Issuu on Google+

Jessica Yarish design portfolio 2007-2013


contents buildings

klahoose multi-centre welcome centre Co-op Market the rise cinema-tech in detail

cities

the Grid spiral live/work shift kyoto

community

the playscape roll shed tea festival


klahoose multi-centre

The Klahoose Multi-Centre is the social and administration centre for the Klahoose First Nation. The buidling provides support services of a health centre, gym, teaching kitchen, and band administration for the growing community. Located on a remote site on Cortes Island, BC, the construction process and materials were a primary consideration. The design makes use of locally felled and milled timber, which increased jobs and skills in the community, as well as prefabricated Structural Insulated Panels and timber elements. Structural form and details take inspiration from traditional first nations dwellings, and overall form responds to the steep waterfront site. The Multi-Centre is naturally lit and ventilated throughout to reduce reliance on electricity.

merrick architecture. Project lead: Darryl Jonas


site location shoreline below the site

Vancouver

victoria

context: British Columbia, Canada

natural rock shelves on site


digital studies


a

health

centre

lounge administration offices

gym

a

n main level plan construction drawing


locally felled and milled timber

section a construction drawing

main hall under construction

foundations on exposed bedrock

prefabricated timber frames

interior exposed structure


aerial view of building and village

random width cedar plank siding

administration wing entrance


view of completed building from north


welcome centre

The Welcome Centre at the University of Victoria acts as the first point of contact for prospective and new students. It provides facilities for course advising, orientation, and socializing in a comfortable, informal environment. The Welcome Centre is an interior renovation within the brutalist University Centre. Challenges were inserting private and public spaces and incorporating warmer materials and lighting without altering the existing concrete structure. 3D visualisations of the proposed renovation were integral for clients’ understanding of the space during design development.

merrick architecture. Project lead: Darryl Jonas

digital studies


view from entrance

completed welcome centre

private advising room


co-op market

The Co-op Market combines a food store with management offices for the Saanich Peninsula Coop in a new, energy efficient building. The building features daylighting through a saw-tooth roof, local materials, and a greenroof. Challenges for this project were creating a separate entrance for delivery trucks and laying out a pedestrian friendly parking lot. The project faced challenges from local planning authorities and residents due to its siting on a greenfield. Extensive public consultations were undertaken to ensure the design addressed the communiy’s concerns. These drawings were used for public information sessions and planning approval packages.

merrick architecture. Project lead: shaun mcintyre


n

ground floor plan

first floor plan


east elevation

south elevation


The Rise

The Rise proposes a building type that supports a range of housing and service needs in response to the inadequate supply of affordable housing, and the segregation of housing types, in Vancouver, BC. Designed for people at various points on the continuum between houseless and housed, The Rise is inclusive of diverse resident types - singles, families, and multiples with differing service and mobility needs. The building balances private and public lives at a number of scales. Autonomous apartments allow individualism, retreat, and responsibility, while shared social spaces throughout the building foster a sense of community and a social support network. The Rise is a landmark building socially and technically. It would be the tallest cross-laminated timber building in Vancouver. CLT construction makes use of local resources and decreases embodied energy and operational energy consumption.

University of Oregon


Vancouver housing conditions

community resources hospital

1 700 000 households in metro vancouver

community centre library school non-market housing single room occupancy

58 000 households at risk of homelessness

transit hub transit route

site

greenway

 

a continuum of housing

 emergency shelter



resident owned

housing types in the rise

 

     

high support need

some support need

low support need

   

1-14 days residence

2-24 months residence

1+ years residence

        

low barrier

the first step towards housing. few restrictions on substance use or possessions.

supportive housing

largely independent with some functional services required. restricted substance use.

social housing

non-market rental housing. restricted substance use.

 


39

.9

m

existing property line high-rise apartments

non-market housing

0. 5m

rail on t ati

first beach

10

site

rec re

r ido oc rr ail ret

mid-rise apartments

clinic

reta il c orri dor

clinic

school neighbourhood amenities

existing site conditions

proposed subdivision parking 172 stalls

retail


rooftop patio

lounge party patio

gym

quiet lounge

workshop

social and supportive housing suites

views

garden lounge

air access computers

low barrier micro-units meeting room

setback between tall buildings

dining room

form response to zoning

a

winter sun

setback for air and light

summer sun form response to light and views

schematic axon

health centre

underground parking


geothermal heat through radiant floors

water collection and infiltration minimized plumbing stacks and pipe lengths

metal screen guardrail inswinging aluminum clad door wood blocking

metal flashing plywood sill liner waterproof membrane calcium silicate panel on aluminum track fibreglass z-girt rigid mineral fibre insulation

vapour barrier air space for electrical

services diagram

balcony door sill detail

concrete core

3 ply CLT structural wall

glulam post and beam

mineral fibre batt insulation 2 layers 5/8" type x GWB bamboo baseboard polished concrete floor

clt bearing wall clt exterior wall

structural diagram

radiant heating 6 ply clt floor

CLT party wall section detail

steel plate connection 3 1/2" metal stud wall


mixed suites

residents’ terrace

shared lounge lobby

third floor plan

mixed suites

offices

kitchen a

bike storage

clinic dining

library

residents’ garden low barrier suites

first floor plan

n ground level plan

computer lab

mixed suites


shared lounge

mixed supportive housing and social housing

social and circulation spaces

lowbarrier suites

parking 220 stalls

section a

rooftop garden


RM-5B 24 097sf 11 367sf (48%) 62 316sf 86 121’ 156 43

   studio unit  31m2 base module for one and two-bed units

  

apartment type distribution  

low barrier (31%)

 

supportive housing (38%)



social housing



(31%)

typical floor plan floors 4-8

   


One-bed unit 37.3m2

typical studio unit

two-bed unit 62.2m2

low-barrier micro-units 20.3sm


cinema-tech

The Pacific Northwest Centre for the Art of Film promotes film education and enjoyment. It includes public theatres, event spaces, a cafe, and film-editing studios. Located in the Pearl District in Portland, Oregon, the site borders the highway, giving it a high level of visibility. The facade expresses activities within - the solid, isolated masses of theatres contrasting with bright social and educational spaces. A series of vertical louvres defines views into the building. A setback to the south creates a public plaza and allows natural light and ventilation to reach workshops and studios. Interaction between public spaces and education spaces is controlled through views and circulation pathways, generating overlap but maintaining distinction.

University of Oregon


a b

admin entrance

main lobby

main entrance

site location and key views public plaza

property line

proposed setback

d

summer

equinox

winter

n sun angle study

ground level plan

c

pedestrian street


live theatre administration Offices

black box Theatre

editing studio

first floor plan

premiere Theatre offices

fourth floor workshop bar with terrace

second floor plan

kitchen student screenings

independent film theatre

student louge

third floor plan

editing studios classrooms

fourth floor plan


event and staging space

workshops and editing studios

elevator core student lounge theatre

administration offices

black box theatre elevator core restaurant

section A

workshop space theatre bar

central circulation hall

main lobby

section B


event and staging space editing studios

premiere theatre bar

main theatre

section c

independent film theatre

central circulation hall

meeting room offices

section d

view of circulation hall from student lounge


in detail

This study for window, wall and roof systems was developed for a new building housing the University of Oregon’s School of Architecture and Allied Arts. In keeping with the School’s mandate of sustainability, features such as a greenroof, fixed and operable exterior sunshades, and a terra cotta rainscreen are used to increase energy efficiency and decrease lifecycle costs.

University of Oregon

window head and green roof


window sill at terra cotta cladding


The GRID

The Urban Land Institute’s Gerald D Hines Competition brings together students of business and design to generate economically feasible neighbourhood development plans. I worked with an interdisciplinary team of four other students to design and present a proposal for Minneapolis over a two-week period. Our proposal, the Grand Rounds In Downtown (GRID) sees the intersection of the Grand Rounds regional park system with Minneapolis’ urban grid as a unique opportunity to create a new recreation-focused district in Downtown East. The GRID is a response to the outdoor culture of Minneapolis and a proposal to develop an active, connected, and liveable downtown neighborhood by: EXTENDING recreational opportunities; INCREASING transit options; DIVERSIFYING housing; PROVIDING residential amenities; and, FOSTERING healthy urban lifestyles.

Gerald d hines competition 2013 with: a.bednarz, e.podowski, m.tierney, and c.watkins


minneapolis population density

NEighbourhood elements: recreation A network of urban trails and parks provides a valuable amenity for Minneapolis' outdoor-centric culture and creates a model for healthy urban lifestyles.

education

community

commerce

The new tribune school provides a unique educational experience, exposing students to Minneapolis' rich sociocultural and natural resources.

A mix of housing options, from studio apartments to family-style condos, retail, and employment opportunities create a thriving residential district.

The new Vikings stadium and the iconic "Movement Tower" generate jobs and establish The GRID as the premier sportsoriented business district in Minneapolis.

site

GRID goals: dwelling units/acre

ke

bi

grid proposed population density

riv er

ro

ad

Library

Do wn t

0 0.1 5 25 60 80 >80

St. Anthony Main

Target Center & Field

ow n

ils

a tr

population = 6,693

40%

CEDAR RIVERSIDE

Mill City Museum

Guthrie Theatre

UofM eastbank

VIKINGS STADIUM

population = 8,309

30 to 54 years

dwelling units/acre

90

100

110

120 >130

ike

population = 5,422

age distribution 0

18

29

b

54

74

ils

tra

EXPAND OPPORTUNITIES FOR RECREATION IN DOWNTOWN

UofM westbank CONNECT TO SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, & NATURAL RESOURCES IN MINNEAPOLIS


po pr r tla st airie nd re et

masterplan key

Vikings Stadium 'A.P.' plaza (game day/winter rec space) Gridiron Recreation Loop Stadium Centre Hotel Gridiron Transit Stop Tribune K-12 School Movement Sports Business Tower 'Eat Street' Washington Bike Plaza Grocery Store (ground floor) High Density Residential High Density Mixed Use Block 5th Avenue linear Plaza Armory Community Activity Center (HCMC) Medium Density Mixed-Use Block Grocery Store Thrivent Financial Building Government Plaza Light Rail Station

k

mu

TE

se

Ro u

um

iT Ra nS

gu

ST ca go

rie

th

ea

te

r

go

ld

me

2.8 42 350

miles of new trail minutes to walk trail system calories burned

da

lp a

rk

10

OW

ent

grid recreation metrics

09

NT OW

N

12

CO

NN

12 07

TI

08

14

grid stormwater metrics

3.7 33% 80%

te

06

ou er

ON

bik

EC

13 05

17

15

02

million gallons of water detained in a 5 year storm reduction in stormwater runoff removal of suspended solids

01

15

ca

rs

03 04

lr t

16

ns

it

le

he n me nepi dic n al cou n ce nt ty re

bu

st

pe op

15

ra

za

-D

elliot park

th

-T

nm

pla

E

e

T

600

12

NU

idg

RE E ST PR AI RI E

lc ity

T 18

ver

br

mil

RE E

go

AV E

ian

gridiron recreation loop

ch i

H

tr

tri sc bun ho e ol

es

sp ar

11 5T

ped

lr uin

ar gy mo m ry

mil

RT LA ND

400

ch

PO

200

ea r

il tra

0

gold medal park

on

e bik

N

st

tha wa hia

01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

ell

iot

pa

rk

grid transportation metrics

3100 6+

residences within 1/4 mile

modes of transportation


typical block section

block components


phase 2

SQUARE FEET

phase 1

full build-out

1.4M ADDED

5M

845,000

4M

SURFACE PARKING

400M 300M 200M 100M

1,130,000

830,000

200,000 396,000 317,000 300,000

100,000

224,000 317,000 225,000

2.2M ADDED 225,000 350,000 125,000

828,000

317,000 120,000

588,000

PHASE I

2M ADDED

545,000

3M

1M

PUBLIC PRIVATE

phase 3

1,043,000

656,000

PHASE II

PUBLIC INVESTMENT $80.5M  $158M  $44M 31%

-100M

10-year phasing, investment and profit calculation

MARKET RATE FOR SALE MARKET RATE RENTAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING PUBLIC OPEN SPACE HOTEL RETAIL

1,000,000

OFFICE

1,415,000

STRUCTURE PARKING

PHASE III

PRIVATE INVESTMENT $149M $547M 27%

$375M $186M


a

cnostac py

d

m a c ro c

An

us

L.

Qu e

Asc

rc

a

Sal

m

pias tube le

hy

Ge u

nigra ix

sa

section through portland pedestrian street

lentago um

a rp

iflorum

ro

Tr

stadium plaza

Vibu rn

winter and summer on the recreation loop

ro

p ogo


recreation opportunities

m us a erica

olonifer a

st

ns

di

C.

yl

na

ta

r ra

a tru m n u gh

Cor

ellipsoida l So r

s cu

is

on g e

Que r

transportation options stormwater plantings

Habitat Nutrient Cycling Soil Building Water Filtration


spiral live/work

This study for a low-impact co-operative housing development in Eugene, Oregon used the sloping site to create varying degrees of privacy and to support stormwater collection and infiltration. Three types of housing accommodate different live/work arrangements: shops below houses along the public street, home offices in the centre, and more private artists’ studios to the north. Shared facilities of garden plots and gathering spaces allow casual interaction between residents and increase greenspace.

university of oregon

slopes plateau

site site access drainage solar angles

site context

elevation on shelton mcmurphy blvd.

site conditions

water flow


artists’ houses

parking

garden plots

office houses

community centre shop houses

shelto

n site plan

n mcm

urphy

blvd.

water infiltration pond


shift kyoto

Over the course of a five-week study abroad term in Kyoto I developed a plan to modernise the historic canal system. Shift Kyoto transforms the underused canals into a pedestrian and cyclist transit network in response to dangerous road conditions. Canal rehabilitation is also an opportunity to manage stormwater flows and increase wildlife habitat. Typologies of park, transit, or commercial use are based on physical characteristics and location in the city. A derelict urban canal, the Takasegawa, acts as a case study for design interventions to the streetscape and the canal channel. Planted edges and subtle variations in paving patterns divide the street into pedestrian, cyclist, and automobile zones. Landscaping makes use of traditional forms and local plants to emphasize the changing seasons and differentiate between types of use. While access to the canal is improved along its length, the focal point is the Shift public plaza connecting the Takasegawa to the Kamo River. A vacant elementary school neighbouring the plaza becomes an art centre to support the unique identity and history of the Takasegawa.

university of oregon with: j.Katich


sur kat ar

takasegawa

kamo river

cycle and pedestrian path

transit canal revitalization

ive r transit commercial park

rivers, forest, and canals define kyoto

proposed canal typologies

rest area and canal overlook

commercial canal revitalization

park canal revitalization

reparative native vegetation

flood buffer zone

shaded pathway

separated cycle path

wider sidewalks for outdoor display


commercial node terrace

shift plaza and arts centre

arts centre main entrance

viewpoint

park node

kamo river

kamo river

rock garden prunus mume (flowering plum) cryptomeria japonica

stage

katsura japonica pinus thunbergii (japanese pine) kawazuzakura (flowering cherry)

shift plaza plan

transit commercial park case study: takasegawa canal

market space

plaza section


the playscape

The Playscape reinvents an existing playground at a co-operative child care centre, for children aged three months to seven years. The pedagogy of the centre informs the design with the principles of experiencebased learning and natural world as educator. Other primary goals were to solve the drainage problem which made the playground inaccessible for much of the winter, and to provide shade in the summer. Collaboration at all stages was a key element in achieving this project. The design process began with a series of site visits to observe current use of the playground and children’s play patterns. Charrettes with teachers, parents, and children were held to better understand the users’ needs, desires, and concerns. The constraints of budget, time, and administrative regulations presented challenges for both detail development and project management. In the construction phase continuous discussion with the client, faculty and industry advisors, and suppliers informed design and scheduling to ensure that the project was completed to meet the needs of all stakeholders.

designbridge, university of oregon with: g.burris, j.creighton, c.janke, l.jones, b.nguy, d.rosenthal, b.waldman, and v.walton


existing conditions

motion and learning workshops with the kids and teachers


proposed site section a


conceptual site plan

exploration

destination bike loop

a

circulation patterns

n

water flow proposed site plan


study models

full-scale mock up


1'6"

existing subgrade

5"

3/4" round river rock

1/2" LDT anchor 2'-0"

PT 4x4

maple plank bench

custom steel angle bracket

5

DRAINAGE PIPE

6

1/2" = 1'-0"

GEOTEXTILE EDGE, TYPICAL 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/8" steel angle plate

1 1/2"

4'-11 9/16"

2'-0"

#8 rebar stake

9

4

holes for 3/8" screws

3"

9"

501b 3/8" lag bolt PT 4x4

1 1/2"

1'-3"

2x4 blocking

3/4" round river rock 6" depth typical

8"+ river cobbles

0'0"

A502c

-2'6"

6" 1'-0"

-2'0"

1'-11 1/16"

1 -1'0"

Frugal Planting Soil 1'0" avg. depth beneath planted areas

1/2" LDT anchor

1/2" hex head bolt, galv.

A

1 1/4"

1/2" hex head bolt, galv.

boulder relocated from existing site location

1/8" welded steel plate

3

6

501b

holes for 1/2" LDTA501b anchor

5 1/8"

2c

8"+ river cobbles

1 1/4"

bench existing boulder relocated from on site

5 A501b

geotextile

2

0 A5

maple plank

Frugal Planting Soil 15" depth typical

4'-11 3/8"

custom steel angle bracket

1/8" welded steel plate

geotextile

+0'0"

2" 4"

-1'0"

3/4" round river rock 6" avg. depth

2x6 rafter

-2'0"

2x2 connector between rafters and purlins

-2'6"

standing seam metal roof

1/2" hex head bolt, galv.

4

2x4 purlin 1/2" lag bolt, galv. 2x4 cross brace

TYP. STEEL BRACKET 1-1/2" = 1'-0"

existing subgrade 2x4 bracing

2x4 blocking

DECK BEAM & BENCH CONN. PLAN

metal gutter 2x8 fascia

4" = 1'-0"

4

SWALE TRANSVERSE SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

8'-4 5/8"

existing concrete wall 1/2" hex head bolt, galv.

10"

2 1/2" maple plank bench

3 A502c

1 1/8" plywood

2x6 post

1 1/4" wood screw 6" o/c

fir 4x4

2x4 blocking

Buehner Block concrete pier c/w beam support bracket existing concrete wall

maple plank bench

custom steel angle bracket

existing concrete wall

compacted, sealed decomposed granite

recycled brick edging

3 1/2"

10 1/8"

7"

1'-5"

1/2" LDT anchor

12"Ă˜ concrete footing

7"

7"

3/8" lag bolt

3/8" wood screw steel angle bracket as per detail 4, A502d

steel knife plate

1/2" LDT anchor

fir 4x4

new plank bench

5'-2"

5"

5'-5 1/16"

9"

#8 rebar stake

3 A502d

PT fir 4x4

construction drawings for the swale and sheler

existing concrete foundation c/w rebar


Garden and shelter under construction

completed shelter


roll shed

This mobile workstation and tool storage cart was a design-build project intended to give students hands-on construction experience, as well as connect student sustainability groups at the University of Oregon. Key design issues were: mobility, security, and ability for many people to contribute over a one-day construction workshop. To achieve these goals most of the project was designed and pre-fabricated prior to the workshop. Connection details and assembly sequence were designed to accommodate different skill levels and a high degree of tolerance. I was part of the management team from the project’s inception to completion and applied for funding grants, organised design charettes, and oversaw project delivery.

designbridge, university of oregon with: t.fields, l.jones, l.levenberg, b.nguy, and r.Reedy stakeholders charrette for initial concept, shown below


construction workshop

on site and in use


tea festival

The Victoria Tea Festival is a fundraiser for Camosun College Child Care Services. I volunteered to design branding and advertising for the festival to improve its visibility. A consistent public image that expressed the character of the festival and could be updated each year was created through discussion with the organising and marketing committees. Along with the posters and tickets, I designed a suite of newspaper and web ads, and the event programs. Victoria Tea Festival

at the Crystal Garden 713 Douglas Stre February 12-13, 2011 Non Transferable No Refunds

$20 advance • $25 door Saturday 12-5pm Sunday 11am-4pm

for info and tick outls:

www.victoriateafestival.com 250-370-4880

5 th Annual

proceeds to Camosun College Child Care Servic

ticket design, 2011

Weekend P:

February 12-13, 2011 Crystal Garden Victoria, BC proceeds to Camosun College Child Care Services

Weekend Pass:

$20 advance • $25 door

5th annual

presenting sponsor

presenting sponsor

poster design, 2011

diamond sponsor

platinum sponsors

media sponsors


3 rd annual February 14-15, 2009 ~ 12-5pm Crystal Garden ~ Victoria, BC

for the love of tea 4 th annual

for the love of tea

February 13-14, 2010 Crystal Garden • Victoria, BC Weekend Pass: $20 advance ~ $25 door

Weekend Pass: $20 advance • $25 door for info and ticket outlets: www.victoriateafestival.com

all proceeds go to Camosun College Child Care Servic

all proceeds go to Camosun College Child Care Services

250-370-4880

250-370-4880

Prenting Sponsor:

www.victoriateafestival.com

Media Sponsors:

presented by: CHILD CARE SERVICES

Platinum Sponsors:

platinum sponsors:

Gold Sponsors:

Weekend Pass: $20 advance • $25 door Non Transferrable • No Refunds

for the love of tea February 13-14, 2010 Crystal Garden Victoria BC Saturday 12-5pm Sunday 10am-4pm

media sponsors:

3 rd annual

4th annual

at the Crystal Garden 713 Douglas Street February 13-14, 2010

prented by:

proceeds go to Camosun College Child Care Servic

February 14-15, 2009 ~ 12-5pm Crystal Garden ~ Victoria, BC

Victoria Tea Festival

at the Crystal Garden 713 Douglas Street February 14-15, 2009 ~ 12-5pm

Weekend Pass: $20 advance/$25 door Non Transferrable ~ No Refunds

poster and ticket design, 2010

gold sponsors:

event supporters: TeaGuide Worldwide Tea Directory ~ Harbour Living ~ CUPE 2081 ~ Options for Health ~ Common Ground Magazine ~ Capital Iron ~ Tourism Victoria

Victoria Tea Festival

gold tea sponsors:

poster and ticket design, 2009

for the love of tea

presented by

CHILD CARE SERVICES



JYarish Selected Portfolio