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STUDIO AIR 2014, SEMESTER 2, FINN WARNOCK JULIA ANN WALKER 640529


Table of Contents P 2-5 P 6-11 P 11-14

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CONCEPTUALISATION

A1 A2 A3

P 15

A4-5

P 15 - 16

A6


Architecure and spacial notaiton has beocme a great intrest of mine. The guidlines for which we mentaly devide space, which has been tought to children in many ways and later become a ruling factor. Since starting the Bachlor I have been greatly challanged in more ways than I ever expected, never knowing what is expected or how the task could be done in the set amount of time, yet always getting there in the end.

CONCEPTUALISATION 3


A.1Design Futuring

FIG.1: (THE BLUR PRAVILION [1])

The Blur Building, built for the Swiss national expo 2002, Yverdon-les-bains, Switzerland. By Diller + Scofidio. The Blur Building contributes a new idea in spatial codification in how space is created, by offering a new experience to the user of being in once an unobtainable object as a cloud. Along with the Blur building users also wore rain coats or ‘brain coats’ which reacted with the users and the space around them once they entered the building, the coats would give off either colour or sound as a action for the user to compensate for the lack of vision. (1)

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Diller + Scofidio are interested in the different relationships between architecture, art, theatre and special notation created in urban space. Changing the preconceived behaviour of the user through a remove of one sense and a creation or over amplification of another, creating a new sensation and experience for the user since a young age. People become set in their habbits, if they are not challange by forms and sencors they inconter. It is this architure challanges peoples ideas in sence but also materiality, as water being in liquid form which is known as transparent is now creating a solid mass.


FIG.1: (HOUSE OF THE FUTURE [2])

Alison and Peter Smithson exhibited in the house of the future in the 1956 held in Hall Kensington, West London, England. It contributed a compact style of living not before seen, along with the plans photographs taken showing a husband and wife in the home using technology not dissimilar to an iPad. The house designed for no children with no garden and set for a high urban density, it was unique in the fact of a court yard garden all around the house to removed the density from the views exiting the building.

The Smithson’s were interested in the flow of people in high urban density and the role of new technology in the new urban family. Along with the house of the future the Smithson’s produced a theatrical work called the golden lane city. Which worked with the ideas of communal living and urban planning in and topographic flow and understanding of a space, which is a natural human method, the exproation of space through preconcived ideas on how space is organised.

The Smithson’s are well known for there theoretical formulation of the new Brutalism and influenced the work of Archigram. (2)

CONCEPTUALISATION 5


A.1 THE ARC TABLE

FIG.1: (THE ARC TABLE [3])

FIG.1: (THE ARC TABLE [3])


A.2 Design Computation

Computing affects the design process by offering a new methodology of thinking about design (Algorimic Thought). It offers a highly innovative mode of thought about design, making pervious problems on non-linear or non 90 degree anlges no longer a challenge, in form finding. The challenge it now presents its self in the designer to then have the knowledge of these tools to use them to there optimum capacity, as architects commonly work with nontypical geometry though computational design symmetry group operations are now done with a click of the button leading to a new area of topological considerations when designing. The geometry optimization though integration of structural performance, fabrication strategy and manufacturing tolerances, has now been being explored also in the interest of ergonomics Jethro Hon working on the Arc Table. Working with Computer aided structural simulation to investigate the behaviour of geometry with reference to different material tolerances before production rather, leading to a new process in design. (2)

Computation is a new set of tools for the designer, having these new skills the discussion of abstraction, reimaging making decisions about the data that is used to drive algorisms process, the algorithms chosen, and its physical implications on the built environment.

Fredierico Diaz Project titled 141 Death Frequency is looks at the abstraction of the information encased in pixels with interpretation though fluid dynamics algorithm. The choice of Fredierico to use the black ball as the repeating unit to highlight the algorithm rather than the data input made and therefore put emphasis on this project as an investigation into algorithmic thought and generative design.(5) The decision in performance based generative design with a human interest can be seen in Stefan RitterExtension to Riga International airport in Latvia. (5) Encounter between architecture and the public with a feedback loop generated from users this is done by Geometry condenses at the slowest point of circulation (security) demonstrating utilizing a Geometric system with strong tectonic expression showing the relationships between the two elements of performance and design.

“It is clear now that computation is ubiquitous, and formmaking and form-controlling are no longer its most expedient uses. Whether it is through proprietary and customised software or a single piece of code, computaions’s primary potential lies in its flexibility to communicate design across multiple disciplines via associative data�(10)

CONCEPTUALISATION 7


141d eath frequency project due to its purpose it was suitable to allow the alorithm to dictate the formof the pavilion while in the case of the international airport it is important that due to the overall function of the building algorithms were more dominate in some parts of the building and absent in others, leading to the thought that while computation is still being developed it cannot be used to form an entire building with different sections and regions such as an airport.

FIG.3: (DEATH FREQUENCY 141 (5))

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CONCEPTUALISATION 9


10

CONCEPTUALISATION


FIG.1: (THE BLUR PRAVILION REF: #4)

CONCEPTUALISATION 11


A.2 Composition/Generation

While computer aided design has been fully integrated in firms like Fosters and partners, Ghery Designs and UNstudio into form finding and performance based design on large scale projects. Computational design is also slowly being integrated into domestic design, here it offers difficult approach, Firm Facit homes uses Software use integrated into design process which now offers mobile production facility produces digital modules on site and has led to more sustainable fabrication process less waste.(4)

UNstudio uses computational methods to develop a knowledge platforms, which act as dynamic, hinge between research and design. Known as Smart Parameter Platform (SPP) , the studio is able to integrate all parameters that define the project.(8) The utilization of this technique is in its infancy and is only seen at such studios which put a high emphasis of integration of digital design and are at the for fount of the technique. Performance based design however cannot be done with out the use of a computer as even a calculator is a computer. The acceptance of this technology into the architectural discourse and the construction industry is not so forth coming as it can be seen as a large leap in terms of terminology and methodology of thinking about design computational technology. (

FIG.3: (CARLO RATTI ASSOCIATI,DIGITAL WATER PAVILION,WORLD EXPO, ZARAGOZA (9)

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CONCEPTUALISATION 13


FIG.3: (UNSTUDIO SMART PARAMATER PLATFORM (SSP) (10).

The exploration of what is a detail, the rise of the invisible detail and macro to mega morphology. Investigation of real time human influence on design can be seen in Carlo Ratti Digital water pavilion at the World Expo, Zaragoza in Spain in 2008. The pavilion explores the digital and the physical in real performance architecture. Material performance with the aid of computational design will reveal space and a discussion of what space is another example is the Blur pavilion(1) which reveals the performative dimension in real time of the visible and the invisible and exploration of digital detail.(9) “While no one nowadays could imagine looking for a document without the help of a search engine, many people still think that problems which are vastly more complex, for example in politics, architecture and urban planning , can be resolved “traditionally, in other words by humans” (8) FIG.3: (FACIT HOMES (11)).

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A.4 Conclusion

1. BLUR BUILDING: CARCIA, MARK “OTHERWISE ENGAGED: NEW PROJECTS IN INTERACTIVE DESIGN”’, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 77 (2013), 44-53. 2. NEIL SPILLER VISIONARY ARCHITECTURE BLUEPRINTS OR THE MODERN IMAGINATION

Until computation is integrated fully into the architectural discourse it will be a constant topic of discussion. Computation is now seeing varying methods which it is Until computation is integrated fully into the architectural discourse it will be a constant topic of discussion. Computation is now seeing varying methods which it is being used within design to help the designer achieve new outcome for architecture. The intended design approach for this studio will be that of generative design, though exploring a natural energy cycles to produce a form which will reflect sustainability generative design reflection on natural processes.

(THAMES & HUDSON) 3. HON, JETHRO “MATHEMATICAL ENSEMBLE: MOLTENI ARC TABLE”’, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 83 (2013), 32-33. 4. DE KESTELIER, XAVIER “RECENT DEVELOPMENTS AT FOSTER + PARTNERS’ SPECIALIST MODELLING GROUP’’’, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 83 (2013), 22-27. 5. DEATH FREQUENCY 141 < HTTP://WWW.DESIGNBOOM.COM/ART/FEDERICO-DIAZGEOMETRIC-DEATH-FREQUENCY-141/ 6. STEFAN RITTER- EXTENSION TO RIGA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IN LATVIA; < HTTP:// WWW.EVOLO.US/ARCHITECTURE/EXTENSION-TO-RIGA-INTERNATIONAL-AIRPORT-INLATVIA/>

Over the course of the past four weeks my knowledge of what is ment by the terms computational design has increased, though lectures reading and tutorials videos, I have become aware of the possibilities of computational design. Navigating though Grasshopper have become familiar with the interface. The use of grasshopper in past designs for mapping to topology of a surface and the ability to track all the changes in my work would have improved past designs to a large extent.

7. JOSEFSSON, KRISTOFFER “SYMMETRY AS GEOMETRY: KUWAIT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT”’, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 83 (2013) 28-31. 8. MOREL, PHILIPPE “COMPUTATION OR REVOLUTION” ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 84 (2014) 76-87. 9. RATTI, CARLO & CLAUDEL MATTHEW “ THE RISE OF THE ‘INVISIBLE DETAIL’: UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND THE ‘MINIMUM MEANINGFUL”’ 84 (2013) 86-91. 10. UVAN BERKEL, BEN “NAVIGATING THE COMPUTIONAL TURN”’, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 83 (2013) 82-87. 11. BELL, BRUCE & SIMPKIN, SARAH “DOMESTICATING PARAMETRIC DESIGN”’, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, 83 (2013) 88-91.

CONCEPTUALISATION 15


STUDIO AIR 2014, SEMESTER 2, Finn Warnock 640529 Julia Walker

PART B


Table of Contents 4.  B.1. Research Field 6.  B.2. Case Study 1.0 The Morning Line 14.  B.3. Case Study 2.0 Bowoss Pravilion 18.  B.4. Technique: Development 26.  B.5. Technique: Prototypes 30.  B.6. Tecnique: Proposal 33.  B.7. Learning Objectives and Outcomes 34.  B.8. Appendix- Algorithmic Sketches 35. References


B.1. Research Field

FIG.1. ABALONE SHELL

Biomimicry, the exoskeleton of a invertebrate. This is known as Biomimetic. bios, meaning life, and mimesis, meaning to imitate Biomimicry is to look toward nature for solutions for design, with the understanding that nature has been undergoing the design and refining process for over a millennia. Biomimicry is the umbrella that covers two different categories: The first is the imitation of structure, this could be on the micro/atomic scale and the arrangement of the atoms, e.g. an abalone shell which is formed from the stacking of a hexagonal grid of the same substance as chalk, or the macro scale, e.g.

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The second is to mimic the function of a biological organism; this would include the modeling of a chemical reaction or the biothing project looking at the movement of magnetic fields. This is known as Biomimicry. Biomimetic generally looks far down the evolutionary chain to early life on earth, due to the simple organization and the fact that complex evolution has not yet taken place. It will generally be composed of fractals, voronois and hexagons. Nature favors these geometries due to the large surface area they provide. Hexagons are repeated in nature over and over on all scales from a benzene ring to beehives.


B.1.

FIG.1: (BIOTHING: ALISA ANDRASEK )

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5


B.2. Case Study 1.0 Morning Line aranda lasch

6

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B.2.

01

03

04

08

09

10

13 8

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14

15


05

06

07

11

12

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17 CRITERIA DESIGN

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B.2.

10

18

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21

22

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24

25

26

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B.2.

27

28 Selection Criteria - Using the algorithm to create complex geometry. This geometry is then translated into a different from though line work. - The translation must contain the same elements of symmetry as the original form. However, Could be misunderstood form the wrong angle, leading to misinterpretation by the viewer. 15-From this angle the form can be understood as an overall, the line work highlights different aspects of the geometry. 17- Is the propagated iteration of 15, from this angle is almost doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t relate back to the original form, though interference of its self, leading to misinterpretation. 25-The line work has created a woven pattern, the lines are at strong angles interlacing with each other highlighting some aspects of the original geometry.

29

29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;The propagated iteration of 22, containing four units only one is directly identifiable to that of 22, leading to CRITERIA DESIGN

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12

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B.3. Case Study 2.0: Bowoss Pavilion

FIG.B.3.1: (BOWOSS PRAVILION)

The Bowoss pavilion was a project conceived and constructed at the school of Architecture at Saarland University in Saarbrucken, Germany. The wooden shell structure is bionic inspired, utilizing minimal material in its construction, It is also a structure that is responsive to natural light, as it allows light in from every angle. This is due to the orientation of the ellipse on the surface for the structure. The first attempt to reverse engineer the project was analyzing the surface pattern, in doing this the repeating unit was then made in grasshopper and propagated across the surface though the box morph function, this is seen in figure B.3.2&3. This was unsuccessful as the surface had gaping holes in the surface. The original panel was then re-modified to panel across the surface

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CRITERIA DESIGN

with no holes, this was successful in removing the holes but not in producing the correct structure (fig B.3.3).


B.3.

FIG.B.3.2: REVERSE-ENGINEER A1 )

FIG.B.3.3: REVERSE-ENGINEER A2 )

FIG.B.3.4: REVERSE-ENGINEER A3 )

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15


B.3.

FIG.B.3.5: BOWOSS PAVILION

1. CREATE ELLIPSE IN RHINO| DIVIDE CURVE CREATE ARCS 2. DIVIDE ARCS| CULL AND SPLIT DATA INTO FOUR GROUPS| MOVE THE FOURGROUPS OF DATA IN Z & Y DIRECTION 3.DIVIDE THE FOUR GROUPS INTO THE RESPECTIVE HORIZONTAL ROWS 4. USE THE ROWS AND DRAW A LINE THROUGH EACH ROW | LOFT EACH LINE WITH NEIGHBOURING LINE 5. CALCULATE AREA OF EACH FACE | USE THE CENTROID TO ORIENT A PLANE| DRAW ELLIPSE ON PLANE TAKING THE DIMENTIONS FROM THE EDGES OF THE FACE 6. SPLIT SURFACE

FIG.B.3.6. FLOW CHART OF METHOD OF PRODUCTION

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B.3.

The first two attempts of reverse engineering were unsuccessful, leading to starting a new method of working with the data flow. This third method which is seen in figure B.3.5, was done by splitting data, moving and recombining this data in order to create the pattern. This was successful when looking at the grasshopper model and the pavilion itself.

FIG.B.3.7: REVERSE-ENGINEER A4

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B.4. Technique Development

01

06

02

07

03

08

04

08

05

10

06- Still keeping the shell curvature, the outer walls have become more draping around the form, while the roof or top of the shell is still rigid and defined structurally.


B.4.

11

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18

14

19

15

20

16- The initial structure, while composed of flat surfaces, flows form one edge to another. This iteration is blocked out & chucky and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the same quality of flow, yet is not as harmful as it seems.


B.4.

21

26

22

27

23

28

24

25

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30

27- Like 06, still has the appearance of the pavilion. This iteration highlights the horizontality of the form with its extending members. The vertical members are only to bridge across for structural purposes, they are potential structural members.

20

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B.4

31

36

37

32

38

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35

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21


B.4.

41

46

42

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45 41- Has only rigid panels on the edges and spine of the shell, connecting these is a rib cage like structure which is composed of pipes interwoven into each other and draping into the pavilion. This removes elements of rigidity from the form of the pavilion while still keeping the base elements of the form. 47- This iteration highlights the frame of the structure, which is the structure itself. 22

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49


B.4.

FIG.B.4.1: SOLAR POWERED LEDS

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B.4.

FIG.B.4.2: PROTOTYPE OF SOLAR SPHERE

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B.4.

50

51

Considering the Lagie brief, I wanted investigate the different methods of energy generation by solar. Solar spheres were designed by Barcelona-based architect Andre Broessel, they are composed of glass and water, fully weather proofed and due to the nature of construction are 35% more efficient than traditional photo-voltaic counterparts. The spheres also offer an interesting opportunity of designing in grasshopper purely due to their own geometry.

52

spheres into my design using iteration 47 of B4. The spheres geometry has been approximated into a form that can be fabricated. Of all three iterations number 50 fits into the principles of iteration 47,being that it is merely a frame for the sphere itself as the iteration is mearly a frame of the structure.

My last three iterations look at a method of framing the

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B.5. Technique: Prototypes

STEAL FRAME

FIG.B.5.1: ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

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SOLAR SPHERE


B.5.

FIG.B.5.2: PROTOTYPED SOLAR SPHERES

Prototype One. Contains three elements 1.

Structural Frame

2.

Panel

3.

Solar Sphere.

The sphere is inserted into its frame in the panel, this is then treated as one unit. The unit is then assembled on to its structural frame.

The prototype frame was made by hand. Each element of the frame must be grooved in order to join the panels together, When inspecting the case study o the Bowoss pavilion and its construction method of joints on the back that have been mitered and CNC routed. The joints as seen in figure B.5.3 have been sanded down to meet each other on a 45 degree angle. This was a successful method of producing the frame however for Lagi the frame would be fabricated though CNC. This system of having an internal frame in which the panels are mounted can support itself and the spheres are held in place as they are a perfect fit.

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27


B.5.

FIG.B.5.3: PROTOTYPED ASSEMBLY SHOWING JOINS

28

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B.5.

FIG.B.5.4: PROTOTYPED ASSEMBLY

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B.6 Technique Proposal

The LAGI site its self is large, for the site I wanted to divide it into parts to induce circulation of users through it. To do this the structure was divided into its two assembly parts. The solar spheres where to be placed separately on the site on built up land fill, this is done to bring attention to the role they play in the structure. Then people could sit, walk & touch the spheres as to have an interaction with them and gain understanding of their purpose on the site. The frame or panels that hold the spheres in the structure are placed parallel to the spheres on site used to create an under pass on the site. This dark environment is linking back to that of the industrial surroundings of the site, the use of steal for the frame and concrete for the bass to bring a cold chill to the user as this part of the structure is not converting energy from nature. The structure its self is placed at the far south western point of the site. This is done to frame a view of Copenhagen for the user as they exit the structure. The overarching dome with the spheres in place , allows maximum light onto the sphere so that they can harness the energy from the sun and given their transparent nature allow light into the pavilion.

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31


B.6.

SITE PLAN

32

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B.7. Learning Objectives and Outcomes

During part B: As biomimicry is such a large field you can find a biological model for everything, it just depends upon what you want it to do. It does not have the restrictions of sectioning or perforation as a research field. Due to this large field there are many solutions to the integration of the solar spheres into my design, but question is whether to let the structure dictate the form or let the spheres dictate the structure. In the later part of part B I have been walking the line between these two possibilities. During part C, I will be looking toward the solar spheres dictating the structure and looking into structural performance to find the answer and concentrating on the detailing the joints which will connect the structure to the spheres and how this is also accomplished. The site plane proposed in B.6. is highly ordered yet vagrant, the separation of the parts of the structure into the site does not induce the circulation and movement intended. During part C I will be taking a new approach to the site plan, revisiting the selection criteria form B.2.Case study 1, looking at abstraction randomization & misinterpretation of the spheres onto the site to induce movement of the users though experience of their visual sense. FIG.B.7.1 : A RANDOM WALK IN TWO DIMENTIONS

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B.8. Appendix - Algoithmic Sketches

Week 6 From this week, learned how to control different offsets from the surface, abstract data from the existing surface, to control the size of the objects that would then be lofted.

Week 5.

Used the surface mapping tool then was able to isolate circles of a specific diameter and control and manipulate this data using the tools I learned in week 6.

WEEK 6

WEEK 5

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REFERENCE 1. B.1.1. Abalone shell http://www.archdaily.com/tag/biomimicry/ 2. B.1.2 Biothingâ&#x20AC;&#x192; http://www.biothing.org/ 3. B.2. Case Study 1.0 The Morning Line 4. B.2.2 scanning electron micrograph of SixNx particals 5. B.3.1 Bowoss pravilion http://www.designdaily.us/2013/01/the-bowooss-bionic-inspired-research.html 6. B.3.5 Bowoss pravilion http://www.designdaily.us/2013/01/the-bowooss-bionic-inspired-research.html 7. B.4.1. Solar powered LEDS http://freshome.com/2012/06/11/100000-swarming-solar-powered-led-spheres-mimicking-nature/ 8. B.4.2 Solar Spheres http://www.designboom.com/technology/spherical-glass-solar-energy-generator-by-rawlemon/ 9. B.7.1 Random walk 2D http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Random_walk#mediaviewer/File:Random_walk_2000000.png

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B.8. Appendix - Reverse-Engineering

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Part C


Table of Contents 4â&#x20AC;&#x192; Understanding and changing the site plan

6 Applying the DLA to the site 8 Feedback and Structure

8. Structual System One

10. Structual System One

12 Sphere structure Three (SSTr) 14 Solar Spheres

15 Assembly diagram 18 Model photos 23 Elevations East and south

24 Plan and Pairing Rules 26 Site Plan 30 Feedback & Final Presentation 32 South elevation 34 Solar Sphere reivsed 36 Final site plan 37 Learning Objective and Outcomes


C1

Understanding and changing the site plan From the feedback received during the interim presentation I went back to review the method for devising my site plane. The LAGI site is sizable; I needed to find an alternative method of dividing the site into different areas, which people would find interesting to enter. I went back and looked at different generative methods and I turned to a generative method of the random walk across, also known as Diffuse Limited Aggregation (DLA). This method looks at the mean free path that one might take, more so than the direction in which a particle can travel until it collides with another and is then made to change direction or course. Before deciding whether or not to use this algorithm I conducted a few sketches (C1.0-2) assigning paths to see the different areas that would be used according to the division of the site. From these first few sketches I found that this would be the algorithim I would use to analyse the site as it gave â&#x20AC;&#x153;greyâ&#x20AC;? usage areas. The areas were not a clean black and white with this algorithm and its generative nature which can lead to flexibility of the resulting product of the site plan.

FIG. C1.0 (DLA RAN ACROSS THE SITE WITH THE SELECTED BLUE PATH)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


FIG. C1.1 (DLA RAN ACROSS THE SITE WITH THE SELECTED BLUE PATH)

FIG. C1.2 (DLA RAN ACROSS THE SITE WITH THE SELECTED BLUE PATH)

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C1 Applying the DLA to the site This was still utilizing the major themes used in the previous site plan, of creating an indicative pathing system though sphere placement and landscaping. After experimenting with the different paths which may or may not be there were several decisions that needed to be made by myself: the indicative paths on the site and where the installation would be situated. From this the DLA would then be run. For both of these decisions I chose to stay with my initial siting as used in Part B for a few reasons. Firstly, it is on the southern side of the site and therefore the spheres can collect the most amount of sun and secondly, the water taxi rank is close by for ease of reaching the installation.

The paths chosen by myself were from all four corners of the site leading to the installation, with one path running down the axis of the site. These paths were then divided and set as seeds for the DLA to run from, the resulting product is shown in (FIG C1.3) was then divided up further through area analysis of the resulting curves of the DLA algorithm. It was found that one large area of the site was not subdivided (seen FIG. C1.4 in green), so this was used as land in which the indicative paths would not be used by the user, the idea was to remove this area from where the user would think to find a path and so was built up. The major intersection points were found from the DLA, these were paths that had three or more crossings and so to keep them as such a sphere is placed at these points. Ruslting in (FIG. C1.5) as the final site landscaping and sphere placement.

FIG. C1.3 (RESULTING DLA ACCROSS THE SITE)


FIG. C1.4 (DLA USED TO DIVIDE THE SITE INTO TO AREAS BLUE BEING NOT DEVLEOVPE, GREEN BEING DEVLEOPED )

FIG. C1.4 (RESULTING SITE PLAND WITH DEVLOPED SURFACE SHOWN IN COUNTOURS LINES AND SOLAR SPHERS SHOW AS BLUE DOTS )


C1

FIG.C1. 0 DEVLOOPED SPHERES CHANGING IN SIZE AND DISTANCE FROM FEEDBACK

FIG.C1. 1 (SSO)

Feedback and Structure Structual System One (SSO) In response to the feedback about the structure, I began increasing the randomization of the size and placement over the structure (FIG.C1.0). From this randomization introduced into the design I found the previous structure would not be efficient in stabilising the spheres in space, so I then looked at different way of detailing the sphere structural system. This came with several challenges, as I wanted to keep the appearance of the sphere floating in mid air to allow people to walk under them and see the distortion of the air above them.

C

DETAILED DESIGN

The first system I considered was ribs that branched across collecting the spheres in their path (FIG.C1.1), The ribs would purely be a structural system by which the sphere could be held and would later be cladded by other elements this was then prototyped and seen in (FIG.C1.2). The rib system however still had the normal appearance and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t display the clearly parametric technique as the ribs were of a normal distribution over the design.


FIG.C1. 2 (PROTOTYPED MODLE OF SSO)

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C1

FIG.C1. 1 (SST)

Feedback and Structure Structual System Two (SST) From the findings of SSO second series SST (FIG.C1.1) of the structure was developed, this system was developed with the idea of disturbing the ground below the structure by having the struts that held up the spheres distributed randomly over the ground. The two struts came from opposing ends of the spheres support frame, then came down and would be held in place by footings in the ground.

C

DETAILED DESIGN

I then increased the density of the spheres over the structure to be able to increase the struts and disturbance caused on the ground plan below. This structure was partly prototyped (FIG. C1.2), however the major problem form this prototype was that the struts themselves would struggle to be able to support the weight of the sphere and also that it was empty, it did not create a canopy around the user. While it was airy it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the capacity of carrying through for further development.


FIG.C1. 2 (PROTOTYPED MODLE OF SST)

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C2

Sphere structure Three (SSTr)

Considering the problems that arose in SST, that the structure was not sufficient hold the spheres, SSTr was developed. This was a robust steel frame structure that would hold the spheres in place using the same support ring seen in SST, however this was then grasped and linked down to a central beam which would carry the load of the sphere to a footing in the ground. This structure, unlike the previous two, is cumbersome in size and in order to create a canopy the mid beam that held the sphere frame would need to be used to hold two of the sphere, not just one. The initial prototype (FIG.C2.0) is designed to hold one sphere, This prototype was found to have strength the other two did not and so was brought futher. Through grasshopper the beam was designed with several editable parameters for the different situations of the spheres (seen in FIGC2.1)

MATERIALITY The stands would be fabricated out of steel.

FIG.C2. 0 (PROTOTYPED MODLE OF SSTR)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


a

a b c d

e

Editable Parameters a - beam length b - notch length c - noth width

g

d- material depth e - beam witdth f - hight of columns

f h

g - diametier for sphere h - depth of mateial.

FIG.C2. 1 (DIAGRAM OF EDITABUL PARAMATERS FOR MODEL SSTR)

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C3

FIG.C3. 0 (DIAGRAME OF LIGHT INTERATACTION WITH SOLAR SPHERE)

FIG.C3. 1 (PROTOTYPED MODLE OF SOLAR SPHER)

Solar Spheres Fabrication, Modeling & Labling For the model, due to shape of the spheres which I would have to have them 3d printed, I then decided to create an object that demonstrated how the spheres functioned in their collection of light as seen in (FIG.C3.0). The top half of the sphere is used for collection and this light is then funnelled down to the bottom of the sphere for conversion from light to energy, this was achieved by the workflow diagram as seen (FIG.C3.3) and the resulting fabrication product seen (FIG.C3.1).

C

DETAILED DESIGN

All the spheres that were fabricated are unique and no two are the same. This was achieved by altering the contour distance and height in relation to one another. However, there are four different groups of spheres which are denoted by letters of the Greek alphabet, they are divided into groups according to their volume see in (FIG. C3.2). The fabricated product was chosen to be made in clear resin, this was done as to reflect the materiality of the spheres in real life, which is glass and water so that they were also transparent and half present to the viewer.


FIG.C3. 2 (MODELD SOLAR SPHERS WITH LABLING SYSEM ACCORDING TO VOLUME)

draw sphere contour sphere

shift origin point of data collection interpolate curve cap and lable FIG.C3. 3 (WORK FLOW DIAGRAM FOR SOLAR SPHERES)

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C3 Assembly diagram. The assembly of the structure for supporting the spheres can be done in four steps illustrated. These will be place with footing system below to stalbize the beams held above.

1

Work flow.

calculate quads of exturdes and place brace draw line from brace to projected centroid below do this for each four baces select two spheres from the two projected centrods draw a line

divided this beam into three segments from this three segments trim to form v shape extrude v shape to base ground plane and trim to form rectangel Fig.C3. 4 (Work flow diagram for Beams)

3 Fig.C3. 5 (assembly diagram for beams)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


2

4

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C

DETAILED DESIGN


DETIALED DESIGN

C


C

DETAILED DESIGN


DETIALED DESIGN

C


C

DETAILED DESIGN


North Elevaltion

East Elevaltion

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C3

FIG.C3. 7 (PAIRING DIAGRAM FOR BEAM ASSEMBLY)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


Plan. For the main installation on the site the spheres coagulated at a point, the spheres at this point differ from the spheres placed on the site. These were supported by the framework seen in (assembly diagram: stage 4: FIG.C3.5). The spheres at the installation point on the site are joined and linked to one another through the beam network. The beam network is not random, it is chosen according to the pairing rules set in (FIG.C3.7) and the volumes of the spheres seen in (FIG.C3.2). This was done due to the weight of the spheres, as if a large one was paired with a small this would not be an evenly distributed load.

The randomness of the beams that flow to the ground gives a non-defined path for the user, and crates a series of gateways over the user. These series are designed to feel strong and to give the user confidence to walk underneath them so that they may look above and see the series of spheres above them distorting the sky above.

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C3

C

DETAILED DESIGN


Site Plan The installation is jiggered and heavy while the site is smooth and flowing, they are contradicting each other and not working as a homogenous object. My intention was to give the user two different feelings while being on the site. One, the idea that they are free to choose their own path though the site, but more often than not they will be lead by the obstacles in their path. Second, the strong overarching gateways of the installation which they may choose to walk though or araound.

DETIALED DESIGN

C


FIG.C3. 8 (VIEW FROM ABOVE OF THE STRUCTURE) C

DETAILED DESIGN


DETIALED DESIGN

C


C4

Feedback & Final Presentation

From the feedback received from the final presentation the overarching beam system and the heterogeneous nature of the final design was seen as disjointed, the comments were to make a more homogenous design by integrating the DLA used for the site plan to form a canopy over the point of coagulation of the spheres and the form of the structure from the final of Part B. In order to do this the amount of spheres placed at this point was decreased and only placed on the southern point of the installation. FIG.C4. 0 (DLA TEST ONE MEDIUM SIZE)

When looking back to grasshopper to create space frame DLA it was trialled in two different ways. Firstly, the DLA was run across the surface of the dome this produced (FIG.C4.2) and secondly, the DLA was only run from the centroid of the spheres and stopped at a point at which they started to overlap with each other, this was to stop the chaos that was produced in (FIG.C4.2) and the resulting hovering branches connected to their opposite counterparts seen in (FIG.C4.3).

FIG.C4. 1 (DLA TEST ONE LARGE SIZE)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


FIG.C4. 2 (DLA GROWN OVER SURFACE OF THE DOME)

FIG.C4. 3 (DLA ORIGNATING FROM CENTROID OF SPHERES)

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C4

SOUTH ELEVATION

FIG.C4. 4 (SOUTH ELEVATION OF CHOSEN DOME)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


Materiality The space frame DLA will be constructed out of carbon fibre and powered coated grey. The colour is done to reflect the absence of the frame as it is used as a canopy over the spheres as it is not the structural element which holds the spheres up.

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C4

FIG.C4. 5 (ISOMETRIC DRAWING OF SPHERE PLACEMENT INSIDE THE DOME, SPHERE ORIENTED SOUTH)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


B

B

67.56

476.15

1572.71

A

FIG.C4. 6 (FINAL DESING FOR SPHERE STANDS DECONSTRUCTED AND SHOWING EDITIABLE DIMENTIONS)

Sphere stands

Sphere placement

The supports for the spheres where also altered after the final presentation, this was done to reflect the role of light and the LAGI brief. The form takes the same structural column placed from the bottom centroid down to the footing placed in the ground. The bracing system for the sphere was then designed using the same workflow seen in (FIG.C3.3) and this was also done for the fabrication of the solar sphere in C2 and has some of the same editable dimensions (as seen in FIG C2.1) of height (A) and width to place the sphere in (B) (seen FIG.C4.6).

Placement of the Spheres in the installation will only occur on the Southern side of the installation (FIG.C4.5 and SITE PLAN FIG.C4.7), as this is the side of the site which will receive the most light and will not be blocked by neighbouring buildings or the alterations of the site due to landscaping. This allows for maximum sunlight collection and energy generation of the spheres on the site and for the users as when they visit the site and the installation they will receive the same treatment as the spheres.

Materiality The materiality of these stands are to stay the same as the initial stands (see FIG.C2.0) so they are again made out of steel, this was done to keep the robust nature of the stand and the trust of the user while standing next to them.

DETIALED DESIGN

C


C4

FIG.C4. 7 (FINAL SITE PLAN)

C

DETAILED DESIGN


Learning Objectives and Outcomes

Part C I found that I lost my design part way though this part of the project, I was absorbed in dealing with the spheres and the mass they had, and how I was going to design to deal with this and still keep my concept of special awareness alive. However, through the learning objectives provided I was able to achieve the final design and found the final cirt curtail to come to a conclusion on this design. There are many aspects of this final design that I will continue to resolve. Firstly, to resolve the most suitable fabrication method for the carbon fibre DLA frame, whether is partly moulded in segments or each segment is done individually and which would be the most appropriate according to the LAGI brief. Secondly, the fabrication of the spheres frames, as due to their height they would be up to twenty meters tall and therefore the taller sphere couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be fabricated out of one single piece of material, it would require several pieces and consideration of how this jointing system would work for this situation.

From Part C, I now feel confident with integrating parametric design techniques into my future work, I now have an understanding of grasshopper and working with data to produce a design and see myself in the near future spending more time on learning and increasing my skills in scripting as it has the potential for increasing my knowledge of different ways of manipulating data in parametric design. However, it was not till after the final crit and my addressing the feedback and creating the DLA space frame and that I felt I was familiar with parametric design. I was able to produce a detailed model of my then final design and had my first 3d printed model I had ever created, although I know that 3d printing should only be used in circumstances such as a sphere I was happy that air gave me the opportunity to use the form of fabrication. Parametric modelling is a powerful tool, it allows memory of detail that we can sometimes forget, from this course I am now able to take a more critical eye to architecture and different parametric techniques and how the designer has used them to articulate their ideas.

DETIALED DESIGN

C


FIG.C4. 8 (VIEW OF FINAL DESIGN FROM ACROSS THE BAY)


C

DETAILED DESIGN

Walker julia 640529 finaljournal  
Walker julia 640529 finaljournal  
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