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Introduction to the SKILLZ Style Guide The SKILLZ Style Guide indicates Grassroot Soccer’s preferred grammar, terminology, and formatting for all Grassroot Soccer and SKILLZ publications. It is used in conjunction with the Associated Press Stylebook. The style guide exists to uphold the quality and consistency of Grassroot Soccer curricula and programming. By following the guidelines in this document, all Grassroot Soccer contributors can ensure they’re using the proper language, format, grammar, spelling, tone, design, instruction and organizational and legal standards in their document.

Contents 1//Getting Started ............................................................................................ 3   2// Headings and Fonts ..................................................................................... 4   3//Photos, Diagrams and Covers ...................................................................... 10   Photos  ...........................................................................................................................................................................................  10   Diagrams  .....................................................................................................................................................................................  12   Covers  ............................................................................................................................................................................................  14   4// Curriculum Step-by-Step ............................................................................ 16   How  to  Write  Introductory  Content  ................................................................................................................................  16   5// Usage and Glossary ................................................................................... 23   Usage  .............................................................................................................................................................................................  23   SKILLZ  Glossary  ........................................................................................................................................................................  31   6//Printing .................................................................................................... 33   Page  Setup  ..................................................................................................................................................................................  33   7//Tips ......................................................................................................... 33  

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1//Getting Started The SKILLZ style and format is optimized for coaches who will be actively using the documents during interventions. For the best implementation of the program, we strongly encourage you to stick to the guidelines. These are the basics to get started: •

Use Microsoft Word to create all your SKILLZ materials

Rockwell and Dakota-Handwriting are the two fonts you will need to follow these guidelines. Before you get started, make sure they are loaded on your computer. o Rockwell should come loaded with Microsoft Word o You can find Dakota – Handwriting here: http://www.fontpalacecom/font-download/Dakota+Regular/ o Or you can email Katherine Daiss at kdaiss@grassrootsoccer.org

Now, you are ready to go!

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2// Headings and Fonts All GRS and SKILLZ publications use the same heading and font formatting as displayed by the “Using the Coach’s Guide” below. This is placed at the front of all curricula. Refer to this as a resource for non-curriculum material since related documents use the same format. The purpose of this section is to set the standard for how headings and fonts should look, as well as to demonstrate how to create them.

Using The Coach’s Guide A CTIVITIES (S UGGESTED T IME ) 1// Major steps Ÿ

Instructions to READ to yourself o Things to SAY to the players ü Responses you might HEAR from the players

KEY MESSAGE:

 KEY MESSAGES  Discussion: to spark conversation amongst players Coach’s Story: Fill in answers to help guide your personal stories ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ µ Take a Stand and Fact/Nonsense statements – these are statements that you must read aloud to the Players.

Coach’s Tips: useful advice and definitions to help you out!

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#//Heading 1 Heading 1 begins each new section and practice. It is shown in the Contents. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell Extra Bold

Ÿ

Size: 28

Ÿ

Style: Bold

H EADING 2 Heading 2 divides the section into categories and is pulled in the Contents. All new activities in a practice are in Heading 2. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell Extra Bold

Ÿ

Size: 20

Ÿ

Style: Bold

Ÿ

Border: ½ weighted black line full border

Ÿ

Include suggested length of activity in parentheses after heading title (if applicable)

HEADING 3: Heading 3 also divides content, but is not shown in the Contents. It is always used in the Introduction page of a curriculum, along with the first page of each practice. It can be used throughout the document as a means to separate specific material. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell (in white)

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Small Caps

Ÿ

Border: ½ weighted black line full border, Black fill colour

Ÿ

Heading always followed by a colon

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#//Heading 4 Heading 4 explains steps of a practice, or as another means to divide a section. It is not pulled in the Contents. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell Extra Bold

Ÿ

Size: 14

Ÿ

Style: None

Ÿ

Include the activity step number

 Discussion: Discussion is the same as Heading 4, but includes the “man talking” bullet (found in webding symbols). Always use  during the Discussion portion of a practice. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell Extra Bold

Ÿ

Size: 14

Ÿ

Style: “man talking” bullet

GRS Body: All over-arching explanation paragraphs are written in GRS Body. In a curriculum, the introduction page will be in GRS Body, but no practice will have GRS Body. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Justify

Bullets

“Bullets” lists important information, most notably the goals, materials, preparation, and schedule of a practice. It is NOT the same as “To Coach.” Ÿ

Font: Rockwell

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Small, black bullet

Ÿ

Left Indentation: .25

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Ÿ

To Coach

To Coach are instructions to the coach and are not read aloud. Instructions to coaches should always be in present tense, active voice (more in Usage & Glossary) Ÿ

Font: Rockwell

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Small, black bullet

Ÿ

Left Indentation: .25 o To Player

To Player are instructions the coach reads aloud to players. Instructions to players should always be in present tense, active voice (more in Usage & Glossary). Ÿ

Font: Rockwell (in grey or blue)

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Small, open bullet

Ÿ

Left Indentation: .75 ü Player Answer

Player Answer are possible responses the coach might hear from players. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Checkmark bullet

Ÿ

Left Indentation: 1.38

µ Take a Stand Take a Stand are important statements a coach must read aloud to the players. They are normally part of an activity. For example: Take a Stand, Fact/Nonsense, or Sex/Gender. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: Star bullet

Ÿ

Left Indentation: .75

Ÿ

All words should be capitalized, except articles 7


Coach’s Tip: Your coach’s tip goes here. Coach’s Tips are useful advice and definitions to help the coach and are not read aloud to players. Ÿ

Font: Handwriting - Dakota

Ÿ

Size: 13

Ÿ

Style: None

Ÿ

Left Indentation: 1

KEY MESSAGE/S:

 KEY MESSAGE 1 ‚ KEY MESSAGE 2 Key Messages are the key messages of a practice and are always written in present tense, active voice (more in Usage & Glossary). Key Messages should be as succinct as possible. Ÿ

Font: Content: Rockwell (in white); Numbers: Wingdings (in white)

Ÿ

Size: “Key Message:” 12; The actual key message: 18

Ÿ

Style: Small caps; the actual key messages are centered. Border: ½ weighted black line full border, Black fill colour

Coach’s Story or Localise Steps: ______________________________________________________________________________ Coach’s Story and Localise Steps are both spaces where coaches must fill in the prompts in order to relay specific information to the players. Ÿ

Font: Rockwell Extra Bold

Ÿ

Size: 12

Ÿ

Style: No indentation

Ÿ

Border: ½ weighted black line full border, no fill.

Ÿ

Create lines by holding shift+hyphen

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Endnotes are important to include when citing information health statistics and other facts that are mentioned in activities or resources at the end of a Coach’s Guide. Please use endnotes instead of footnotes so that the flow coaching instructions are not disrupted. •

Font: Rockwell

Size: 8

Style: none

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3//Photos, Diagrams and Covers Images are a great way to liven-up a curriculum and explain complex activities to coaches. However, if not used correctly, they can create confusion or downgrade the quality of the curriculum. Use the guidelines below to design an effective, polished, curriculum.

P HOTOS Photos have two main components: the caption and image. Caption: •

Font: Rockwell

Size: 8

Style: Italicized

Align center with photo

Content: Description of image in active voice: player + action; activity name; location if available

Image: •

High resolution, complete image

Photos should always show action, not standing around

Make sure the people/person in the photo is not cut-off!

Good Photo

Note:

ü Proper caption info ü Caption aligned centrally

ü Good image resolution and color

ü Complete image is shown ü Girls are in motion SKILLZ Coach demonstrates how to learn and support in My Supporters

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Bad Photo

Note:

Boy in DRC

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Caption has inadequate info

Caption font is too big, not italicized or center aligned

Poor image quality – photo is hard to see, boy is cut-off

Photo has no action or motion


D IAGRAMS Diagrams are a helpful way to show coaches how to setup and run an activity. They have three components: title, caption and diagram. Title: • •

Heading 4 Short description of the step or activity shown in the diagram

Caption: •

Font: Rockwell

Size: 8

Style: Italicized

Align center under photo

Content: Diagram number, activity name, description of image in active voice: player + action (if not described in “To Coach”)

Diagram: •

Show location of objects in field of play

Show distance between objects in field of play on diagram or in description

Indicate where lines start

Indicate motion of players on diagram or in description

Writers Tip: If your diagram looks pixelated, you can download diagrams from the Diagrams folder on gDrive. Email Kat Daiss: kdaiss@grassrootsoccer.org for access.

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Good Diagram

ü Icons for different objects ü Distances labeled

ü Arrows showing motion of activity ü Diagram label

Bad Diagram

• • • • • •

No diagram label Unclear icons No indication of where player lines start No indication of direction of motion Pixilation No title 13


C OVERS Covers should represent the curricula and include the following information: Ÿ

Title Font: Football 08-Defender or Helvetica

Ÿ

Logos: Always include GRS logo, as well as partner and funder logo if applicable. Major funders like USAID should be placed far left and larger than the rest. See below

Ÿ

Include space for “Coach’s Name:” and “Coach’s Number:”

Ÿ

Photo should always show motion and activity

Ÿ

Photo Caption: Location and activity, date preferred

Ÿ

Date of final version (Month, Year)

Good Cover

ü ü ü ü ü

Active photo Proper caption Appropriate logos, note USAID far left Proper font Line for Coach’s Name and Coach’s Number 14


Bad Cover

• • • • • •

No logos Title uses wrong font Picture shows no motion or activity No photo caption Wasted white space No date

Writer’s Tip: You can download the correct logos, fonts, and images from the Logos folder on Google Drive. Email Kat Daiss for access: kdaiss@grassrootsoccer.org

Common Logos GRS R&D

GRS

PEPFAR

*Confirm with GRS communications and/or business development team that appropriate logos are shown. For example, if a project is funded by Mercy Corps, then the cover should have the Mercy Corps logo on it. 15


4// Curriculum Step-byStep H OW

TO

W RITE I NTRODUCTORY C ONTENT

The beginning of every coach’s guide should start with the following non-practice sections in the set order and format below. Other non-practice content (like Coordinator’s Guides, development courses, communication material, Peace Corps Program Toolkits) is detailed in the following-chapter.

1// Cover Page Ÿ

Title Fonts: Football 08-Defender or Helvetica

Ÿ

Logos: Always include GRS logo, as well as partner and funder logo if applicable. Major funders like USAID should be placed far left and larger than the rest. See below.

Ÿ

Include space for “Coach’s Name:” and “Coach’s Number:”

Ÿ

Photo should always show motion and activity

Ÿ

Photo Caption: Location and activity, date preferred

(Also detailed on pg. 9 – see example)

2// Introduction Page Ÿ

The introduction page should immediately follow the cover page.

Ÿ

Include brief background behind SKILLZ methodology and objective of the program, along with the background of implementing partners.

Ÿ

Style: o Introduction: Heading 1 o Name of the curriculum and the implementing partners: Heading 3

Ÿ

Always include “Created by: Grassroot Soccer Research and Development” Logo at the bottom of the page.

3// Contents Ÿ

The Contents page (also known as the Table of Contents) should immediately follow the Introduction page. Always title this page “Contents”.

Ÿ

Style: “Contents” – Heading 1

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Ÿ

How to setup an automatic Contents page: o Insert à Indexes and Tables à Table of Contents à Options à Check the following: §

Heading 1

§

Heading 2

o Only include the Heading 2 practice activities—delete warm ups and cool downs. o If possible, keep on one page

4// SKILLZ Coaching Ÿ

The Intervention o In greater detail than the curriculum summary in the Introduction, explain the specifics of the programme: what age group, how many coaches per how many players, how long is the practice, how many practices. State how many practices a player must attend in order to graduate.

Ÿ

Taking Attendance o Make the below bullet relevant for your programme: §

Ÿ

Taking attendance at EVERY practice is one of the most important things a SKILLZ Street coach must do. Without taking careful attendance records there is no way to know how many Players have been reached across South Africa, and whether or not the programme is working.

The Big 5 o During training, coaches learn about the Big 5. Refresh the coaches on the Big 5 they learned in training. The first bullet may include other information than HIV/AIDS— such as malaria, TB, or gender-based violence—but the following 4 will always remain the same.

 Share accurate information about HIV/AIDS. ‚ Create Safe Space ƒ Build Personal Connections „ Give Powerful Praise … Spark Vital Conversations

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5// The 11 Bes The 11 Bes are the things a SKILLZ coach should BE to bring about the greatest positive change in the lives of their players.

Writer’s Tip: Localize the 11 Bes to match the curriculum and region where your program will be implemented. For example, SKILLZ PLUS adapts “BE aware” to say coaches should be aware all participants are HIV-positive.

The 11 BEs The 11 BEs are the 11 things that a SKILLZ coach should BE to bring about positive change in the lives of his or her players. Use this table as a reference to help you maximize interaction with players. 1. BE engaging: Bring excitement and high energy to every practice. Speak in a loud, clear voice and use your body language to show players how much you care. 2. BE an elephant: An elephant has big ears and a small mouth—listen more than you speak! A strong coach only speaks about 10% of the time. Ask lots of questions and let players answer each other’s questions. 3. BE aware: Understand the background of your players and the issues they face. Ensure that all players have an opportunity to participate and be aware that some players on your team may be vulnerable. 4. BE a referee: A referee makes the game fair and fun for all players. Create a safe and fun environment for all your players. 5. BE a team player: Use language and words that your players understand and can relate to. Remember that you are a member of the SKILLZ team as well as the coach. Let players laugh and treat them as equals. 6. BE prepared: Review the practice goals, schedule, and preparation sections before each practice. Bring your coaching materials, Coach’s Guide, and M&E book to every practice. 7. BE flexible: Consider new ideas and change plans when appropriate. Use alternative coaching materials when suggested materials aren’t available. Innovate and improvise by changing and tweaking activities to make them more relevant to your community and players. 8. BE positive: Use the TLC (Tell it, Label it, Celebrate it) praise approach. Use “Kilos” strategically so that all “Kilos” have high energy.

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9. BE focused: Start and end practices on time. Balance “play time” and “discussion time” to ensure practice goals are achieved. Keep discussion relevant and on-topic. 10. BE a captain: Lead by example. Practice safe sexual behaviours and test for HIV with your sexual partner at least once each year. Create a safe space for players to talk to you outside of practice time. 11. BE real: Allow your own personality to come out with your SKILLZ Coaching. Use the Coach’s Guide as a resource, NOT as a script. When you don’t know the answer to something, do everything possible to find out. Share powerful personal stories.

6// Using the Coach’s Guide Ÿ

This page helps coaches make the most of their guide and training session.

Using The Coach’s Guide Learning to use the guide To be prepared, read the upcoming practice twice the day before your session. Use your guide while you work with the kids and look out for the different pieces of the Coach’s Guide explained below:

A CTIVITIES (S UGGESTED T IME ) 1// Major steps Instructions to READ to yourself Things to SAY to the players ü Responses you might HEAR from the players

 KEY MESSAGES  Discussion: to spark conversation amongst players Coach’s Story: Fill in answers to help guide your personal stories ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Fact/Nonsense and Sex/Gender statements – these are statements that you must read aloud to the kids.

Coach’s Tips: useful advice and definitions to help you out! 19


H OW Ÿ

TO

W RITE

A

P RACTICE

Setup each practice using the format and order shown below.

#// Practice Name in H. 1 GOALS: BY THE END OF THIS PRACTICE, PARTICIPANTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO… (HEADING 3) ü Identify quantifiable practice goals here. ü Use checkmarks instead of bullets. Writer’s Tip: Use measurable and consistent language like “Identify 3 causes…” or “Explain the importance…” or “Describe how…” MATERIALS: •

List all of the materials a coach will need during the practice.

Materials can be listed without sentences, for example:

Risk Field cards

12 cones

3 balls

PREPARATION: •

List all of the preparation a coach needs to do for this practice.

SCHEDULE: •

Warm Up (10 min)

Activity (40 min)

Cool Down (10 min)

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ACTIVITIES:

W ARM U P (T IME

IN

M IN )

1// Always start with a warm up Ÿ

Use the “To Coach” format to tell the coach what to do. Every practice should begin with some type of warm up.

Ÿ

Use assertive and directive words like “instruct,” “explain,” or “show” to ensure the coach is leading an active warm-up.

Ÿ

All warm ups should be at 5-minute intervals. For example, 5, 10, or 15 minutes. o Use the “To Player” format to instruct the coach what to tell the players. ü Write responses coaches may hear from players.

A CTIVITY N AME (T IME

IN

M IN )

1// Only the first letter of the heading is capitalized in Heading 4 steps Ÿ

Write “To Coach” immediately after a Heading 4 step. o Use the “To Player” format to instruct the coach what to tell the players. ü Write responses coaches may hear from players. Writer’s Tip: Writing large chunks of instruction can be hard for a coach to read in the middle of a practice. Better to break up lots of text into multiple bullets.

 Discussion: Ÿ

Ask the players the following questions and allow time to speak. o Questions a coach asks directly to players? ü Responses players might say (with period).

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KEY MESSAGE/S:

 THE KEY MESSAGE/S ALWAYS FOLLOWS A DISCUSSION.

‚ INSERT KEY MESSAGES THROUGHOUT THE PRACTICE FOR YOUNGER PLAYERS.

ƒ GROUP KEY MESSAGES AT THE END OF THE PRACTICE FOR OLDER PLAYERS.

C OOL D OWN (T IME

IN

M IN )

1// Cool Down Ÿ

Every practice should end with a cool down.

Ÿ

All warm ups should be at 5-minute intervals. For example, 5, 10, or 15 minutes.

Writer’s Tip: For a full list of warm-up, main and cool down activities, view the GRS Activity Bank folder. Reach out to Kat Daiss for access: Kdaiss@grassrootsoccer.org

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5// Usage and Glossary U SAGE & (ampersand) Always use & in practice titles. For example: Sex & Gender. Acronyms and abbreviations Use sparingly and only when the acronym is commonplace. On first reference, spell the words that make the acronym and place the acronym in parentheses after those words. Grassroot Soccer (GRS). Exceptions: AIDS and HIV. For plural abbreviations and acronyms, add an s, not an ‘s: SMSs, not SMS’s. EXCEPTION: Possessive GRS is GRS’s. That said, avoid using if possible. Capitalize all parts of the acronym: (such as TOC for Training of Coaches; do not use ToC). Active voice Write in the active voice rather than passive voice to make sentences clear and easy to translate. In active voice, the subject performs the action expressed by the verb; in passive voice, the subject is acted upon, rather than performing the action. µ Active: Jamison trained 50 coaches in Nigeria. µ Passive: Fifty coaches were trained by Jamison in Nigeria. Active voice is also more efficient writing. It takes fewer words to write a sentence using the active rather than passive voice. Two extra words adds up when multiplied across one curriculum, let alone 500 copies of that curriculum. For example:

µ Active: Ask a volunteer to sing a few lines of Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika. (12 words)

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µ Passive: A volunteer should be asked to sing a few lines of Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika (14 words.) You can identify the passive voice by looking for the verb “to be” (am, is, are, was, were, be, being, or been) followed by a verb ending in ed, en or t. Passive voice requires BOTH1. µ Passive: Simple and powerful connections between soccer and life are created by SKILLZ programs. (are + created) To fix passive voice, figure out who is doing the action in the sentence and make that “actor” the subject of the sentence. Then change the verb to the proper active voice tense. µ Active: SKILLZ programs create simple and powerful connections between soccer and life. Ages Use figures, not words. The girl is 12 years old. Use hyphens for ages expressed as adjectives before a noun or as substitutes for nouns: A 12-year-old girl, a game for 15-year-olds. For ranges, use ages (not aged, which means growing older) with an en dash: The survey represents young women in South Africa, ages 15-19, who have HIV. AIDS Use the acronym without spelling it out on first reference. If it is spelled out (for instance, in a glossary), use acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Because AIDS is a clinical syndrome, it is incorrect to say AIDS virus. Correct usage is: HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. American English Always use British English unless writing specifically for an American audience. British English

1

http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/wocc/ActivePassiveVoice.asp

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Always use British English unless writing specifically for an American audience. Compound Statements and Questions Avoid using compound statements and questions, particularly when writing Take a Stand statements and Discussion questions. A compound statement is when someone makes a statement that touches upon more than one issue, yet allows for only one response. Compound statements disrupt the clarity of a response and discussion. µ Compound statement: Fact/Nonsense: You are more likely to get HIV if you have more than 1 sexual partner and they are 5 years older than you. Correction: Separate the statements. ü Fact/Nonsense #1: You are more likely to get HIV if you have more than 1 sexual partner. ü Fact/Nonsense #2: You are likely to get HIV if you have a partner 5 years older than you. Same goes for compound questions: µ Compound question: Discussion question: How does having sex and getting pregnant make life more complicated? Correction: Separate the Discussion questions: ü Discussion question #1: How does having sex make like more complicated? ü Discussion question #2: How does getting pregnant make life more complicated? Commas in a series (also called serial commas) Regardless of complexity, always use a comma before the last conjunction. Tell players that today we will discuss abuse, your rights, and how to say no. Contractions Do not use contractions unless quoting from another source or writing for marketing reasons. Contractions are shortened versions of word groups by omitting letters and replacing them with an apostrophe. 25


ü Inappropriate: Don’t, shouldn’t, haven’t ü Appropriate: Do not, should not, have not Copyright Notice The placement of the copyright notice has its own page at the very end of a curriculum, 11 pt. font. Use copy below and double check the appropriate program title is mentioned. Terms of Use: Use this [SKILLZ XX] Coach’s Guide as a reference for research purposes. If you use any content, please reference Grassroot Soccer or this guide (e.g., ‘adapted from [SKILLZ XX] Coach’s Guide’) in the content you develop. In no way does this mean you are a partner of Grassroot Soccer nor can you use the Grassroot Soccer name to promote your organization or products. You are prohibited form using the [SKILLZ XX] Coach’s Guide as a training tool until you have received training from Grassroot Soccer staff. Dates Use non-American style. Diacritical marks Diacritical marks are punctuation marks over certain letters in non-English words. Carefully check you are using the correct marks for non-English words. Common marks are: acute accent (é), gave accent, cedilla, circumflex, tilde, and umlaut. Distances See Numbers. Use figures for all numbers unless it begins the sentence. Double Negatives Avoid using double negatives, especially when writing Take a Stand and Fact/Nonsense statements. Double negatives occur when two forms of negation are used in the same sentence. The negatives cancel each other out and transform the meaning into a positive. The reader may have a hard time understanding the meaning of the sentence. ü Inappropriate: Take a Stand: You should not avoid mixing alcohol and sex. ü Appropriate: Take a Stand: It is okay to mix alcohol and sex. 26


“Drunk” [Should there be a terms section?] Avoid using this term. We want players to understand the risks of alcohol consumption, even if the player or his/her partner has consumed just a small amount. ü Inappropriate Ex: Drunk sex is risky because…. ü Correction: Mixing sex and alcohol is risky because… e.g. Avoid this term. Alternatives to use are such as or for example Mark the parts of your body you love with any symbol of your choice, such as a star, a flower, or an animal. Gender norms are things society expects of people because of their sex. For example, women clean the house and men earn the money. e.g. vs i.e. e.g. is the abbreviation of for example. i.e. is the abbreviation for that is, a more specific term. Editing and Naming Save the document you are working on Name of the Project-Your Initials-DATE. For example, SKILLZ Style Guide_LB_9 July 2012. If you edit a document, add your initials and revise the date. For example, SKILLZ Style Guide_LB_JD_10_July 2012. Continue this way as more drafts are edited. For example, SKILLZ Style Guide_LB_JD_JM_12 July 2012. Emphasized words in text Avoid overuse. Use italics, not capitals, bold, or underlining. Avoid over exclamation points. ü Inappropriate: Biologically, women are twice as likely to be infected with HIV through unprotected heterosexual sex! ü Appropriate: We can change gender expectations! etc. 27


Avoid this term. Do not make readers guess what you mean. Instead, include other examples of what you mean. If it must be used, insert a period at the end, regardless of where it is in the sentence. Gay Use men who have sex with men unless the person or group you are referring to identifies as gay. HIV and AIDS Avoid using HIV/AIDS whenever possible because it can cause confusion. Most people with HIV do not have AIDS. Also avoid the expression HIV/AIDS prevention because HIV and AIDS prevention are different. HIV prevention typically involves activities such as correct and consistent condom use, avoiding multiple concurrent partners, and changes in norms, whereas AIDS prevention involves activities such as improved nutrition and drug treatment. Both HIV epidemic and AIDS epidemic are acceptable, but HIV epidemic is a more inclusive term. i.e. Avoid this term One alternative is to use that is: The programme manager encouraged her to advertise her business, that is, her woven baskets. Implementing Partners Partners that work alongside Grassroot Soccer in a specific scope of work. Can be abbreviated to IPs. Italics Italicize titles and subtitles of published books, reports, proceedings, poems, plays, movie, and other major works. Enclose in quotation marks titles of unpublished works, articles, parts of books, and television programmes. Italicize words in foreign languages, unless they are commonly used in English. If a word appears multiple times in a lengthy piece use your judgment whether repeated italics will be disruptive to reading.

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Malaria Malaria is NOT capitalized unless it begins a sentence. Money For U.S. currency, use figures and $ sign instead of writing dollars. In documents written for an international audience, specify U.S. dollars by putting US before the dollar figure with no periods or spaces: The programme cost US$2.5 million. Numbers Use figures for all numbers unless it begins the sentence. If necessary, recast the sentence. OVC Orphans and vulnerable children. UNAIDS cautions against using AIDS orphans because it is misleading term (implies the orphans have AIDS) or stigmatizes individuals by their situations. Similarly, avoid using vulnerable children without additional context: children made vulnerable by AIDS is more specific and appropriate. Page numbers Always put page numbers on the bottom, centre of each page in Rockwell, 12point font. Do not put a page number on the cover page. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) Avoid this term. It is preferable to use people living with HIV, as it is more inclusive. Use people affected by HIV to encompass family members and dependents who are otherwise affected by the HIV-positive status of a person. Percent, percentage points Spell out percent; do not use the % symbol expect in lists, tables, and slide presentations. For numbers less than 1, use a 0 before the decimal: 0.5 percent. Photo credits Include photo credits on printed documents and web articles. If photos is donated to Grassroot Soccer, use, “Photo courtesy of (photographer’s name).” 29


Players Use this term instead of “Kids.� SKILLZ SKILLZ should always be capitalized when referencing a SKILLZ curricula or training. When referencing skills learned, use the proper spelling of skills. STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) Use STIs (sexually transmitted infections) unless you are directly quoting a source. Other dated terms to avoid are: venerable diseases and social diseases. STIs (sexually transmitted infections) When making plural, lowercase the final s. Sub-Saharan Two words, hyphenate. The prefix is not capitalize, sub-Saharan. Time Use figures except for noon and midnight. Use 24hr clock to indicate time. Example: 3:30pm should be written as 15h30 Warm Up Do not hyphenate.

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SKILLZ G LOSSARY Common Grassroot Soccer and SKILLZ acronyms are listed below. CDW Curriculum Development Workshop CPC Community Project Coordinator CSV Coach Support Visit FCW Facilitation and Coaching Workshop FFHC Football for Hope Centre GRS Grassroot Soccer HCT HIV Counselling and Testing IP Implementing Partner MC Master Coach M&E Monitoring and Evaluation MSS Most Significant Story My SKILLZ Street SC Site Coordinator TOC Training of Coaches TOMC Training of Master Coaches

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TOSC Training of Site Coordinators

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6//Printing P AGE S ETUP •

Make sure the document is PDF’d before printing.

Once PDF’d, scroll through the document to make sure all formatting looks correct. If so, you are ready for printing.

Print 2-sided

Print in black and white

Use standard A4 paper

7//Tips Microsoft Word can be tricky. Below are some helpful tips. Ÿ

Insert a page break (Insert à Break à Page Break) rather than hitting enter several times to go to a new page.

Ÿ

More to come…..

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SKILLZ Style GUide