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EXPLORING THE WORLD OF WORK

Student Name: Kayla Funkenbusch

Now that you have completed some Self-Exploration and Self-Assessment, it’s time to familiarize yourself with resources that can help your further explore careers that are a good fit for you. The sites below are all great resources for occupational research. Get online and go to each of the sites and review the data offered there. In Unit 2: You identified 12 careers of interest (6 from the Interest Profiler and 6 from the SKILLS assessment). After learning about Career Clusters & Pathways, you identified 4 more careers of interest. This gives you a list of 16 careers of interest. This assignment will give you the opportunity to further research some of those careers of interest. 1. Looking back at the careers of interest you identified from the Interest Profiler, SKILLS assessment, and Career Clusters assignment, list those careers of interest here. Physical Therapist Nurse Anestheist Dermatolgoist Occupational Safety and Health Specialist Coroner Lawyer Online sites for Career Research  O*NET: www.online.onetcenter.org: This site is an up-to-date, comprehensive resource on occupations.  Occupational Outlook Handbook: www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm:  Missouri Connections: www.missouriconnections.org 1. Search the O*NET for the job title of two careers from your list above and explore the results. Click on “SUMMARY” and “DETAIL” reports and then try the “CUSTOM” link to tailor the information to your interests and needs. The “CUSTOM” link allows you to rate the importance of specific factors in relation to the job title you are exploring. It also cross-references to the DOT code and to wages and salaries links. Jot down the information you have uncovered at this site in the blanks below. Note the SOC for future reference and key facts of those positions that you are researching. TYPE YOUR RESPONSES INTO THE GREY BOXES then save the document and submit it to the drop box on ANGEL. 1. Career/Occupation Title: Physical Theapist

SOC Code Number: 29-123.00

Summary Description of Job: Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that improve mobility, relieve pain, increase strength, and improve or correct disabling conditions resulting from disease or injury. Skills: Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively. Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people. Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do. Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential


actions to choose the most appropriate one. Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others. Work Values: Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service. Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement. Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status. Helpful High School Courses: Psychology, Biology, English Language, Government, Sociology, Physics, Computers and Electronics, Mathematics, Sales and Marketing, Communication and Media, Chemistry, Foreign Language Education/Licenses Needed: Master's degree, Doctoral or professional degree, Bachelor's degree. Missouri requires license. Pay: Median wages (2012) $38.39 hourly, $79,860 annual Job Outlook: Bright Outlook ; Projected growth (2012-2022) Much faster than average (22% or higher) Related Occupations: 25-1071.00 Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary; 25-1072.00 Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary ; 29-1122.00 Occupational Therapists

2. Career/Occupation Title: Dermatologists

SOC Code Number: 29-1069.02

Summary Description of Job: Diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases or other conditions of the skin. Skills: Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people. Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making. Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one. Science — Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems. Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do. Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.


Work Values: Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement. Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy. Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status. Helpful High School Courses: Biology, Communication and Media, English Language, Mathematics, Foreign Language, Psychology, Sociology, Physics Education/Licenses Needed: Doctoral or professional degree, Master's degree, Bachelor degree. Pay: Median wages (2012) $90.00+ hourly, $187,200+ annual Job Outlook: Faster than average, 15% to 21% Related Occupations: Dermatopathologist; Managing Partner; MD Physician-Dermatologist; MOHS Surgeon/General Dermatologist; Medical Doctor MD; Physician; Practicing Dermatologist; Senior Physician

2. Search the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OHH) for two careers different careers from your list above and explore the results. Jot down the information you have uncovered at this site in the blanks below. 1. Career/Occupation Title: Lawyer Summary Description of Job: Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, and government agencies on legal issues and disputes. Skills: Analytical skills. Lawyers help their clients resolve problems and issues. As a result, they must be able to analyze large amounts of information, determine relevant facts, and propose viable solutions. Interpersonal skills. Lawyers must win the respect and confidence of their clients by building a trusting relationship, so that clients feel comfortable and share personal information related to their case. Problem-solving skills. Lawyers must separate their emotions and prejudice from their clients’ problems and objectively evaluate the matter. Therefore, good problem-solving skills are important for lawyers, to prepare the best defense and recommendation. Research skills. Preparing legal advice or representation for a client commonly requires substantial research. All lawyers need to be able to find what applicable laws and regulations apply to a specific matter. Speaking skills. Lawyers are hired by their clients to speak on their behalf. Lawyers must be able to clearly present and explain evidence to a judge and jury. Writing skills. Lawyers need to be precise and specific when preparing documents, such as wills, trusts, and powers of attorney. Work Values: Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority,


Recognition and Social Status. Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement. Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy. Helpful High School Courses: English Language, Writing, Speaking, Philosophy, History, Foreign Languages Education/Licenses Needed: Becoming a lawyer usually takes 7 years of full-time study after high school—4 years of undergraduate study, followed by 3 years of law school. Most states and jurisdictions require lawyers to complete a juris doctor (J.D.) degree from a law school accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA). ABA accreditation signifies that the law school—particularly its curricula and faculty—meets certain standards. A bachelor’s degree is required for entry into most law schools, and courses in English, public speaking, government, history, economics, and mathematics are useful. Almost all law schools, particularly those approved by the ABA, require applicants to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). This test measures applicants’ aptitude for the study of law. As of August 2013, ABA had approved 203 law schools; others were approved by state authorities only. A J.D. degree program includes courses, such as constitutional law, contracts, property law, civil procedure, and legal writing. Law students may choose specialized courses in areas such as tax, labor, and corporate law. Licenses: Becoming licensed as a lawyer is called being "admitted to the bar" and licensing exams are called "bar exams." To practice law in any state, a person must be admitted to its bar under rules established by the jurisdiction’s highest court. The requirements vary by individual states and jurisdictions. For more details on individual state and jurisdiction requirements, visit the National Conference of Bar Examiners. Most states require that applicants graduate from an ABA-accredited law school, pass one or more written bar exams, and be found by an admitting board to have the character to represent and advise others. Lawyers who want to practice in more than one state often must take separate bar exams in each state. After graduation, lawyers must keep informed about legal developments that affect their practices. Almost all states require lawyers to participate in continuing legal education either every year or every 3 years. Many law schools and state and local bar associations provide continuing legal education courses that help lawyers stay current with recent developments. Courses vary by state and generally are related to the practice of law, such as legal ethics, taxes and tax fraud, and healthcare. Some states allow lawyers to take their continuing education credits through online courses. Advancement: Newly hired attorneys usually start as associates and work with more experienced lawyers and judges. After several years, some lawyers may be admitted to partnership and become partial owners of the firm they work for. Some lawyers go into practice for themselves or move to the legal department of a large corporation. A small number of experienced lawyers are nominated or elected to judgeships. Other lawyers may become full-time law school faculty and administrators. For more information about


judges and law school faculty, see the profile on judges and hearing officers, and the profile on postsecondary teachers.

Pay: $113,530 per year; $54.58 per hour Job Outlook: The projected percent change in employment from 2012 to 2022. The average growth rate for all occupations is 11 percent. Related Occupations: Arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators help resolve conflicts outside of the court system by facilitating negotiation and dialogue between disputing parties. Judges and hearing officers apply the law by overseeing the legal process in courts. They also conduct pretrial hearings, resolve administrative disputes, facilitate negotiations between opposing parties, and issue legal decisionsParalegals and legal assistants do a variety of tasks to support lawyers, including maintaining and organizing files, conducting legal research, and drafting documents. Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a wide variety of academic and vocational subjects beyond the high school level. They also conduct research and publish scholarly papers and books.

2. Career/Occupation Title: Psychologist, General Summary Description of Job: This occupation may require a background in the following science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational disciplines: • Cognitive Psychology and Psycholinguistics • Community Psychology • Comparative Psychology • Developmental and Child Psychology • Educational Psychology • Environmental Psychology • Experimental Psychology • Family Psychology • Forensic Psychology • Geropsychology • Health/Medical Psychology • Personality Psychology • Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology • Psychology, General • Psychology, Other • Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology • Psychopharmacology • Social Psychology


Skills: Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do. Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions. Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively. Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience. Work Values: Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service. Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy. Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement. Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions. Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status. Helpful High School Courses: Speed Reading, Language Literature, Foregin Language, Psychology, Sociology, Biology, Mathematics, Technology, Life Science, Physics, History Education/Licenses Needed: Undergraduate; depends on clincial area of expertise: Doctoral degree, Master degree coupled with licenses and more advanced training and education. Pay: $69,280 was the median annual wage for psychologists in May 2012. Job Outlook: Employment of psychologists is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be best for those who have a doctoral degree in an applied specialty and those with a specialist or doctoral degree in school psychology. Related Occupations: Anthropologists and Archeologists; Market Research Analysts; Mental Health Counselors and Marriage and Family Therapists; Physicians and Surgeons; Postsecondary Teachers; School and Career Counselors; Social Workers, Socialogists; Special Education Teachers; Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors; Survey Researchers


3. Go to Missouri Connections, log in to your account, and research two different careers from your list above. Jot down the information from this site in the blanks below. 1. Career/Occupation Title: Nurse anesthetists Summary Description of Job: Nurse anesthetists administer anesthesia to patients before and during surgery. They care for and monitor patients during and after the surgical procedure. Nurse anesthetists are registered nurses trained to administer anesthesia. They work in a variety of settings including: Surgery rooms, Delivery rooms, Dentist offices, and Surgical centers. Nurse anesthetists meet with patients to obtain and review medical histories. They review the results of medical tests such as x-rays or EKGs (electrocardiograms) to obtain pertinent information about the patient's health. This helps them develop anesthesia care plans. Prior to procedures, they prepare patients and administer the anesthesia. During procedures, they manage the breathing of patients using a variety of medical techniques and equipment. They look at pupils, skin color, pulse, blood pressure, and respiration to make sure the patient is doing well. In some situations, an emergency may arise and nurse anesthetists must act fast. They may have to open patient airways and administer fluids and necessary drugs very quickly. They may also have to insert catheters. After the procedure is completed, the nurse anesthetists monitor patients' recovery. They give drugs or medicines to lessen any ill effects, such as nausea. Skills: Nurse anesthetists need to: Communicate: listen to others, understand, and ask questions. Express ideas clearly when speaking or writing. And, Read and understand work-related materials. Reason and Problem Solve: Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. Combine several pieces of information and draw conclusions. Use reasoning to discover answers to problems. Analyze ideas and use logic to determine their strengths and weaknesses. Develop rules or follow guidelines when arranging items. Judge the costs and benefits of a possible action. Understand new information or materials by studying and working with them. Identify problems and review information. Develop, review, and apply solutions. Concentrate and not be distracted while performing a task. Think of new ideas or original and creative ways to solve problems. And, Remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures. Use Math and Science: Use scientific methods to solve problems. And, Add, subtract, multiply, and divide quickly and correctly. Manage Oneself, People, Time, and Things: Check how well one is learning or doing something. Manage the time of self and others. Go back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information without becoming confused. And, Motivate, develop, and direct people as they work. Work with People: Be aware of others' reactions and change behavior in relation to them. Look for ways to help people. And, Teach others how to do something, using several methods. Work with Things: Watch gauges, dials, and output to make sure a machine is working properly. Analyze needs and requirements when designing products. Test and inspect products, services, or processes. And, Evaluate quality or performance.


Perceive and Visualize: Quickly and accurately compare letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. And, Identify a pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in distracting material. Work Values: Consider support from their employer important. They like to be treated fairly and have supervisors who will back them up. They prefer jobs where they are trained well. Consider relationships important. They like to work in a friendly, non-competitive environment. They like to do things for other people. They prefer jobs where they are not pressured to do things that go against their sense of right and wrong. Consider achievement important. They like to see the results of their work and to use their strongest abilities. They like to get a feeling of accomplishment from their work. Consider good working conditions important. They like jobs offering steady employment and good pay. They want employment that fits their individual work style. They may prefer doing a variety of tasks, working alone, or being busy all the time. Consider recognition important. They like to work in jobs which have opportunities for them to advance, be recognized for their work, and direct and instruct others. They usually prefer jobs in which they are looked up to by others. Have investigative interests. They like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking. They like to search for facts and figure out solutions to problems mentally. Have realistic interests. They like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They like to work with plants, animals, and physical materials such as wood, tools, and machinery. They often prefer to work outside. Have social interests. They like work activities that assist others and promote learning and personal development. And, They like to communicate with others: to teach, give advice, help, or otherwise be of service to others. Helpful High School Courses: Speed Reading, Writing, Communication, Foreign Languages, Mathematics, Anatomy and Physiology, Chemisty, Physics, Computer Application, Psychology, Sociology, Nursing, First Aid, Intro to Health Care Education/Licenses Needed: To work as a nurse anesthetist, you typically need to have a high school diploma or GED; graduate from a nursing program; work for at least one year in adult critical care; graduate from a master's program; complete a clinical residency; and be licensed as a registered nurse. Education after high school: To become a nurse anesthetist, first you must become a registered nurse. After working for at least a year in adult critical care, you attend a two-year master's program in nurse anesthesia. In these programs, you take courses in advanced physiology, anatomy, biology, and chemistry. You also take applied courses in pharmacology and anesthesia practices. All nurse anesthetist programs require you to participate in a clinical residency. This means that you work and study in hospitals and medical centers under the supervision of nurse anesthetists and professors. Students continue learning about the principles of anesthesia through observation. At the same time, they practice the skills and techniques of administering anesthesia and patient care. Work experience: Working as a registered nurse for several years is very good training before you begin your graduate program. On-the-job training: New nurse anesthetists generally receive some training on the job. Training varies by employer. Military training - Some branches of the military offer training in nursing specialties to people who are already licensed as a registered nurse. Training lasts 14 to 27 weeks,


depending on your specialty. Additional training occurs on the job. Licensing / Certification - All states require nurse anesthetists be licensed as registered nurses (RNs). Some states also require certification for nurse anesthetists. Requirements vary by state. In Missouri, applicants for a certified registered nurse anesthetist license must have a registered nurse license and apply for a Document of Recognition as a nurse anesthetist. To receive a registered nurse license, applicants must: be a resident of Missouri; graduate from an approved nursing school; submit fingerprints and undergo a background check; and pass a written exam. To receive a Document of Recognition as a nurse anesthetist, applicants must: have a master's degree from an accredited college or university with concentration as a nurse anesthetist; and pass a specialized exam. More information about licensing, contact: Missouri Division of Professional Registration, Board of Nursing, 3605 Missouri Boulevard, P.O. Box 656, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0656; Phone: 573.751.0681, http://pr.mo.gov/nursing.asp Pay: Nurse anesthetists (SOC 29-1151); Wages are greater than $90/hour or $187,200/year.Pay varies by employer, area of the country, and the worker's level of experience. Nurse anesthetists who work full time may receive benefits. Typical benefits include health insurance, sick leave, and paid vacation. Job Outlook: Very High; Had a great table that provided information about the number of "registered nurses" in various regions. It also provided information about the expected growth rate and future job openings. Employment Major employers: Anesthesiologist's offices, Federal, state, and local government agencies, and Hospitals. Overall Outlook: Demand depends on the trend for hospitals to have complete anesthesia teams including physicians, nurses, and other staff members. It depends on advances in technology, the growing number of older people, and increases in hospital and day surgical care. Technological advances allow a greater number of medical problems to be treated. Other factors include government regulations and changes in health care funding. Employment for nurse anesthetists is expected to grow the most in hospitals and medical offices where patients go for short-stay surgeries. Related Occupations: Anesthesiologists and Registered Nurses

2. Career/Occupation Title: Occupational Health and Safety Specialist Summary Description of Job: Occupational health and safety specialists investigate work places. They recommend ways to remove health hazards. Occupational health and safety specialists work for government agencies. They investigate reports of unsafe working conditions. Sometimes they are called when several workers experience unusual illnesses. They also inspect factories and other production facilities on a regular basis. Occupational health and safety specialists inspect work places. They look for health hazards such as unsafe machinery or bad air quality. Specialists inspect work places and analyze issues such as: Lighting, Ventilation, and Temperature. Specialists collect samples of the air, dust, and other materials. They use many types of equipment to take these samples. They may also talk to workers to learn about their symptoms or health hazards they have seen. In addition, specialists read doctors' reports about workers illnesses. They investigate to determine if worker illnesses are related to their jobs.


After they gather information, specialists determine which, if any, health hazards are present. They write reports listing the hazards and their recommendations for changing or removing them. Specialists may help employers make the changes. For example, they may talk to engineers about ways to redesign equipment. They may also teach workers how to prevent accidents, or injuries from overworking their muscles. They may train new employees about specific safety policies. They also maintain specific plans for how to handle emergencies. Occasionally, workers sue their employers because of work-related injuries or illnesses. Specialists prepare documents about their findings for these hearings. They may also testify in court. Skills: Occupational health and safety specialists need to: Communicate: Listen to others, understand, and ask questions. Express ideas clearly when speaking or writing. And, Read and understand work-related materials. Reason and Problem Solve: Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. Analyze ideas and use logic to determine their strengths and weaknesses. Combine several pieces of information and draw conclusions. Identify problems and review information. Develop, review, and apply solutions. Use reasoning to discover answers to problems. Judge the costs and benefits of a possible action. Identify ways to measure and improve system performance. Develop rules or follow guidelines when arranging items. Determine how a system should work. Study how changes in conditions affect outcomes. Understand new information or materials by studying and working with them. Concentrate and not be distracted while performing a task. And, Think of new ideas or original and creative ways to solve problems. Use Math and Science: Use scientific methods to solve problems. And, Use math skills to solve problems. Manage Oneself, People, Time, and Things: Check how well one is learning or doing something. And, Manage the time of self and others. Work with People: Be aware of others' reactions and change behavior in relation to them. Persuade others to approach things differently. Use several methods to learn or teach others how to do something. And, Look for ways to help people. Work with Things: Test and inspect products, services, or processes. Evaluate quality or performance. Watch gauges, dials, and output to make sure a machine is working properly. And, Analyze needs and requirements when designing products. Perceive and Visualize: Identify a pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in distracting material. And, Quickly and accurately compare letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. Imagine how something will look if it is moved around or its parts are rearranged. Work Values: Occupational health and safety specialists are people who tend to value: Support from their employer important. Like to be treated fairly and have supervisors who will back them up. Prefer jobs where they are trained well. Good working conditions important. Like jobs offering steady employment and good pay. Employment that fits their individual work style. Prefer doing a variety of tasks, working alone, or being busy all the time. Achievement is important. See the results of their work and to use their strongest abilities. Feeling of accomplishment from their work. Independence is important. Like to make decisions and try out ideas on their own. Prefer jobs where they plan their work with little supervision. Recognition is also important. Like to work in jobs which have opportunities for


them to advance, be recognized for their work, and direct and instruct others. Prefer jobs in which they are looked up to by others. Have investigative interests. Like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking. Like to search for facts and figure out solutions to problems mentally. Have conventional interests. Work activities that follow set procedures, routines, and standards. Working with data and detail. Working where there is a clear line of authority to follow. Helpful High School Courses: In high school, take classes that prepare you for college. A college preparatory curriculum may be different from your state's graduation requirements. Occupational health and safety specialists use math and science frequently. Try to take math classes through Calculus and science classes through Physics. You should also consider taking some advanced courses in high school. This includes Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses if they are available in your school. If you do well in these courses, you may receive college credit for them. Advanced courses can also strengthen your college application.Helpful electives to take in high school that prepare you for this occupation include: Computer Applications and Safety and First Aid. The courses listed above are meant to help you create your high school plan. If you have not already done so, talk to a school counselor or parent about the courses you are considering taking. You should also check with a teacher or counselor to see if work-based learning opportunities are available in your school and community. These might include field trips, job shadowing, internships, and actual work experience. The goal of these activities is to help you connect your school experiences with real-life work. Join some groups, try some hobbies, or volunteer with an organization that interests you. By participating in activities you can have fun, make new friends, and learn about yourself. Maybe one of them will help direct you to a future career. Education/Licenses Needed: To work as an occupational health and safety specialist, you typically need to: have a high school diploma or GED; have at least a bachelor's degree; and complete moderate-term, on-the-job training. Education after high school - Occupational health and safety specialists learn their skills through formal training programs. Specialists need at least a bachelor's degree in a safety-related field. Common areas of study are safety engineering, industrial hygiene, and chemical engineering. Regardless of your major, you should take courses in math and science. Work experience - Experience as a safety professional may be required for many positions. On-the-job training - Health and safety specialists learn about laws and inspection procedures on the job. They also are supervised by an experienced worker in the beginning. Supervision may last up to a year. Military training - Some branches of the military train people to be environmental health and safety specialists. Training lasts 11 to 19 weeks, depending on your specialty. Additional training occurs on the job. Licensing / Certification Needed: In Missouri, occupational health and safety specialists are not required to be licensed. Pay: Occupational health and safety specialists (SOC 29-9011);Wages vary by employer, specialty, and the worker's level of experience. Occupational health and safety specialists who work full time usually receive benefits. Typical benefits include sick leave, paid vacation, health insurance, and a retirement plan.


Job Outlook: Major employers: Local, state, and federal government agencies and hospitals. Outlook: Demand for these specialists will be created by the public's interest in safety in the work place. Issues such as emergency preparedness, changing regulations, the environment, and technological advances in safety equipment and threats will all increase the public's interest in this field. Despite the expected growth, government funding determines the number of jobs in this occupation. Funding is likely to be affected by the economy and by the popularity of health and safety programs. Related Occupations: The occupations listed below are similar to the occupation you are currently exploring. The occupations may have similar work duties, use similar skills, be in the same career ladder, have a similar level of education, or be related in another way. Occupations include: Compliance Officers and Inspectors, Fire Inspectors, Fire Investigators, Forensic Science Technicians, Private Detectives and Investigators, Safety Engineers, and Transportation Inspectors.

REFLECTION QUESTIONS: 1. Did you feel that one site more than the others gave you better information about the job? Explain: I felt the MissouriConnections.org, Connect to Your Future site gave me the best information to complete this Exploring The World of Work worksheet. This site was very user friendly. I really liked how the MissouriConnections.org site was clearly layed out with the Occupation Topics, Overview, Task list, Common work activities, Working conditions, Physical demands, Skills and abilities, Knowledge, Preparation, Helpful high school courses, Hiring practice, Licensing / Certification, Wages, Employment and outlook, Interests, Advancement opportunities, Resources, Related information, Occupations, Degrees & Certificate Programs, Industries, and US jobs were clearly laid out on the left hand side of the computer screen. I also like the At a glance box with the eye in the eye hand corner that provided several bulleted points including the salary per year (Missouri median). 2. Did the information about skills required for your careers of interest match with the skills you already have (think back to your SKILLS assessment results) or did it indicate that there are still some skills that you will have to acquire before entering this job? Explain which of the required skills you already possess and which ones you still need to acquire: For all ofnthese careers I already posses the following skills: reading comprehension, writing, communication, service orientation, time management, working independently, and leadership skills. After researching these careers I also need to acquire the following skills: active listening, critical thinking, critical problems with scientific facts and data, social perceptiveness, using scientific rules and methods to solve problems, and research skills. 3. Did any of the information you researched about these careers of interest surprise or disappoint you? Explain: The information that surprised me the most was how many different career opporunities there are for psychologists. I also didn't know that there are a lot people working as a psychologists with only an undergraduate degree and no license. It was also surprising to see the varies levels of salaries based on level of education and experience as well as places of employment. 4. After completing this research, which of these careers would you prefer to research further? Physical therapist, dermatologist, and psychologist.


Artifact 3 Unit 3 Exploring the World of Work