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july–september 2011

TRAVELER

®

of Charleston

Visitor Magazine Tours Attractions Restaurants Shopping Arts Antiques Events Articles Coupons Maps

COMPLIMENTARY www.travelerofcharleston.com THE SOURCE FOR ALL THINGS CHARLESTON


FREE

Parking

Photo: Faith McDavid

Departing from the “RED BARN” Charleston’s Oldest Carriage Company

Present this Ad for

FREE PARKING or Discounted Tickets! We also offer a combination Harbor and Carriage tour for one low price

Tickets: 40 N. Market Street (in Rainbow Market)

www.palmettocarriage.com | 843.723.8145


Contents 10

THE WATER IS FINE

DEPARTMENTS 8 14 32 40 52 56 58 61 62 68 69 70

From the Publisher Fun & Recreation Shopping & Retail Dining & Entertainment Art & Antiques Featured Events Calendar of Events Area Golf Courses Maps Tide Charts Visitor 411 Directory of Advertisers

FEATURES 10 31 44 51

The Water is Fine The Beaches of Charleston Tasty Tour Recipe – Charleston Cocount Pie

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TASTY TOUR 6

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Unlike Any Other. “Boone Hall is a must see stop on any trip to Charleston.” ~ NBC Daytime Television

As seen on American Idol • Wheel of Fortune and in The Notebook • North & South

BOONE HALL PLANTATION & GARDENS America’s Most Photographed Plantation

NEW ATTRACTION! Take a journey through

BLACK HISTORY IN AMERICA Visit our website for details.

843.884.4371 1235 Long Point Road Mt. Pleasant, SC Open Everyday (except Thanksgiving & Christmas)

www.boonehallplantation.com Stroll the world famous Avenue of the Oaks Explore the Gullah Culture Tour the Plantation Home Take the Plantation Coach Tour

See it all for ONE LOW PRICE OF ADMISSION

$2.50off

One Regular Adult Admission

BOONE HALL PLANTATION & GARDENS

Not Valid With Any Other Offers, Discounts, or For Special Events Not Valid for Senior, AAA, Military, or Children’s Admissions TOC11


From the Publisher...

WELCOME TO CHARLESTON! Remember not so long ago when everyone was down and out because of the cold weather? Well, get out the suntan lotion and flip-flops and put on some Jimmy Buffet because summer has arrived and a memorable vacation awaits! If this is your first time visiting Charleston in the summer season, then get ready to have a great time. There are countless things to do to fill the itinerary, from going on water tours and visiting the beaches to museums, shopping and dining. Many will have a desire to be out on the water, not only for the cool ocean and harbor breezes but also because this is one of the must-not-miss things to do when visiting Charleston. Check out our article “The Water is Fine,” on page 10 to understand why this is true.

TRAVELER

®

of Charleston

Member of: Charleston Convention & Visitors Bureau; Charleston Restaurant Association; Summerville/Dorchester Chamber of Commerce.

Charleston is now known as a dining destination, but this wasn't always so. Read more about what changed and why the city is now a major player in the culinary scene - and get some fine dining recommendations in the article “Tasty Tour,” on page 44. The goal of this magazine is to be a useful tool in planning a fantastic vacation. In the following pages, you'll find a comprehensive and organized list of the top and most respected businesses in the Charleston area. On behalf of everyone in the Charleston tourism and hospitality industry, thank you for visiting and please come again! All the best,

Publisher/Founder.................... Keith Simmons Graphic Designer...................... Heineman Design Writer........................................... Brian Sherman Distribution................................. Mike Derrick Distribution................................. Brian Bean Distribution................................. Debbi Farrell

info@travelerofcharleston.com | (843) 580-9054 | www.travelerofcharleston.com TRAVELER of Charleston is produced by the Traveler Communications Group, LLC, and is published four times yearly and distributed to various locations throughout the Charleston area, including all visitors centers, hotels, beach rentals, grocery stores, high-traffic areas, advertiser locations and many other points throughout the surrounding area. Concept, design and contents of TRAVELER of Charleston are copyrighted and may not be reproduced. www.travelerofcharleston.com.

The copy and advertising deadline for the next issue is August 31, 2011. 8

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The Water is Fine There are endless ways to enjoy the waves in Charleston Article by: Jason A. Zwiker

I

f you really want to understand Charleston, get your toes wet.

Dip your feet into the water, feel the warmth on top and the cool just below. There’s an entire history written in the water, from the ocean that brushes against us to the rivers that flow inland on either side. Imagine you’re one of the first English settlers who put their boots on the west bank of the Ashley River way back in 1670. You want to build a city, and you want it to prosper. Commerce is on your mind, so you’ll want a port. But the same waters that carry friendly merchant vessels may also carry warships, pirates and storms.

The location was a plum choice. Charleston Harbor provided easy access to the Atlantic Ocean and tidal creeks allowed for easy transport of goods further inland. The trade in rice and indigo brought fantastic wealth to the port city.

The decision to build Charles Towne (as Charleston was originally known) on the nearby peninsula was made with exactly these considerations in mind. Walled fortifications surrounded gridded streets and a central public square in a location that allowed eyes to keep watch in all strategic directions.

The wall and ramparts are long gone, and the cannons on White Point Gardens at the Battery are now just for show (the odds of the French/Spanish Armada or Blackbeard’s flagship ominously closing in on the peninsula are significantly lower today), but Charleston is a city forever bound with the bountiful waters that surround it.

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The trade in rice and indigo brought fantastic wealth to the port city.

The South Carolina Aquarium (100 Aquarium Wharf ) is a great place to begin an acquaintance with the ocean, estuaries, rivers and tidal creeks that make South Carolina so naturally beautiful, as well as with the fish, birds, mammals, and plants that live alongside us. From Liberty Square at Aquarium Wharf, you can board Fort Sumter Tours, and enjoy a blissful cruise through Charleston Harbor, followed by a walking tour of the historic island fort on which the first shots of the American Civil War were fired. Still want more? Charleston Harbor Tours offers a 90-minute cruise that features every fort in the harbor - Fort Sumter, Fort Moultrie and Fort Johnson. That ought to wow the history buff in the family. In fact, a wide variety of harbor tours are available for those who want to enjoy a breathtaking view of the grandeur of the historic buildings while the cool breeze sweeps by. There are dinner cruises and fishing

charters aplenty. Sandlapper Water Tours even has nighttime jaunts in which you’ll be enraptured by tales of pirates and maritime ghosts. Those craving cool music and spicy cuisine might consider the Sunset Blues & BBQ Cruise from Charleston Harbor Tours. Folks who like to live life a little faster might choose to board the bright yellow catamaran known as THRILLER (rock music, wind and waves; what’s not to love?). Are you ready to break away from the beaten path and really make this vacation special? Call Adventure Harbor Tours and make it happen! Opportunities to enjoy the water don’t stop once you’re back on the peninsula, of course. Not only is The Battery where some of the most majestic Southern mansions can be found, it is also one of the most popular places for a waterfront stroll. Waterfront Park, between Vendue Range and Adger’s Wharf, offers a splendid view of Charleston Harbor and its many picturesque highlights, including the eight-lane, cable-stayed Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge that connects the city to Mount Pleasant and, if you look carefully, the ruins of Castle Pinckney on a small shoal about a mile offshore. On hot days, you’re sure to see children aplenty frolicking in the fountain at the north entrance of the park. It’s a great place for a stroll or just to sit in the shade and enjoy an Italian ice. july-september 2011 travelerofcharleston.com

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By the way, the fact that the waterfront is just a hop, skip and a jump from where the City Market stands is no coincidence. Once upon a time, the “Mosquito Fleet” would offload the day’s catch at the pier. Street vendors would then cart the fish, shrimp and crab through the market, calling out the specials in a singsong rhyme, selling fresh-caught seafood to locals just as an ice cream vendor might sell treats today. OK, but say you’ve dipped your toes in the water and are now ready to dive in. Some of the more popular sandy places include Folly Beach, Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. Folly is casual and hip, definitely the place to go if you remembered to bring along a surfboard or paddleboard (If you forgot, go see the friendly folks at McKevlin’s Surf Shop, 8 Center St., about a rental.) The Edwin S. Taylor Fishing Pier on Folly Beach is a great place for the angler in the family to unwind while the kids build castles in the sand. Isle of Palms is a great place for family fun in the sun. There are plenty of beachfront bars and restaurants, including the legendary Windjammer, where you’re likely to find top-tier live music inside and beach volleyball out back.

Sullivan’s Island has a special charm: gorgeous beach, charming paths, Fort Moultrie (the literary buff likely already knows that Edgar Allan Poe was once stationed here during his military career) and lots of retail shops and dining options on Middle Street. The more adventurous may want to take a slightly longer trip and check out the undeveloped barrier islands accessible only by boat, such as Capers Island, about 15 miles north of Charleston, or Bull Island, which is part of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. Ferry tours provide access to these islands, which are replete with pristine wildlife habitats, hiking trails and “boneyard beaches” of sun-bleached dead trees that are a photographer’s dream. The more adventurous may want to take a slightly longer trip and check out the undeveloped barrier islands accessible only by boat, such as Capers Island, about 15 miles north or Charleston (call Barrier Island Eco Tours), or Bull Island, which is part of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. If fishing is more your thing, consider chartering an adventure either in the spectacular waters surrounding our barrier islands or a creek fishing odyssey. When you’re ready to soothe your soul with some Angler Management (an inshore fishing and sightseeing charter), you’re in the right place to do exactly that.

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Eco-Tour enthusiasts who believe that breathtaking scenery is best enjoyed in the serenity of a kayak or on a paddleboard will not be disappointed. Not ready to navigate the estuaries on your own? Tag along on a guided kayak tour with Nature Adventures. Take the Water Taxi to Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum (40 Patriots Point Road, Mount Pleasant) for an altogether different view of life on the water: from the perspective of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown or the inside of a submarine or destroyer. Be sure to visit the Congressional Medal of Honor Museum on the hangar deck of the USS Yorktown to pay tribute to some of our country’s bravest heroes. Put simply, the list just goes on and on and on. Are you a sailing aficionado? We have you covered and then some. You could even sail in style on The Schooner Pride, a tall ship that will make you feel like you are back in the days of old. Love luxury? Fate Sailing Charters will have you sailing in a private, air-conditioned yacht. Go on a private dolphin watch Morris Island Lighthouse and shelling tour with Absolute Reel Screamer Charters. Is parasailing or wakeboarding more your style? Talk to our friends at Tidal Wave Watersports in the Isle of Palms Marina or rent a powerboat from the Marina.

Water is why this place was chosen to become Charleston. Water is why this place was chosen to become Charleston, and water is why this city has thrived. No tale of Charleston is complete without evoking the image of majestic tall ships slipping across the waters, of cackling pirates and high adventure on the open sea, and of rough hewn fishermen making a living from their hard-earned harvest.

Stir in a few idyllic scenes of fishing on the edge of a dock and the one-ofa-kind feeling of pluff mud between your toes on a summer day and you get the picture. That’s the reason those who’ve been here the longest spend their quiet time outdoors, most likely under the shade of a favorite tree, watching the surf or the slow roll of the grasses on the salt marshes.

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Fun & Recreation Charleston is known for its beauty, history and fantastic harbor. Many experienced touring companies are ready to show you a great time.

ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES, you’ll find everything from takeit-easy and relaxing tours to fast, knock-your-socks-off excitement. In addition, kid-friendly and familyfriendly activities abound. If exploring the city sounds like fun, then you won’t be disappointed, since this section of the magazine is home to Charleston’s best touring companies, attractions and museums. Take a carriage ride or a walking or water tour, visit a plantation or two or go to the beach.

How to use this magazine: You’ll find each type of tour and attraction categorized for easy reference. Many listings include a map grid locator. Find the grid location, then reference the maps on pages 62 through 67.

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Aquariums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Carriage Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Combo Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Fishing Charters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Museums & Parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-20 Plantations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Walking Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Water Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-28


FUN & RECREATION

AQUARIUMS

COMBO TOURS

South Carolina Aquarium

Harbor & Carriage Combination Tour

100 Aquarium Wharf • Charleston • (Map: K-3) (843) 720-1990 • www.scaquarium.org Discover jaw-dropping creatures and eye-opening exhibits at Charleston’s #1 family attraction! Step into the newly renovated Saltmarsh exhibit featuring more than 25 stingrays; get up-close to a rare albino alligator; see several shark species; touch coastal creatures in the Touch Tank; or go behind-the-scenes in the state’s only Sea Turtle Hospital. Enjoy daily shows, educational programs, hands-on fun and much more for the whole family!

Harbor Tours • 10 Wharfside St. • (Map: K-4) Palmetto Carriage • 40 N. Market St. • (Map: I-5) (843) 723-8145 • For tickets: www.charlestonharbortours.com • (800) 979-3370 or (843) 722-1112. $33 • $20/kids 4-11 • Charleston Harbor Tours departs from the Maritime Center three times daily with a 90-minute live narrated sightseeing cruise aboard the 1920s style Bay Steamer – Carolina Belle. Palmetto Carriage tour departs from the Big Red Barn every 20-30 minutes beginning at 9am. The one-hour tour covers 25-30 blocks of the Historic District.

CARRIAGE TOURS

Harbor & Plantation Combination Tour

Palmetto Carriage Works

For tickets: 10 Wharfside St. • (Map: K-4) online at www.charlestonharbortours.com or Zerve ticketing: (800) 979-3370 or (843) 722-1112 Adults $31 • Tour a spectacular Southern plantation, the location of many feature films, the new Slave Museum and beautiful grounds paired with a 90-minute “Harbor of History” tour. See great views of Fort Sumter, Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge, the Battery and downtown landmarks. Tours may be taken on different days.

40 N. Market St. • (Map: H/I-5) • (843) 723-8145 www.palmettocarriage.com • Charleston’s premier carriage company! We leave from The Big Red Barn every 15 to 20 minutes, rain or shine, beginning at 9am. Tours are one hour long, covering about 25-30 blocks of the residential and historic district. All of our guides are citylicensed, entertaining and informative. See our ad on the inside front cover.

By 1770 Charleston was the fourth largest port in the colonies, after only Boston, New York, and Philadelphia.

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Market Hall was built in the 1830s and houses the Museum of the Confederacy.


FUN & RECREATION

FISHING CHARTERS Angler Management Fishing (843) 259-1489 • www.AnglerManagement SC.com • Custom, year-round saltwater inshore fishing charters that cater to families, groups, beginners and professionals. Fish in the Intracoastal Waterway, Harbor and tidal creeks, catching redfish, trout, flounder, kings, jacks, sharks and more. U.S. Coast Guard Certified licensed and insured, Captain Ethan will provide all licenses, bait, tackle and ice to pack up the day’s catch. Eco and harbor tours are available as well. See ad in this section.

Tall Tails Fishing Charters Departs from the Isle of Palms Marina • (Map O:5) • (843) 209-5153 • www.fishcharleston.com Specializing in families, experts and beginners… lets go have fun! See coupon in ad for 10% off. “There doesn’t have to be a thousand fish in the river. Let me locate a single good one and I'll get a thousand dreams out of him before I catch him. And if I catch him, I’ll let him go.”....Jim Deren.

Gullah (also called Sea Island Creole English and Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called “Geechees”), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. States.

Palmetto Carriage Works www.palmettocarriage.com 18

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MUSEUMS AND PARKS

Audubon Center At Beidler Forest

Children’s Museum Of The Lowcountry

(843) 462-2150 • www.beidlerforest.com The Lowcountry’s “real swamp” experience! The Audubon Society’s Francis Beidler Forest contains the largest stand of virgin bald cypress and tupelo gum swamp forest left in the world. 1,000-year old trees, native wildlife abound in this untouched sanctuary. 1.75-mile boardwalk allows the chance to venture deep into the heart of the swamp. Tues-Sun, 9am-5pm. Harleyville, S.C., I-26 W to exit 187, follow “Beidler Forest” signs.

Blackbeard’s Cove Family Fun Park 3255 Hwy 17 N. • Mount Pleasant • (Map L:5, 3 miles north of the Isle of Palms connector) (843) 971-1223 • www.blackbeardscove.net Blackbeard’s Cove Family Fun Park has something for everyone! Go-Karts, 2 miniature golf courses, 70+ arcade games, jump-land, indoor playground, gemstone mining, climbing wall and paintball! Our Galley serves a delicious lunch and dinner menu featuring Sergio’s Homemade Pizza. Parents, you can relax at the outdoor Tiki Bar with a beer or a glass of wine while the kids have their run of the park.

In 1886, the city was nearly destroyed by an earthquake which damaged 2,000 buildings.

25 Ann St. • Downtown Charleston • (Map: G-2) (843) 853-8962 • www.explorecml.org Downtown Charleston’s #1 destination for children and their families - Race boats down rapids, climb aboard our Lowcountry Pirate Ship or explore the towers of our Medieval Castle. These are experiences found only at the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry. Eight interactive exhibits, hands-on activities and programming for children 3 months to 10 years. Open Tuesday-Saturday, 9am-5pm and Sundays, 1pm-5pm. Closed Mondays - Admission $7 and children under 1 are free.

Aqua Safaris, Inc. www.aqua-safaris.com

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FUN & RECREATION

MUSEUMS AND PARKS


FUN & RECREATION

MUSEUMS AND PARKS

MUSEUMS AND PARKS

Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site

Edmondston-Alston House

1500 Old Towne Rd. • Charleston • (area map) (843) 852-4200 • Hours: daily 9am-5pm. Web: www.charlestownelanding.travel • Charles Towne Landing is the birthplace of Charleston and South Carolina. Established in 1670, this is where your visit to historic Charleston begins. Today, Charles Towne Landing SHS experiences include a museum, outdoor exhibits along the History Trail with an accompanying audio tour, cannon demonstrations and special events, the Adventure, a reproduction 17th century trading vessel and the Animal Forest zoo. Visit their events page and website for more information.

21 East Battery • Charleston • (Map: G-9) • (843) 722-7171 • www.middletonplace.org • The stately Edmondston-Alston House was built in 1825 on Charleston’s High Battery. A witness to many dramatic events in Charleston’s history, the house is a classic example of the city’s changing and sophisticated taste in architecture and decorative arts. The house is a repository of family treasures, including Alston family silver, furniture, books and paintings that remain in place much as they have been for over a century and a half. Look seaward from the second floor piazza, where Gen. Beauregard watched the bombardment of Fort Sumter.

Edisto Island Serpentarium

Fort Sumter Tours

1374 Hwy. 174 • Edisto Island, SC 29438 (843) 869-1171 • www.edistoserpentarium.com The first true serpentarium in SC! The facility is dedicated to the recognition, preservation and study of the world of reptiles. Educational and exciting displays of reptiles from around the world and the region. Alligators & turtles play in large outdoor ponds and gardens, while others bask in the large indoor solarium. See coupon in ad in this section.

Departs from two locations: Liberty Square, downtown Charleston • (Map K:3) or Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant (Map P:1) • (843) 7222628 • www.spiritlinecruises.com • Charleston is full of history at every turn, and one of its most famous claims to fame is Fort Sumter National Monument, the site where the Civil War began. We provide the only commercial boat transportation to Fort Sumter, departing from both Mount Pleasant and downtown Charleston. Tours include a 30-minute narrated cruise through Charleston Harbor and back, as well as an hour to tour the fort and its on-site museum.

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FUN & RECREATION

PLANTATIONS Boone Hall Plantation 1235 Long Point Rd. • Mount Pleasant (Map: M-4) (843) 884-4371 • www.boonehallplantation.com • “One of America’s Oldest Plantations,” with more than 320 years of history and heritage, is located only eight miles north of Charleston on Hwy. 17. The famous “Avenue of Oaks,” nine original slave cabins, house tours and shows are all offered for one price. Mon-Sat: 8:30am-6:30pm; Sun: 1-5pm.

Charleston Tea Plantation 6617 Maybank Hwy. • Wadmalaw Island • (843) 559-0383 • www.charlestonteaplantation.com The Charleston Tea Plantation is located on quiet and beautiful Wadmalaw Island, just 25 miles outside downtown Charleston. Traveling through the tranquil beauty and endless sea of green, visitors can experience how tea is planted, grown, nurtured and harvested from the raw leaf to finished black tea – made possible by the farm’s several hundred thousand historic tea bushes.

Drayton Hall 3380 Ashley River Rd. (Hwy 61) • Charleston, (843) 769-2600 • www.draytonhall.org • Circa 1738 • Drayton Hall has survived the centuries and is the oldest unrestored plantation house in America open to the public. Admission includes hourly tours and daily programs, river and marsh walks, the African-American Cemetery, rental of an interactive Landscape Tour on DVD and artisan-inspired Museum Shop. A National Historic Landmark and a historic site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Open to the public daily except major holidays.

Magnolia Plantation And Gardens 3550 Ashley River Rd. (Hwy 61) • Charleston (843) 571-1266 • www.magnoliaplantation.com Open daily 8am-5:30pm • Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, this plantation contains one of America’s oldest gardens (c. 1680). The gardens are planted for abundant color in every season and include one of this country’s largest collections of azaleas and camellias. The house contains museum-quality early American antiques. Other features include a petting zoo, guided tours, swamp garden, gift shop, Barbados tropical garden, nature train, café and much more.

Middleton Place National Historic Landmark • 4300 Ashley River Rd. (Hwy 61) • Charleston • (843) 556-6020 www.middletonplace.org • An 18th-century rice plantation and National Historic Landmark comprising 65 acres of America’s oldest landscaped gardens. A tour of the House Museum highlights family collections and the Middletons’ role in American history. Explore the stable yards, where craftspeople re-create the activities of a self-sustaining Lowcountry plantation. African-American focus tours, carriage rides, garden market & nursery. Open daily, 9am-5pm.

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FUN & RECREATION

WALKING TOURS Bulldog Tours 40 North Market St. • Downtown • (Map: I-5) (843) 722-TOUR • www.bulldogtours.com As seen on the Travel Channel’s “America’s Most Haunted Places,” this premier walking tour company will have you exhilarated and entertained at the same time. There are four tours to choose from, such as the Ghost & Graveyard, The Dark Side of Charleston, Ghost Dungeon and Haunted Jail Tour.

Charleston Strolls Walk With History (843) 766-2080 • www.charlestonstrolls.com As featured in The New York Times, this-two hour walking tour is the best way to see Charleston’s Historic District. Discover famous landmarks, historic highlights, antebellum mansions, quaint alleys and hidden gardens. $18 per adult. Mon-Sat at 10am. Departs from the Mills House Hotel (corner of Meeting & Queen). Reservations are recommended.

Culinary Tours Of Charleston 40 N. Market St. • Charleston • (Map: I-5) • (843) 727-1100 • www.culinarytoursofcharleston.com Come join us as we walk, talk and taste our way through Charleston and experience the history through our Lowcountry cuisine. Daily tasting tours introduce guests to tasty bites at many great “food finds.” Go behind the scenes and visit with chefs, bakers, artisan food producers, chocolatiers and specialty shops.

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FUN & RECREATION

WATER TOURS Absolute Reel Screamer Charters Tours depart from: Crosby’s Seafood 3222 Folly Rd. • Folly Beach • (843) 270-4464 www.follybeachcharters.com • This private, two-hour boat adventure is what Folly Beach & Charleston are all about! Cruise through calm rivers and estuaries, go shelling, catch shrimp and harvest oysters with a native Captain. Encounter bottlenose dolphins and the famous Morris Island Lighthouse where Civil War Soldiers fought, died and are still buried. Reservations required – mention ad in this section for 10% off!

Adventure Harbor Tours Tours Depart from the Charleston Harbor Marina • 20 Patriots Point Rd. • (Map P:1) • (843) 442-9455 • www.adventureharbortours.com Family fun for everyone! Tours include our popular “Stormin’ the Beach”, (55.00/25.00) 2.5 hour shell and sharks teeth expeditions to Morris Island, and “Off the Beaten Path” (75.00/50.00) Civil War tours in the backwaters of Charleston (includes 1 hour on Morris Island). Want more action? Schedule a day of inshore fishing with one of our pros. Coupons, pics, directions and more info available on our website. Reservations encouraged; some see us!

Aqua Safaris, Inc. Serving the Charleston area (843) 886-8133 or (800) 524-3444 www.aqua-safaris.com • The one call for all of your Lowcountry water activities: inshore and offshore fishing, sailing, motor yachts, eco-excursions, pirate sails for kids and special events. Now featuring dolphin sunset sails aboard the largest passenger Catamaran north of Ft. Lauderdale! ($15/children, from $25 adults).

Barrier Island Eco-Tours 50 41st Ave. • Isle of Palms Marina • (Map: P-5) (843) 886-5000 • www.nature-tours.com Naturalist guided boat excursions to Capers Island Preserve. Explore salt marsh creeks, see dolphins and wildlife up-close, the “boneyard beach” and walk inland trails. Morning and sunset eco-tours, creek fishing, crabbing, kayaking or beach-side cookouts.

Charleston Harbor Tours Charleston Maritime Cntr. • 10 Wharfside St., Charleston • (Map: K-4) • (800) 979-3370 or (843) 722-1112 • www.CharlestonHarborTours.com Board the Carolina Belle for Charleston’s only live narrated Harbor History Tour. Relax and enjoy a beverage from the snack bar as the captain informs you about the forts and landmarks that shaped Charleston’s historic harbor. Private charters and group dinner cruises are available. $17.50 Adult, $16.50 senior and $13 child 4-11, under 4 are free.

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FUN & RECREATION

WATER TOURS Charleston Sailing Charters Tours Depart from the Charleston City Marina Downtown (Map B:3) • 17 Lockwood Dr. • (843) 882-7852 • www.CharlestonSailingCharters.com Experience Charleston in luxury aboard our exclusive 50ft sailing yacht “Fate.” We take pride in providing our guests with unparalleled service for daily sunset sails, special occasions, family affairs, or corporate events. 6 passengers for one low price, starting at $375 for two hours. Reservations required; catering available.

Charleston Water Taxi Downtown: Maritime Cntr. • 10 Wharfside St. (Map K:4) • Mount Pleasant: Charleston Harbor Marina at Patriots Pt. • (Map P:1) • (843) 3302989 • www.charlestonwatertaxi.com • Linking Mt. Pleasant and historic downtown Charleston. Relax and enjoy views of the Ravenel Bridge, while dolphins and pelicans feed alongside the boat. The water taxi runs on a continuous loop around Charleston Harbor between Patriots Point (USS Yorktown) and downtown Charleston.

Isle of Palms Marina 50 41st Ave. • Isle of Palms • (Map O:5) (843) 886-0209 • www.iopmarina.com A full service marina with 50 slips, a full service store with a deli where groceries, beer, wine, bait and tackle can be found. Powerboat rentals and also customized excursions, group outings and fishing charters. See coupon in ad!

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FUN & RECREATION

WATER TOURS Nature Adventure Tours 483 W. Coleman Blvd. • Mount Pleasant (Map P:2 at Shem Creek, on the water) (843) 568-3222 • www.kayakcharlestonsc.com Charleston’s outstanding naturalist-guided kayak, canoe and paddle-board tour service. Tour salt-water marshes, swamps, rice plantations. See dolphins, pelicans and a wide variety of wildlife. Families and beginners are welcome – rentals also available, See coupon in ad!

Sandlapper Water Tours Tours depart from the Maritime Cntr. (by Aquarium) • 10 Wharfside St. • Charleston • (Map K-4) (843) 849-8687 for info, call (800) 979-3370 for tickets • www.sandlappertours.com • Come aboard the only haunted “Ghost & Pirate Tour” on the water by night, or experience the Charleston harbor by day on the “History Tour”! Go shelling on Morris Island and see dolphins on the “Nature Tour.” Take in the sights on the “Sunset Cruise.” Private charters & group rates avail reservations recommended - See ad for coupon.

SpiritLine Charleston Harbor Tour Departs from two locations: Aquarium Wharf, downtown Charleston (Map K:3) or Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant (Map P:1) • (843) 722-2628 www.spiritlinecruises.com • Hour and 30 minutes. Cruise past the Charleston’s famous Battery, the Cooper River Bridge, Waterfront Park, Patriots Point, Fort Sumter, Fort Moultrie.

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We’re rockin' the boat in Charleston!

Live narration & rock music that makes history fun!

CHECK OUT

Fort Sumter & Moultrie, USS Yorktown, Ravenel Bridge, 2 Lighthouses,Harbor, Atlantic Ocean, Dolphins, and aquatic life

OFF SHORE TOUR

• 1 hour 25 mile tour • Aboard 55 foot catamaran • Ages 3+ only - you may get wet • Sunglasses recommended • $30/adults, $20/children under 13

Book your tickets online ThrillerCharleston.com Call us at (843) 276-4203! Tours Depart From: 1313 Shrimp Boat Lane, Mount Pleasant at historic Shem Creek (dock in-front of Vickery's Bar & Grill)


FUN & RECREATION

WATER TOURS Thriller Charleston Tours depart from 1313 Shrimp Boat Lane Mount Pleasant • (Map P:2) • (843) 276-4203 www.ThrillerCharleston.com • Experience Charleston’s only offshore adventure tour boat. Feel the rush of adrenaline as we burst through the jetties and surf the waves on our way to the Morris Island Lighthouse. Feel the wind, sun and spray on your face as our stereo system plays great music and you see and hear about five forts, the Lighthouse and Charleston.

Tidalwave Watersports 69 41st Ave. • Isle of Palms at the Marina (Map O:5) • (843) 886-8456 www.tidalwavewatersports.com • Choose a day and have a great time on the water parasailing, wake-boarding, guided and self-guided waverunner safaris, water skiing, banana-boat rides, powerboat rentals, fishing charters or a harbor cruise. Conveniently located at the Isle of Palms Marina – only a 15 minute drive from downtown Charleston. See their ad for coupon offer!

By the mid-18th century Charleston had become a bustling trade center, the hub of the Atlantic trade for the southern colonies, and the wealthiest and largest city south of Philadelphia.

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The Beaches of Charleston WHAT BEACHES ARE NEAR CHARLESTON? Three public beaches are in close proximity to downtown Charleston: Folly Beach, the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. HOW FAR ARE THEY FROM DOWNTOWN CHARLESTON AND HOW DO I GET TO THEM? They are all about a 20-minute drive. Reference our maps on pages 64-65 for driving directions. WHICH BEACH IS BEST? That all depends on your needs and preferences. FOLLY BEACH • This barrier island is laid back and known as the “Edge of America,” with a unique culture and the best waves of all the beaches. • It is the only beach where alcohol is permitted (in plastic containers). • Parking can be a problem if you arrive after 11am during the busy season, but it’s still manageable. • Beach shops, restaurants and bars are within walking distance. ISLE OF PALMS • This is the most commercialized beach with many shops, places to eat, bars and public restrooms. • It was certified as a Blue Wave Beach because it meets the criteria related to cleanliness, safety and access to the public for the tenth year in a row. • Parking is more abundant, at $6 or $7 per day. • Families frequent IOP because of their strict alcohol rules and atmosphere. SULLIVAN’S ISLAND • There is a good mix of locals and visitors. • It is best described as undisturbed and natural. • Parking can be a problem if you arrive after 10am. There are no public parking lots – street parking only. • There are no public restrooms and alcohol is not permitted.

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Shopping & Retail Charleston was founded in the late 1600s as a port city, and it has remained a thiving place to buy goods ever since! Buy local and enjoy the rewards.

WHY IS THE CHARLESTON AREA CONSIDERED TO BE THE CENTER OF SHOPPING IN THE SOUTHEAST? Take a walk down King, Broad or Market Streets and the answer will become evident. Everything from haute designer boutiques and jewelry stores to big national and treasured local retailers are all located in Charleston. For outlet shopping visit Tanger Outlets in North Charleston.

About Charleston South Carolina has two state mottoes: ‘Dum Spiro Spero’ (‘While I breathe I hope’) and ‘Animis Opibusque Parati (‘Ready in Soul and Resource’).

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SHOPPING & RETAIL

SHOPPING Charleston Charm 90 N. Market St. • Charleston • (Map H:5) (843) 577-3977 • www.charlestoncharm.com Charleston Charm is a quaint jewelry store located in the Historic City Market of Charleston, SC. This mother and daughter boutique features over 500 gold and silver charms, “Historic Charleston Ironwork” and “Charleston Rice Bead” collections along with locally handcrafted jewelry. They are also introducing the new “Guy Harvey Signature Jewelry.”

Dacuba’s Fine Jewelry 84 North Market St. • Downtown (Map: H-5) • (843) 853-0103 www.dacubasjewelry.citymax.com • Nestled in the heart of Charleston ... Dacuba’s is a unique fine jewelry store with a wonderful selection of Sterling Silver and 14kt Gold Jewelry. Their featured “Southern Gate” collection is fashioned after the wrought-iron work seen throughout this historical city. Custom-made Charleston charms are just some of the many treasures you’ll find in their shop. They strive to bring beautiful custom quality jewelry to their customers! (See ads on pages 4-5 for more info).

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SHOPPING & RETAIL

SHOPPING Filthy Rich Of Charleston 61 S. Market St. • Charleston • (Map I:5) (843) 805-8488 • www.shopfilthyrich.com Open 7 Days a Week • Filthy Rich offers affordable reproductions of jewelry worn by the stars. The store carries a wide range of celebrities, including Princess Diana, Jacqueline Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, and many others. At Filthy Rich, you can SPARKLE like Monroe without spending the dough!

Nice Ice Fine Jewelry

THE SOURCE FOR ALL THINGS CHARLESTON

145 Market St. • Charleston • (Map: G-4/5) (843) 577-7029 • Exclusive boutique to such renowned designers: Slane & Slane, Charriol, Jude Frances, Philip Stein Watches, Marco Bicego, Dominique Cohen and Bellarri. We also offer an extensive and unique collection of fine jewelry, engagement rings and pearls. Custom designs are a specialty for this charming shop with a knowledgeable, friendly staff and extraordinary customer service. See their on the inside back cover.

Northwoods Mall

www.travelerofcharleston.com

2150 Northwoods Blvd. • North Charleston www.shopnorthwoodsmall.com • Mon-Sat: 10am-9pm, Sun: Noon-6pm • Northwoods Mall is home to all your favorite stores like Belk, Dillard’s, Sears, JCPenney, and the Lowcountry’s only Sephora, Hollister Co and Hot Topic plus all of your favorites. A great shopping place with over 100 fabulous stores, 20 eateries including King Street Grille, Jason’s Deli, Olive Garden, O’Charleys, an indoor play area and a thirteen-screen stadium theater, making it truly a total experience.

Oil & Vinegar 1329 Theatre Dr. • Mount Pleasant in Towne Centre (Map: N-4) • (843) 654-1556 • e-mail charleston@oilandvinegarusa.com • Are you passionate about taste? Then you will be sure to enjoy Oil & Vinegar! Visit us in Towne Centre and you’ll find a vast selection of imported olive oils, vinegars, pasta, sauces, tapenades, spices, exotic herb mixes and more. You don’t have to be a culinary expert to enjoy the Oil & Vinegar experience. Looking for the perfect gift? Free shipping on orders over $75 outside of Charleston.

The Powder Magazine on Cumberland Street is a 1713 gunpowder magazine and museum.

After Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland (1630–1685) was restored to the English throne following Oliver Cromwell’s Protectorate, he granted the chartered Carolina territory to eight of his loyal friends, known as the Lords Proprietors, in 1663. 34

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SHOPPING & RETAIL

SHOPPING Princess of Tides Boutique 430 King St. • Downtown Charleston (Map: G-2) • (843) 637-4673 • 644 Long Point Rd., Belle Hall Shopping Center • Mount Pleasant • (Map: M-3) • (843) 884-6774 www.PrincessOfTidesShop.com • A princess leap from the Children’s Museum, experience the most magical store in the historic shopping district! Best sellers include: princess gowns, pirate & superhero gear, dance outfits & tutus, infant gifts, American doll clothes, flower hair accessories, and a Fairy Tutu Ensemble for $29! Create your own lip-gloss, sugar scrub sundae, and fragrance at the store. Royal horse drawn carriage rides with Cinderella on select dates.

Oil & Vinegar

www.mountpleasant.oilandvinegarusa.com

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SHOPPING & RETAIL

SHOPPING Spice & Tea Exchange 170-A Church St. • (Map: H-5) • (corner of S. Market & Church Sts.) • (843) 965-8300 A truly unique sensory experience! Their cooking herbs, spice blends and rubs are handselected for your cooking needs, and gourmet ‘teas are enjoyed by tea lovers across the nation. Combine traditional and exotic gourmet spices, cooking herbs and seasonings from around the globe in the preparation of our 60+ hand-mixed signature blends and rubs. Packaging by the ounce allows you to experiment as you journey through our vast selection of spices and seasonings.

Tanger Outlets 4840 Tanger Outlet Blvd. • North Charleston (Map: V-3) • (843) 529-3095 • Hours: Mon-Sat. 10am-9pm, Sun. 11am-6pm www.tangeroutlets.com/charleston • Find the brands you know, choices you want and prices you’ll love at the Tanger Outlet. Buy direct from the manufacturer at over 90 brand name stores such as Banana Republic, Nine West, Nike, Lucky Brand Jeans, Coach, Gymboree and more, just north of Charleston. From downtown Charleston take I-26 westbound, exit 213A, left on Montague, right on International Blvd. Bring in their ad (this section) and receive a free Tanger Coupon Book worth hundreds in additional savings.

The Trunk Show 281 Meeting St. • Charleston • (Map H:3) (843) 722-0442 • Mon-Sat 11am-6pm. or by appointment • The Trunk Show is an affordable alternative to acquire elegant designer clothing for women and men, fine furniture, estate jewelry, accessories and refined vintage clothing for those with the most discriminating tastes. The Trunk Show takes vintage & consignment shopping to a whole new level. Free parking across the street (spaces 10, 11, 12).

The Notebook, 2004, starring Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling, was filmed in Charleston. The American theatre on King Street was Allie and Noah’s first date spot.

Filthy Rich www.shopfilthyrich.com

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Dining & Entertainment Charleston’s diverse culinary scene is amazing. Innovative chefs and their dishes will dazzle the taste buds and warm the heart. Charleston has great taste!

FINDING A GREAT PLACE TO DINE shouldn’t be a problem since award winning restaurants and chefs are scattered throughout the city. The months of January through March are prime seafood season. Some of the best restaurants in the city are represented in the following pages. Experience locally caught seafood, desserts, fine & casual dining and find great places to have a nightcap!

How to best utilize this section: For organizational purposes, the text listings are broken up into casual dining, fine dining and night life.

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

FINE DINING Bocci’s 158 Church St. • (Map: H-5) • (843) 720-2121 www.boccis.com • USA Today mentioned Bocci’s as one of the leading Italian restaurants in the United States! Featuring full Italian fare at affordable prices, this family restaurant brings everything that is right about Italian food to the table. Open for dinner nightly; reservations recommended.

Cru Cafe´ 18 Pinckney St. • Downtown Charleston (Map: I-4/5) • (843) 534-2434 • www.crucafe.com In an 18th-century home on Pinckney Street, Charlestonians sip mint julep tea on the porch and dine on upscale comfort food at John Zucker’s Cru Cafe. “Do it right and use the best posssible ingredients” is his mantra. Serving lunch Tues.-Sat., 11am to 3pm and dinner Tues.Sat., 5pm to 10pm.

Charleston Dine Around Tours and tastings at different restaurants each night • (843) 687-8442 • www.charlestondinearound.com • Charleston has some of the best restaurants, chefs, and sommeliers in the world, and our goal is to expose them by having foodies taste multiple restaurants in one night. Our restaurant tours give chefs the opportunity to showcase their creative flair. Three great restaurants, three courses prepared by chefs, 3 wine/cocktail pairings and restaurant history.

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

FINE DINING SpiritLine Dinner Cruise Departs from two locations: Aquarium Wharf, downtown Charleston (Map K:3) or Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant (Map P:1) • (843) 722-2628 – www.spiritlinecruises.com • There’s no better way to experience Charleston and her history than from the decks of a SpiritLine yacht. Join us for a non-stop, live narrated harbor tour that lasts 1 hour and 30 minutes. Enjoy a leisurely cruise past the palatial homes of Charleston's famous Battery, the Cooper River Bridge, Waterfront Park, Patriots Point, Fort Sumter, Fort Moultrie and our bustling seaport.

Middleton Place Restaurant 4300 Ashley River Rd. • Charleston (843) 556-6020 • www.middletonplace.org Savor Lowcountry cuisine while taking in views of America’s oldest landscaped gardens. For lunch, visitors enjoy a three-course, prix fixe menu. Lunch served daily 11am-3pm. Dinner guests pay no admission after 5:30pm and can stroll through the gardens prior to an elegant, candlelit evening. Dinner served Sunday, Tuesday-Thursday from 6pm-8pm and Friday & Saturday from 6pm-9pm.

The Angel Oak Tree, located on Johns Island, claimed to be over 1,400 years old, is actually about 400.

Cru Café www.crucafe.com

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Tasty Tour Why Charleston is now a dining destination Article by: Jason A. Zwiker

We like our meals long and leisurely here in the Charleston. What’s the hurry? Slow afternoons on the back porch, fried pork chops and greens washed down with sweet tea while watching the world tick by. That’s the way we do things. It was, and is, good eating for our guests as well (now, granted, there might be times when honest-togosh fried chicken, the authentic stuff from the best Southern kitchens, might take some getting used to for a Yankee traveler brought up on Shake ‘n Bake, but even so). Visitors to Charleston usually came to see the magnificent architecture and plantations left over from a time gone by or perhaps to enjoy Spoleto in its season. Our restaurants were great, all agreed, but they weren’t the main reason for the trip. Curiously, though, about a decade or so back, something began to shift. A new crop of top-flight local chefs began to emerge in the dining scene. They were in fact so unsatisfied with the descriptive “great” that they pushed the level of the local kitchens right up to “world class.” The proof is in the pudding: Today, a visitor to Charleston is just as likely to have chosen the destination for the food as for any other reason. The shift was more than just a few new recipes jotted down in the kitchen: A whole new consciousness has emerged. Today’s top names in local dining are just as likely to have their own microfarm on one of the islands, growing vegetables for taste rather than for quantity. There are heritage breed hogs grazing in fields nearby. No, friend, a pig is not a pig, and should you befriend a local chef or farmer, he or she will be happy to explain

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You’ll also definitely want to try some of our fresh local seafood while you’re in town. The best part is that you can find it fresh and local in some sweet casual locations that are easy on the eyes and easy on the wallet.

exactly why (if you’re lucky, the explanation will involve a plate filled with ham that says far more than words ever could). Just as in days gone by, you might have sketched out an itinerary to walk the Battery, visit Fort Sumter and take a day trip to the historic gardens down Highway 61 while in town; today it will serve you to map out your dining destinations as well. While you’re downtown, you should try Cru Café (18 Pinckney). Chef John Zucker understands what good food is all about: that’s probably why he was number one in his class at Cordon Bleu in Paris. Check out all the tempting pasta and risotto delicacies on the menu! That ginger-seared salmon got you thinking, didn’t it? Or maybe some of the pan-seared duck breast … Hey, there’s no rule that says you can only dine somewhere once per trip, right? Just down the road at Bocci’s Italian Restaurant (158 Church), you can enjoy a variety of scrumptious veal specialties (you’ll love the veal Parmesan) or some duck Tuscano with an orange argo dolce sauce, served with Parmesan risotto, mushrooms and sautéed spinach. There is an extensive wine list, and the atmosphere and décor will make you feel as though you’ve wandered into the Old World of long ago.

Should your travel plans include time on the water, consider a Spiritline Dinner Cruise. Imagine a luxurious multi-course meal with your choice of several entrée options, all while seeing the sights of Charleston Harbor in high style. Did we mention the music, dancing and entertainment? If you’re visiting some of our famous plantations and gardens along Highway 61, consider Middleton Place Restaurant (4300 Ashley River) for fine dining. Traditional Lowcountry plantation fare is what you’ll find here, including our perennial favorites: she-crab soup, and shrimp and grits. Is the above a comprehensive list all there is to eat in Charleston? Heavens, no! But it ought to get you walking down the right path, tasting a sampling of the best the city has to offer. Want a little extra help in getting that perfect food and drink pairing down pat? Check out Charleston Dine Around (charlestondinearound. com/). Or check out Culinary Tours of Charleston (40 N. Market) for a unique way to experience the city and its cuisine together Go out; explore; walk the city, let way lead to way; plate lead to plate. Soon enough you’ll realize why the prestigious James Beard Foundation now routinely sniffs about our kitchens in search of nominees for the Best Chef award for the Southeast and why food writers coast-to-coast are dancing the Charleston all the way down to … well, you know. Bon appétit! july-september 2011 travelerofcharleston.com

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

CASUAL DINING Baskin Robbins 280 W. Coleman Blvd. • Mount Pleasant • (Map O:1) • (843) 881-6741 • For 62 years Baskin Robbins has been delighting customers with irresistible treats. Like founder Irv Robbins says, “Not everyone likes all our flavors, but each flavor is someone’s favorite.” Come on in for your old favorite or get a free taster spoon and find your new favorite. We now have many new toppings, fresh baked waffle cones and soft serve ice cream. See coupon in ad for 10% off!

Charleston Crab House 41 S. Market St. • downtown • (Map H:6) (843) 853-2900 • 145 Wappoo Creek Dr. James Island • (843) 762-4507 www.charlestoncrabhouse.com • Serving Lunch & Dinner daily. Celebrating 20 years, the Charleston Crab House serves fresh local seafood including S.C. shrimp year-round. A favorite for locals and visitors with roof-top dining downtown and a waterfront patio in James Island.

Did you know that riding the downtown Trolley or bus service is free? To see the available routes refer to our downtown map page.

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CASUAL DINING

Cupcake

Gilligan’s Seafood Restaurant

433 King St. • downtown Charleston (Map: G-2) • (843) 853-8181 • 644 Long Point Rd., Belle Hall Shopping Center • Mount Pleasant (Map: M-3) • (843) 856-7080 • www.freshcupcakes.com • Featured by USA Today, Martha Stewart and also by Ellen as “the best cupcakes in America!” Cupcakes: they’re sweet and delicious... tiny works of art that bring back the delights of childhood. Baked fresh daily, our cupcakes are concocted from the finest all-natural ingredients, like real vanilla beans, sweet cream butter, fresh fruit, and rich chocolate – finished off with homemade icing and an assortment of toppings, creating a fun, swanky update of a vintage favorite.

Downtown Charleston (end of the Market) (Map: J-5) • (843) 853-2244; Goose Creek, 219 St. James Ave. • (843) 818-2244; Johns Island, 160 Main Rd. • (843) 766-2244; Moncks Corner, 582 Dock Rd. • (843) 761-2244; Mount Pleasant, 1475 Long Grove Dr. (843) 849-2244; Summerville, 3852 Ladson Rd. (843) 821-2244 • www.gilligans.net. Established in 1991, Gilligan’s has grown to 9 family friendly locations, serving the freshest seafood in a casual atmosphere. Fresh oysters, 100% domestic shrimp, fish, steaks, chicken, pasta, the best hush puppies in the area and a great kids menu. Open 7 days for lunch, dinner and to go. See coupon in this section!

East Bay Deli

Hyman’s Seafood

334 East Bay St. • downtown Charleston (Map: J-4) • (843) 216-5473 • 1120 Oakland Market Rd. • Mount Pleasant • (Map: M-5) (843) 216-5473 • 9135 University Blvd. N. Charleston • (843) 553-7374 • 4405 Dorchester Rd. • N. Charleston • (Map: X-4) • (843) 7471235 • Charleston’s real New York-style deli slices sandwich meats fresh every morning and uses only quality products such as Thumann’s deli meats and Hebrew National deli dogs. The varied menu comes with many options from which to choose: soups, chili, both hearty and heart-healthy sandwiches, wraps, giant spuds and desserts.

215 Meeting St. • Charleston • (Map H:5) (843) 723-6000 • hymanseafood.com Hyman’s Seafood is a must when visiting Charleston. Reviewed by over 30 national publications and voted No. 1 seafood restaurant in the Southeast by Southern Living magazine nine years in a row. Lunch and dinner served 7 days a week. Parking and back entrance from Charleston Place. No reservations, come early to avoid the wait. See coupon in ad for free crab dip or shrimp salad!

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

CASUAL DINING


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

CASUAL DINING Joe Pasta 428 King (Corner of King & John St.) • (Map: E-5) Downtown Charleston • (843) 965-5252 Joe Pasta specializes in great Italian food at a great price for both lunch and dinner. Their menu features fantastic soups, salads, Parmesan sandwiches, pizza, superb pastas, exquisite desserts, and a full liquor, wine, and beer bar. The restaurant provides a laid-back and cozy atmosphere that is family friendly. See coupon in ad!

A.W. Shuck’s 35 South Market St. • (Map: I-5) • (843) 723-1151 www.a-w-shucks.com • A great place for a plate of fried shrimp, a dozen raw oysters and a cold pitcher of beer, all right on the historic Market. Fresh-off-the-boat daily specials – this is where the locals eat seafood. Find out what the buzz is all about.

Tommy Condon’s 160 Church St. • (Map: H-5/6) • (843) 577-3818 www.tommycondons.com • Have you ever been in an authentic Irish pub and restaurant? Well, tucked away on Church Street, just a half block off Charleston’s historic Market, you will find Tommy Condon’s, a pub that will delight your soul. At Tommy’s you will very likely happen upon a bit of frolic, friendly conversation, laughter and song. Serving lunch and dinner daily.

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

NIGHTLIFE Club Habana 177 Meeting St. (above Tinder Box) • (Map: H-5) (843) 853-5900 • After more than a decade, Club Habana, in the renovated 167-year-old Madren Building, is Charleston’s premier martini and cigar bar. Our reputation precedes us for offering a unique beverage menu, gourmet desserts and upscale, cozy seating, featuring the state-of-the-art Smokeeter ventilation system. Enjoy everything from light jazz to modern rock while enjoying your favorite libation from the most extensive liquor selection in Charleston – from single malt scotches and small batch bourbons to fine ports and Madeiras. Experience why Club Habana has been voted best martinis, best cigars and best atmosphere in Charleston. Check out our knowledgeable staff and nightly specials. Relax and pamper yourself at Club Habana.

As the relationship between the colonists and Britain deteriorated, Charleston became a focal point in the ensuing American Revolution. It was twice the target of British attacks.

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

FREE Appetizer w/ Purchase of 2 Entrees! up to $10.99 value Not Valid w/other Offers - Traveler Magazine

Great Italian Food Family Friendly Atmosphere 428 King Street & John Downtown Charleston 843-965-5252

THE SOURCE FOR ALL THINGS CHARLESTON

www.travelerofcharleston.com

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Joe Pasta


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Recipe Charleston Coconut Pie This simple and delicious dessert is the perfect summer treat! Ingredients • 4 eggs, beaten • 1/2 cup self-rising flour • 1 1/3 cups sugar • 1/2 stick butter or margarine – melted • 2 cups milk • 1 teaspoon vanilla • One 8 ounce can flake coconut

Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat all the ingredients together and pour into a 10 inch pie plate. Bake for 45 minutes. Though the filling seems unsettled, do not cook the pie any longer. Refrigerate it and it will settle without spoiling its creamy consistency. No topping is needed but feel free to beat up a meringue, or simply use Cool Whip.

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Art & Antiques Charleston was founded in the late 1600s as a port city, and it has remained a thiving place to buy goods ever since! Buy local and enjoy the rewards.

THE CHARLESTON ARTS SCENE is diverse and encompasses the performing, cultural and decorative arts. Charleston is renowned for its fantastic art organizations such as CFADA (Charleston Fine Art Dealers’ Association) and the French Quarter art galleries. Art & Antique galleries from the classical to the contemporary can be found throughout the area. The famed Antiques District is an area located on Lower King Street between Beaufain and Queen Streets.

The city hosts a number of awardwinning art focused events and festivals such as Spoleto, Piccolo Spoleto, MOJA, Art Walks, Fine Art Annual and the Palette & Palate Stroll. See the Calendar of Events sections to see what's on the schedule.

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ART & ANTIQUES

ANTIQUES Terrace Oaks Antique Mall 2037 Maybank (Hwy. 700) • James Island (843) 795-9689 • Mon-Sat. 10am-5:30pm www.terraceoaksantiques.com • Since 1988, Terrace Oaks Antique Mall has been the leader in the Charleston area for multi-dealer antique shops. Their 10,000-square-foot, climate-controlled shop houses 90+ booths with all different tastes and styles. When it comes to antiques, they have just about anything your heart desires. Located just one mile off of Folly Road on the way to Kiawah and Seabrook Islands.

PERFORMING ARTS Chamber Music Charleston www.ChamberMusicCharleston.org (843)763-4941 • Experience the excitement of live classical music performed in some of Charleston’s most captivating settings! From intimate House Concerts and rousing Memminger Concerts to the excitement of the annual Mozart In The South Festival, Chamber Music Charleston continually present concerts that spark the imagination and garner rave reviews. “This wasn’t just a concert; it was a happening! Bravo, tutti!”

Theatre Charleston (843) 813-8578 • www.theatrecharleston.com Theatre Charleston, a non-profit organization comprised of the area’s leading local theaters, is dedicated to helping you easily find out what’s playing when and where. For a full calendar of this season’s live productions, check us out at www.theatrecharleston.com, and see a show tonight!

In 2010 Charleston was listed as one of the country’s top 10 cities for theater, and one of the top 2 in the South.[44] Most of the theaters are part of the League of Charleston Theatres, better known as Theatre Charleston. july-september 2011 travelerofcharleston.com

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ART & ANTIQUES

TRAVELER 速

of Charleston

Scan this QR (quick response) code with your smart phone!

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Featured Events It’s Event Season in Charleston! July – September, 2011 The featured events listed will give you an idea of events, festivals and what’s going on throughout Charleston.

4th of July Festivities & Displays

Charleston knows how to celebrate the 235th anniversary of our nation’s independence in style with a number a great events! Patriots Point, home of the USS Yorktown and Medal of Honor Museum, hosts the largest area festival. All day events for children and adults with live music, a Kids Zone, discounted tickets to explore the ships and the largest fireworks display in the city. Located in Mt. Pleasant. From 5pm – dusk. You can’t beat watching fireworks from the beach! Go to Folly Beach at the fishing pier or the Isle of Palms at Front Beach. The Red, White and Blue on the Green Festival in Summerville is tremendous, starts on Sunday the third, with a fireworks display on Monday the fourth. On Sunday from 5-8pm at Hutchinson Square there will be a parade, family fun activities, food/drink vendors and live musical entertainment. $3 per person. The fun will continue on the fourth with a fireworks display at Gahagan Park at dusk. Free event. (843) 821-7260 for more info. North Charleston also has a great all-day festival at Riverfront Park. Family fun and live entertainment are from 3-9pm with a spectacular fireworks display at dusk. Free event. The SC Aquarium hosts an evening of family fun with BBQ, a 4-D Theatre, face painting, music and a one-of-a-kind view of the fireworks over the harbor. (843) 577-FISH).

BBQ & Bluegrass Festival at Boone Hall Plantation

September 4 This festival has become a popular area favorite. There is always a wide variety of delicious BBQ available for everyone in attendance to purchase, with beer, wine and live entertainment as well. Two of the most celebrated acts in the bluegrass and country music circles, Rhonda Vincent and Sam Bush, will perform. This year, Piggly Wiggly will present under “The Big Tent” a number of festivities and demonstrations throughout the day. There will be plenty of family fun and entertainment and a Zambelli Fireworks Show at the end of the day. Gates open at noon, $30/adults, $10/children 6-12, under age 6 are free. 56

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FEATURED EVENTS

Fall Tours of Homes www.preservationsociety.org

35th Annual Fall Tours of Homes and Gardens

September 22 – October 23 Experience Charleston’s distinctive architecture, history and culture during the Preservation Society’s extremely popular annual fundraiser. Visit intimate gardens and architecturally significant private homes, churches and public buildings as you stroll through Charleston’s historic streets. Tours highlight American architecture from the early Georgian Period into the 21st century. Enjoy unique neighborhoods that represent Charleston’s flourishing culture from the Colonial era to the present. Most of the properties on tour are privately owned and are open to the public exclusively for the tours. For tickets and more information, visit their gift shop at 147 King, visit preservationsociety.org or call (843) 722-4630. Tickets are $45 per person.

MOJA Festival of Arts

September 29 – October 9 A Celebration of African-American and Caribbean Arts. Selected as one of the Southeast Tourism Society’s Top 20 events last autumn (for the third consecutive year), the 2011 MOJA Arts Festival promises an exciting lineup of events with a rich variety of traditional favorites. Nearly half of MOJA’s events are admission-free, and the remainder are offered at very modest ticket prices ranging from $5-$20. The MOJA Arts Festival is a multi-disciplinary festival produced and directed by the City of Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs. The Festival highlights the many AfricanAmerican and Caribbean contributions to western and world cultures. MOJA’s wide range of events include visual arts, classical music, dance, gospel concert, jazz concert, poetry, R&B concert, storytelling, theatre, children’s activities, traditional crafts, ethnic food and much, much more. Visit mojafestival.com or call (843) 724-7305 for schedule and more info.

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Calendar of Events July – September, 2011

Middleton Place www.middletonplace.org

JULY 2011 2, 3

4th of July Weekend at Middleton Place – Home of Arthur Middleton, signer of Declaration of Independence. War re-enactors & encampment, musket firing, camping life demos. (843) 556-6020, middletonplace.org.

4

Fireworks Display Locations and Festivities – Featured! See page 56.

4

Riverdogs Minor League Baseball & Fireworks – Joe Riley Park, game at 6:35pm, (843) 723-7241.

9

Shark Week at the SC Aquarium – 9am-6pm.

9, 16

Reggae Nights Concert Series – 9th, Mystic Vibrations at Wannamaker Park, 16th: Da Gullah Rootz at James Island County Park – Food, beverages, souvenirs, $6 adults, children under 12 free, 8pm, (843) 795-4386.

9

Life & Leisure – Charles Towne Landing, the birthplace of SC! Wild animals, the Spanish, Native Americans, disease! South Carolina’s colonists had many worries upon their arrival in the new world. 11am-4pm, (843) 852-4200, charlestownelanding.travel.

6-9

Mega Dock Billfish Tournament – City Marina. megadocktournament.com.

15

Blast From the Past – Rock n’ roll musical featuring biggest hits from 50s – 70s, Charleston Music Hall, (843) 853-2252.

15

Charleston Fine Art Dealers Association’s 6th Annual Palette & Palate Stroll Fine Art Galleries and Restaurants are paired together, foodies and art lovers will enjoy this event! $45 pp, call (843) 819-8006 or cfada.com.

16

Cannon Firings at Charles Towne Landing State Historical Site, the birth place of SC! Living history demonstrators and learn about Colonial life. (843) 852-4200, charlestontownelanding.travel.

22 – 24

World Team Tennis Finals – Family Circle Cup Stadium, (800) 677-2293, familycirclecup.com.

23

All-Star Rock Tour at Boone Hall Plantation – 80s rock music legends (Orleans, John Cafferty, Robbie Dupree, John Ford Coley, Dan and David Patrick. 7:30pm, $30pp at gate, boonehallplantation.com.

World Team Tennis www.familycirclecup.org 58

travelerofcharleston.com july-september 2011


6, 20

Reggae Nights Concert Series – 6th, Selah Dubb at Wannamaker Park, 20th: Jah Works at James Island County Park – Food, beverages, souvenirs, $6 adults, children under 12 free, 8pm, (843) 795-4386.

13

A Day in the Life of a Sailor – Charles Towne Landing, the birthplace of SC! Learn how ships played a vital role to the colonists. Board the “Adventure,” Charleston’s only reproduction 17th-century wooden ship. Enjoy stories, sailors’ skills, shanties, visit the museum and Animal Forest. 11am-5pm, (843) 852-4200, charlestownelanding.travel.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

AUGUST 2011

SEPTEMBER 2011 4

BBQ & Bluegrass Festival at Boone Hall Plantation. Featured event! See page 56.

10

From Seeds to Shillings – Charles Towne Landing, the birthplace of SC! See costumed interpreters working in the crop garden. Learn how Colonial crops were used as medicines, fragrances, and dyes. 11am-4pm, (843) 852-4200, charlestownelanding.travel.

15 – 18

Chamber Music Charleston – Mozart in the South Festival. Thurs: Cathedral of Luke & St. Paul (126 Coming St), 7pm, $5-30 pp. Fri Soiree at Gov. Thomas Bennett House (60 Barre St), live auction, gourmet food & wine, 6:30pm, $100 pp. Sat: Little Mozart Circus, free outdoor event on Marion Square. Sun: Wind Ensemble Finale Concert, Middleton Place, 7pm, $5-$35 pp. (843) 763-4941 or mozartinthesouth.org.

17

Cannon Firings at Charles Towne Landing State Historical Site, the birth place of SC! Living history demonstrators and learn about Colonial life. (843) 852-4200, charlestontownelanding.travel.

22 – 10/23 35th Annual Fall Tours of Homes & Gardens – Featured event! See page 57. 29 – 10/9

27th Annual MOJA Arts Festival – Featured event! See page 57.

30

Curator Led Tours of Confederate Fortification on James Island – Curator of history at the Charleston Museum, 1:30pm, call (843) 722-2996 or charlestonmuseum.org.

Shark Week www.scaquarium.org

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Area Farmers’ Markets ONGOING EVENTS 7/9, 8/6, 9/10

Shaggin' on the Cooper – Live music & dancing starts at 7:30pm, $10pp, Mount Pleasant Pier at Waterfront Park, (843) 795-4FUN.

7/15, 8/12, 9/2 & 23

Moonlight Mixers – Dance to live oldies and shag music on the Folly Beach Pier from 7pm-11pm. (843) 794-4FUN.

7/23, 8/20, 9/17

Folly Beach Fishing Pier Tournament, registration begins at 6am, tournament ends at 4pm, prizes. $12 pp.

thru 8/29

Farmers’ Market at Freshfields Village, Johns Island. Mondays Only! 4-8pm.

thru 9/5

Charleston Riverdogs Minor League Baseball games. Call (843) 577-3647 or riverdogs.com for schedule.

thru 10/27

Blues & BBQ Harbor Cruise – Two hour cruise aboard the Carolina Belle with delicious food, cash bar and live blues music. Cruise dates: July 3, 14, 21, 28. August 4, 11, 18, 25. Sept 1, 8, 15, 22, 29. Oct 13, 27. $39.95 pp. Tours depart from the Maritime Center at 10 Wharfside St, downtown. (843) 722-1112 or charlestonharbortours.com.

Ongoing

Secessionist Soldiers and Slaves – Event at both Middleton Place and Edmondston-Alston House (21 East Battery). middletonplace.org.

Varies

Area Farmers Markets – Downtown Charleston at Marion Square, Saturdays only from 8am-2pm. Mount Pleasant on Coleman Blvd, Tuesdays only, 3 pm to dark, (843) 884-8517. North Charleston at Park Circle, every Thurs, 1-6pm. Freshfields Village on Johns Island, Mondays only from 4-8pm.

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travelerofcharleston.com july-september 2011


RESORT COURSES KIAWAH ISLAND GOLF RESORT COURSES (843) 768-2121 • www.kiawahgolf.com Cougar Point Gary Player, architect Oak Point Clyde B. Johnston, architect The Ocean Course Pete Dye, architect Osprey Point Tom Fazio, architect Turtle Point Jack Nicklaus, architect SEABROOK ISLAND RESORT COURSES (843) 768-2529 www.discoverseabrook.com Crooked Oaks Course Robert Trent Jones Sr., architect Ocean Winds Course Willard Byrd, architect WILD DUNES RESORT COURSES Isle of Palms, (843) 886-2255 www.wilddunes.com The Harbor Course The Links Course Tom Fazio, architect

LOCAL COURSES Charleston Municipal James Island, (843) 795-6517 John E. Adams, architect

AREA GOLF COURSES

Area Golf Courses Charleston National Country Club Mt. Pleasant, (843) 884-4653 Rees Jones, architect Coosaw Creek Country Club N. Charleston, (843) 767-9000 Arthur Hills, architect Crowfield Golf & Country Club Goose Creek, (843) 764-4618 Robert Spense, architect Dunes West Golf Club Mt. Pleasant, (843) 856-9000 Arthur Hills, architect Golf Club at Briar’s Creek Johns Island, (843) 768-3050 Rees Jones, architect Golf Club at Wescott Plantation N. Charleston, (843) 871-2135 Michael Hurdzan, architect Legend Oaks Plantation Course Summerville, (843) 821-4077 Scott W. Pool, architect Links at Stono Ferry Hollywood, (843) 763-1817 Ron Garl, architect Patriots Point Links Mt. Pleasant, (843) 881-0042 William Byrd, architect Pine Forest Country Club Summerville (843) 851-1193 Robert Spense, architect RiverTowne Country Club Mt. Pleasant, (843) 216-3777 Arnold Palmer, architect

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TIDE CHARTS

Tide Charts July – September, 2011

Tide predictions provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) at the Custom Wharf House in Charleston Harbor.

Charleston and most other coastal areas experience two high and two low tides per day. Tides are caused by the gravitational effect of the moon. Why is knowing the tides helpful? If a day of fishing is planned, doing so when the tides are changing will normally prove to be when the catching is best. When planning a trip to the beach, it’s also nice to know whether the tides are in or out. The waves will naturally be larger on an incoming tide.

AUGUST 2011

JULY 2011 Low DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

68

AM 2:39 3:22 4:06 4:51 5:36 6:24 7:15 8:10 9:07 10:07 11:07 12:03 12:59 1:50 2:39 3:25 4:08 4:49 5:28 6:06 6:44 7:24 8:08 8:57 9:50 10:44 11:38 12:35 1:24 2:10 2:55

Low

High PM 2:33 3:20 4:09 5:00 5:53 6:51 7:52 8:56 10:01 11:04 ----12:04 1:00 1:52 2:41 3:28 4:13 4:56 5:39 6:24 7:10 8:01 8:56 9:53 10:50 11:45 ----12:31 1:22 2:13 3:03

AM 8:37 9:23 10:09 10:58 11:50 ----12:51 1:46 2:45 3:47 4:49 5:49 6:48 7:42 8:34 9:22 10:08 10:52 11:35 ----12:35 1:18 2:04 2:54 3:47 4:42 5:36 6:29 7:20 8:10 9:00

PM 8:57 9:41 10:25 11:11 11:59 12:45 1:44 2:44 3:46 4:48 5:48 6:44 7:38 8:27 9:13 9:56 10:37 11:17 11:56 12:18 1:03 1:49 2:39 3:31 4:24 5:18 6:10 7:00 7:47 8:34 9:20

DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

travelerofcharleston.com july-september 2011

AM 3:41 4:26 5:13 6:02 6;54 7:49 8:49 9:51 10:53 11:51 12:39 1:29 2:14 2:56 3:35 4:12 4:47 5:22 5:58 6:37 7::22 8:13 9:09 10:09 11:08 12:01 12:51 1:39 2:26 3:13 4:01

SEPTEMBER 2011 High

PM 3:54 4:46 5:41 6:38 7:38 8:41 9:45 10:48 11:46 -----12:45 1:35 2:22 3:06 3:47 4:27 5:07 5:47 6:29 7:16 8:09 9:08 10:09 11:07 ----12:05 1:00 1:53 2:46 3:38 4:31

AM 9:50 10:41 11:34 ----12:35 1:31 2:31 3:34 4:36 5:37 6:33 7:25 8:13 8:57 9:38 10:18 10:57 11:36 ----12:34 1:18 2:08 3:04 4:03 5:02 5:58 6:53 7:45 8:36 9:28 10:18

PM 10:06 10:54 11:43 12:30 1:28 2:30 3:33 4:36 5:35 6:30 7:20 8:06 8:48 9:27 10:05 10:41 11:17 11:54 12:16 1:00 1:49 2:44 3:42 4:40 5:36 6:29 7:19 8:08 8:54 9:44 10:32

Low DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

AM 4:48 5:39 6:32 7:30 8:32 9:37 10:39 11:37 12:16 1:02 1:44 2:23 3:00 3:35 4:08 4:42 5:18 5:58 6:43 7:36 8:35 9:39 10:42 11:43 12:19 1:09 1:57 2:46 3:34 4:24

High PM 5:26 6:23 7:22 8:25 9:28 10:29 11:25 ----12:29 1:17 2:02 2:43 3:22 4:00 4:37 5:14 5:54 6:39 7:41 8:29 9:31 10:30 11:26 5:31 12:40 1:35 2:29 3:22 4:15 5:09

AM 11:14 ----12:19 1:17 2:19 3:23 4:25 5:23 6:17 7:05 7:49 8:30 9:08 9:45 10:20 10:56 11:33 ----12:37 1:27 2:26 3:30 4:32 5:57 6:27 7:21 8:14 9:07 10:00 10:54

PM 11:25 12:11 1:11 2:14 3:18 4:20 5:18 6:10 6:56 7:39 8:18 8:56 9:32 10:07 10:42 11:17 11:54 12:15 1:04 2:00 3:02 4:03 5:02 6:50 7:41 8:32 9:22 10:13 11:06


VISITOR 411

Visitor 411 Population: Estimated to be 124,500 in 2009 – Charleston is the second largest city in the state. Population for the Metro Area estimates a total population of 664,607; the largest in the state. Climate:

Charleston’s subtropical climate is known for mild winters, warm temperatures in the spring and fall with hot and humid summer seasons. Hurricanes are a threat during summer and early fall. The last was Hugo in 1989, a category 4 storm.

Emergency Services: Dial 911

Area Information Visitor Centers:

DOWNTOWN CHARLESTON: 375 Meeting St. MOUNT PLEASANT: 99 Harry Hallman Jr. Blvd. NORTH CHARLESTON: 4975 Centre Point Dr. SUMMERVILLE: 402 N. Main St.

Parking:

There are numerous parking garages in downtown Charleston which can be found on our downtown map. Metered street parking is an option throughout the city as well.

Public Transportation:

DOWNTOWN TROLLEY: Bus system offers free transportation (see map for routes). carta.com CARTA: Bus system transports passengers everywhere from the beach and beyond. carta.com AIRPORT: Charleston International, International Blvd (off of I-526), North Charleston AMTRAK: Gaynor Ave, North Charleston. amtrak.com WATER TAXI: Transports visitors from downtown to the USS Yorktown & Mount Pleasant. charlestonwatertaxi.com. 843.330.2989

Top Five Employers:

Joint Charleston (Navy & Air Force Bases): 22,000 Medical University of South Carolina: 11,000 Charleston County Schools: 7,200 Berkeley County Schools: 3,650 Dorchester County Schools: 2,800

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DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS

Directory Of Advertisers FUN & RECREATION Absolute Reel Screamer Charters . . . . . . .28 Adventure Harbor Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Angler Management Charters . . . . . . . . . . 16 Aqua Safaris Water Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Audubon Center at Beidler Forest . . . . . . 19 Barrier Island Eco Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Blackbeard’s Cove Fun Park . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Boone Hall Plantation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 25 Bulldog Walking Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Charles Towne Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Charleston Harbor Tours . . . . . . . . . . 3,25,37 Charleston Tea Plantation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Charleston Water Taxi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Children’s Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 City of Folly Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Culinary Tours of Charleston . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Drayton Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Edisto Island Serpentarium . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Edmondston-Alston House . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Fate Luxury Sailing Charter . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Fort Sumter Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Isle of Palms Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Magnolia Plantation & Gardens . . . . . . . . 22 Middleton Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Nature Adventures Kayak Tours . . . . . . . . 26 Palmetto Carriage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,37 Sandlapper Water Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 SC Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Schooner Pride Sailing Tour . . . . . . . . . . . 36 SpiritLine Charleston Harbor Tour . . . . . . 29 Thriller Charleston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Tidalwave Watersports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 SHOPPING Charleston Charm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Dacuba’s Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Filthy Rich Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Nice Ice Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Northwood/Citadel Malls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Oil & Vinegar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Princess of Tides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Spice & Tea Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Tanger Outlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 The Brass Pirate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 The Trunk Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Town of Summerville SC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT A.W. Shuck’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Baskin Robbins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Bocci’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Charleston Crab House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Charleston Dine Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Club Habana Cigar Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Cru Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Cupcake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 East Bay Deli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Gilligan’s Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Hyman’s Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Joe Pasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Middleton Place Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . 42 SpiritLine Dinner Cruise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Tommy Condon’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 ARTS & ANTIQUES Chamber Music Charleston . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Terrace Oaks Antique Mall . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Theatre Charleston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 70

travelerofcharleston.com july-september 2011



Charleston SC - Visitor Information - Traveler Magazine - Summer 2011