo Wild Wings. At Buffalo Wild Wings his ideal date would buy 18 medium hot wings, give him a massage, and watch Golden Gophers Hockey. For you die-hard Blake Athletics fans out there, his pre-game rituals include juggling, listening to music by 9-inch Nails, having deep spiritual

thoughts, and visualizing entire games in his head. You may get lucky to see him roll into the Aamoth Parking lot, bumping Kanye, over Curtis. Although he drives a car, you should know that his dream ride would be a moped similar to the one Safari Steve rolls i n , e x cept in hot pink. H e is a man of vision, who sees himself in ten years as “hopefully living.” He draws inspiration from fictional characters such as the elephant from the epic novel, Everybody Poops, and from his favorite book, Where the Wild Things Are. Even when I asked him personal questions about his bench press he bravely replied, “I’m just

breaking double digits, I don’t want to brag”. As a senior, Mystery Athlete will play a prominent role in this year’s varsity hockey team’s success. He will bring much experience and leadership to a club that has b e e n on a roll, m a k ing it to state the past two years. With eight returning seniors and a large junior class, this year’s hockey team is only looking to outdo last year’s team. We will look to Mystery Athlete to give us hope as the season begins. Mystery Athlete confidently sees virtue in this year’s upcoming season saying that, “it’s gonna go great, Birkholz is gonna be the first Junior to win Mr. Hockey.”

Although much of this information makes up who Mystery Athlete is, I was aware of the type of spectacular individual I had found after I had asked him one of my first few questions. His answer, shook my foundation and beliefs to their roots, and truly embodies this life-changing experience. I asked Mystery Athlete, “How did you get to be so good,?” He blew me away with his answer, “It wasn’t my choice, it was a gift from God, God chose me, natural selection… you know, some people get it, some people don’t, I just got lucky.” In my mind Mystery Athlete is what our school wants to see in all of its students. He is a driven man who can be an example to all of us. A man of passion and promise, he is, above all, a man of perfection. Take what you have learned in this article : sneak into the pre-game locker room, challenge a 31 knight elf on World of Warcraft, and, most importantly, go the hockey games. Can you guess who he is?


nov 07

07 spectrum sports Our Very Own Ms. Soccer

“Get’cha Head in the Game”: Sports Mentality Hannah Tieszen Contributing Writer

ings take place with the captains, and then teh coaches, before they go head to the pool to do cheers and prepare thletes know the emotions in- themselves for the competition. The volved in the sports: anger for a mentality for swimmers and runners loss, glory for a win, pain for that fi- is similar, being that they both involve nal sprint or play, and anxiousness for individual performance, and also rewhen the whistle finally blows to start. quire complete focus on the meet and Athletes also want to know what they improving times. can do to enhance their performance. Other sports use methods of The solution for many is achieving the visualization to imagine themselves right state of mind before entering a swimming faster, crossing the finish season, pracline, or scoring tice or game. the winning goal. Visualiz C a n an athlete’s ing goals, and approach to what needs a particular to be done to sport, whether accomplish it is crossthem, is an country, basextremely important factor ketball, baseball or any in the success of a season. other sport, really affect Mr. Lee also his or her persays that any formances? Is athlete “has there any truth to be thinkto common ing positive expressions thoughts, or like “sports are the athlete will 98% mental”, not be focused on what needs or the phrase “get’cha head to be done in www.drpbody.com in the game” All sports require specific mindsets to compete. the competition.” from Disney’s “High School Musical?” An athlete’s The mentality for team sports, approach to a sport can really affect such soccer and lacrosse, differs from how the season turns out, and a per- individual sports. In a team sport, evson’s attitude can also affect a team’s ery player must contribute in order for outcome. the team to succeed Success can be Cross-country and track largely impacted by the team’s willcoach, Gary Lee, says, “In running, ingness to work together and also how the best runners are able to block out they help each other in the games. Gothose things not pertaining to the com- ing into a team sport, an athlete must petition. The focus needs to be on the be able to pull their own weight as a course, the technique and the strategy strong competitor, but balance it with of the race. If mentally they are think- working strongly with their teaming about other things, they will not mates. As a whole, the success of our perform as well in the race.” This mes- school teams is relient on the enthusisage is important for other sports, but astic participation of so many willing, especially running, because the focus eager and ready athletes. must be on the task at hand in order for So remember this athletes: there to be success. When top runners what you put into a season or game is go out to run in a meet, they’re one what you will get out. Believe in the hundred percent focused on finishing strengths of your team and yourself, strong and succeeding their goals. and you will find success in your sea For girls swim and dive, Sut- son. ton Higgins ’11 says that team meet-

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Thomas Wheeler Page Editor

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egan Gallivan ‘08, a senior at our very own Blake school was named was named Ms. Soccer for the 2007 season by the Minnesota State High School league. She was the Ms. Soccer of the Class A State. She has been named All-Metro and All-State as well for the past three years. Starting her freshman year on the varsity team, Megan has been one of our top players. This season alone she had 18 goals and 15 assists. Fellow teammate and co-captain Emily Moos ‘08 said,” Megan is so much fun to play with. She is always positive, and a great leader on and off the field. She has been my biggest support this year, and I am so happy I have had the opportunity to play with her. She is the best!” Megan will be playing Division 1 soccer next year at Columbia University in New York City.

Thomas Wheeler, Alfred Young

Megan Gallivan and the Challenge Cup.

A “Spark” of Greatness “Sparky keeps a positive attitude that rubs off on the team. He is a very devoted coach and he trusts his players.” -Eric Barry ‘09 “No man is more dedicated to a team. Tradition, integrity, and passion” -Austin Dressen ‘09 “Anyone who knows Charlie, as I have been fortunate to know him over the past 30 years, knows that he teaches values through his direction but most clearly in what he models for all of us. Charlie Seel is a mentor, a role model, and a class act for others to follow.” -Paul Menge

“He’s not only 100% positive, but he’s also very alive in practice and likes to get involved. That’s how all soccer coaches should be!” -Joe Ali ‘09 “Sparky has taught me how to be a true competitor and how to love the game of soccer. Most importantly he instills in us players the value of the relationships you make in the classroom and on the field.” -Kip Dooley ‘08

“His experience and determination is what drove us forward and led us to victory.” Andy Ellwien Alfred Yeung Charlie Seel coaches at the Boys’ State ‘08 soccer game.

“Sparky understands that team chemistry wins championships, not individual players. And that’s what makes him so successful.” -Blake Dressen ‘08


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Production of Clothes Becomes a Violation of Human Rights L

Alfred Yeung Layout Editor

upe is paid three dollars an hour, forced to work at home additionally for no pay, forbidden to use the bathroom, and locked in a factory for over 12 hours every day. Lupe and her fellow workers could no longer withstand the treatment they were receiving, and walked off their job to protest the company they sewed clothes for, Forever 21. One might think that such factories with terrible conditions must be located in El Salvador, China, India, or some third world country where labor is cheap and factory regulations are overlooked, but in reality, Lupe’s factory, and many others like it, is located in Los Angeles. Despite its identity of being the land of the free and an advocate of equal rights, the US has allowed labor crimes to continue to slip through the fingers of prosecution, causing the lives of individuals to seem less important than the financial stability of large corporations. Such atrocities have occurred throughout the history of the US. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, many immigrants, children included, worked in sweatshop condition. Their hours were long and trying, and the working conditions could have caused their deaths.

Since then, the government has passed laws to protect workers from potentially life-threatening workplaces and have banned the use of child labor. It would seem that workers would be treated more fairly with these laws, and yet conditions continue to worsen, even in

workers didn’t have proper documentation and couldn’t speak English. According to one of the workers, “If you don’t have the correct papers and cannot speak English, then you are invisible.” The immigrants who moved to the US and ended up in sweatshops believed

Factory conditions in the past continue to haunt the laborers today. the US. Although there are laws protecting workers from appalling conditions, large corporations, such as Forever 21, continued to violate the rules, claiming that they couldn’t control the conditions in the clothing factories. The unethical situation was brought to court, and with years of hard work and legal battles, the Forever 21 workers were able to get the rights they deserved. It was especially difficult to win their case because many of the

that they would have a better life in the US. The US was a country where, they thought, everyone who worked hard would be met with success. However, the symbolic Stature of Liberty and the image of the ideal middle class family become nothing by myths in the experience of many working immigrants. Some believed that the American Dream existed, but upon arrival, their lack of documentation prevented them from accessing job opportunities and eliminated

their hopes of an American dream. Buying clothes that are created by laborers suffering under sweatshop conditions creates support of these conditions. Some company factories that use sweatshop conditions do not see, or do not care that their actions are harmful and immoral. Companies often change their factory policies to support their workers because many consumers do not want to be a part of the horrible treatment of individuals with sweatshop conditions. In the Forever 21 case, the laborers persuaded people to boycott the clothes at Forever 21 by educating them about the illegal events occurring in the factories. If the public refuses to shop at a certain store, those in charge must change their ways and support the needs of their workers in order to continue generating revenue. This process of garnering change in society is much like the peaceful methods used during the Civil Rights Era. Due to the bus boycotts and the influence of the movement, the bus companies lost business and money. If individuals are able to recognize the moral dilemma of sweat shops and come together as the majority, they can use their power as consumers to reject and prevent the severe violation of human rights.

Some Blake Apparel Inadvertently Supports Sweatshops Lucy Litman Managing Editor

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ou slip on your Blake apparel, whether from Legacy Day or the Newest Homecoming themed shirt. But, does the thought of where these clothes were made ever come into mind? Have you looked at the tags for any other reason than to check the size? After some investigation, I gathered together the Blake clothing to investigate where these items that we all so proudly wear. The Blake Homecoming Gear along with some of the Prom clothing was made by a company called Gildan Active wear. According to an article written by Daniel Workman, a noted economist, Gildan Active wear subcontracts Central American Sweatshops to get their product made in the

most cost effective way. In a statement ties in Central America. issued several years ago, Gildan Active Fruit of the Loom, who made Wear admitted to contracting a Hondu- our Legacy Shirts, utilizes sweatshops ran sweatshop in the where the workt r a d e ers had mandazones of tory work shifts Central longer than the America. legal maximum. T h e s e They also fired sweattheir workers ils h o p s legally, and then have been proceeded to haknown to Alfred Yeung rass them in their utilize 15 homes and sign The 2006 Legacy Day shirt utilized a company that p e r s o n “voluntary” res- uses sweatshop labor, Fruit of the Loom. unites ignation letters. Gildan however, is con- who produce 3400 shirts each day and tinuing their expansion of the exploita- in exchange for the 10-12 hours these tion of sweatshops in Central America. employees work, they workers will reBy 2010, Gildan plans to spend $ 500 ceive roughly $7. billion to expand its production facili- Blake Prom apparel however

utilizes J-America, which has adopted Labor Codes of Conduct. J-America requires enforcement of the Labor Code of Conduct by all the people that it contracts to. The code places a maximum working time of 48 hours per week, and must have one day a week off. Limitations on age are enforced, and no one younger than 14 may be hired. When Spectrum talked to Ms. Scherer about the apparel that was bought she stated, “I haven’t thought that much about it, usually vendors come to us.” This is common as most of us do not think about what we put on every morning. However, there is more to our clothes than name brands and patterns; we must be more aware of the immoral situations surrounding the production of our clothes.


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Popular Sweatshop-Free Options Created in 1996, Gap Inc.’s* Code of Vendor Conduct is based on internationally accepted labor standards and is intended to promote sustaintudents often unwittingly purchase clothing able improvements in working conditions across made in sweatshop factories. While many the industry. Gap maintains that all of their facAmerican companies would prefer to ignore the tories must follow this Code and comply with existence of sweatshops, there are other compa- all local labor laws and regulations. According nies that pledge to be sweatshop free. The best to their website, the Code’s expectations include way we can end the spread of sweatshops is to the prohibition of discrimination, forced labor support companies who and child labor, requirements for wages, American Apparel promote safe working work hours, safe and healthy working 1433 W. Lake Street conditions. Among the conditions, and assurance of workers’ companies who embrace Minneapolis, MN 55408 freedom of association. *The Gap Inc. insweatshop free ethos are cludes the clothing companies Gap, Old American Apparel, Pata- Mon-Sat: 10am-9pm Navy and Banana Republic. Sun: 12pm-6pm gonia, Gap and Edun. However, the president of Gap Patagonia’s Synchilla Pullover American ApparNorth America, Marka Hansen, has reGap’s Herringbone Chinos el has established a presence in the marketplace cently been confronted with sweatshop accusawith its brightly colored clothing. Dov Charney, tions. A subcontractor was found to be using child Founder and CEO of American Apparel, is an labor to sew Gap clothes in India. Upon learning outspoken advocate for immigrant rights and of the alleged abuse, the fair-labor enterprise and has maintained his H a n sen stated, “I Gap commitment to ethical manufacturing in the nine f e e l Southdale Center violated and years of his company’s existence. While Ameri- I feel Ridgedale Center very upset and can Apparel would “love to change the world,” a n g r y with our vendor Rosedale Center they have started by changing the way clothes and the subcontractor Mall of America can be made and persuading consumers to pay w h o made this very, attention to labor and environmental issues. v e r y, very unwise decision.” The relationship with between Gap Unlike the immoral treatment of workAdidas’s Neptune XC ers in sweatshops, factory workers of American and this subcontractor has now been terminated. American Apparel Flex Fleece Apparel are treated well to ensure their general Founded on the premise of trade as a Zip Hoody wellbeing. Salaries are means of fostering economic growth in Patagonia performance-related at developing countries, EDUN was cre1648 Grand Ave about $12 an hour, well ated by Ali Hewson, Bono and New York above California’s mini- St. Paul, MN 55105 clothing designer Rogan Gergory in 2005. mum wage of $6.75. OthMade in locally run factories in Africa, er American Apparel staff Mon-Sat: 10am-7pm South America and India, EDUN is a full benefits include subsi- Sun: 11am-6pm fashion collection for men and women. dized health insurance for The company’s staff visits each factory $8 a week, free English at least twice a year to try to improve lessons, subsidized meals and free parking. compliance infractions and grow the factories’ Not only are American Apparel’s brightly capabilities so they are practical resources. Also, colored T-shirts sold in their commercial stores, EDUN is currently developing and implementthey are also used by small artist-run companies ing a Corporate Adidas creating screen-printed shirts. As Design ColSocial ResponsiPatagonia’s Lightweight Ski Hat lective in Uptown Minneapolis, several local b i l i t y Champs Sports strategy that include designers use the basic American Apparel tee to w i l l Foot Locker display their funky designs. In 2005, Blake’s An- m o n i - Sports Authority toring of all Gap’s Wool Cableknit Sweater imal Rights Committee raised money by selling EDUN Gear Running Store s u p p l i e r s , t-shirts with a penguin superhero printed on the P e r formance front of an American Apparel tee. (Each Ameri- Improvement planning, and capability training at can Apparel t-shirt explicitly states on its tag, the factory level. “Sweatshop Free T-shirts™.”) As the public becomes more aware of the Creating mainly outdoor clothing, Pa- consequences of sweatshop labor, one is faced tagonia is considered to be a very socially re- with the decision to either advocate companies sponsible company due to its environmental and with fair labor standards or support the compaworker campaigns. From the beginning, Patago- nies employing young children in immoral condinia has taken a stand against the globalization of tions. From American Apparel to Gap to Adidas, trade that compromises environmental and labor there is a rapidly growing number of companies standards. Patagonia is also a member of the Fair who outwardly focus on improving working conAdidas’s Supernova Cushion Gap’s Flap Pocket Boot Cut Jeans Labor Association, with very few violations of ditions and avoiding violations of human rights. the fair labor standards at its factories.

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Women:

Kate Morton Editor-in-Chief


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spectrum life

A Taste of Fuera

Meredith Duff Contributing Writer

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lake students who have taken Spanish have experienced the different activities of the Spanish project called Fuera at one time or another! Fuera is an assignment where a student is required to go out and explore the metro area and to experience Mexican and Spanish culture. Students are required to participate in a variety of activities. One possible option is to eat at an authentic Mexican restaurant. One of my personal favorites (located in Minneapolis) is Taco Morelos. The restaurant is about 10 minutes away from our very own Blake upper school and is open daily. The restaurant is small and has a festive feel with accenting lights through out the restaurant, and friendly service. The tapas, a very common dish found in many Spanish speaking countries, are amazing, full of natural spices and flavors to excite the taste buds. Another great dish at Taco Morelos, is the burritos, which may be different from our familiar favorites at Chipotle, but have a much more authentic flavor to them. [Taco Morelos 14 W 26th street, (612)-870-0053] If you are looking for something a little more upscale that still has that authentic taste try Masa in downtown Minneapolis. At this restaruant, the food is only half of the experience. Located on Nicollet Mall in the heart of the city with a modern vibe, you cannot help but love this restaurant. The food is a little bit more expensive, with an average entrée just under twenty dollars but it is well worth it. Masa has numerous types of tacos, all with fresh ingredients, that are a favorite order. Open for lunch and dinner, you may want to make reservations to guarantee at spot! [Masa 1170 Nicollet Mall (612)-338-6272]

dkimages.com

Some delicious tacos available at the Mexican hot spot Masa.

nov 07

Students Experience Blake Connections

Sarah Pomerantz Contributing Writer

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he Upper School program Blake Connections, which was started last year, aims to connect current Blake students with alumni who work in a field that interests the student. This is an interview with two Blake seniors, Teddy Von Beveran ‘08 and Peter Hajas ‘08, who experienced the program this summer.

Why did you decide to use Blake Connections?

What did you gain from the experience?

Peter: After hearing the announcement for someone to help out with “groundbreaking new shareware software,” I was interested. It seemed like some-

Peter: The entire experience taught me a lot about the business world. I learned a lot more about computers while working with the systems administrator and helping him solve problems. I learned about the environment in a web startup company by working with the CFO and talking with him about things like advertising. Finally, I was truly exposed to user interaction, as I worked directly on making sure our software was as straightforward and easy to use as possible. This all contributed to teaching me about the field that I’m interested in, computer science, and has inspired me to pursue a startup in the future.

What sort of internship did you choose through Blake Connections? Peter: I worked as an intern at a local tech startup company called Yugma. Yugma creates software that makes it ridiculously easy to share and collaborate with people across the globe, and bridges boundaries between PC, Mac and Linux users. I worked with Yugma on projects that they needed doing to help benefit the software or user expeZanny Lannin rience. I also worked directly with the Systems Administrator there, helping Peter Hajas worked with Yugma, a local him perform computer, network and software company. systems maintenance while learning a thing I could really get into, where I great deal about technology at the same could apply what I know to help people time. with their work. After speaking with Dion Crushshon about the program, Teddy: I worked as an intern at a com- and then the CFO of the company, it pany called CaptionMax. They provide seemed like a place where I could help closed captioning and audio descrip- people globally collaborate with each tion services to major TV networks. I one-another. worked primarily in their IT department doing anything from fixing computers, to setting up servers, to designing a system to compare and reconcile conflicts between their sales and finance contact databases. Why did you choose this particular program? Peter: Computers are my passion. One of the things I enjoy doing most is helping people with technology, teaching them how to use it and how it helps solve their problems. Yugma was a unique opportunity for me to apply my passion to something tangible and also learn about the environment in a startup company. Teddy: I chose to work at CaptionMax because they were offering an internship they described as IT and Video Engineering, both of which I consider fascinating fields. I also thought it would be an excellent learning opportunity.

Teddy: Not only did I learn a lot about the technology and specific fields I was working in, but more importantly I learned what it is like to be in an office/working environment, and to hold a nearly full time job. What was your most exciting experience during the internship?

Peter: The most exciting thing I experienced during my time at Yugma was the office move. After coming home from my summer immersion trip to Mexico, I returned to the internship. I was informed that we were soon moving our location from our office to a significantly larger building and workspace. I volunteered to help out with the move. One morning, I arrived at 7:00 am and began preparing for the move. The computer systems that run the back-end of a company (things like the network and email) are vital to the operation of the business. Therefore, it was very important that we executed the move as fast and efficient as possible. The most exciting and memorable part of the move that I recall was helping Zanny Lannin the systems administrator move comTeddy von Beveran had an internship at puters, networking equipment, cables, CaptionMax. phone boxes and monitors to the new Teddy: Because it provided an easy location and setting them up in record way to gain access to internship optime. This experience truly taught me portunities. Blake Connections is an how dynamic and fast-paced startups excellent resource for Blake Students. can be. It makes it much easier to get an internship when you have these sort of connections available.


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spectrum life

Blake Students and Faculty Share Their Thanksgiving Traditions T

Keegan Dubbs Page Editor

hanksgiving is quickly approaching and in the spirit of the holiday, students and faculty share their traditions.

table with us. The other is that we buy a candy pig and put it in a plastic bag, and then smash it and eat the pieces.” -Anne Feuss ‘09 “I use my motherin-law’s eleven page hand-written recipe for the gravy. It’s a crowd favorite!”Ms. Scherer

“I don’t eat turkey, even on Thanksgiving. This bothers my sister, so usually my sister and I get into a fight about why I don’t eat turkey. In the end, I end up eating a Lean Cuisine.”-Hayden Broberg ‘10

“My uncle holds a contest to see which kid can clear their plate first. The winner gets a prize.” -Kaylyn Grazinger ‘11

“Every Thanksgiving we switch off which side of the family we celebrate with. It’s really fun to stay in touch with everyone.”-Joe Ali ‘09

“We go for a family walk around Lake of the Isles to help us digest our Thanksgiving feast.”Meredith Duff ‘09

“We have two really special traditions. One is that we let the dogs sit at the

“Whoever is caught with bad manners has to have a little Porcelain turkey put

in front of their place. It’s embarrassing but a good lesson.”Britt Randolph ‘08 “We go to my aunt’s house in North Dakota, and on the drive up we count how many wild turkeys we see.” Jorah Cohen ‘10 “When I lived in California I would celebrate Thanksgiving with my friends rather than my family.”-Mr. Delgado “We make the turkey as a family. It’s a blast”-Charlie Dunning ‘09 “My mom makes two different turkeys, one on the grill, and the other in a pressure cooker.”Kate Morton ‘08 “We always go to a movie after dinner.” -Lucy Litman ‘08

“We watch the Thanksgiving Day parade together.”-Sara Swenson ‘09 “We practice our Thanksgiving recipes a month before Thanksgiving to be sure that the dinner is perfect.”Mark Yankovich ‘09 “My entire extended family comes into town for Thanksgiving, rather than any other holiday.” -Lauren Gellman ‘08 “We always go out to eat and then stay at a fancy hotel for the night.” Lila Baker ‘08 “I make a different sweet potato dish every year. Some years it’s good, most years it’s not.” -Emily Mitchell ‘09

Take a Peak into the Community Judiciary Board Ben Gitis Page Editor ave you ever wondered who gets to decide your fate if you mistakenly plagiarize? You elect people each year to be on the Community Judiciary Board, but do you wonder what they do all year? Well, they do a lot. Recently new members have been elected for the Community Judiciary Board (CJB). Now the entire board consists of two sophomores, Zach Kozlack ‘10 and Taylor Reed ‘10, three juniors, Ummul Kathawala ‘09, Alex Bakken ‘09 and Evan Fenner ‘09, and three seniors, Michael Mestiz ‘08, Minty Kunkel ‘08 and Lila Baker ‘08. There are no freshmen on CJB. CJB members rotate with two-year terms. The two sophomore representatives, Zach Kozlack and Taylor Reed, were elected this fall. For the juniors, Ummul Kathawala and Alex Bakken were elected last fall and are beginning the second year of their term. However, the third junior representative, Evan Fenner was elected this fall and will serve until the end of his senior year. Both Minty Kunkel and Lila Baker were re-elected this

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fall as seniors, while Michael Mestiz is starting the second year of his term. This fall Mr. Zalk was re-elected as the head of CJB. And an additional faculty member, Ms. Hennessy, was elected to be a representative on CJB. The Administrative Representative always is the Assistant Director of the Upper School, Mr. Menge. The Community Judiciary Board meets every other

says Mr. Zalk. Mr. Zalk expresses that during these hearings the board talks to all who are involved to “get a sense of why everything that happened, happened.” They are able to ask questions in order to gain a better understanding of what the surrounding circumstances were. However, on occasion it is not clear what hap-

week t o discuss issues i n the community. However, if a case arises the members meet immediately. Most issues they deal with are related to academic honesty and substance abuse. When a student gets in trouble, the CJB meets and talks with that student to hear what happened directly from them. Then they meet with the grade dean to talk about what happened. “It is not a dispute about facts,”

pened. If that is the case, then the board tries their best to find out what exactly happened. When the board decides what to do about the student they don’t need a unanimous or majority vote. They don’t vote at all. They just discuss until they all agree on what to do. Although the board carefully deliberates, the CJB plays a recommending role and their decision is only a suggestion for Mr. Bogursky. Mr. Bogursky makes the final decision and has the ability to overturn the CJB’s

decision. Although Mr. Bogursky has the ability to do this, it rarely happens. Board members are allowed give out only a bit of information about the CJB, because of its fundamental principals to keep all hearings and discussions confidential. The CJB is “not trying to be a secret organization” says Mr. Zalk, but rather it is “trying to protect the private information of everyone involved in a case.” By doing this, the CJB ensures absolute confidentiality to all of the students who attend hearings and it removes a lot of pressure that would otherwise be added by the community. According to the charter, the CJB is required to appear at assembly twice a year to talk to the community about what they have been doing all year. They report on the types of issues that they have been hearing. But, they don’t give any specifics in order to keep the hearings private. Although the board meets several times a year and does important work, the community rarely recognizes them because of the level of integrity that they maintain.


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spectrum variety

nov 07

Looking Hot in Cold Weather

Katy Marshall Copy Editor

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innesotans may learn to embrace six solid months of below freezing temperatures, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t find ourselves chilly on the coldest winter mornings. Nevertheless, we cannot allow our northern latitude to relegate us to weeks of weeks of tucking our jeans into furry boots. Rather, I urge you to find a fashionable equilibrium that prevents frigid temperatures from cramping your style, while protecting you from the frostbite that is bound to result from a miniskirt in December (even if you do pair it with Uggs). More is more this season and I invite you to play with color and texture in hues and fabrics that will allow even the dimmest days to come alive.

First and foremost, the key to successful winter fashion is layering. This technique is bound to keep you warm indoors and out. Moreover, it allows you to get more use out of garments that otherwise wouldn’t have made it past October. Your favorite tshirt or fall dress can be worn well into winter if you don them over a t-shirt or turtleneck. Add tights, leggings, a blazer or a vest to make your outfit even more versatile. Play with proportions. Trapeze jackets and shrugs are easy to wear over layers and come in unexpected, playful shapes and sizes. Cardigans can be effortlessly stylish and incredibly comfortable. This season, look for ones that are oversized with giant pockets for a chic twist (they’re great over leggings). In order to keep your layers looking fresh and not overdone, dare to

Blake Girls & Boys Soccer Teams’ Inner Weirds

Kiley Naas Staff Writter

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e all know we have them, those odd little idiosyncrasies that make you who you are. The time has come to be proud and let your weirdness show! I asked the Soccer Teams about some of the things that make them unique. Here are a few of their inner weirds. Can you relate? “I haven’t shaved my legs in a really long time because of superstition. We were winning when I wasn’t shaving my legs, so I haven’t ever since.”

“I brush my teeth before each game for good luck, but if I gargle with Listerine, then I don’t have to bush.” “I wear my blue cleats when there is home game and I wear my white cleats at an away game.” “I never listen to Sparky’s pre-game talks.” “I have to shower before every game.” “I never talk to anyone during the car ride to a game; we jut sit in silence.” “I wear 3 pairs of socks: 2 thin and 1 thick.”

“It bugs me when tables Alfred Yeung aren’t straight in a line. Jill Avery at the state semi-finals. “The night before a So, when I come into a game, I put the blinds class where the tables down in my room and listen to Pink are not straight, I have to fix them.” Floyd. Naked.” “I don’t wear underwear while playing soccer for good luck.” (both a girl and a “When I am frustrated, I pull a fist full of grass out of the ground and smell it.” boy stated this innerweird) “I have to eat my corn on the cob sideways not around.”

pair the unexpected. Mix a variety of fabrics of different weights. A gauzy tank top adds contrast to corduroy, faux fur or velvet. Knits from chunky to pointelle are everywhere this season and are sure to keep you warm. If you like to keep your clothing simple, make a statement with accessories. Add a brightly colored brooch, belt or bracelet to a neutral outfit. Long necklaces are still a stylish option. Scarves are ideal; wear them down or double them up and loop the knot slightly off to the side. You can also go in the other direction and mix bright colors and patterns. Go out on a limb and wear lime green patterned tights! Winter is a great time to wear a crazy accent as long as you keep the rest of your outfit relatively toned down. After all, you have myriad options from tank tops to tunics that can be added to make your outfit even cozier.

Lastly, I beg that you think outside of the shoebox. Uggs or similar boots may be comfortable and even practical, but you shouldn’t make them a staple. Riding boots and cowboy boots are also casual enough to wear with almost anything and protect your feet from slush and snow. Ankle boots are very trendy and provide some protection. Even ballet flats are manageable when paired with thick tights. Save your Uggs for a snowy day and add some variety to your winter wardrobe. At the very least, put them away until Thanksgiving! Life is too short to bury your feet in wooly boots as soon as you reluctantly stow away your flip-flops. Reinvent yourself this season. Find a fresh winter style that works for you and flaunt it!

Advice From “M Squared”

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used to believe that I was a normal size, but when I came to highschool, I realized that I am not as skinny as everyone else. What should I do? Curiously Corpulent Curiously, The first thing you have to remember is that one “normal” size is a wide gamut, but it sounds like that’s not, the issue. Rather, it’s your perception that you’re worried about, or the judgements of others. Although I could use far more space than I have to reassure you that the images you’re bombarded with on a daily basis aren’t the models of a healthy body, I think it’s more important to assure you that it’s not necessarily a problem to not be as skinny as everyone else (in the case of some people, their thinness may be unhealthy). You need to be comfortable with your size, judged independently of those around you. And, after all, your body is just an infinitesimal fraction of what makes up the complex “you.”

I had my conference a few weeks ago and I am not doing as well as I had hoped. My parents won’t let me go out until I get my grades up, but I really want to hang out with my friends this weekend, and I have been working hard, but my parents don’t agree... What should I do? Frustrated Student Frustrated, Do you know what specifically your teachers were concerned about, or where your grades needed improving? Try checking in with your teacher to see what you can do to improve. Teachers are here to help us, and altogether too many students forget that. Although you may not be able to prove to your parents that you’ve been working like mad, you can show them that you’ve taken initiative and have a plan to bring those grades up. (If you’re finding it hard to do it alone, try talking to Mr. Menge or checking out the SIAC board to try and to find a peer tutor in your trouble subject.) Good luck!

Please send your questions for “M Squared” to spectrum@blakeschool.org or leave a question in room 351 in the “M Squared” box. All questions are welcome. *Note: “M Squared” is Michael Mestitz ‘08.


nov 07

spectrum variety

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First Lawn Gnome Club Meeting: Great Success! Daniel Webber Staff Writer

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he first meeting of Blake’s new lawn gnome club on October 5 was described as “very successful” by Paige Esterkin ’08, Grand Poobah of the club and lawn gnome fanatic. “Our goal was to paint and hide at least 45 gnomes Friday morning,” said Esterkin. “Not only did we meet our goal, but we ended up getting 69 gnomes finished and hidden at various locations in the school, thanks to the help of so many brave volunteers.” For those of you who missed or slept through assembly on October 4, the lawn gnome club is a recently formed group that held its first meeting in the courtyard before school on October 5. Long-time gnome enthusiasts worked with newcomers to paint lawn gnomes and hide them around the school to help raise gnome awareness. Though you

may not think it, the lawn gnome club and beliefs.” “I myself am not a lawn is a very politically minded group. “The gnome,” said Kent Carlson ’10, “but issue of lawn gnome rights that doesn’t mean I can’t is very important and often support them as an ally. goes neglected,” said Vice All you have to do to Grand Poobah Brittany become an ally is pledge Randolph ’08. “We, here to support the fight for at the lawn gnome club, are gnome and dwarf rights, trying to create a safe enviand be a human, night ronment for anyone, whether elf, or Draenei.” For you are a gnome, a dwarf, or more information about just one of their allies,” Ranbecoming a lawn gnome dolph added. ally, you can speak with “The lawn gnome Grand Poobah Esterkin club was really welcomor Vice Grand Poobah ing and friendly,” said Nico Randolph. Both are Peterson ’08, one of many happy to talk to anyone who came out to show supwho wants to support the port for gnomes everywhere www.princeton.edu cause. Friday morning. “It’s a great Students start Blake’s first “We’re hoping that a place for anyone who’s pas- Lawn Gnome Club. lot of new people will sionate about lawn gnomes still be coming out,” said to meet people who share their interests Esterkin. “The last meeting was so suc-

Chubby Dubby Likes... Good Day Café

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Keegan Dubbs Page Editor

t’s official: I have finally found a new brunch hot- spot. This breakfast and lunch restaurant is titled the Good Day Café, and is located on 5410 Wayzata Boulevard in the heart of Golden Valley. GDC is sure to quell any breakfast or brunch craving with its wide variety of egg dishes and bakery delights. The menu covers all the classics like pancakes and quiche, but also includes some specialty items such as beignets, which is like a New Orleans style doughnut, with a French flavor. Good Day Café also offers an egg sandwich on their brunch menu. It’s a twist on the breakfast classic with a kick of spice, and is a suitable meal for any time of day. Needless to say, this dish is not for the timorous. While you’re devouring your meal you may want to look up from the food and notice the very pleasing ambiance. At the café the walls are bright and perky and there are many inspirational quotes sprinkled across the menu

as well as walls, along with a few jokes here and there. If your meal doesn’t make your day better, the character of the establishment will. GDC also offers a notable lunch menu. Their prices are affordable, and the portions are perfect. GDC fills you up, but won’t weigh you down. The lunch menu includes a variety of soups, sandwiches, and salads. Although this may seem run of the mill, even the most tiresome dishes seem to be re-invented. For example, the all too common Caesar salad is re-vamped with an enticing and tangy new dressing. Another special feature of Good Day Café is its built in coffee bar. While your waiting for your table, or when you’re on the run, the coffee bar sells a variety of pastries and drinks, such as an assortment of juices. They even have a cozy sitting area to curl up with newspapers awaiting you on the tables! It’s a departure from the classic restaurant and a welcomed surprise. I would encourage all culinary enthusiasts to stop by for a wonderful experience and delicious dish.

cessful; next time we’re setting our goal for 100 gnomes,” she said. “Though I’m surprised I haven’t heard of anyone finding a single gnome yet. Most of them weren’t that hard.” “The meeting Friday morning was really gnomalicious, but I was disappointed with the freshmen. Not a single one showed up. For shame,” said Nico, disapprovingly shaking his head, “for shame.” Preparations are already in place for a second meeting. Anyone interested is encouraged to pay attention to the daily bulletin and in assembly, no matter how much you may want to sleep through it. “Even if you’ve had no prior experience with lawn gnomes, you should give the club a try,” said Grand Poobah Esterkin. “It’s gnometacular!” In other news, the new badminton club will have no future meetings, due to complete lack of usable shuttlecocks.

Melting Sugar on Snow Hannah Page Contributing Writer Colorless cotton candy alights on gravel tongue Skyward showerheads spouting droplets of feathery frozen ecstasy Pinpricks insistent Roses blushing in icy-skin soil kissed by a thousand snowflakes Farewell birdsong winding through balding treetops Melodious, fading Icicles congregating Feverishly sweating Impatiently waiting as summer prepares world’s longest disappearing act Stowing swimsuits grainy with sandy memories Mermaids’ synthetic tales Sea foam sliding slick off seamless scales Salt into dust The sea glass bottled perfume of summer spilt Savory sweetness Melting into black-ice carpet Pulled from summer’s closet Jack Frost’s crystal breath reviving frosty fibers But Punxsutawney Phil reclaims Rainy days and birdsong A neon sign gradually thawing The round man of fire On his throne in the sky


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nov 07

Viggo Mortenson Delivers Brilliant Performance in “Eastern Promises”

JD Yablonski Contributing Writer

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hen a movie’s opening scene involves a barbershop assassination by open shaving blade, you know you’re in for a ride, and we’re talkin’ Wild Thing, not Mild Thing. “Eastern Promises” is the story of British nurse Anna Khitrova’s investigation into a young mother’s death. Anna, played by Naomi Watts, suspects foul play involving a London-based crime family affiliated with the infamous Russian crime brotherhood known as Vory V Zakone, and her curiosity leads her into a world of ruthless violence that she never anticipated. Her investigation begins with a seemingly innocent friendship with an elderly Russian restaurant-owner named Semyon, whom she later discovers is actually the head of the Zakone-affiliated

crime family. “Lord of the Rings” star countless close up “neck attacks”, the Viggo Mortensen plays Nikolai, the movie is not what I would call a “date family’s ambitious driver and delivers movie.” Unfortunately I learned that the a fantastic performance. His character’s hard way, as Charlie Dunning ’09 and intricate layers allow the I, high-fiving during viewer to identify with countless [literally] him throughout the film, eye-popping fight despite his bone-chillingly scenes, found that murderous tendencies. As our dates were less Anna begins to expose the than happy with our unspeakable truth about movie selection. the young mother’s death, Hey, it was either she develops an intense that or that new relationship with Nikolai Amanda Bynes that is in one instant movie, and there’s caring, and the next instant no chance I’m frighteningly violent. hittin’ that one up You should be for at least another forewarned that this movie three decades. is extremely gory. With seriously, if www.imdb.com But a full-on nude showerViggo Mortenson in“Eastern Promises.” you dig gore fight scene that makes and hard-core Jason Bourne look like a Boy Scout and Russian mafia thugs, check this out, it is

Hit Book Series “Gossip Girl” Premiers on the CW Allison Malecha Contributing Writer

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f you’ve happened to catch part of a conversation between girls the last few Thursday mornings, you’ve probably heard the name “Gossip Girl” come up more than once. It’s a show that depicts the ultra-luxe lives of the lucky few who have the privilege to indulge in the high life of New York’s Upper East Side. “Gossip Girl” is a combination of the NYC glamour and five hundred dollara-pop shoes from “Sex and the City,” and exaggerated high school drama, and messed up families of the “O.C.” Perhaps it’s more than coincidence that two of the show’s executive producers, Josh Shwartz and Stephanie Savage, also helped produce the “O.C.” Starring in the hit-worthy series as Serena Van der Woodsen is Blake Lively, whose name may bring to mind a certain long-legged soccer star from “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants.” Once again her character is a carefree all-American beauty that can’t help but attract all the looks the moment she walks into a room. Playing her sometimes-best friend Blair Waldorf is Leighton Meester, who beneath a façade of “girl who has it all,” is more insecure than anyone. Nate Archibald is cast as heartthrob Chace Crawford, and jerk-

of-the- year Chuck Bass is played by Ed transformed into a hip rocker dad who Westwick. Penn Badgley, who hid under has a history with none other than Mrs. all that hair as the “other Tucker” in “John Van der Woodsen herself. Tucker Must Die” plays mysterious Dan These are not the only Humphrey. Taylor Momsen - who you differences between the TV show and may remember as Cindy Lou Who from the book: the plot itself varies greatly “The Grinch Who Stole Christmas”, between the two. However, are these plays his sister, Jenny. differences bad? Already an avid fan of There is always the show, Kate Laxson a considerable risk ‘09 doesn’t think so: in transferring a New “The show is addicting York Time’s bestselling and a must watch!” It book series (by seems that both formats Cecily von Ziegesar) have their benefits: the to living, breathing books delve deeper into people coming at the character’s thoughts you through the fulland develop the story color pixels of a TV line further, while the screen. After the first show cuts straight to all episode, several major the exciting drama. differences between If you’re going characters became to be ignoring that apparent, especially in ever-growing pile of www.nytimes.com the Humphrey family. Blake Lively in the new hit series homework for an extra The TV version of the “Gossip Girl.” hour every Wednesday character Jenny, with night, you might as her straight blonde hair and thin figure, is well learn a few morals in the process. If almost a polar opposite of book’s version TV is at all a reflection on life, “Gossip of Jenny, who is described as having Girl” is a testament to the platitude trademark brunette curls, small stature, “money doesn’t buy happiness.” But and a very robust figure. Meanwhile then again, if these inner circle A-listers the dad Rufus, who is supposed to be were completely satisfied and conflicta scruffy, offbeat poetry editor with a free, it wouldn’t make much of a show, knack for ignoring hygeine, has been would it?

definitely worth the price of admission. And although I might be making this movie out to be something of a “Hostel” or “Saw,” it truly holds cinematic value and its intriguing plotline and character development is more than enough to keep you on the edge of your seat. The audience learns just enough about Nikolai’s troubled past and multi-faceted personality to find itself identifying with the apparent “bad guy.” Mortensen’s performance alone is reason enough to skip a week-end with your friends and catch the feelgood movie of the year. And although I cannot promise you that your life will be changed as mine was due to Mortenson’s gripping exposé, I can assure you that you will be left with popcorn dangling like a Josh Birkholz breakaway from the corner of your mouth after you witness the dazzling presentation of this thrilling drama.

Top 5 Songs of the Fall Laurie Peltola Contributing Writer

#1. “Stronger” (Kanye West) You’ve heard it played on the radio at least twice in one sitting and you can’t walk through the halls without hearing “harder, better, faster, stronger” at least once. #2. “No One” (Alicia Keys): The R&B superstar is back with a simple, soulful jam who’s bumping bass and thick synth riffs mix perfectly with Keys’ powerful voice #3. “How Far We’ve Come” (Matchbox Twenty) Their first single since 2002 is rapidly climbing the charts and brings a completely different energy than their previous works, with a fast pace and nearly frantic drumbeat #4. “Everything” (Michael Bublé) Ok, so its almost ridiculously cheesy, but you know you like it. This soft serenade is a must for the mix that you’re making for that special someone and you just can’t help but hum along with the catchy melody #5. “Apologize” (Timbaland feat. OneRepublic) Timbaland finds the perfect combination of smooth R&B and pop hook in his new song, sure to be a chart-topper in a matter of days.


nov 07

Free Downloads iTunes Become Big Hits Joe Ali Staff Writer

solid songs that have been featured as the free download are “Lonely By Your ave you ever opened up iTunes and Side” by Azzido da Bass featuring realized you need new music? I’m Johnny Blake. The song is 100% pop sure this has happened to all and boasts great of you, and most likely, it hapvocals with all pens often. But then, there’s electronic injust one problem; your wallet struments. Aside is flat, and your iTunes acfrom “Bubcount reads “$.06.” bly,” another Lucky for us, iTunes free download has the feature “single of the to hit it big afweek.” There are usually two ter its feature on songs, each of different music “single of the genres. iTunes bases their free week” is “Herwww.blur.hk singles on what they forsee as culean” by The becoming “the next big thing,” “The Good, the Bad, and the Good, The Bad which is oftentimes much dif- Queen’s” album cover. And The Queen, ferent than the perspective of whose lead singmost teenagers. er was originally the front man for the Some songs that have been British band, Blur. “Herculean” was on featured as “single of the week” have several music critics’ short lists for the turned out to be flops, but an even great- best single of the year. er number of songs have since then be- Listeners can give reviews and come very popular. The song “Bubbly” leave comments about the song on its by Colby Caillat was introduced into the “purchase page.” Before I decide to hit mainstream “get song,” I usually read by the iTunes through the reviews and the “single of bio of the band. The reviews the week,” are very mixed, but it is defiand shortly nitely helpful to get insight t h e r e a f t e r, from listeners who have a “Bubbly” wide array of musical tastes. rocketed all The free downloads on the way to #1 iTunes are oftentimes hit or on the list of miss, but at least you know iTunes’ most that you’re saving 99 cents downloadfor another song. Make sure ed songs. www.amazon.com to check out the singles evThanks to Colby Caillat ery Monday. You might be “single of the surprised about the quality week,” I snagged the song while it was of a free song! free. Most people had to dig deep and shell out 99 cents for it. Several other

H

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spectrum a&e

Upcoming Concerts Keith Urban—November 17th at Xcel John Butler Trio—November 18th at 1st Avenue Robin Thicke—November 19th at 1st Avenue Tegan and Sara—November 30th at Pantages Theatre Modest Mouse—December 3rd at Orpheum Theatre

Soundtrack of My Life: Zoey Gold ‘11

“Help From my Friends”—The balance because it’s also about learning Beatles My friends have always been how to move on, rather than dwelling on the past for the rest of your life.

there for me and they always get me through everything, so this song represents the friends in my life.

“Heart Attack”— Sum 41 An out-of-

“Do You Remember”—Jack Johnson My cous-

in burnt a CD for me before he went to college a few years ago. He told me to listen Jack Johnson to track 08, which happened to be this song. He also put a video of us dancing to this song when we were toddlers.

“Graduation”—Vitamin C This

song represented my fourth grade year because my best friend Abra and I found it and made it “our song.” Ever since then, I think of her when I listen to this song.

outside.away.com

school friend taught me how to play this song on the guitar. It’s really fun to play and it reminds me of how I used to be able to play the guitar, but definitely can’t anymore.

“I Miss You”— Blink 182 My best

friend from a soccer academy that I was at this past summer put this song on a CD for me. He also sang it to me at a bonfire that we had, while he played his guitar. Every time I hear this song it brings back all my camp memories.

“Better Together”—Jack Johnson This song was played in my Bat Mitzvah video during the section of pictures of my brother Max and I, so every time I hear this song, I think of him.

“Love and Memories”— O.A.R. This song was part of a sum-

mer mix that me and a few friends The Beatles put together, so when ever I hear it, I think about this past summer and it makes me remember all the fun times I had.

“The Trapeze

Swinger”— Iron and Wine

I put this song on a CD for my friend before he moved away because it’s all about rememwww.tollbooth.org bering past times O.A.R.’s “In Betweeen Now and Then” and not forgetting album cover. what has happened. It’s a nice

www.beatlesroutes.com

“Blackbird”— The Beatles This

song was in a video that my brother made of my cousin who passed away a few years ago, and every time I hear it, it makes me think of my cousin. This song kind of represents my family because of that video.


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spectrum backpage

nov 07

Blake Student Art On Display

Liza Winton ‘09

Artists from left to right: Britta Wangstad ‘08, Rachel Neil ‘09, Elle Gilmore-Szott ‘08, Solveig Ellingboe ‘08, Anna Savin ‘08, Camille Kroll ‘10, Theresa Ford ‘09, Ali Rich ‘09, Liza Winton ‘09, Theresa Ford ‘09, Hallie Nolan ‘11, Ande Saunders ‘09, ?, Kelsey Becker ‘09, Kate Gallagher ‘08.

Spectrum_November_2007  

GossipGirl Comes toLife onCW Blake Upper School “T here are few plays I’ve read in Internships through Blake Connections M^2an- swersyour qu...

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