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THE SCIENCE OF JAPANESE RAMEN

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THE

RAMEN LAB SAITO JUNYA

IPPUDO EAST VILLAGE JAPANESE RAMEN NOODLE BRASSERIE

IPPUDO

65 FOURTH AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10003 PHONE: 212-388-0088 / FAX: 212-388-9923


IPP UDO RAM E N


Ramen is a Microcosmos in a Bowl Ramen is a cosmos created in a bowl. The basic broth is derived from the essence of pork, chicken, beef, or seafood, and seasoned with soy sauce, salt, miso, and other important ingredients. It's totally up to each individual chef to decide which ingredients and how much to use. Flour, eggs, kansui (an alkaline water) and other ingredients are used to make noodles. The chefs do not simply mix these ingredients together. Their own particular originality is infused into the thickness, length, form, and texture of noodles. Toppings such as yakibuta (roast pork) and ni-tamago (soy sauce flavored boild egg) are also selectively used according to the tastes, preference and individuality of the chef. Soup, noodles, and topping, the trinity brings forth the cosmos. Ramen is quite a creative dish with infinite potential for expansion and diversity.


MEET THE TEAM

The Revolutionary Team Constantly Seeks Changes


“To continuously innovate to remain true�

The selection of ingredients and the seasoning suited to the customer's well-being has won over female customers tempting them to want to try it everyday. As a revolutionary flag bearer, the team exhaustively explores the possibilities of ramen. This resulted in ground-breaking innovations being added to Tonkotsu ramen and eventually impressed people from overseas, not to mention the Japanese.In the meantime, the team scrutinizes ingredients and seasonings from around the world to successively create new ramen varieties using some of the various cooking techniques found worldwide.


MEET T HE CHEF


Shigemi Kawahara Ramen King & founder of IPPUDO

Shigemi Kawahara, often dubbed the Ramen King, is the founder of IPPUDO and a charismatic entertainer in the kitchen. Born and raised in Fukuoka City, Kyushu, he became interested in the restaurant and hospitality industry after graduating from college and consequently worked and trained in a number of European restaurants in Japan. In 1979, at the age of 27, he opened his first restaurant and bar, After the Rain, in Fukuoka city. He opened the first IPPUDO, with seating for ten, in his hometown in October 1985. When Shigemi Kawahara started IPPUDO in 1985, he also created his very own “Tao,” or way, of ramen. His philosophy — to continuously innovate to remain true — is to keep reinventing in the kitchen; redefining recipes for a dish that emerged over 300 years ago. Kawahara’s reinvention of the Hakata-style tonkotsu (porkbased) ramen with its signature delicate, creamy broth, earned IPPUDO its global acclaim. Shigemi Kawahara sees the restaurant as a stage where each employee plays a role like an actor. From cooking to serving, every move is choreographed to perfect timing, even down to the moment when the staff bids a customer goodbye.


GLOBAL SIGNATURES

IPPUDO

SHIROMARU CLASSIC

YIE LD 3 Servings PRE P TI ME 10 Hrs CO O K TI ME 15 Mins

IPPUDO's original creamy tonkotsu pork broth served with homemade thin and straight noodles, topped with pork belly chashu, sesame kikurage mushrooms, bean sprouts, bamboo shoots and spring onions.

INGREDIENTS Salted Pork 1 lb pork 1 tsp salt Soup 6 cups water (1.5L) 50g ginger root, sliced 3 cloves garlic, skinned 1 bunch green onions 4 Tbsp soy sauce 2 Tbsp sake 1 tsp salt 1 tsp sesame oil Noodles 9 oz fresh angel hair pasta (225g) 8 cups water (2L) 2 Tbsp baking soda Topping boiled egg halves bean sprouts, blanched briefly green onions, cut finely

DIRECTIONS

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Rub salt on pork and let it sit overnight in the fridge. In a pot, put water, ginger root, garlic, green onions and salted pork, and boil at high heat. Skim fat and other floating scums. Then cover, reduce to low heat, and simmer for 1½ to 2 hours. Let the broth and pork cool completely in pot. Strain and save pork. Slice pork and set aside for a topping. Prepare the rest of the toppings now as well (boiled eggs, blanched bean sprouts, cut green onions), before making the soup and noodles. Once the noodles are cooked, you will need to add the soup and toppings right away or the noodles will get soft, so you won't have time to prepare the toppings at the end. Boil the broth and add soy sauce, sake, salt and sesame oil. Let it simmer at very low heat until noodles are ready. In boiling water in a pot, add baking soda (be careful, it may boil over), then add the fresh angel hair pasta. Cook the pasta for 30 seconds, and strain. Immediately divide noodles into bowls and add soup onto noodles. Top with boiled eggs, bean sprouts, green onions and sliced pork.


GLOBAL SIGNATURES

IPPUDO

AKAMARU MODERN

YIE LD 6 Servings PRE P TI ME 10 Hrs CO O K TI ME 15 Mins

A bolder translation of the original pork broth. Served with homemade thin noodles, pork belly chashu, bean sprouts, sesame kikurage mushrooms and spring onions. A refined, modern-style ramen.

INGREDIENTS Broth 4 lb pig hocks and/or trotters, ask the butcher to cut into the smallest piece possible 2 lb chicken backs, cut into small pieces 1 lb chicken feet 1 large onion, peeled and slit around 1 whole garlic 2" ginger, sliced 1 leek, sliced 15 green onions, white parts only, cut them in half across 5-8 slices of white oyster mushrooms 1 (8-qt) heavy stock pot or an equivalent Pork Belly (Chashu) 1½ lb slab boneless pork belly, rolled and secured with strings ½ cup soy sauce 5 green onions, halved 1 whole garlic, bruised 2 whole shallots, halved

DIRECTIONS

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Place the chicken, pork bones and marrow in a stock pot. Add enough water to fully cover them. Cover with a lid. Over high heat, bring the water to a boil. Once boiled, drain the bones and wash/scrub any dark marrow or coagulated blood off from the pork with cold water. The last 2 hours before it's done, place the 5 oz pork fat on a sieve or strainer, put it in the broth, cover the pot and let the fat cook until soft and tender. Drain and finely mince the pork fat. Set aside. Preheat the oven to 250 F. In a saucepan, place the pork belly. Add water to fully cover the pork and put the water to boil. Once boiled, drain and remove the scum. In the same saucepan, place the pork back in along with the remaining ingredients for chashu. Cover with a lid. Over high heat, put the sauce to boil. Once boiled, transfer the pot to the oven and cook for 5 hours. Bring the broth to boil and add your choice of seasoning. Start with a little and add as you go. You can always increase seasoning but you can't undo over seasoned broth. Arrange the noodles in a bowl and place the chashu, egg, some minced pork fat, your favorite toppings and garnish. Serve immediately.


FEATURED RAMEN

IPPUDO

MISO TONKOTSU

YIE LD 3-4 Servings PRE P TI ME 10 Hrs CO O K TI ME 20 Mins

A rich, fragrant miso-based broth and homemade noodles, topped with seasonal boiled vegetables, pork belly chashu, fried minced pork and chopped spring onions.

INGREDIENTS Soup A 6 cups water (1.5L) 2 cloves garlic, crushed 20g ginger, sliced ½ lb (225g) ground pork 3-4 green onions 3"x1" (8x3cm) Dried Kombu B 5-6 Tbsp Miso Paste 2 Tbsp Sake 1 Tbsp Soy Sauce ½ tsp sugar ¼ tsp chili bean paste such as Tobanjan or any chili paste C 2 Tbsp sesame oil 1 clove garlic, grated Noodles 300g dried thin spaghetti 8 cups water (2L) 2 Tbsp baking soda

DIRECTIONS

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Prepare the toppings (sliced pork, boiled eggs, green onions, and cooked corn), before making the soup and noodles. Once the noodles are cooked, you will need to add the soup and toppings right away or the noodles will get soft, so you won't have time to prepare the toppings at the end. Put Ingredients A in a large pot and let boil for 15 minutes. Strain, then put the broth back in the pot. Add ingredients B to the broth and let it simmer at low heat. In boiling water in a pot, add baking soda (be careful, it may boil over), then add pasta. Cook the pasta according to the package. While cooking pasta, add ingredients C to the soup and stir. After cooking pasta, immediately divide noodles into bowls and add soup onto noodles. Top with Yakibuta, boiled egg halves, green onions and corns. Discard the “solids” in the sieve and let the soup simmer for another 5 min. If the soup tastes quite salty at this point, that is correct. It’s Japanese ramen… It is salty. Cook the fresh ramen noodles according to package instructions, and drain well. Divide the noodles into two large bowl and ladle the soup on top (you may have a bit more than needed). For each serving, place 1 shoyu egg (cut into half), 2 tbsp of finely diced scallions, 3 rectangular nori sheets, and 2 tsp of garlic and togarashi oil.


SPICY TONKOTSU

IPPUDO

KARAKA RAMEN

YIE LD 8 Servings PRE P TI ME 30 Mins CO O K TI ME 20 Mins

Our original tonkotsu broth and homemade noodles topped with “Karaka” spicy miso paste, pork belly chashu, bean sprouts, sesame kikurage mushrooms, spring onions, roasted cashew nuts, sansho pepper and fragrant garlic oil.

INGREDIENTS Spicy Miso Paste ½ cup (130 grams) of white miso paste ½ cup (130 grams) of red miso paste ¼ cup (80 grams) of sichuan douban chili paste 1 small (or ¾ medium) onion, cut into chunks 6 cloves of garlic, smashed 2" (33 grams) of ginger, cut into chunks 3 Tbsp (60 grams) of mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine) 2 Tbsp vegetable oil 1 Tbsp toasted sesame oil 1 Tbsp dashi granules 2 tsp (17 grams) of sesame paste (if Asian brands are unavailable, use tahini)

DIRECTIONS

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Shoyu Soft Boiled Eggs 4 large free-range eggs 3 Tbsp soy sauce 2 Tbsp dark brown sugar 1 Tbsp water

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To make the spicy miso paste, first combine all of the ingredients in a blender and blend until smoothly pureed. You may need to stop and scrape the blender a few times to get it going in the beginning. Transfer the mixture into a pot and set over medium heat. Bring to a low simmer and keep cooking/stirring for another 5 min. Let it cool completely and store in an air-tight container in the fridge until needed. Next, to make the shoyu soft-boiled eggs, gently place the eggs in a small pot and fill it with water until the eggs are covered by 1?. Add a generous pinch of salt (not listed in the ingredient-list because it’s more of a superstition for easy-peeling than anything…) and bring the water to a bare simmer on medium-high heat, then immediately lower the heat down to low (only enough heat to keep it at a bare simmer/or if you want to be anal, 212ºF/100ºC). The second the water reached the right temperature, set the timer at 4:30 min. Gently move the eggs around a few times during cooking. Once the timer goes off, immediately transfer the eggs into cold water and leave them to cool completely. Combine soy sauce, dark brown sugar and water in a small sauce pot. Warm up the mixture just enough to melt the sugar, then set aside. Peel the eggs then submerge them in the soy sauce-mixture. Turning them occasionally while marinating for 2~3 hours.


T HE E L EMEN TS

More than anything, the taste of Ippudo’s soup is delicious. And for good reason. The soup is cooked for 18 hours and then left for a whole day at a low temperature before a soy-based broth called kaeshi is stirred through. The wheat noodles are carefully selected and prepared with a little water. Their crisp yet slippery texture matches the soup perfectly. The final piece of the puzzle is the char siu barbecued pork used as a topping. It’s made from simmering both pork shoulder and belly meat.

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IPPUDO’s specialty pork-based stock goes through a unique “double maturation process”, cooking for a good 18 hours in a specially-crafted soup pot, then being rounded off using a lower heat maturation method for another full day. The reason for this lengthy process is to be able to extract every last drop of the pork bones’ umami (savory taste) and to create a complex, multilayered flavor. As its name suggests, the texture of the broth in the mouth is more velvety than ever while the oil and kaeshi tailored to the soup add to the overall smoothness.

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Their noodles use a blend of several varieties of wheat, including the unique Ra-Mugi strain, grown specifically in Fukuoka prefecture for making ramen noodles. In fact, the Shiromaru bowl uses ultra-fine rounded noodles, resulting in a smoother texture. Compare this to the Akamaru, which uses more angular noodles which cling to the broth more.


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Noodles are just noodles, right? Actually not. Much like bread with the different varieties of whole grain, whole wheat, rye, multigrain and white, there are all kinds of noodles, and pairing the correct noodle shape can make a big difference in the overall eating experience, which is why the signature dishes, “Shiromaru Classic” and “Akamaru Modern” don’t use the same kind of noodles. Both types of noodles use a unique blend of wheat varieties interfusing “Ra Mugi” (so named as an abbreviation of ramen + mugi meaning wheat), a wheat variety from Fukuoka prefecture specially grown for use in ramen and “Kaze no daichi” (windy plains), a wheat variety specially grown for IPPUDO. After repeated trials, IPPUDO came up with the perfect noodle shape and taste to complement each kind of ramen dish.

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If the broth, noodles and kaeshi are a cosmos in a bowl, the chāshū is a little piece of heaven. Chāshū is often written as char sui and probably conjures up images of roast pork. Not IPPUDO’s chāshū. While traditionally chāshū only uses pork belly, IPPUDO’s chāshū uses two sumptuous cuts of pork belly and pork shoulder. These two pork cuts are slowly simmered in a time-honored soya sauce-based braising liquid resulting in a flavor that you need to taste in order to believe.

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The base flavour, or kaeshi, uses a secret blend of soy sauces from Kyushu. As the ramen world's equivalent of a trade secret, the exact recipe is known only to Kawahara-san and a few closely trusted associates! This secret recipe is known only to the founder and chairman, Shigemi Kawahara and a handful of other trusted “kaeshi guardians”. This closely guarded secret is the result of two years of experimentation to revamp the kaeshi and enhance the depth of its flavor.


GLOBAL SIGNATURES

IPPUDO

HIRATA PORK BUN

YIE LD 16 Buns PRE P TI ME 24 Hrs CO O K TI ME 30 Mins

A hand-sized white bun stuffed with a thick slice of pork, lettuce, IPPUDO's secret BBQ sauce, Japanese mayonnaise and mustard, creating a tantalizingly sweet taste.

INGREDIENTS Pork ½ cup kosher salt ½ cup sugar 4½ cups water, divided 2½ lb skinless boneless pork belly, cut into quarters ½ cup reduced-sodium chicken broth Buns 1 cup warm water (105-115°F), divided ½ tsp active dry yeast 3 Tbsp sugar plus a pinch 2 Tbsp nonfat dried milk 3 ½ cups cake flour (not selfrising) 1 ½ tsp baking powder Canola oil for greasing and brushing Equipment: a deep 12-inch skillet with domed lid or a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok with lid Accompaniments: hoisin sauce; thinly sliced cucumber; chopped scallions

DIRECTIONS

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4 5

Rub salt on pork and let it sit overnight in the fridge. In a pot, put water, ginger root, garlic, green onions and salted pork, and boil at high heat. Skim fat and other floating scums. Then cover, reduce to low heat, and simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Let the broth and pork cool completely in pot. Strain and save pork. Slice pork and set aside for a topping. Prepare the rest of the toppings now as well (boiled eggs, blanched bean sprouts, cut green onions), before making the soup and noodles. Once the noodles are cooked, you will need to add the soup and toppings right away or the noodles will get soft, so you won't have time to prepare the toppings at the end. Boil the broth and add soy sauce, sake, salt and sesame oil. Let it simmer at very low heat until noodles are ready. In boiling water in a pot, add baking soda (be careful, it may boil over), then add the fresh angel hair pasta. Cook the pasta for 30 seconds, and strain. Immediately divide noodles into bowls and add soup onto noodles. Top with boiled eggs, bean sprouts, green onions and sliced pork.


GLOBAL SIGNATURES

IPPUDO

CHASHU DONBURI

YIE LD 2 Servings PRE P TI ME 50 Mins CO O K TI ME 20 Mins

IPPUDO's famous melt-in-your-mouth chashu cooked with egg, sweet onions, and topped with spring onions and Japanese nori. It is a dish made of fattier cuts of pork that are braised over low heat for a very long time.

INGREDIENTS Pork 6-8 cups water a block of pork belly, about 1 lb 6-8 cups of anchovy broth 1/4 radish, about 1/3 pound, cut into chunks Sauce 1 onion, cut in half 6 Tbsp soy sauce 4 Tbsp sake 4 Tbsp sugar 2-3 bay leaves 10 whole peppercorns 1 inch piece of ginger 2-3 cloves of garlic, smashed 2 Tbsp corn starch mixed with 2 Tbsp water Topping 3-4 green onions an egg per serving cooked rice pickled ginger (optional)

DIRECTIONS

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Cut green onion into thin strips and put in a bowl of water while you cook. In a pot of water (6-8 cups), add 10-15 dried anchovies. Next, add a few pieces of kelp and a radish. Boil for about 20 minutes, discard kelp and anchovies, but keep the radish. Sear the pork belly. Add a little oil in the pan and sear for a few minutes on each side. Next, add the seared piece of meat into the anchovy broth, and add onion, soy sauce, sake, sugar, bay leaves, peppercorns, ginger, and garlic. Boil for about 30 minutes. After about 30 minutes, remove from the pot and let it rest for a few minutes. While it's resting, make the sauce. Ladle some of the soy sauce based broth into a smaller saucepan, place on medium heat, and thicken by adding the cornstarch. If you like it thicker, add a little more cornstarch. In a bowl of rice, place strips of green onion all over the rice. Add the pork belly slices and cooked radish pieces. Then, add chopped green onion, pour some of the sauce on top of the pork belly slices, sprinkle sesame seeds, and add ginger.


Japanese Wonder to the World Japanese ramen has a roughly 400-year history. At the beginning of the 20th century, expatriate Japanese from mainland China sold ramen at food stalls in Yokohama's Chinatown. This is how ramen spread to the rest of Japan. In those days, Chinese lamian was adapted to suit Japanese preferences and called Chuka Soba. In the 1950s, Chuka Soba gradually proliferated to become the common people's taste readily enjoyed by one and all. In the meantime, ramen made its emergence through the cooking techniques used for Chuka Soba. Then it was only a matter of time until the ramen varieties flourished locally and regionally using available traditional ingredients. In the 1980s, many chefs and cooks became enchanted by the freedom and depth that ramen offered, and ramen shops started popping up one after another. These chefs stimulated, motivated and encouraged one another, to advance the rise in the Japanese ramen market.

Ippudo East Village is the first international Ippudo to introduce the World to authentic Hakata tonkotsu pork soup. From its modest origins on the Japanese Island of Kyushu to the non-stop buzz of our American flagship eatery in the East Village, our ramen is adored and beloved by New Yorkers, Japanese and hungry travelers the world-over. While Ippudo East Village adheres strongly to its roots, embracing traditional Japanese ramen culture as its essential foundation, we aim to offer a modern and truly unique interpretation that is at the same time both an inspiration from Japan and influence of New York. Since its opening in 2008 and all the following years of taking the ramen scene by storm, Ippudo East Village has stayed true to its primary focus of spreading happiness, smiles and thanks to each customer through one piping hot bowl at a time.


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