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JYOTSNA SIVAGURU

architecture portfolio


JYOTSNA SIVAGURU

jyotsna.sivaguru@mavs.uta.edu EDUCATION The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington , TX M.Arch GPA: 3.6 Fall 2008 - Fall 2010 Anna University, Chennai, India B.Arch GPA: 3.5 Fall 2002 - Fall 2007 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE The University of Texas at Arlington, TX, USA Teaching Assistant Aug 2009 - Dec 2010 Jaisim Fountainhead, Bangalore, India Architectural Intern Aug 2007 - Jul 2008 Jaisim Fountainhead, Bangalore, India Architectural Intern Jan 2006 - June 2006 SIFFS (with Ar. Benny Kuriakose), Chinnakudi, India Volunteer June 2005 - July 2005 SKILLS Software: AutoCAD, 3DSmax, Google sketchup, Rhino, Adobe Photoshop, Adone Illustrator, Adobe Premier, Adobe InDesign, MS Office suite Language: English, Hindi, Tamil, Kannada


CONTENTS GRADUATE WORK 1.Kessler Montessori School 2.Redefining the modular 3.Josh tower : conceptual highrise 4.Ambulatory Surgery Center 5.Shading the Turnbull house UNDERGRADUATE WORK 6.Undergraduate Thesis : Media Center


KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

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KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

Diagram showing the major access streets in the neighbourhood leading to the site. MAIN ACCESS STREETS

Diagram showing the major areas of heat and light from the sun on the site SUN STUDIES

Diagram showing the noise zones that might be created by the proposed school with increased pedestrian and vehicular traffic. NOISE ANALYSIS

SITE AND CONTEXT The site is situated in a quiet neighbourhood in the Oak Cliff area of Dallas, TX. There is a red brick church immediately to the South of the site for the proposed school. The church housed a small day care center with a few classrooms. The proposal was for when the school housed in the church wanted to expand. The existing site had steep contours of about 30’ from the top of the street to the lowest point. There were also some trees and the beginnings of a park to the North end, while the South end was a parking lot and a decrepit basketball court. The tallest building in the immediate context was the Church next door with its steeple, the rest of the neighbourhood was residential low-rise with red-brick veneer finish on all its exteriors. PROCESS The goal was to start off thinking sectionally and incorporate the site analysis. Since it was a comprehensive design studio, there was emphasis on code analysis and understanding the methods of access and egress along with implementing some green design principles from the early stages. CONCEPT My big idea for the project was to create a school that was based around the concept of social interaction. The building was divided into two parts by a linking grand stair, one side for the learning spaces and the other part for the activity spaces. The classrooms were percieved as “learning spaces”; rather than “rooms” and the building became a learning tool; to reflect the basic ideas behind montessori education. A ramp on the West side of the building served as the big interaction space and the linking element on the outside, so that the kids could look into other spaces without having to specifically go to a certain destination. The ramp branched off on the first intermediate landing level, translating into an outdoor stair linking the interaction spaces on the interior and exterior.

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KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

FIGURE/GROUND DIAGRAM OF SITE AND SURROUNDINGS, WITH EXISTING LANDSCAPE

SITE PLAN PLAN From the street, one enters into a space where the ramp is visible and one can either take ramps to go up or down to the classrooms. The entrance was situated in between both the buildings to facilitate some shared facilities in the future. The building was divided into two parts by a grand linking stair, the South side housing the learning spaces and the North side housing the larger congregational spaces and library. The West side is the circulation core with the ramp, with the elevators and egress stairs. The ramp leads to the corridor that accesses the classrooms, so that there is a visual continuity throughout the building. The entire building is a learning experience for the kids, where all the senses are engaged and they understand and learn inadvertently. The lowermost level is for the kindergarten kids, which is a block off to the South-East of the building. The rest of the spaces grow throughout the building, along the ramp. Each group of two classrooms share a bathroom and hand wash areas and are separated by space divider-learning tools. DAYLIGHTING AND SUNSHADING The South facade is a short, relatively opaque facade, and the mass of the ramp and corridors shield the habitable spaces form the harsh Western sun. The library, large gym and lunch spaces are open to the North, to allow plenty of North light into these large spaces.

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KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

LEVEL 1 PLAN

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LEVEL 2 PLAN

LEVEL 3 PLAN


KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

ACCESS AND EGRESS

BUILDING ENVELOPE

SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION

BUILDING DIAGRAMS ACCESS AND EGRESS Two egress stair towers are on the West side of the building, accessible at every half-level of the ramp. The main circulation through the building is a combination of elevators and ramps. BUILDING ENVELOPE The building envelope is a rainscreen wall with the insulated CMU backup and window openings in the classrooms.The larger congregational spaces are more transparent. HVAC DUCTS There are HVAC ducts at the top and bottom of the space, the top ducts for the warmer return air and the bottom ducts for the cooler fresh air. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION The red boxes depict the classroom spaces and the yellow box is the library. The transparent masses represent the other congregational spaces.

HVAC DUCTS

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STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM The building is a regular concrete framed structure with a CMU infill wall. Smaller shear walls the egress staircase walls hold up the ramp.


KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

INTERIOR VIEW

INTERIOR VIEW

LEARNING SPACES Each class level is clustered grouped together with a partition and toilet space in between. The idea is to provide maximum flexibility and make the partitions are learning aids. The dividers between the classrooms are squares and rectangles of different colors and textures. The dividers between the classrooms and the corridors are also large colorful cylindrical toys. The beams and columns are exposed, and painted a bright color to educate the children about the building structure and system, in keepiung with the principles of Montessori learning. CLASSROOM FURNITURE There is a large mat on the ground, which is like a jigsaw puzzle that can be switched out, for the childrent to play with. The tables are single-seater tables, designed for easy reconfiguration and maximum flexibility. Every classroom has large bay windows in front of the wall area that the children can use as a standing- work desk or to climb and sit on. CLASSROOM INTERIOR LAYOUT

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KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

PERSPECTIVE FROM STEPPED COURTYARD

BUILDING SECTION

BUILDING SECTION

WALL SECTION

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The kindergarden blocks are at the lowest level, with lowheight window sills that the children can look out of. The stepped outside courtyard is envisioned as a large , multilevel playground for the children. The middle courtyard also functions as a performance and assembly space, with the raised courtyard and the grand linking stair that leads out, looking into it.


KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

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KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

SECTION MODEL

BUILDING IN ITS CONTEXT

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KESSLER MONTESSORI SCHOOL, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

VIEW FROM THE NORTH SIDE, LOOKING SOUTH

PROPOSED VIEWS FROM THE CLASSROOMS

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MATERIAL STUDY : REDIFINING THE MODULAR

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

INSPIRATION

MATERIAL EXPLORATION The broad intent of this project was to rethink and redefine the use of existing materials to create newer uses or interpretations of known, everyday material. INSPIRATION My inspiration for the project came from the idea of lego blocks, how the exact same piece can be used in different ways to create different configurations. I developed a block of wood, with a tongue on one side and groove on the other, so it could form a block or square that was made of the exact same piece. I made the block using MDF and the tablesaw, material and tools that are easily available usable. MAKING THE BLOCK

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FINISHED BLOCK


MATERIAL STUDY: REDEFINING THE MODULAR

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

WALL 1

WALL 2: CAVITY WALL

The next phase of the project involved finding applications of the new block. I discovered that with different permutations and combinations, I could build 7 different types of walls with the same piece, sometimes needing a half-block ( original block sawn in half) to finish the top of the walls. Each of these walls could also have a unique architectural application.

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WALL 3: STAGGERED WALL


MATERIAL STUDY : REDIFINING THE MODULAR

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

Since the units are the key to the wall, not the material, these can be made with any material that can be cast to this form and can be scaled up proportionally to any size as required.

WALL 4:CORNER UNITS

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WALL 5: FLUTES

WALL 6: STILTS


MATERIAL STUDY: REDEFINING THE MODULAR

SPRING 2010 PROF. ALBERT MARICHAL

APPLICATIONS Some applications of the modular wall are as illustrated. The cavity wall ( with single and double height voids) can be used as a wall for insulation and light transmission, as required in the interior. If any change is needed in the indoor light requirements at any time, it is easy to change, as only the modules to be worked with are affected. The other corner configurations mane it a good interior wall space, especially in offices or situations where it is not desired to have a massive solid wall in the interior space.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

SITE

INTENT The intent of the project was to re-examine the process of creating architecture through alternate drawing techniques. The final project was intended to be a conceptual building that grew out of the context it was created from. PROCESS We were allowed to choose any site in any city in the world, and find pictures that were descriptive of the important characteristics of the city. I chose Mumbai, India, as I was intrigued by the contrast and conflict in the city. We also had to choose a few words to describe our understanding of the city and what our building would be based on, and my words were : CHAOS, CONFLICT and CONTRAST and TENSION.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

Based on the images we chose, we had to make a collage drawing, using the colors on the images as guides to the colors on the drawing. Subsequent drawings are overlays of previous drawings and new photographs.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

We then built 3-dimensional interpretations of the model, using the image as a reference and using different peices of the image printed on different types of paper as components in the model. After photographing the model at various angles, the play of light and shadows were documented and used as inspiration to build a 3D model of the building.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

The site is in a thin strip of land sandwiched between the ocean on two sides. There is also a large bus station on the South-East and is set in a dense low-rise area. There are views to the sea on the East and West sides and into the city on the North side. There is a view to the tip of the peninsula on the South side.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

The building was conceived as a transparent glass box with a circulation core running through all the levels. Since there are views to the sea and the city all around, balconies were given a lot of emphasis to capture the views.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

Views of the building from different sides. The colors are derived from the culture of the city, yellow and orange from the vibrancy of the streets, the busy composition of the facades from the chaos and business of the streets, and the blue circulation tower as the link, from the sea.

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JOSH TOWER, MUMBAI, INDIA

FALL 2009 PROF. RICHARD FERRIER, UTA

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AMBULATORY CARE CENTER, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2009

PROF. DAVID JONES, UTA; TOM HARVEY : HKS INC, DON HANKE : HDR INC

The project was to design an Ambulatory Care Center, i.e. a health care facility where people undergo day surgeries. The average length of stay is 10 - 12 hours. The program requirements were two operating rooms, pre-op and post-op spaces, along with recovery spaces. It was also required to have some shelled office space and some clinics. The site was in the medical district in Dallas, TX. My concept was the idea of the building as being a healing tool. Natural light, the color green and gardens play an important role in recovery, whether short or long. There is also a desire for the family of the patient and the patient to feel like they are in close proximity to each other.

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AMBULATORY CARE CENTER, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2009

PROF. DAVID JONES, UTA; TOM HARVEY : HKS INC, DON HANKE : HDR INC

SECOND FLOOR DIAGRAM

FIRST FLOOR DIAGRAM

SITE PLAN

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SITE DIAGRAM

The building form is a pure geometric shape, to reflect the clean lines that a healing environment needs to have. Every patient room has a view to a garden or landscaped courtyard, so that the first thing that the patient sees when they get out of anasthesia is natural light or a plant or tree. All patient rooms are well lit naturally.


AMBULATORY CARE CENTER, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2009

PROF. DAVID JONES, UTA; TOM HARVEY : HKS INC, DON HANKE : HDR INC

The circulation is planned so that the sterile spaces are in a different wing from the recovery spaces. This allows the family of the patients to be able to access the recovery rooms without entering the sterile spaces. The entrances to the spaces are controlled by nurse stations.

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AMBULATORY CARE CENTER, DALLAS, TX

SPRING 2009

PROF. DAVID JONES, UTA; TOM HARVEY : HKS INC, DON HANKE : HDR INC

SECTION

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION

The materials used are natural stone and concrete with brick infill in the first floor. The upper level, where flexibility is required is made with paneled metal infill, which can be modified to suit whatever function is housed in there.

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

The project was for a class called Energy Use and Conservation. In the first part, we had to analyze the Turnbull house in Napa Valley, California using the climate consultant software. In the second part, we had to move the house to the climate of Dallas, TX and design shading devices for the porch.

The house has been designed as a weekend house for the Turnbull family. It is a 640 sft house set in the California hillside, on 49 acres of land.

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

From the analysis and inferences from the wind roses, psychrometric chart and temperature timetable plot of the Climate Consultant software, the following points were inferred. DESIGN GUIDELINES THAT HAVE BEEN FOLLOWED •  Snug floor plan, central heat source, South facing windows, pitched roof for protection •  Organize floor plan so winter sun penetrates into daytime spaces with specific functions that coincides with solar orientation. •  Steep pitched roofs vented to the exterior, with a wellinsulated ceiling below. •  There is a lot of South facing glass or passive solar heating, but it is not shaded during the summer. •  Building footprint is small enough to eliminate excessive air conditioning. DESIGN GUIDELINES THAT HAVE NOT BEEN FOLLOWED •  No window overhangs •  No wind protection on the South and South-West (heavy mass walls) •  No whole house fan •  No sunny, wind protected spaces adjoining the house

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

Following the reconstruction of the house in Dallas, TX , I ran an analysis of the house in the Dallas, TX area using the climate consultant software, and got some design guidelines for the shading and passive solar heating of the house.

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING Recommendations: South glazing should be a maximum of 7% of the finished floor area, if the house has no additional internal thermal mass. It should be shaded from direct summer heat gain. The recommended south glazing (exposed South glazing in winter months)is as follows: Living area: 7% of 289 sft = 20.23sft Bedroom area: 7% of 133 sft = 9.31 sft in December, January, February (when passive solar heating is required ; shaded during other months) Central porch area: 7 % of 126 = 8.82 sft in winter months The selective exposure of the glass is to ensure that there is no overheating in the hot summer months, which will increase air conditioning loads. Central porch area: area of glass per door = 10.4 sft no of doors = 4 area exposed per door = 1.38 sft Bedroom area: area of glass window = 18.33 sft area exposed = 9.31 sft

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

The South side of the house is the one with maximum glazing. It is shaded using sun shading devices. The East and West sides are blank walls, with no fenestration. The eastern wall is shaded by trees. The Western side holds a pavilion, to watch the sunset from, called the Sunset pavilion. The trees around the pavilion shade it and the wall of the house behind it.

SHADING AND VENTILATION STRATEGIES

Since there is such a magnificent view towards the South, the design demands for large expanses of glass on the South side. The efficient way to incorporate the glass into the design is to have an efficient system of shading the glass during periods of overheating, so that there is no additional solar gain. Shading is accomplished by using a combination of permanent and removable shading devices. The South profile angles at 12.00 noon of various months are drawn and are used to size the shading devices. A combination of permanent and temporary shading devices are used in order to get maximum benefit from the sun during the winter.

SOUTH ELEVATION

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

The first 4’ of the shading device is fixed, to shade the South glass all year-round. The next 2’ is removable, to shade the October sun. The next 2’6” of the device is also removable, to shade the glass from the November sun. PLAN

SOME TECHNIQUES INVESTIGATED FOR OPERABLE SHADING DEVICES

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SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA TIME STEP SEQUENCE OF SKETCHUP MODEL SHOWING SHADING STRATEGIES

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JANUARY 21

FEBRUARY 21

MARCH 21

APRIL 21

MAY 21

JUNE 21

JULY 21

AUGUST 21

SEPTEMBER 21


SHADING THE TURNBULL HOUSE , DALLAS , TX

SPRING 2010

PROF. TRUETT JAMES, UTA

OCTOBER 21

NOVEMBER 21

DECEMBER 21

NATURAL VENTILATION STRATEGIES

The windows are placed away from the bed area, so that there is no direct blast of air on the sleeping occupants of the room, neither is there sunlight directly on their faces. The South window has fixed glass at the bottom, for passive solar gain and the top part of the window is operable, for fresh air ventilation; since most of the ventilating breeze comes from the South. The outlet (on the North side) is retained as is, since most of the colder air comes in from the North. The sun shading device on the South side is also set back from the wall by about 4� so that there is no build-up of cool air above the device and all the air is streamlined into the wall.

NATURAL VENTILATION STRATEGIES

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SOUTH WINDOW IN BEDROOM


SUVIDHA, BANGALORE, INDIA

2007-2008

PROJECT INTENT Retirement homes are privately owned accommodations for seniors who are able to manage and pay for their own care. Generally, retirement homes are designed for seniors who need minimal to moderate support with their daily living activities. These settings enable residents to live as independently as possible, while providing certain services and social activities. Retirement homes are also called “retirement residences�. The aim of hte project is to provide a place where these elderly people can spend their life after retirement without changed lifestyle and providing a peaceful environment away from the chaotic city life. MY INVOLVEMENT My involvement in the project was in the conceptual development stage as a drafter to draft the sketches of the principal architects in charge, and in the construction drawings stage to develop construction drawings and revisions under the supervision of the project architect. The primary software I used was Autocad, and photoshop and illustrator for presentations. I also developed 3D views using 3D Studio max.

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SUVIDHA, BANGALORE, INDIA

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2007-2008


SUVIDHA, BANGALORE, INDIA

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2007-2008


SUVIDHA, BANGALORE, INDIA

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2007-2008


MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

FOCUS OF STUDY To research and understand the technological, spatial and acoustical requirements of television and radio broadcast centers and design the first of its kind integration of media infrastructure in the country. Sensitivity to the site and its surrounding context and the integration of landscape elements into the The offices of a media giant were being rethought and the three divisions: radio and television broadcast centers and print offices were being integrated into the same facility. The corporate office needs to provide for 900 staff members and a floating population of about 200 everyday. DETERMINING THE SCOPE OF DESIGN The requirements and area statements were formulated based on literature studies, case studies, book and internet studies of similar buildings around the world and interaction with the users A questionnaire was used to record the responses of the users who were interviewed. Additional notes were prepared to gather other information and data provided.

LOCATION MAP

The site is located in a mixed-use neighbourhood close to the beach. There are views of the city on the West and North sides, and views of hte sea on the East side. The South side has views of a residential neighbourhood. SITE PLAN

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MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

FIRST FLOOR PLAN : TYPICAL TELEVISION STUDIO LEVEL PLAN

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MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

TYPICAL RADIO STUDIO LEVEL PLAN

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MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

TERRACE LEVEL PLAN

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MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

SECTION THROUGH STUDIOS

SECTION THROUGH ATRIUMS

The studios have to be large volume spaces, with the control rooms at the top, looking into the studios. The volumetric space required varies proportionally with the size of the studio and the purpose. Central atriums connect the various levels of the lobby and are around the central circulation core. There are balconies and terraces on the East side, to take advantages of the views of the beach. There is also a shaded outdoor cafe on the terrace, to take advantage of the views and the sea-breeze from the East during the evenings.

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MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

STUDIO INTERIOR VIEW

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MEDIA CENTER, CHENNAI, INDIA

SPRING 2007

PROF. ANSELEM SELVARAJ, PROF. ADHISESHAN, ANNA UNIVERISTY

ACOUSTICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDIO SPACES I did a lot of detailed research on materials and their insulation characteristics, and used the results to detail the studio spaces. The structural system was also a virendeel truss system, in order to integrate the depth of all the service lines into the thickness of the slab. STRUTURE AND MATERIALS The building is an reinforced concrete framed structure, with brick walls or glass infill. The roof is a virendeel truss (reinforced concrete truss), to cover the large columnless spaces required. All the balconies and terraces are landscaped, to compensate for the lack of green space on the site and in the surrounding areas. The windows are all double-glazed for maximum energy efficiency.

TYPICAL STUDIO DETAILS

FRONT ELEVATION

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ARTWORK

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ARTWORK

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JYOTSNA SIVAGURU

jyotsna.sivaguru@mavs.uta.edu ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS Sustainability, Smart buildings, Energy conservation and reduction , Vernacular Architecture AWARDS and RECOGNITIONS Member, Golden Key Honor Society BOAT (Building Owners’ Association of Texas) Scholarship Fall 2009 - Spring 2010 Best Graduating Student awarded by the Pidilite Group June 2007 Member, Council of Architecture, India First prize in paper presentations on Globalization 2002 First prize in paper presentation on Architectural Conservation 2004 STRENGTHS Active participant in various intercollegiate competitions during undergrad. Treasurer of the Architecture student body (equivalent of the AIAS); member of the core group that organised ZoNASA; a regional level convention of 600 students of Architecture from 16 colleges. Self-motivated, quick learner. OTHER INTERESTS Reading books Writing blogs Abstract photography


Portfolio  

Some examples of my work so far during my career in architecture as a student and professional.

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