Page 1

transplaced by porosity geometry, structure, and space:

kadim alasady

volume 2 | part 4 - part 6


Thesis Student Kadim Alasady Masters of Architecture Track I Advisor Bruce Johnson Assistant Professor University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design and Planning Department of Architecture terra@ku.edu 102 Marvin Studios Advisor Genevieve Baudoin Assistant Professor University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design and Planning Department of Architecture gbaudoin@ku.edu 102 Marvin Studios


A Independent Study Proposal Presented to the Graduate School University of Kansas

In Partial Fulfilment Of the Requirements of the Degree Master of Architecture Track I

May 2013


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THESIS FRAMEWORK section 1.0 | Thesis Components section 1.1 | Reference Data

PRELIMINARY DESIGN section 2.0 | Structural Column Decoding section 2.1 | Site Context Analysis section 2.2 | Space Frame Analysis

SCHEMATIC DESIGN section 3.0 | Structural Column section 3.1 | Space Frame

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT section 4.0 | Exhibition Program section 4.1 | Pavilion Program section 4.2 | Pavilion Design

FABRICATION section 5.0 | Fabrication Drawings

section 5.1 | Fabrication Photography

EXHIBITION section 6.0 | Exhibit Design

section 6.1 | Exhibition Photography


Part Fo Design Develo Sectio


our n op. on 01 Part Four

Design Development

In this part, the Exhibition and the Pavilion are given program to act as rules to transform geometry. Table of Contents:

Section 4.0 | Exhibition Program Section 4.1 | Pavilion Program Section 4.2 | Pavilion Design


Design Development

250

Section 4.0 | Exhibition Program

Section 4.0

Table of Contents

Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space) Section 4.0.2 | Four Scale Component Section 4.0.3 | Parametric Mapping


Description

Design Development

251

Section 4.0 | Exhibition Program

Section 4.0 — Exhibition Program

Section 4.0 will unpack the different parts of the final exhibition by first explaining the exhibit space and its site conditions which assisted in defining the exact spatial zones for the exhibit. Second, the different scales of the space frame design as it is a relating to the exhibit space. And third, the hypothetical spatial block for the exhibit.


Description

Design Development

252

Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

Section 4.0.1 —

Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

The university’s first library, this Oread limestone and red sandstone building was designed in the Romanesque Revival style by Kansas City architect Henry van Brunt, who also designed the first chancellor’s residence immediately east of it. Both were built with the 1891 bequest of Boston leather merchant and philanthropist William B. Spooner, uncle of Francis H. Snow, an original faculty member and the fifth chancellor. Dedicated in October 1894, it was the library until 1924, when the much larger Watson Library opened.

Renovations to the exterior of Spooner Hall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, began in spring 2010 and were completed a year later. The work, by Nouveau Construction and Technology Services and the Western Construction Group, includes consolidating and patching deteriorated stone and replacing capstones that are beyond repair. The exterior was cleaned and waterproofed, and steel panels on upper walls wee repaired and coated to prevent further deterioration.

In 1926 it became the Spooner-Thayer Museum of Art, housing collections that were a 1917 gift of Sallie Casey Thayer in memory of her late husband, Kansas City department-store magnate William B. Thayer of Emery, Bird, Thayer. These collections included ceramics, glassware, textiles and Asian paintings. In 1978, the artwork was moved to the new Spencer Museum of Art.

A courtyard on the south side of Spooner is named for Lawrence department-store owner Arthur D. Weaver.

The Museum of Anthropology opened in Spooner in 1979; it was renamed the Anthropological Research and Cultural Collections in July 2005 and became part of the Biodiversity Institute in fall 2006. In fall 2007, Spooner Commons was completed as a joint project of the Hall Center for the Humanities, the Biodiversity Institute and the Spencer Museum of Art. The space on the main level is used for meetings, workshops, symposia and lectures, and exhibits on the arts, sciences and humanities. The $500,000 project included new wiring, lighting and furnishings.


Site Plan ( N-> )

Design Development

Orientation

Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

253


Floor Plan

Design Development

254

Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

Spooner Hall primary exhibit space is approximately 3,645 (+/-), this is the area identified on the right. Within this area the exhibit have to design to choreograph an experiences that is wholistic to the vast open space. Thus, structural mapping and acoustical reflections of the ceiling began acting as rules to define boundaries within the existing space, 1.

1


Exhibit Space Selection

Design Development

255

Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

The boundaries which are derived from the exiting column structural grid and the reflected ceiling pattern are identified as the primary exhibit spaces. There will be four primary exhibit spaces that will house the pavilions, 2.

2


Density Grids

Design Development

256

Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

Within the four primary exhibit spaces a grid was extracted from the ceiling pattern. The gird is then scaled to yield four densities, 1. The four densities are placed within their zone to act as a place holder for the spatial block, 2. Densities of the grid are reflective of four scales in design; body, domestic, urban, and infrastructure. These four scales act as programmatic factors for the hypothetical Cartesian spatial blocks, right.

1

2


Exhibit Space Selection

Design Development Section 4.0.1 | Spooner Hall (Exhibit Space)

257


Description

Design Development

258

Section 4.0.2 | Four Scale Component

Section 4.0.2 —

Four Scale Component

The space frame component is applied to the four scales. Beginning with the body (most dense) and transforming to the infrastructure (most porous). Within each scale the component also transform from density to porosity. The constant change in densities and porosities yields a wide range of applications for the component.


Scale.00 (BODY)

Design Development

260

Section 4.0.2 | Four Scale Component

2

5

06� RADIUS

1

4a

3

6

4

7

8

The component begins as a equilateral triangle with the three axes of symmetry identified, 1. Then the points of connection are subtracted to create the joint, 2. The points of connection are the smoothed by applying a radial fillet to the corners, 3. To optimize the material a spline with controlled points driving by two axes of symmetry is created, 4, 4a. The splines are then applied in four configurations to yield the four geometric profiles, 5-8.


S.00.D.03

S.00.D.02

S.00.D.01

S.00.D.00


Scale.01 (DOMESTIC)

Design Development

262

Section 4.0.2 | Four Scale Component

2

5

12� RADIUS

1

4a

3

6

4

7

8

The component begins as a equilateral triangle with the three axes of symmetry identified, 1. Then the points of connection are subtracted to create the joint, 2. The points of connection are the smoothed by applying a radial fillet to the corners, 3. To optimize the material a spline with controlled points driving by two axes of symmetry is created, 4, 4a. The splines are then applied in four configurations to yield the four geometric profiles, 5-8.


S.00.D.03

S.01.D.02

S.01.D.01

S.01.D.00


Scale.02 (URBAN)

Design Development

264

Section 4.0.2 | Four Scale Component

2

5

24� RADIUS

1

4a

3

6

4

7

8

The component begins as a equilateral triangle with the three axes of symmetry identified, 1. Then the points of connection are subtracted to create the joint, 2. The points of connection are the smoothed by applying a radial fillet to the corners, 3. To optimize the material a spline with controlled points driving by two axes of symmetry is created, 4, 4a. The splines are then applied in four configurations to yield the four geometric profiles, 5-8.


S.02.D.03

S.02.D.02

S.02.D.01

S.02.D.00


Scale.03 (INFA.)

Design Development

266

Section 4.0.2 | Four Scale Component

2

5

48� RADIUS

1

4a

3

6

4

7

8

The component begins as a equilateral triangle with the three axes of symmetry identified, 1. Then the points of connection are subtracted to create the joint, 2. The points of connection are the smoothed by applying a radial fillet to the corners, 3. To optimize the material a spline with controlled points driving by two axes of symmetry is created, 4, 4a. The splines are then applied in four configurations to yield the four geometric profiles, 5-8.


S.03.D.03

S.03.D.02

S.03.D.01

S.03.D.00


Description

Design Development

268

Section 4.0.3 | Parametric Mapping

Section 4.0.3— Parametric Mapping

The parametric definition used to generate the structural configuration of the parts is defined by input and output vectors, 1. These vectors are used to perform a change basis operation to configure the structure and to apply structural loading. All the vectors have three parameters: 1. Point (centroid of the connecting face) 2. Direction (the path in which the part will configure in relation to the other parts) 3. Magnitude (the applied load at the specified point)

1


Grasshopper Components

Design Development

269

Section 4.0.3 | Parametric Mapping

2

5

3

6

4

7

The change basis operation is used to apply each step configuration based on the vectors of input and output, 2, 3, 4. Then using the centroid of the whole configuration, a rotation is applied, 5. Figure 5 is the last geometric configuration before arriving at a double reflection operation, 6, 7.


Design Development

272

Section 4.1 | Pavilion Program

Section 4.1

Table of Contents

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program


Description

Design Development

273

Section 4.1 | Pavilion Program

Section 4.1 — Pavilion Program

Section 4.1 will describe the four scales of the program for the four pavilions; body, domestic, urban, and infrastructure.


Description

Design Development

274

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

Section 4.1.1 —

Four Scale Program

The matrix on the right assists in trying to clarify the definitions of the four scales. BODY: the physical structure of a person or an animal, including the bones, flesh, and organs. DOMESTIC: of or relating to the running of a home or to family relations. URBAN: in, relating to, or characteristic of a city or town. INFRASTRUCTURE: the basic physical and organizational structures and facilities (e.g., buildings, roads, and power supplies) needed for the operation of a society or enterprise.


Vitruvian Man

Design Development

LeCorbusier Modular

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

276

The analysis of the proportions of the body acts as a geometric discipline to measure the pavilions. The vitruvian man by Leonardo da Vinci prescribes a body figure arms extending to reach the circle and that total length equates to the height, 1. The modular by Le Corbusier prescribes a system in which the total height of the body as the arm is raised is in proportion, 2. The two both neglect the what each considers, and a union of the two yields an all encompassing system, 3, 4.

1

2


Combined Proportion System

3

Design Development

277

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

4


Final Resultant

Design Development Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

278


4 Part Isometrics

Design Development

279

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The pavilion undergo a series of operational transformations, all beginning with the maximum allowed spatial zone (10’ x 17’ x 16’), 1. To decrease the maximum allowed spatial zone, the proportion system is applied in section to subtract 8’ from the height of the spatial zone, 2. And a series of operational transformations is applied to each pavilion to create the final resultant, 3. The void in each pavilion is the geometrically inhabitable space, 4.

1

2

3

4


SCALE.00 - BODY

Design Development

280

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The translation from the Cartesian spatial zone to the approximated geometrically inhabitable space occurred in a sequence of boolean operations (addition and subtraction), 1, 2.

1

2


Transformation Diagrams

Design Development

281

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The operational transformations begin by collapsing all of the rules, 3. Thus, the first operation occur by applying a boolean subtraction to create the (10’ x 17’, 8’) spatial zone, 4. Then the first order of geometry (linear) is subtracted, 5. And lastly, the second order of geometry is subtracted (curvilinear), 6. The geometrically inhabitable space the final resultant, 7.

3

4

5

6

7

6a

7a


SCALE.00 - DOMESTIC

Design Development

282

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The translation from the Cartesian spatial zone to the approximated geometrically inhabitable space occurred in a sequence of boolean operations (addition and subtraction), 1, 2.

1

2


Transformation Diagrams

Design Development

283

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The operational transformations begin by collapsing all of the rules, 3. Thus, the first operation occur by applying a boolean subtraction to create the (10’ x 17’, 8’) spatial zone, 4. Then the first order of geometry (linear) is subtracted, 5. And lastly, the second order of geometry is subtracted (curvilinear), 6. The geometrically inhabitable space the final resultant, 7.

3

4

5

6

7

6a

7a


SCALE.00 - URBAN

Design Development

284

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The translation from the Cartesian spatial zone to the approximated geometrically inhabitable space occurred in a sequence of boolean operations (addition and subtraction), 1, 2.

1

2


Transformation Diagrams

Design Development

285

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The operational transformations begin by collapsing all of the rules, 3. Thus, the first operation occur by applying a boolean subtraction to create the (10’ x 17’, 8’) spatial zone, 4. Then the first order of geometry (linear) is subtracted, 5. And lastly, the second order of geometry is subtracted (curvilinear), 6. The geometrically inhabitable space the final resultant, 7.

3

4

5

6

7

6a

7a


SCALE.00 INFRASTRUCTURE

Design Development

286

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The translation from the Cartesian spatial zone to the approximated geometrically inhabitable space occurred in a sequence of boolean operations (addition and subtraction), 1, 2.

1

2


Transformation Diagrams

Design Development

287

Section 4.1.1 | Four Scale Program

The operational transformations begin by collapsing all of the rules, 3. Thus, the first operation occur by applying a boolean subtraction to create the (10’ x 17’, 8’) spatial zone, 4. Then the first order of geometry (linear) is subtracted, 5. And lastly, the second order of geometry is subtracted (curvilinear), 6. The geometrically inhabitable space the final resultant, 7.

3

4

5

6

7

6a

7a


Design Development

288

Section 4.2 | Pavilion Design

Section 4.2

Table of Contents

Section 4.2.1 | Four Scale Pavilion Section 4.2.2 | Parametric Mapping


Description

Design Development

289

Section 4.2 | Pavilion Desgin

Section 4.2 —

Section 4.2 will the represent the designs of each pavilion with program integration. The pavilions begin with a generative structure that propagates in space and is bounded my site conditions. Then the structure is transformed through pragmatic integration.

Pavilion Design


Description

Design Development

290

Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

Section 4.2.1 —

Four Scale Pavilion

The transformation diagrams in the previous section represented a set of operations to apply to the structure once it propagates within the site bounds. The operations are derived from the survey that listed different aspects at each scale. Specific aspects from each scale was then taken and applied as a programmatic element to transform each structure. Other parameters that drove the deisgn are materail limitation, budget, structural feisablity, and fabricaiton time.


Full Exhibit Layout

Design Development Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

291


SCALE.00 - BODY

Design Development

Program

Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

292

The Body Pavilion begins its design evolution as a basic structural module that propagates in space and is limited my site conditions, 1. The side conditions in this specified case were derived from the plan specifications of the exhibit space. Then through a series of transformations the typology is subtracted from or added to; to arrive at the final form, 2. And finally, customized profiles are created to integrate the programmatic elements into the pavilion, 3. 1

2

3


Model Perspective

Design Development Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

293


SCALE.01 - DOMESTIC

Design Development

Program

Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

296

The Domestic Pavilion begins its design evolution as a basic structural module that propagates in space and is limited my site conditions, 1. The side conditions in this specified case were derived from the plan specifications of the exhibit space. Then through a series of transformations the typology is subtracted from or added to; to arrive at the final form, 2. And finally, customized profiles are created to integrate the programmatic elements into the pavilion, 3. 1

2

3


Model Perspective

Design Development Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

297


SCALE.02 - URBAN

Design Development

Program

Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

300

The Urban Pavilion begins its design evolution as a basic structural module that propagates in space and is limited my site conditions, 1. The side conditions in this specified case were derived from the plan specifications of the exhibit space. Then through a series of transformations the typology is subtracted from or added to; to arrive at the final form, 2. And finally, customized profiles are created to integrate the programmatic elements into the pavilion, 3. 1

2

3


Model Perspective

Design Development Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

301


SCALE.03 INFRASTRUCTURE Program

Design Development

304

Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

The Infrastructure Pavilion begins its design evolution as a basic structural module that propagates in space and is limited my site conditions, 1. The side conditions in this specified case were derived from the plan specifications of the exhibit space. Then through a series of transformations the typology is subtracted from or added to; to arrive at the final form, 2. And finally, customized profiles are created to integrate the programmatic elements into the pavilion, 3. 1

2

3


Model Perspective

Design Development Section 4.2.1| Four Scale Pavilion

305


Description

Design Development

308

Section 4.2.2 | Parametric Mapping

Section 4.2.2— Parametric Mapping

The parametric definition on the right generates a threedimensional tetrahedral grid. On the vertex of each tetrahedral an XY plane is placed. Then the basic module is transplaced from its initial centroidal plane to its final vertex plane. Then two user driven controllers manage the operation of the structure.


Grasshopper Components

Design Development Section 4.2.2 | Parametric Mapping

309


Part Fi Fabric Part Five

Fabrication

In this part the fabrication specifications and logistics will be analyzed and used as the basis for full scale fabrication. Table of Contents: Section 5.0 | CNC Milling

Sectio Section 5.1 | Laser Cutting


ive cation

on 01


Fabrication

312

Section 5.0 | CNC Milling

Section 5.0

Table of Contents

Section 5.0.1 | Material Optimization Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling


Description

Fabrication

313

Section 5.0 | CNC Milling

Section 5.0 —

Section 5.0 will cover the details of the fabrication dealing with the CNC (Computer Numerical Control). The CNC will be used for the Infrastructure and Urban Scale pavilions because they use .5 inch MDF.

CNC Milling


Description

Fabrication

314

Section 5.0.1 | Material Optimization

Section 5.0.1 —

Material Optimization

This first stage in the fabrication process was to optimize the sheet size (stock) with the number of shapes (parts). In an ideal situation, where the tolerance is approaching zero and thus negligible, the maximum number of parts can be fabricated out of the minimum number of sheets. The following pages will display the number of parts laid out on one sheet per differing part.


Stock and Part

Fabrication

315

Section 5.0.1 | Material Optimization

1. Stock 2. 00-03.A Part 3. 00-03.B Part 4. 00-03.C Part 5. 00-03.D Part

1

2

2

4

5


BODY & SCALE FOUR DENSITIES

Fabrication Section 5.0.1 | Material Optimization

316


URBAN & INFRASTRUCTURE FOUR DENSITIES

Fabrication Section 5.0.1 | Material Optimization

317


Description

Fabrication

318

Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

Section 5.0.2 —

CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

The CNC (Computer Numerically Controlled) Router is a digitally driven, coordinate based prototyping and production machine. The CNC mills materials utilizing a cutting bit fixed in a rotary spindle which traverses along an overhead gantry system. The gantry delivers the bit along the X, Y, and Z axis’ based on coordinates developed in relation to a 3D Model in the form of a tool path. Unlike a rapid prototyper, which prints a part layer by layer, the CNC will incrementally remove waste material revealing the part from within solid stock. A wide array of materials may be milled with the CNC when paired with the appropriate cutting bits including: wood, wood composites, cork, plastics, plastic composites, foam, casting wax, and non-ferrous metals. Though generally reductive in its nature, the CNC can also be implemented in augmented additive processes (ie. drawing, marking, scoring). The slected material for this project will MDF and the CNC operation is 2.5 Axis Profiling. 2 1/2 Axis Machining creates toolpaths that follow 2D lines, or flat surface geometry, to cut to a programed depth. Cuts are determined by the X and Y coordinates at each point along the surface edge or line. Cuts are made in depth increments to fit the tool’s cutting capacity. 2 1/2 axis milling is used primarily for cutting sheet materials.


319


03.INFRASTRUCTURE SCALE Component Specification

PART SCALE 48” EQ. TRI.

Fabrication Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

320


Stock and Part

Fabrication Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

321


Technocel Processing

Fabrication Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

Technocell processor is the software that the physical machine uses to generates previews and time approximations of the tool path operation. On the right are screen captures demonstrating the simulation from the Technocel processor by mapping the tool path. Since the the bit size was .5 in. the created a tolerance of 1 inch, which required a spacer to be inserted into to subtracted toolpath so that the part will not offset its position on the last cut.

322


Sheet Layout and Count

Fabrication

323

Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

03.D.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 7 SHEETS 21 PARTS 00:08:52 PER SHEET

03.C.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 5 SHEETS 15 PARTS 00:08:41 TIME PER SHEET

03.B.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 2 SHEETS 6 PARTS 00:07:50 TIME PER SHEET

03.A.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 7 SHEETS 21 PARTS 00:05:03 TIME PER SHEET


02. URGAN SCALE Component Specification

PART SCALE 24” EQ. TRI.

Fabrication Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

324


Stock and Part

Fabrication Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

325


Techno Sel Processing

Fabrication Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

Technocell processor is the software that the physical machine uses to generates previews and time approximation of the tool path operation. On the right are screen captures demonstrating the simulation from the Technocell processor by mapping the tool path. Since the the bit size was .5 in. the created a tolerance of 1 inch, which required a spacer to be inserted into to subtracted tool path so that the part will not offset its position on the last cut.

326


Sheet Layout and Count

Fabrication

327

Section 5.0.2 | CNC 2.5 Axis Profiling

02.D.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 8 SHEETS 96 PARTS 00:20:57 PER SHEET

02.C.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 3 SHEETS 36 PARTS 00:19:51 TIME PER SHEET

02.B.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 2 SHEETS 24 PARTS 00:18:30 TIME PER SHEET

02.A.PART 48” x 96” x .5” MDF 6 SHEETS 72 PARTS 00:12:52 TIME PER SHEET


Fabrication

328

Section 5.1 | Laser Cutting

Section 5.1

Table of Contents

Section 5.1.1 | Universal Laser Systems Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication


Description

Fabrication

329

Section 5.1 | Laser Cutting

Section 5.0 —

Section 5.1 will list out the fabrication details of for the Domestic and Body Scale as well as the laser cutter specifications.

Laser Cutting


Description

Fabrication

330

Section 5.1.1 | Universal Laser Systems

Section 5.1.1 — Universal Laser Systems

The PLS6.75 is a free-standing platform designed and engineered for light manufacturing operations and batch production. The PLS6.75 can accept all Universal laser cartridges for a power range of 10-75 watts. The PLS6.75 offers a material processing envelope of 32” x 18” x 9”, 5,184 in3 (813 x 457 x 229mm, 84,950 cm3) and is particularly suited for manufacturing and production environments. There are also a number of patented Uniquely Universal features designed specifically to expand your processing capabilities that are only available from Universal Laser Systems. Laser Interface+™ and Rapid Reconfiguration™ are standard Uniquely Universal features on the PLS6.75, and a number of additional options are available to enhance your laser processing capabilities. All Universal laser platforms use interchangeable components, giving you the ability to tailor your system to fit your needs.


Machine Drawings

Fabrication Section 5.1.1 | Universal Laser Systems

331


01. DOMESTIC SCALE Component Specification

Fabrication

332

Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

Section 5.1.2 — Domestic and Body Scale Fabricaiton

Unlike the CNC machine the laser cutter run time is drastically longer. While the CNC processed more sheets and less parts; meaning less tool path travel distance, the laser cutter laser travel distance is remarkable longer. The number of parts per stock sheet increased by ratios of 3:12, 12:44, and 44:192. The laser cutter also has a tolerance control that is to the nearest 1/256” of an inch. Numerous test cuts were taking to achieve the closest approximation of .25”. On the right is a diagram showing all of the test cuts done to approximate the thickness of the laser (tolerance).


Tolerance

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

333


01. DOMESTIC SCALE Component Specification

PART SCALE 12� EQ. TRI.

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

334


Stock and Part

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

335


Universal Laser Systems Processing

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

The laser interface is the driver which gives control over power, speed, pulses per inch and other system settings. It also output a simulation of the laser cutting job and give a estimated time of completion.

336


Sheet Layout and Count

Fabrication

337

Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

01.D.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 9 SHEETS 396 PARTS 02:41:42 TIME PER SHEET

01.C.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 7 SHEETS 308 PARTS 02:35:39 TIME PER SHEET

01.B.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 4 SHEETS 176 PARTS 02:19:53 TIME PER SHEET

01.A.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 4 SHEETS 176 PARTS 01:52:12 TIME PER SHEET


00. BODY SCALE Component Specification

PART SCALE 6� EQ. TRI.

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

338


Stock and Part

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

339


Universal Laser Systems Processing

Fabrication Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

The laser interface is the driver which gives control over power, speed, pulses per inch and other system settings. It also output a simulation of the laser cutting job and give a estimated time of completion.

340


Sheet Layout and Count

Fabrication

341

Section 5.1.2 | Domestic and Body Scale Fabrication

00.D.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 4 SHEETS 768 PARTS 06:05:48 TIME MINUTES

00.C.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 1 SHEETS 192 PARTS 05:54:36 TIME PER SHEET

00.B.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 1 SHEETS 192 PARTS 05:24:24 TIME PER SHEET

00.A.PART 48” x 96” x .25” MDF 4 SHEETS 768 PARTS 04:21:36 TIME PER SHEET


Part Si Exhibi Part Six

Exhibition

In this part the design of the final exhibition will be documented. That will include the final flat works and layout proposals providing a framework for the exhibit. Table of Contents: Section 6.0 | Exhibit Design

Sectio Section 6.1 | Exhibit Photography


ix ition

on 01


Exhibition

344

Section 6.0 | Exhibit Design

Section 6.0

Table of Contents

Section 6.0.1 | Exhibition Layout Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works


Description

Exhibition

345

Section 6.0 | Exhibit Design

Section 6.0 —

Section 6.0 will explain the layout of the exhibit and the coordination of the flat works. The exhibit at Spooner Hall includes the four scale pavilions, the booklet spreads, the posters, the city analysis model and the column analysis model.

Exhibit Design


Description

Exhibition

346

Section 6.0.1 | Exhibition Layout

Section 6.0.1 — Exhibition Layout

On the right, the exhibition layout. The four main pavilions are nested with the zones that are created by the column grid. And the support work of process is printed on 17 x 11 spreads and displayed along the adjacent walls. On the right side of the space, the Column Model and analysis work is displayed and on the left side the Site Model and analysis work is displayed. The center aisle will hold primary referential text which was used through out the research.


Description

Exhibition

348

Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works

Section 6.0.2 —

Flat Works

The section will detail all of the flat works which were composed for the exhibit at Spooner Hall. The flat works is organized such that each pavilion has a poster explaining its transformations and a fifth poster displaying the entirety of the exhibit.


00.BODY Scale Poster and Interaction Photos

Exhibition

352

Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works

The poster on the left explains how the propagated system of the component was transformed. It lists out programmatic elements and the programmatic elements become formal transformations. All of the transformations ratios are driving by the human scale.


01.DOMESTIC Scale Poster and Interaction Photos

Exhibition

354

Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works

The poster on the left explains how the propagated system of the component was transformed. It lists out programmatic elements and the programmatic elements become formal transformations. All of the transformations ratios are driving by the human scale.


02.URBAN Scale Poster and Interaction Photos

Exhibition

356

Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works

The poster on the left explains how the propagated system of the component was transformed. It lists out programmatic elements and the programmatic elements become formal transformations. All of the transformations ratios are driving by the human scale.


03.INFRASTRUCTURE Scale Poster and Interaction Photos

Exhibition

358

Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works

The poster on the left explains how the propagated system of the component was transformed. It lists out programmatic elements and the programmatic elements become formal transformations. All of the transformations ratios are driving by the human scale.


04.EXHIBITION Poster and Interaction Photos

Exhibition

360

Section 6.0.2 | Flat Works

The poster on the left explains the exhibit as it propagates at the Spooner Hall exhibit space. The four structures spiraling from the Body Scale on the right side of the entry to the Domestic Scale directly in front of the body, and the Urban Scale opposite from the Domestic Scale and final the Infrastructural Scale adjacent to the Urban Scale.


Exhibition

362

Section 6.1 | Exhibit Photography

Section 6.1

Table of Contents

Section 6.1.1 | Exhibit Photography


Description

Exhibition

363

Section 6.1 | Exhibit Photography

Section 6.1 — Exhibit Photography

Section 6.1 will display the final exhibit photography. They will be listed in order beginning with the Infrastructural Scale to the Body Scale.


Description

Exhibition

364

Section 6.1.1 | Flatworks

Section 6.1.1 — Exhibiti Photography

Section 6.1.1 will display the final exhibit photography. They will be listed in order beginning with the Infrastructural Scale to the Body Scale.


365


Special Thanks: Lauren Brown, Bernard Vilza, Michael Merz, Ian Frazier Graham, Michael Shakelford, Jesse Bright, Austin Swick, Paola Sanguinetti, Andrew Atwood, Kevin Erickson, and Emily Ryan


Project Data: Cost: $2,800.69 Time for Fabrication: 4 Days 20:39:38 Number of Parts/Sheets: 3058/74 Time for Installation: 3 Days 12:00:00 Project Duration: 11 Months, 10 Days Pages: 386 Images: 75 Figures: 1146 Exhibit Duration: 2 Days, 11 Hours Software Used: Rhinoceros 3D, Grasshopper 3D, AutoCAD, Revit, 3ds Max, Karamba, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Indesign, Adobe Illsutrator, Vray Book Links: 528 Indesign File Size: 74,140 KB Project Folder Size: 67.9 GB


Transplaced by Porosity V2  

Volume 2 | Part 4 - Part 6

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