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ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013


Vision Mission

Our Core Values

Vision

A just society that celebrates the fullness of life realized with the help of a community embodying Ignatian Spirituality.

Mission

We aim to form a community of volunteers, former volunteers, and associates who nurture and live out the principles and values of Ignatian Spirituality, embodied in and realized through their individual vocations characterized by service, simplicity, solidarity, and social justice.

What We Do What We Do

JVP recruits, trains, forms, and sends young men and women volunteers to work in underresourced institutions which play a crucial role in the development of Philippine society. Volunteers are prepared and assisted by the foundation in developing the necessary skills to render effective service as educators and capacity builders. Both the volunteers and the communities they serve are empowered by the experience of taking part in the work towards positive social change.

JVP Batch 34 Volunteers /Photo by: Gerlie Sianda (B19)

Our Core Values

Service that builds Service is faith in action, using all talents and gifts for the greater good.

Social Justice that empowers We are called to make a conscious and active choice to be involved in the promotion and development of just human structures and systems. Solidarity that unites The choice to be in communion with those we work with and work for in promoting social justice. Simplicity that frees The attitude to see all things as a gift. This lends to an appreciation of all that has been given. Spirituality that loves We espouse the spirituality that appreciates God in all things, that respects all human beings and the environment in which we live, inspiring us to nurture ourselves and our world.


ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

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contents

Chair’s Message 3 Board of Trustees 4 President’s Report 5 The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) 5 The Network of Leaders 15 Organizational Sustainability 21 Independent Auditor’s Report 22 Statement of Financial Position 23 Statement of Financial Activities 24 Statement of Changes in Fund Balances 25 Statement of Cash Flows 26 Schedule of Expenses 27 Schedule of Property and Equipment 29 Cash and Cash Equivalents 30 Notes to Financial Statements 31 Statement of Representation 38 The National Office Team 41


Chair’s Message

Let us continue to be generous! As we set to recall, with deep gratitude to our good Lord, for the past, fruitful year of the JVP Foundation and look forward to the next year with hope and generous optimism, may we remember the hundreds of thousands of our kababayan who have suffered in recent maninduced and destructive natural calamities. The military siege which held hostage the entire city of Zamboanga, the terrible earthquake that struck Bohol, Cebu and nearby places and just very recently, the sheer devastation brought by the super typhoon ‘Yolanda’ which hit the islands of Samar, Leyte, Northern Cebu, Coron, Palawan and other places in the Central Visayas, have profoundly tested our collective resolve as a nation. It is in times like these that the true spirit of volunteerism, anchored on our faith upon a loving, compassionate God and with a generous heart (kusang-loob), becomes even more urgent and relevant. Let us continue to contribute to nation-building in these crucial times by our collective action to be generous. Let us be beacons of hope and resilience amid the desperation and widespread despair among our countrymen in affected areas. Finally, let us continue to pray for one another that with the many blessings we received we may be untiring in sharing; for our families we draw inspiration from, and for the communities we serve. God bless us all.

Atty. Martin B. Delgra III 3


Board of Trustees

Atty. Martin B. Delgra III Chair

Maria Cecilia C. Bulos President

Lawrence Tyrone C. Tang Corporate Secretary

Myrna Aboniawan-Siose Board Representative CDO Local Chapter

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Jeromeo L. Jose

Vice President & Board Rep Manila Local Chapter

Joseph D. Server Associate Member

Alfredo P. Medina, M.D. Board Representative Davao Local Chapter

Gary G. Lauriano Treasurer

Rev. Fr. William H. Kreutz, SJ Founder/Chaplain

Jonafel G. Singson Board Representative Naga Local Chapter

Ma. Victoria C. Montano Board Representative Zamboanga Local Chapter


President’s Report The JVP Story continues…   The Program Year 2012 to 2013 marked several milestones in the life of the Jesuit Volunteers Philippines. This year, we continued to write our story of commitment through the twenty-seven (27) volunteers who completed their year of service last April 2013. We also missioned another batch of eighteen (18) young men and women to different under-resourced communities in the country. They served as teachers, parish and community workers bringing the good news of God’s overflowing love for His people. This year also marked the first time a local chapter, particularly the Cagayan de Oro Local Chapter, formally adopted the Ecoville Resettlement Area as a community partner in its disaster relief and rehabilitation efforts due to typhoon Sendong. The local chapters were also actively involved in raising funds for the foundation. Each local chapter organized special events and called on their network of friends to support the foundation.   The year is the 20th year since the establishment of the Jesuit Volunteers Philippines Foundation, Inc. (JVPFI). From an academe-based program, JVP has transformed itself to a legitimate, nonprofit, volunteer-managed organization with a network of over a thousand members, partners and beneficiaries, all over the world. Our informal research reveals that JVPFI is unique in that it is the only volunteer management organization, at least in the Philippines, that was established and is being continuously managed by volunteers who have undergone the program. We are proud yet humbled by the challenge of making sure that this program which started thirty-four (34) years ago continue to make a difference in the lives of our volunteers, our partner communities and our alumni network as well.

The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) For Program Year 2012 – 2013 (Batch 33), the Jesuit Volunteers Philippines missioned twelve (12) men and fifteen (15) women to various under-resourced communities in the country. Batch 33 volunteers—through education and community-building—taught, counseled, and moderated school councils in elementary and secondary schools; organized youths; facilitated seminars, workshops, and training sessions for farmers; and organized sub-pastoral parish councils and taught children in conflict with the law (CICL) at the national prisons. These 27 men and women, having lived among the people they served and empowered, has been transformed; a dynamic that most, if not all, 843 JVP volunteers experienced through the Foundation’s thirty-four years. 5


The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) Education MARK ANTHONY “Mark” E. AFABLE

Xavier University - Ateneo de Cagayan, AB Philosophy 2012   Mark was assigned as an Edukasyon sa Pagpapakatao and Christian Living Education Teacher at the St. Anthony Academy in Mondragon, Northern Samar. Through Mark’s work, Students reported that their self–confidence and public speaking skills were developed through sharing at the daily assemblies. They became more participative in school-wide Masses. Parents became more supportive of their children’s school activities and became active in the school’s parent-teacher council. Students appreciated the recollections and the opportunity to reflect on and share about their experiences.

FRANCIS RAPHAEL “Kiko” A. ANGELES Ateneo de Manila University, BS Computer Science 1997

Kiko was assigned as a Christian Living Education Teacher and Guidance Counselor at the Sto. Niño Institute in Getafe, Bohol. Through Kiko’s work, Students’ understanding of their faith and their practice of their spirituality deepened. The school’s Guidance Program and Office is now operational and the counseling sessions provided students the opportunity to talk about and share their concerns and issues. Students became more active in campus ministry and SCA activities, developed their capacity to organize and lead outreach, fundraising, and formation activities. Students became more responsive during schoolwide Masses and the choir members were more open to other types of liturgical music, including Jesuit-composed songs.

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YBONNE CHRISTINE “Ybonne” N. CHUA

Ateneo de Manila University, AB Philosophy 2011 Ybonne was assigned as a High School Teacher and Assistant Student Activities Coordinator at the St. Therese of Miarayon High School in Miarayon, Talakag, Bukidnon. Through Ybonne’s work, Students exhibited satisfactory academic performance. They gained the knowledge and skills related to topics discussed as seen in the exam results. The members of the Drum and Lyre Club appreciated and enjoyed their new instruments. They gave a successful musical performance during the barangay fiesta. Computer Club members used their MS Publisher skills to develop communication materials for their school and club activities. The students were introduced to the World Wide Web or the Internet; created email and Facebook account. Parish youth council appreciated the support of Ybonne in different parish activities.


The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) PATRICK LOUIE “P3” D. DEQUIÑA

Ateneo de Davao University, BS Management Accounting 2012 P3 was assigned as a High School Teacher and Student Activities Coordinator at the St. Therese of Miarayon High School in Miarayon, Talakag, Bukidnon. Through P3’s work, Students’ aptitude in Math, English and Science were improved, as seen in their quarterly and achievement tests. The students were more participative in non-classroom activities, and the Student Body Organization Officers were able to fulfill all their responsibilities and most activities in their Student Activities plan. Activities planned by the English Club were accomplished.

HANNAH LOUISE “Hannah” O. ENANORIA Ateneo de Davao University, AB Sociology 2011

Hannah was assigned as a Program Officer for Education at the Fundacion Allegro, Sitio Simsimon, Kalagangan in San Fernando, Bukidnon. Through Hannah’s work, The community’s teachers developed their skills in classroom management and lesson plan development. Documentary requirements were promptly submitted to the Department of Education for compliance. The feeding program motivated the students to attend pre-school classes and provided them ease from hunger. The community women organized themselves and formed MASUMPIT, a local organization to understand and appreciate the importance of the family as the foundation of basic learning and values.

NATASHA ALLEN “Tasha” M. GALBRAITH

Ateneo de Manila University, BS Psychology, Minor in Education 2012 Tasha was assigned as a Grade 1 Teacher and Technical Assistant at the Pax Christi Learning Institute in San Mariano, Roxas, Oriental Mindoro. Through Tasha’s work, Students were able to attain the competences of their level, improved cognitive and psychomotor skills and students’ attitude toward learning improved. Parents were happy with the developments in their children who are now all ready for admission to Grade 2. The local community affirmed the PCLI’s contribution in education. The Teacher-in-Charge achieved a high standard of performance this school year and raised the standards for the school years to come. Over 70 storybooks, textbooks, and workbooks were added to the school library, reading corners were set up in all classrooms and it is evident that there is an increase in students’ interest and proficiency in learning. PCLI was able to update their funder and maintain good standing with them for the coming year. Teachers’ skills in test construction questionnaires have improved. Teachers felt inspired and hopeful for sustained faculty development. Funds were raised to purchase additional interactive educational materials for the school.

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The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) WILFREDO “Kulas” S. GARINGA, JR.

Ateneo de Naga University, BS Psychology 2012 Kulas was assigned as a Guidance Counselor and English Teacher at the Divine Child Academy of Lawaan in Lawaan, Eastern Samar. Through Kulas’ work, Students had a safe venue to talk about their personal issues, problems, and concerns. Students with disciplinary issues were made aware of their misdeeds and were given guidance and help. Parents/guardians were informed of the students’ scholastic performance and behavior in school. Students gained confidence in speaking English. All members of the staff had active roles in the school paper and yearbook and students learned basic journalism skills. Students were able to practice their social skills, boost their self-confidence, and celebrate their accomplishments with their parents.

STEFANI NICOLE “Nikki” D. ALCANTAR

Ateneo de Manila University, BS Management 2012 Nikki was assigned as the President’s Assistant for Special Projects at the Loyola College Culion (LCC) in Culion, Palawan. Through the Discernment Committee which Nikki was part of, the different committees were able to make better decisions about the school. As a teacher, only 1 student dropped out of her College Algebra class after exceeding the number of allowed absences and 9 out of 11 students passed; in Trigonometry, 16/18 passed; in Chemistry, all passed (17/17); in Management Accounting, all passed (2/2). Three of the First Year AB Literature majors became Dean’s Listers. The pictures she took were used as promotion materials and in the website design. Hotel operations have stabilized and there is a steady inflow of guests. The staff continues to be enthusiastic about their work. Hotel Maya was able to host its first wedding with foreign guests.

YNEZ YSABEL “Ynez” V. ALCID

Ateneo de Manila University, BS Legal Management 2008 Ynez was assigned as a Community Enterprise Development Facilitator with Uma Republika in San Vicente, Sumilao, Bukidnon. Ynez worked with the women in the community to explore potential value-added products and services. With her help, the women’s committee of PANAW-Sumilao Multi-purpose Cooperative explored potential products and enterprises, particularly farm eco-tours, hand-knit coasters, knit bags made from “up-cycled” sacks, brooms, and cornick (crispy corn snack). Through Ynez’ work, Networks were established to promote the local enterprises. There was a marked increase in farmers’ participation. Twenty-five PANAW women were trained and at least 3 women expressed eagerness to continue with the cornicks enterprise. Skilled women gained supplemental income from handknits. There was a reported increase in household income by 25%-35% in the last 3 months of implementation. Several product batches of handknits (including test marketing batches) have been produced with increased production volume, improved design, and improved quality. The cooperative’s operations: data management, monitoring and evaluation were in place thus PANAW-Sumilao was able to comply with the Cooperative Development Authority (CDA) and members can avail of loans and program benefits.

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The Volunteer Service Program (VSP)

KRISHA JUNE “Kakai” A. BURGOS

Xavier University, BS Business Administration major in Business Economics 2012 Kakai was assigned as a Program Coordinator at the Silid Aralan, Inc. (SAI) in Rodriguez, Rizal. Through Kakai’s work, More than 90 Children from 4 public elementary and high schools in Rodriguez were able to register to and participate in the program.

SAI students were able to have regular and consistent learning sessions. Quarterly progress reports were generated for stakeholders, to update sponsors, and raise funds for the foundation. SAI centres in other parts of the Philippines have volunteers who are trained, ready and prepared to facilitate and guide kids effectively.

MILDRED “Dhred” S. ÑUBOG

Eastern Mindoro College, BS Education Major in English 2010 Dhred was assigned as a High School English, Math, and Physics Teacher at the Fr. Leoni Memorial School in Cabanglasan, Bukidnon. Through Dhred’s work, The Dynamic Learning Program (DLP) resulted in an increase in students’ average monthly exam scores, reading comprehension, and grasp of basic concepts and information. Students enjoyed a more engaging classroom environment as seen in their active participation in class. Students reached the semi-final round of “Quiz on Air,” a Bukidnon-wide radio quiz show for high school students which boosted their selfconfidence and public speaking skills. Activities for graduating seniors were successfully held. The school was given an ESC (Educational Support Contracting) reaccreditation by the Department of Education.

MARIA VERONICA “Nikki” S. VERGARA

Ateneo de Manila University, BS Psychology, minor in Education 2012 Nikki was assigned as a High School English, Math, and Physics teacher at the Fr. Leoni Memorial School in Cabanglasan, Bukidnon. She prepared Dynamic Lesson Program’s (DLP) lesson plans and modes of assessment. Through Nikki’s work: There was in increase in the students’ exam scores, their reading comprehension and grasp of basic concepts. This was ensured by having more contextualized lesson plans. As a Guidance Counselor, she was able to manage many student cases. She also facilitated the Seniors Exit interviews for the student to reflect on their years in the High School. Nikki co-organized a youth camp where participants gained a renewed understanding of the self as an agent of change in their community.

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The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) JOHANNE LORREN “Johanne” A. ARCEO

Ateneo de Manila University, BS Management 2012 Johanne was assigned as a Assistant Camp Facilitator for Livelihood and Assistant to the Community Development Team Leader at the Xavier University Ecoville in Cagayan de Oro City. The survivors of typhoon Sendong were relocated at the Lumbia Resettlement Project. Through Johanne’s work, A more thorough process of selecting families to be transferred to the permanent housing was established. The institution was able to conduct a field validation of partner and beneficiaries based on the specific place of origin and other relevant criteria. An Operations Manual was drafted to guide XEMPCO officers. XEMPCO (Xavier Ecoville Multi-purpose Cooperative) members had skills training sessions for better job prospects and livelihood opportunities

LARA DOMINIQUE “Lara” A. DE JESUS

Ateneo de Manila University, AB European Studies 2011 Lara was assigned as a Documentation Officer at the Sentro ha Pagpapauswag ha Panginabuhi, Inc. (SPPI) in Catarman, Northern Samar. Through Lara’s work, Booklets on SPPI projects such as seaweed farming and alternative livelihood programs were produce and the positive impact on their partner-beneficiaries were published. Seaweed farmers now use a clearer and more organized presentation on seaweed farming that can be used for knowledge-sharing and their success stories were documented Activities were properly documented which will help in writing reports to funders/donors. More accurate data were generated that gave evidence to the sustainability of the projects and programs.

CAMILLE DOMINIQUE “Camille” TACASTACAS Ateneo de Manila University, BS Psychology 2011

Camille was assigned as a Program Associate with Cartwheel Foundation, Inc., in Culion, Palawan. Through Camille’s work, The Adult Capability Program (ACaP) was established in Tagbanua communities in Alulad, Marabal and Cagait in Culion. She helped in clarifying and orienting partner communities and institutions of their duties and responsibilities in the project. She also assisted in developing an updated and comprehensive community profile which provided the basis for Cartwheel’s reports and provided information to potential partners and funders. Early Childhood Education (ECE) students now have several indigenous learning materials in their classrooms. The fundraiser “Cartwheel Carols” which Camille helped organize generated more than Php100,000.00 to support Cartwheel Foundations’ programs.

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The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) Community Building RODERICK “Erick” L. BALICTAR

PHILIP ROBERT “Bobby” C. FLORES

Erick was assigned as the Area Health Coordinator/Nurse at the Foundation of Our

Bobby was assigned as a Social Enterprise and Livelihood Coordinator at the Philippine Jesuit Prison Service (PJPS) in New Bilibid Prisons, Muntinlupa City.

Mabini College, BS Nursing 2012

Lady of Peace Mission in Sitio Gala, Brgy. AningwaySacatihan, Subic, Zambales.

Through Erick’s work, The clinic was able to serve an average of 30 individuals per month and Erick was able to conduct household visits to 80% of the residents. The clinic was also able to perform referral services to the San Marcelino District Hospital and District Health Office when needed. Out of 30 pupils undergoing supplemental feeding, 90% have increased in weight with mothers enthusiastically participating in the monthly meetings. Health services such as vaccination and deworming have been delivered to community children. Eighteen community members who had been diagnosed with malaria were all cleared and more importantly, the disease was controlled and the area has been declared malaria-free. There was also a marked increase in the Cooperative store sales benefiting the members of the community.

Capitol University, BA Tourism 2012

Through Bobby’s work, A useful survey was used to identify beneficiaries of the livelihood program in PJPS. Community women were able to adequately evaluate their situation and plan for their own businesses or improve their existing enterprises. Inmates were able to strengthen their relationships with their families through the spiritual formation program. This resulted to changes in their attitudes towards their life and their families. The PJPS administration was able to keep track and evaluate the results of the projects on their beneficiaries. An Operations Manual was also produced to ensure the smooth implementation of the project in the future. Bobby also helped in the marketing of PJPS products which provided funds for parish operations and generated greater awareness of PJPS’ work among the general public.

KARL MIKEL“Kai” M. PREGON

Ateneo de Davao University, BS Biology 2012 Kai was assigned as a Program Officer for Advocacy with the Diocesan Comission of Social Action-Justice and Peace in Borongan, Eastern Samar. Through Kai’s work, Awareness was raised among the people of Eastern Samar on the negative effects of mining. Partner communities and organizations became more knowledgeable about the legal battle against mining and became more aware of their rights. Reports were generated, compiled and submitted to organizations united in the cause against mining. The community witnessed a Covenant Signing by the electoral candidates in the provincial and municipal levels on their efforts to curb the ill-effects of mining.

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The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) ISOBEL RANULFA “Rainey” Z. SARMIENTO

Ateneo de Manila University, AB Literature (English) 2009 Rainey was assigned as Program Associate at the Cartwheel Foundation, Inc., in Culion, Palawan. Through Rainey’s work, Community teachers were able to develop appropriate and relevant teaching methodologies for the partner indigenous communities. The effectiveness of the program was assessed and the Adult Capability Program (ACaP) and participants’ skills and knowledge development was tracked. Voters’ education sessions were conducted by ACaP community teachers for the May 2013 elections. The ACaP program became responsive and relevant to the communities’ needs. Early Childhood Education (ECE) classes were conducted for 14 learners from Cagait from November 2012 to March 2013. Rainey helped raise about Php 100,000 for Cartwheel’s general funds which will be used to continue various programs for partner communities.

FILBERT AARON “Filbert” G. TIU Ateneo de Manila University, AB Psychology 2012

Filbert was assigned as Program Officer for Social Action Ministry at the Diocesan Commission on Social Action-Justice and Peace in Borongan, Eastern Samar. Through Filbert’s work, An accomplishment report and proposal to the UNDP-Parks and Wildlife Bureau (PAWB) – Samar Island Biodiversity Program (SIBP) for livelihood projects was developed. This was also submitted to various project funding agencies. An information guide was produced to educate and increase the understanding of various stakeholders on the nature and purpose of the project. A training program was implemented for the parish Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) Core Team to level off on the project rationale with its implementing agency, the AUSAID Project- PACAP Disaster Risk Management Project. Through the project, the partnership with the Local Government Units (LGUs) was strengthened and there was a sharing of best practices and strategies for DRRM. Civil society organizations, religious, and the youth sector were formed to fulfill the 2014 DENR Action Plan.

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DELARA “Lara” T. ZANTUA

Mabini College, BS Nursing 2012

Lara was assigned as Assistant Camp Facilitator at the Xavier Ecoville in Cagayan de Oro City. Through Lara’s work, The updated databases became a reliable source of information for interventions and support for Xavier Ecoville (XE) families. Rotary Club scholars received support and were able to continue their studies and receive a stipend as part of their scholarship. Youth and adult participants were able to acquire certification from Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) through the education sessions which Lara facilitated. XE partner-families were able to accomplish marriage and baptismal requirements, about 15 couples were wed and 15 children received the Sacrament of Baptism.


The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) Socio-Pastoral LEIZL “Ethel” P. AGAD

Ateneo de Davao University, AB International Studies minor in Sociology 2012. Ethel was assigned as Assistant Projects Officer at the Mangyan Heritage Center (MHC) in Calapan, Oriental Mindoro. Through Ethel’s work, Mindoreños (in particular, parishoners, teachers and students) had greater understanding and appreciation of the Mangyans and their culture through positive promotion and showcase of Mangyan culture. Ethel also ensured the proper documentation of MHC activities, provided efficient library services for researchers and visitors. She also helped generate additional income for MHC’s culture-related projects and managed the website.

HAROLD “Noy” S. FLOREN

Xavier University, BS Biology 2012 Noy was assigned as a Guidance Counselor and Modules Developer at the Gelacio I. Yason Foundation-Family Farm School in San Mariano, Roxas, Oriental Mindoro. Through Noy’s work, Relevant formation modules were developed and turned-over to local staff for implement in the next school year. Students reported gaining more self-knowledge thus improving their interpersonal, social, spiritual, and other related skills. There was increased student participation in various co-curricular school activities which developed their leadership skills. Faculty members also reported that they developed more confidence in running youth development programs and activities. There were less behavioral complaints from teachers about students. Teachers reported a marked improvement in students’ respect and cooperation at school.

JOSE EMMANUEL “Yayun” O. PATRIMONIO Xavier University, BS Psychology 2012

Yayun was assigned as a Project Assistant at the UGAT Foundation-PANATAG Program. Yayun was able to serve PANATAG’s primary clients who were children of overseas Filipino workers. Through Yayun’s work: Concerns on family life, and form support groups were facilitated Three hundred fifty students were reached in conducting formation sessions. Participants were able to deepen their self-awareness as well as develop their leadership capacities. The program’s volunteer mentors were managed by ensuring that they grow in their mentoring skills and gave feedback on dealing with the children. Through the session, families also gained greater awareness on the issues of migration.

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The Volunteer Service Program (VSP) GILLIAN SOFIA “Yanyan” L. SAMSON Xavier University, BS Management Accounting 2012

Yanyan was assigned as an Assistant Campus Minister at the Sacred Heart Institute for Transformative Education (SHIFT) in Mondragon, Northern Samar. Through Yanyan’s work, Student-members of the Campus Ministry Organization (CMO) have grown in their spiritual and personal life. They reported having a greater sense of purpose and developed their skills in serving at the mass and in singing as part of the choir. CMO members also had the opportunity to reach out to other members of the university community through projects, recollections and retreats. They were able to develop their self-confidence and share their skills and talents (mime, interpretative dance, etc.) while also sharing their faith. A forum that provided a venue to civil society and church organizations was organized to discuss the development, political, and peace and order concerns of Samar Island, and to plan for peaceful, honest, and orderly national and local elections last May.

JIM “Jimbo” B. AKUT II Xavier University, BS Psychology 2011

Jimbo was assigned as a Youth Formator at the Philippine Jesuit Prison Service, New Bilibid Prison Reservation Muntinlupa City. Through Jimbo’s work, The youth inmates’ interest in the formation modules increased through the 10 months as evidenced by their class attendance. The youth inmates also grew in self-knowledge and in their faith as heard from the insights they shared during reflection sessions. Visitors in PJPS gained a better understanding of inmates’ life and changed their views about inmates through proper orientation given by Jimbo. Inmate church workers became more active, participative, and reliable workers in the church activities.

RAYMAND ROY “RR” P. SARDIDO

Ateneo de Davao University, BS Entrepreneurship 2012 RR was assigned as a Basic Ecclesial Community (BEC) Formator and Organizer at the St. Paul the Apostle Parish in Inabanga, Bohol. Through RR’s work, Parishioners’ awareness of BECs in the parish was heightened as they participated in many parish activities. Community issues in barangays surfaced and steps to resolve them were drafted through a survey that RR initiated. Parishioners became enthusiastic about the BEC and discussions were well-attended. Church volunteers were equipped with knowledge and skills in organizing barangay BECs.

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The Network of Leaders For the past 20 years, the JVP story has gone beyond the adventures of the current volunteers in their respective areas of assignments. Our more than 800 strong alumni network and partners continue to make a difference in and through their local communities. The Program Year 2012-2013 were highlighted by different national office and local chapter activities. The JVPFI continued its involvement in several networks that advocate greater volunteer participation. Through its membership in the Association of Foundation, JVPFI now sits as one of the lead organizations in the National Coalition on Volunteerism. The NCV aims to respond to the needs of the volunteer sector in the country. The foundation also shared its experience in volunteer and foundation management in the Valuing Volunteerism Forum organized by The Association of Foundations (AF), AusAID, United Nations Volunteers and the US Department of State, Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs.

The Kusang-Loob Book Launch

Fr. Jett Villarin, S.J (B1) pose with other KusangLoob contributors during the book launch.

JVP Alumni with Associate Members.

Gina Fernandez (B11) Editor, Marvin Glenn Fernandez (B24/25) and Fr. Errol Nebrao (B20/21) Layout Artist for kusang-loob book.

Left: Tim Gabuna (B3) gave a brief history of the longest running volunteer service program. Right above photo: Fr. Jett Villarin SJ autographs to sign a copy for Clar Ligunas (B32) Right below photo: DSWD Assistant Secretary JV Jimenez (B9) with DepEd Assistant Secretary Rey Laguda. (B14)

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The Network of Leaders JVPFI participated in the Volunteer Summit organized by VSO Bahaginan.

Max Ventura, (B14), PhilAm Life Executive Director shared the challenges and fulfillment in corporate volunteering.

The Manila Local Chapter

Fr. Gil Donayre, S.J. (B20 and 21) and Fr. Errol Nebrao, S.J. (B21) were recently ordained priests of the Society of Jesus in May 2013. The JVP Manila Local Chapter gathered for a Thanksgiving Mass.

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The Network of Leaders The Cagayan de Oro Local Chapter

18 August TSP (Talk Share and Pray) Session with Fr. Rudy Fernandez, S.J.

Jubilee Celebration 2012. The JVP CDO Local Chapter members pose with Fr. Rudy, former JVPFI Assistant National Chaplain at his anniversary as a Jesuit priest.

Members of the CDO Local Chapter showed their support at the the Batch 33 Pre-Orientation Seminar last 17 May 2012.

Cagayan de Oro Local Chapter Steering Committee (2012 – 2013) Myrna Siose Board Representative The JVP CDO Local Chapter hosted a fundraising Dinner on 22 February 2012.

Omar Tan Local Executive Officer Loel Von Castrodes Secretary General Michelle Suazo Treasurer Chiri Cababaros In-charge for Alumni Whitney Nagasan In-charge for Recruitment

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The Network of Leaders The Davao Local Chapter Chuck Initiative - 21 February 2013 Atty Chuck Delgra (B2), JVPFI with Fr. Bill, SJ pose with Fr. Dan McNamara, SJ, Rector of the Davao Jesuit Community at the “friend”raising dinner at the Café Laguna, Abreeza Mall.

Batch 33 Year-End Evaluation and Synthesis April 2013 The Davao Local Chapter hosted the Yearened Evaluation and Synthesis of JVP Batch 33. Assistant National Chaplain Fr. Rudy Fernandez, SJ, celebrated the morning Mass by the shore of the Yearend venue in Samal Island, Davao City.

Japhet Diones (B5) welcomed the guests to the simple evening of fellowship and sharing of the work of JVPFI. After the presentation was a sumptuous dinner with the guests. JVPFI Chairperson Chuck Delgra shared some of his memorable and humorous experiences as a Jesuit Volunteer in the 80s. Fr. Bill, S.J explained that sponsorsing a volunteer is investing in a needy community’s future.

Davao Local Chapter Steering Committee (2012 – 2013) Alfredo Medina, MD Board Representative Ryan Rolf Fuentes Local Executive Officer Hannah Enanoria Secretary General Christine Evangelio Membership Officer

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Carmeli Montecillo Recruitment Officer

First Re-Entry Session for B33 with Batches 30, 31 and 32 - April 2013 Members of the Davao Local Chapter welcome the returning JVPs of Batch 33 in a re-entry session, an afternoon of sharing of the first few weeks of going back to their families and friends. The returning JVP B33 Davao volunteers were with their batchmate Marck of the CDO LC.

2013 Highlights Recruitment Talk for Batch 34 Election of new Steering Committee Participation in Sendong Relief Operations at Cagayan de Oro City Received the JVPFI Executive Director and Program Officer for the Network of Leaders on their Local Chater visit Recruited five (5) JVPs for Batch 33


The Network of Leaders The Naga Local Chapter

Members of the Naga Local Chapter (NLC) pose with Fr. Bill Kreutz, SJ at the Kusang-loob book launch in the Ateneo de Naga University, 25 January 2013

Fr. Bill Kreutz, S.J. greets students who came for the Kusang-loob book launch.

Members of the NLC pose after one of many kumustahan sessions

Naga Local Chapter Steering Committee (2012 – 2013) Various NLC activities JVPFI Executive Director Martin Perfecto with Fr. Bill, S.J. visited the Local Chatper on August 2012. JVP alumni came and Batches 1-10, 11-20, 21-32 were represented. December 2013 Talk, Share and Pray (TSP) Dinner JVP Recruitment Talks for different organizations in Ateneo de Naga University and Daet. Fundraising dinner with the Naga City Chamber of Commerce last January 2013 Fr. Rudy Fernandez, S.J. visited the NLC, and led a community Mass

Jonafel Garol Board Representative Shayne Bonavente Local Executive Officer Fe Din Secretary General Len Quitangon Membership Officer Joel Guerrero In-charge for Recruitment

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The Network of Leaders The Zamboanga Local Chapter On 20 May 2012 Bukas-Palad had a Luncheon concert held at Astoria Plaza, Zamboanga City. This was in celebration of the centennial jubilee of the Ateneo de Zamboanga University. The concert was for the benefit of the construction of the Sacred Heart Chapel. Chikahan In the desire to re-activate JVP – ZLC a chikahan time was organized one Saturday afternoon in July 2012. This brought together some JVP’s for a simple kumustahan. A good respite for all JVP-ZLC members.

Sunday Mass sponsorship To help in the promotion of the JVP , the Zamboanga Local Chapter made efforts to sponsor a Sunday Mass in the ADZU Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus with Fr. Willy Samson, S.J.

Major Activity: September 8, 2012 (Recruitment Talk, JVP Thanksgiving Mass, JVP-ZLC meeting) JVP Recruitment Talk graced by Marievic Cabanes-Montaño and Martin. Celebrating the Mass with Fr. Willy Samson, SJ, (Asst to the President for Formation, ADZU) 8 September 2012 : JVP – ZLC meeting with Martin Perfecto The presence of a JVP visitor will often draw JVP alumni together. JVP – ZLC is a willing and gracious host to JVP guests. To gather the JVP alumni in Zamboanga City can be a challenge yet for anything called by JVP, the alumni is ready to lend a hand and be present. Program Year 2012 – 2013 was, as all Program Years, a grace-filled one for we see JVP alumni doing their part to make a difference in their entrusted tasks. The JVP story continues, and the JVP community continues to be a source of inspiration to anyone who will choose to go back to it now and then. For in truth, we bring our community in our hearts! We may be far apart and dispersed, yet one in heart, still.

20

Mini-activities: Feeding Program On June 2012, Mimi Najar-Fernandez (Batch 17) initiated coordination with Human Nature –Zamboanga for the involvement of JVP – ZLC in the Gawad Kalinga Feeding Program And on 15 July 2012, Human Nature Zamboanga together with I CAN make a difference Inc., Pilar College, JVP Zamboanga and the LBC team @ GK Tulungatung conducted a feeding program. Extension of Help At the height of the impact of Typhoon Gener and the monsoon rains in Manila and parts of Luzon, JVP-ZLC partnered with I Can Make a Difference, Ateneo de Zamboanga University and LBC – Zamboanga for the gathering of donations. The initial move generated a more concerted effort to help Luzon through the entities of ADZU.

Zamboanga Local Chapter Steering Committee (2012 – 2013) Marivic Cabanes-Montaño Board Representative Franz Cantillo Local Executive Officer


Organizational Sustainability Since the strategic planning in 2011, the JVPFI had set several targets to ensure its sustainability. We continue to enjoy our accreditation as a donee institution given by the Philippine Council for NGO Certification and the Department of Social Welfare and Development. As a certified donee institution, our donors can use their donations to the foundation for tax deduction purposes.   However, we continue to face challenges as we aim for financial stability and organizational sustainability. We saw our donations decrease by about 7.6% from Php 5,180,175 in PY2011-2012 to Php 4,816,506 in this program year. This decrease in donations came amidst a 17.7% increase in our expenses primarily due to the 42% increase in volunteers from 19 to 27 last program year. This resulted to a deficit of Php 358,873 for this program year from the previous year’s surplus of Php 790,304.   It is encouraging to note though the participation of the local chapters in our resource mobilization efforts. We have piloted local chapter-driven special events in all local chapters in this program year. The events were aimed to make a call for support within the local chapter’s area to the work of the foundation. While the efforts yielded different results, it is worth noting that the a total amount of Php 117,500.00 was raised from these events. These efforts will be institutionalized thereby animating further our local chapters to be involved in all aspects of the Foundation’s work.   Our “200 for 2M” campaign yielded Php 484,745.40 for the program year. Efforts from certain batches of alumni-volunteers to raise funds from among themselves or their friends, to partially or fully support a volunteer are gaining ground. For program, year 2012-2013, a total of fifty-eight (58) alumni-volunteers participated in this campaign. This shows that our “internal-giving” effort which we embarked on a few years continue to be supported by our alumni(ae).   Amidst the challenges of organizational sustainability, we continue to be guided by the strategic direction we have set for the Foundation. These include resource mobilization efforts that aims to one, generate 20% surplus over budget yearly; two, double our Endowment Fund by end of program year 2015-2016 by adding 2 Million Pesos yearly to the Fund; and, three, ensure that donors pledge 80% of the funds required at the start of the program year. The BOT feels that this is the best way to make sure that our program continues for the years to come.

Thirty-four years since its establishment the JVP program has brought hope and inspiration to our volunteers, alumni and communities. Despite the many challenges the program and the foundation continue to encounter, we will carry on. We believe in what we do. We will continue to endure and remain faithful to our mission of bringing God’s love to the world.

21


22


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization)

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION (Philippine Peso)

As of April 30 Notes

2013

2012

ASSETS Current Assets Cash Receivables Total Current Assets Non-Current Assets Property & Equipment Less: Accumulated Depreciation Net Carrying Value Other Non-Current Assets Total Non-Current Assets

sched 3 2, 5

10,989,059.51 275,676.46 11,264,735.97

9,752,670.96 988,075.87 10,740,746.83

sched 2

897,870.00 -744,627.08 153,242.92 1,207,500.00 1,360,742.92

823,580.00 -718,804.11 104,775.89 1,957,500.00 2,062,275.89

12,625,478.89

12,803,022.72

127,305.57 16,704.94

107,104.41 19,199.51

144,010.51

126,303.92

2, 6

TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES Liabilities Payables and other liabilities Current Statury liability

2, 7 2, 8

Total Liabilities Fund Balances Endowment Fund

2

11,000,000.00

10,000,000.00

Program Fund

2

1,481,468.38

2,676,718.80

12,481,468.38

12,676,718.80

Total Fund Balances

###

TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES

12,625,478.89

12,803,022.72 Exhibit A

(Please see accompanying notes to financial statements)

23


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization)

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES (Philippine Peso)

For the Fiscal Years ended April 30

REVENUES Donations Grants Membership and Annual Dues Interest and Investment Income Fundraising Activities

Notes

2013

2, 9 2, 10 2 2

3,708,037.96 263,497.58 22,400.00 802,301.27 20,269.44

Total Revenues EXPENSES Program Expenses (Schedule 1) Volunteer Service Program Salaries and Benefits Resource Mobilization Board of Trustees, Committees, General Assembly Continuing Service/Padagos Publications and Information Management Systems Linkages and Partnerhips

3,971,094.93 ### 802,901.50 36,400.00 244,764.86 125,014.00

4,816,506.25

5,180,175.29 ###

2,039,201.49 1,368,546.99 178,099.25 99,611.94 128,073.96 51,411.37 27,576.64

1,568,446.25 1,142,923.10 34,011.31 132,127.25 198,099.23 107,342.00 14,838.50

3,892,521.64

542,332.00 725,416.67

3,197,787.64 ### ### ### 565,852.00 ### 619,963.90 ###

1,267,748.67

1,185,815.90

5,160,270.31

4,383,603.54 ###

-343,764.06 (15,109.47)

796,571.75 ### -6,267.12

sched 1

Total Administrative Expenses Total Expenses EXCESS (DEFICIT) BEFORE EXTRA-ORDINARY GAIN (LOSS) Foreign Exchange Gain (Loss)

###

sched 1

Total Program Expenses Administrative Expenses (Schedule 1) Salaries and Benefits Office Expenses

2012

2

###

EXCESS (DEFICIT) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENSES & LOSS (to Exhibit C)

-358,873.53

790,304.63 ### Exhibit B ###

(Please see accompanying notes to financial statements)

24


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization)

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES (Philippine Peso)

Endowment Fund FUND BALANCES, BEGINNING ADD (DEDUCT): Transfer of Funds Prior Period Adjustment FUND BALANCES-Adjusted ADD (DEDUCT): Excess of Revenues over Expenses & Loss (from Exhibit B) FUND BALANCES, END (to Exhibit A)

Program Fund

2013

2012

10,000,000.00

2,676,718.80

12,676,718.80

11,937,436.06

1,000,000.00 -

(1,000,000.00) 163,623.11

163,623.11

(51,021.88)

11,000,000.00

1,840,341.91

12,840,341.91

11,886,414.18

(358,873.53)

(358,873.53)

790,304.62

1,481,468.38

12,481,468.38

12,676,718.80 Exhibit C

11,000,000.00

(Please see accompanying notes to financial statements)

25


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization) STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (Philippine Peso)

For the Fiscal Years ended April 30 Notes

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Excess (deficit) of revenues over expenses & loss (from Exhibit B) Add (Deduct) Adjustments Depreciation Prior Period Adjustments 2 Operating income (loss) before working capital changes Add (Deduct): Changes in operating assets and liabilities Decrease in Receivables Increase in other current assets Decrease in other Non-current assets Increase (Decrease) in payables and other liabilities Increase (Decrease) current statutory liability

2, 5

2, 7 2, 8

Net Cash generated from (used in) operations NET CASH GENERATED FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Acquisition of Property and Equipments

2013

2012

(358,873.53)

790,304.63

130,904.11 163,623.11

119,499.55 (51,021.88)

(64,346.31)

858,782.30

712,399.41 750,000.00 20,201.16 (2,494.57)

115,980.11 77,386.16 61,950.72 (294,170.58) 14,882.36

1,415,759.69

834,811.06

1,415,759.69

834,811.06

(74,290.00)

(4,700.00)

(74,290.00)

(4,700.00)

sched 2

NET CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Adjustment in Accum Depreciation

sched 2

NET CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

-105,081.14

-

(105,081.14)

-

NET INCREASE (DECREASE ) IN CASH

1,236,388.55

830,111.06

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING BALANCE

9,752,670.96

8,922,559.90

10,989,059.51

9,752,670.96

CASH, END BALANCE (to Exhibit A)

Exhibit D (Please see accompanying notes to financial statements)

26


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization)

SCHEDULE OF EXPENSES (Philippine Peso) Schedule 1 For the Fiscal Years ended April 30 2013 PROGRAM EXPENSES Volunteer Service Program Promotions, Screening & Matching Seminars, skills training and conferences Transportation & Living Allowance Program Coordination & Monitoring Program Development Sub-total Program Staff Salaries and Benefits Salaries/Allowances/Honoraria Staff Planning & Development/Benefits/Bonuses Sub-total Resource Mobilization Resource Mobilization for Soliciation & Grants Resource Mobilization for Special Projects Sub-total Board of Trustees/Working Groups/General Assembly Board of Trustees/Working Groups/General Assembly Sub-total Continuing Service/Padagos Seminars, Activities and Meetings Program Coordination and Monitoring Sub-total General Communications/Coordination & Information Management Program Printed Matters Information Management Program & Electronic Communications Sub-total Linkages and Partnerships Networking & Conferences Sub-total

125,526.19 1,159,133.85 523,018.92 229,638.76 1,883.77

2012

109,242.98 985,584.83 379,543.19 92,833.46 1,241.79

2,039,201.49

1,568,446.25

1,120,133.27 248,413.72

999,640.52 143,282.58

1,368,546.99

38,401.50 139,697.75

1,142,923.10 ### ### 33,251.30 760.01

178,099.25

34,011.31

99,611.94 99,611.94

128,073.96 128,073.96

46,475.95 4,935.42 51,411.37

27,576.64 27,576.64

132,127.25 132,127.25

198,099.23 198,099.23

106,030.00 1,312.00 107,342.00

14,838.50

27

14,838.50


Sub-total Linkages and Partnerships Networking & Conferences Sub-total TOTAL PROGRAM EXPENSES ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES Management Staff Salaries & Benefits Salaries/Allowancesa for Administrative Staff

51,411.37

27,576.64

107,342.00

14,838.50

27,576.64

14,838.50

3,892,521.64

3,197,787.64

542,332.00

Sub-total

542,332.00

Administrative Expenses Office Expenses Depreciation

459,461.56 130,904.11

565,852.00 565,852.00

411,433.35 119,499.55

For the Fiscal Years ended April 30 2013 Local Taxes, Licenses & Fees Other Expenses Sub-total TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

GRAND TOTAL

28

10,051.00 125,000.00

2012 88,682.00 349.00

725,416.67

619,963.90

1,267,748.67

1,185,815.90

5,160,270.31

4,383,603.54


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization)

SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT Schedule 2

As of April 30, 2013

DESCRIPTION

DATE

FILING CABINETS- steel, 4 drawers FILING CABINET - steel,

TOTAL COST

2013 DEPRECIATION ACCUMULATED ADJUSTMENT NET BOOK S VALUE 2012-2013 DEPRECIATION

94,500.00

31,500.00

86,625.00

-

7,875.00

3,500.00

1,166.67

3,208.33

-

291.67

17,000.00

-

TYPEWRITER- manual

29-Jun-93

17,000.00

-

Computer PC Acer model no:veriton 3900Pro ( 4 units) model no: Aspire M5630 (1 unit)

07-Sep-10 15-Jul-08

68,000.00 12,000.00

22,666.67 -

49,111.11 12,000.00

-

18,888.89 -

LCD Monitor model no: X193W ( 2 units) acer model no : X193HQ G (2 units) acer model no: VS12131 (1 unit) View Sonic

07-Sep-10 07-Sep-10 13-Feb-10

17,000.00 17,000.00 7,000.00

5,666.67 5,666.67 1,895.83

12,277.78 12,277.78 7,000.00

-

4,722.22 4,722.22 -

Computer & Loptap Upgrading

15-Sep-10

72,000.00

24,000.00

52,000.00

-

20,000.00

Loptap Acer model no: Aspire MS2220

15-Jul-08

20,000.00

20,000.00

-

0.00

Loptap Acer model no: emachines MS2268

07-Sep-10

20,000.00

6,666.67

14,444.44

-

5,555.56

NetBook model no: emachines NAV51

07-Sep-10

18,400.00

6,133.33

13,288.89

-

5,111.11

LCD Projector Acer model no: DNX0717

30-Mar-09

50,000.00

8,333.34

50,000.00

-

(0.00)

HP Deskjet printer D2360

08-Mar-04

13,800.00

-

13,800.00

-

-

Lexmark Printer & scanner model : X1185

02-Mar-05

3,490.00

-

3,490.00

-

-

Samsung Printer model no: ML1610 laser

16-May-06

3,900.00

-

3,900.00

-

-

Lexmark Printer, Scanner & Fax machine model: interpret S405

11-Aug-10

3,500.00

2,697.92

-

Fax machine brother model: 290MC

26-Jun-00

8,490.00

8,490.00

-

Straight Back Chairs (red)

05-Sep-10

14,000.00

666.67

6,111.11

-

7,888.89

Straight Back Armchairs (gray)

05-Sep-10

8,000.00

666.67

3,777.78

-

4,222.22

Straight Back Armchairs (gray)

30-May-04

1,000.00

1,000.00

-

Tables Gray small

05-Sep-10

10,000.00

833.33

4,722.22

-

5,277.78

Table Gray Big

05-Sep-10

5,000.00

1,666.67

3,611.11

-

1,388.89

Table wood

28-Feb-04

2,500.00

2,500.00

-

Microwave Oven American Home

30-Aug-09

4,000.00

Coffe Maker American Home model: ACM-116B

30-Mar-04

3,500.00

-

3,500.00

-

-

Pantry Cabinet model : J&T NO.2018

06-Jan-07

1,078.49

-

1,078.49

-

(0.00)

Digital Camera Polaroid model: i533

02-Aug-07

6,995.00

-

6,995.00

-

-

FY 2010-2011 acquisitions

353,300.00

-

FY 2010-2011 adjustments

(40,073.49)

-

-

1,166.67

-

-

889.66

4,000.00

-

802.08

-

-

0.00

Model : AMW-6510B

418,307.65

105,081.14

353,300.00 (353,300.00)

29

HP Deskjet K-109Z Printer

14-Jul-11

4,700.00

1,566.67

2,741.67

-

1,958.33

SAMSUNG PRINTER model no: ML2160 laser

01-Sep-12

4,790.00

1,064.44

1,064.44

-

3,725.56


FY 2010-2011 acquisitions

353,300.00

-

FY 2010-2011 adjustments

(40,073.49)

-

418,307.65

105,081.14

353,300.00 (353,300.00)

HP Deskjet K-109Z Printer

14-Jul-11

4,700.00

1,566.67

2,741.67

-

1,958.33

SAMSUNG PRINTER model no: ML2160 laser

01-Sep-12

4,790.00

1,064.44

1,064.44

-

3,725.56

PANASONIC AIRCON Split Type

18-Dec-12

Sub-total

69,500.00

8,687.50

8,687.50

897,870.00

130,904.11

849,708.22

-

105,081.14

60,812.50

153,242.92

C/O ADMU TABLE - 610 mm x 1524 mm

29-Jun-93

2,300.00

-

2,300.00

-

-

wooden shelves

29-Jun-93

22,500.00

-

22,500.00

-

-

CEILING FAN -propeller type

29-Jun-93

8,800.00

-

8,800.00

-

-

AIR CONDITIONER- Carrier, w-type, .75 kw capacity

31-Jul-94 14,500.00

-

14,500.00

-

-

CABINET-wooden

29-Jun-93

Sub-total

DESCRIPTION

DATE

GRAND TOTAL

2,500.00

2,500.00 2013 ADJUSTMENT NET BOOK DEPRECIATION ACCUMULATED 50,600.00 50,600.00 S VALUE TOTAL COST 2012-2013 DEPRECIATION

948,470.00

130,904.11

900,308.22

105,081.14

153,242.92

JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization)

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS As of April 30, 2013 (Philippine Peso)

Schedule 3 Cash in Banks: MBTC-SA MBTC-Dollar BDO-SA SBTC-Dollar SBTC-CA SBTC-SA Sub-total

093-3-09317569-8 093-2-09300834-5 3570-01319-1 0662-032090-200 (new) 0662-032090-002 (new) 0662-032090-201 (new)

Petty Cash Fund Short-term Investments: SBTC SBTC PSBank Security Bank Sub-total TOTAL CASH & CASH EQUIVALENTS

30

153,755.10 796,141.39 621,804.70 95,469.87 1,157,284.85 21,951.60 2,846,407.51 5,000.00

Coupon Bonds Philam Asset TD (Ateneo) DIMA/SDA#0662-4232-001448

2,810,260.92 5,327,391.08 8,137,652.00 10,989,059.51


JESUIT VOLUNTEERS PHILIPPINES FOUNDATION, INC. (a non-stock, non-profit organization) Notes to Financial Statements April 30, 2012 1.

ORGANIZATION The Jesuit Volunteers Philippines Foundation, Inc. is a non-stock, non-profit organization duly registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 5, 1993 as amended on October 18, 1995 with Registration No. AN 093-002043. Primarily, the purpose for which it was organized is to form a community of men and women who are able to live the Ignatian spirituality through service, simplicity, solidarity and by being agents of change in order to help build a sovereign society of peace and freedom based on social justice, people’s participation and authentic Filipino values. As a non-stock, non-profit foundation organized for social welfare purposes, the Foundation is exempt from the payment of income received as contemplated under Section 26 (g) of the National Internal Revenue Code, as amended. There were 6 and 7 employees of the Foundation as of April 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Its registered address is Rm. 220, 2nd Floor, MVP Center, Ateneo de Manila University Campus, Loyola Heights, Quezon City, Philippines. The Foundation adopted a fiscal year of reporting ending April 30. The financial statements of the organization as of and for the years ended April 30, 2013 and 2012 were authorized by Management for issue on August 8, 2013. The Board of Trustees is still empowered to make revisions even after the date of issue of the financial statements.

2.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented unless otherwise stated. Basis of Preparation The financial statements of the partnership have been prepared on a fair value measurement. The financial statements are presented in Philippine peso, which is the firm’s functional currency, and all values represent absolute amounts except when otherwise indicated. The company applied Section 35 (Transition to the PFRS for SMEs) in preparing the Financial Statements, with January 1, 2010 as the date of transition. The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplate the realization of assets and settlement of liabilities in the normal course of business. Statement of Compliance The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Philippine Financial Reporting Standards (PFRS) for Small and Medium sized Entities (SMEs). The significant sections and practices of the Organization are set forth to facilitate the understanding of the financial statements: Financial Assets Financial assets include Cash, Advances and Other Receivables. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS Peso Accounts – are stated based on the reconciled balances between book and bank record.

31


Foreign Currency Accounts - transactions were recorded at a pegged rate more or less prevailing during the period. Petty Cash Fund - a small amount of cash set aside for making minor cash payments for which writing of checks is not practicable. ADVANCES AND RECEIVABLES Cash Advances - advances made to officers and employees to carry out program activities of the various projects of the organization. Such were liquidated against program/project related expenses. The balance represents un-liquidated advances as of balance sheet date. Accounts Receivable – represents collectibles from the staff for unreturned excess cash advances and personal expenses paid by the office. Accounts Receivable-Others – represents amount collectible from individuals and organizations other than those classified as advances. Salary Loans - loans provided to personnel as part of their privileges, which are amortized against their respective salaries over a specific period. OTHER CURRENT ASSETS These include prepayments and deposits which are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT Property and equipment are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation. The cost of an asset comprises its purchase price and directly contributable costs of bringing the assets to working condition for its intended use. Asset acquisitions are recorded initially as an expense deductible from the grant in accordance with the approved budget by the funding agency. A corollary entry is made to capitalize the cost of the asset and transfer to the property and equipment fund. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated life of the asset and charged against the property and equipment fund. Management has a policy on the estimated useful lives of the asset. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated lives of the related asset as follows: Estimated useful life Furniture & Fixtures Office Equipment

3 years 3 years

Major repairs and betterment that extend the life of the assets are capitalized, maintenance and minor repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities are recognized initially at fair value. Financial liabilities are recognized when the Organization becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. Financial liabilities include Other Payables and Accrued Expenses.

32


Accounts Payable These represent amount owed to individuals and members which are payable within the normal accounting cycle or on demand. Included in this account are expenses contracted in the current year but will be paid in the succeeding year. Accrued Expenses These represent amount owed to individuals and organization which are payable within the normal accounting cycle or on demand. Included in this account are expenses contracted and incurred during the current year but will be paid in the succeeding year. Other Payables Other payables include payables to staff and other entities arising from various reimbursements. Current Statutory Liability This account represents government-required personnel contributions and taxes withheld against salaries. These are intended to be remitted to the respective agencies. Funds Held in Trust This account refers to deposits to the Organization’s bank accounts which are intended for other individuals or organizations. It is credited when cash is deposited and debited when disbursements is made to the intended party. Financial Instruments Date of Recognition The Organization recognizes a financial asset or a financial liability in the balance sheets when it becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. Initial Recognition of Financial Instruments All financial assets are initially recognized at fair value. Determination of Fair Value For all other financial instruments not listed in an active market, the fair value is determined by using appropriate valuation techniques. Valuation techniques include net present value techniques, comparison to similar instruments for which market observable prices exist, options pricing models, and other relevant valuation models. Impairment of Financial Assets The Organization assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset or a group of financial assets is deemed to be impaired if, and only if, there is objective evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that has occurred after the initial recognition of the asset (an incurred ‘loss event’) and that loss event (or events) has an impact on the estimated future cash flows of the financial asset or the group of financial assets that can be reliably estimated. Evidence of impairment may include indications that they borrower or a group of borrowers is experiencing significant financial difficulty, default or delinquency in interest or principal payments, the probability that they will enter bankruptcy or other financial reorganization and where observable data indicate that there is measurable decrease in the estimated future cash flows, such as changes in arrears or economic conditions that correlate with defaults. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows (excluding future credit losses that have not been incurred). The carrying amount of the asset is reduced through use of an allowance account and the amount of loss is charged to the statement of income. Interest income continues to be recognized based on the original effective interest rate of the asset. Loans, together with the associated allowance accounts, are written off when there is no realistic prospect of future recovery and all collateral has been realized. If, in a subsequent year, the amount of the estimated impairment loss decreases because of an event occurring after the impairment was recognized, the previously recognized impairment loss is reversed. Any subsequent reversal of an impairment loss is recognized in profit or loss, to the extent that the carrying value of the asset does not exceed its amortized cost at the reversal date.

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For the purpose of a collective evaluation of impairment, financial assets are grouped on the basis of such credit risk characteristics as industry, past-due status and term. Future cash flows in a group of financial assets that are collectively evaluated for impairment are estimated on the basis of historical loss experience for assets with credit risk characteristics similar to those in the group. Historical loss experience is adjusted on the basis of current observable data to reflect the effects of current conditions that did not affect the period on which the historical loss experience is based and to remove the effects of conditions in the historical period that do not exist currently. The methodology and assumptions used for estimating future cash flows are reviewed regularly by the Organization to reduce any differences between loss estimates and actual loss experience. The Organization first assesses whether objective evidence of impairment exists individually for financial assets that are individually significant. If it is determined that no objective evidence of impairment exists for an individual asset with similar credit risk characteristics and that group of financial assets is collectively assessed for impairment. Assets that are individually assessed for impairment and for which an impairment loss is on continues to be recognized are not included in a collective assessment or impairment. If, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognized, the previously recognized impairment loss is reversed. Any subsequent reversal of an impairment loss is recognized in the statements of income, to the extent that the carrying value of the asset does not exceed its amortized cost at the reversal date. Derecognition of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities Financial assets A financial asset (or, where applicable a part of financial asset or part of a group of similar financial assets) is derecognized when: x the rights to receive cash flows from the asset have expired; x the Organization retains the right to receive cash flows from the asset, but has assumed an obligation to pay them in full without material delay to a third party under a pass-through arrangement; or x the Organization has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from the asset and either (a) has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, or (b) has neither transferred nor retained substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, but has transferred control of the asset. Financial Liabilities A financial liability is derecognized when the obligation under the liability is discharged, cancelled or expired. Where an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as a derecognition of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability, and the difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognized in the statement of income. Offsetting Financial Instruments Financial assets and financial liabilities are offset and the net amount reported in the balance sheet if, and only if, there is a currently enforceable legal right to offset the recognized amounts and there is an intention to settle on a net basis, or to realize the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. This is not generally the case with master netting agreements, and the related assets and liabilities are presented gross in the balance sheet. Impairment of Non-Financial Assets The Organization assesses as at reporting date whether there is an indication that an asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, or when annual impairment testing for an asset is required, Management makes an estimate of the asset’s recoverable amount. An asset’s recoverable amount is calculated as the higher of the asset’s or cash-generating unit’s fair value less costs to sell and its value in use or its net selling price and is determined for an individual asset, unless the asset does not generate cash inflows that are largely independent of those assets or groups of assets. Where the carrying amount of an asset exceeds it recoverable amount, the asset is considered impaired and is written down to its recoverable amount. In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessment of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. Impairment losses are recognized in the statements of income in those expense categories consistent with the function of the impaired asset.

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An assessment is made at each reporting date as to whether there is an indication that previously recognized impairment losses may no longer exist or may have decreased. If such indication exists, the recoverable amount is estimated. A previously recognized impairment loss is reversed only if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the asset’s recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognized. If that is the case, the carrying amount of the asset is increased to its recoverable amount. That increased amount cannot exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation and amortization, had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset in prior years. Such reversal is recognized in the statements of income unless the asset is carried at revalued amount, in which case the reversal is treated as revaluation increase. After such a reversal, the depreciation charge is adjusted in future periods to allocate the asset’s revised carrying amount, less any residual value, on a systematic basis over its remaining useful life. Provisions and Contingencies Provisions are recognized when the Organization has a present obligation, either legal or constructive, as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation, and the amount of the obligation can be estimated reliably. When the Organization expects reimbursement of some or all of the expenditure required to settle a provision, the entity recognizes a separate asset for the reimbursement only when it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received when the obligation is settled. The amount of the provision recognized is the best estimated of the consideration required to settle the present obligation at the balance sheet date, taking into account the risks and uncertainties surrounding the obligation. When a provision is measured using the cash flows estimated to settle the present obligation, its carrying amount is the present value of those cash flows. Provisions are reviewed at each reporting date and adjusted to reflect the current best estimate. Contingent liabilities and assets are not recognized because their existence will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the entity. Contingent liabilities, if any, are disclosed, unless the possibility of an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is remote. Contingent assets are disclosed only when an inflow of economic benefits is probable. Fund Balances To ensure observance of limitations and restrictions placed on the use of resources available to the Organization, the accounts of the Organization are maintained in accordance with the principles of fund accounting. Fund Accounting assumes that the Organization receives funds under various terms and conditions and may be grouped in various ways based on their intent and purpose and restrictions set by donors and management. It is an accountability or stewardship concept, used principally by NGOs that are legally responsible for seeing that certain funds or assets are used only for specified purposes. Total fund balances comprise of Program Fund and Endowment Fund. Program Fund caters to the primary operations of the organization. Endowment Fund represents amount allocated and restricted by the Board and/or respective donors. The income earned from the fund may be used for program operations. The amount of the fund can only be changed based on decisions of the Board and/or respective donors. Revenue and Cost Recognition Revenue is recognized to the extent that is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Organization and the amount of revenue can be reliably measured. However, when an uncertainty arises about the collectability of an amount already included in the revenue, the uncollectible amount, or the amount in respect of which recovery has ceased to be probable, is recognized as an expense, rather than as an adjustment of the amount of revenue originally recognized. The following specific criteria must also be met before revenue is recognized: x x

Grants Received. This is recognized at the pegged exchange rate. These are considered restricted project funds when specifically restricted by the respective donors. Donations and Contributions are recognized upon receipt.

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  

Foreign Exchange Gain or Loss is stated at net amount of gain over loss during the period. Interest Income is recognized as the interest accrues. Other Income includes other incidental sources of funds.

Expenses Direct expenses were charged against the respective program/project/activity. Common/indirect expenses were charged based on the Organization’s policy of cost allocation. 3.

RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES Parties are considered to be related if one party has the ability to control the other party or exercise significant influence over the other party in making financial and operating decisions.

4.

CHANGES ARISING FROM THE TRANSITION TO PFRS FOR SMES There is no material differences between the Financial Statements prepared under PAS 101 and the financial statements in PFRS for SMEs.

5.

RECEIVABLES comprised: Accounts Receivable-Others Grant/Donations Receivable Office Loan Receivable Advances to Employees Total

6.

2013 P

P

OTHER NON-CURRENT ASSETS comprised: Export and Industry Bank (see note below) Ateneo De Zamboanga University Ateneo Multi-Purpose Cooperative Total

67,477.38 172,558.64 21,136.04 14,504.40 275,676.46

2012 P

P

2013 P

P

505,000.00 687,500.00 15,000.00 1,207,500.00

39,868.93 855,453.50 35,086.04 57,667.40 988,075.87

2012 P

P

505,000.00 1,437,500.00 15,000.00 1,957,500.00

The Export & Industry Bank, where the organization owns shares of stock totalling P505,000.00, has closed early 2012, and is now under receivership by the Philippine Deposit Insurance Corporation. Management is undertaking steps to recover its investment in said bank.

7.

PAYABLES & OTHER LIABILITIES comprised: 2013 Accrued Expenses Accounts Payable Total

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P P

60,166.56 67,139.01 127,305.57

2012 P P

40,000.00 67,104.41 107,104.41


8.

CURRENT STATUTORY LIABILITY comprised: 2013 Withholding Tax Payable SSS Payable Phil. Health Payable Pag-ibig Payable Total

9.

P

P

11,479.94 3,550.00 1,175.00 500.00 16,704.94

2012 P

P

9,802.44 6,806.27 1,450.00 1,140.80 19,199.51

DONATIONS comprised: 2013 Donation for General Fund Sponsor-A-Volunteer Special Projects Total

P

P

817,617.94 2,710,617.20 179,802.82 3,708,037.96

2012 P

P

1,253,251.95 2,661,183.98 56,659.00 3,971,094.93

10. GRANTS comprised: 2013 KZE/Misereor Missio Total

P P

0.00 263,497.58 263,497.58

2012 P P

272,448.00 530,453.50 802,901.50

11. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE-OTHERS comprised: JVP staff Withholding tax - compensation Total

P P

39,868.93 25,928.57 67,477.38

P

14,504.40

12. ADVANCES TO EMPLOYEES comprised: JVP staff 13. LOCAL TAXES, LICENSES & FEES comprised: SEC – penalties, fines Local taxes Annual Registration fee Total

2013 P

P

0.00 9,551.00 500.00 10,051.00

2012 P

P

81,000.00 7,182.00 500.00 88,682.00

14. GRANT/DONATIONS RECEIVABLE comprised: 2013 Joseph Server Bombin Cadiz Marina Balandra Panara Namin Foundation Anonymous (OR# 2497) Total

P

P

50,000.00 15,000.00 20,000.00 80,000.00 7,558.64 172,558.64

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We are grateful to all our sponsors and donors for Program Year

2012-2013!

ORGANIZATIONS AND INSTITUTIONS Missio Ateneo de Davao University Ateneo de Manila University Artemis Realty Corporation Bahay ni Angelo King Foundation Enveo Management & Consultancy Services House of Representative /Hon. Sonny Belmonte J.A.Delgado Memorial Foundation Inc. Lopez Group Foundation Inc. Matthew Aarts and Amylou L. Aarts Malayan Insurance / Yvonne Yuchengco Philippine Coastal Storage & Pipeline Corp. PAGCOR Salome Tan Foundation Smart Communication, Inc. Xavier School Ateneo de Zamboanga Jesuit Residence, ADMU Mision De La Compania Mary the Queen Parish Residence Halls, ADMU San Pedro College, Inc.

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Vision Mission Vision

Our Core Values

Thanks to our sponsors andValues donors Our Core for Program Year 2012-2013! Service that builds

A just society that celebrates the fullness of life realized with the help of a community embodying Ignatian Spirituality.

Mission

We aim to form a community of volunteers, former volunteers, and associates who nurture and live out the principles and&values of Ignatian Spirituality, Antonio Carmen La Viña embodied in and realized through their Atty. Josephine Maribojoc individual vocations characterized by service, simplicity, Betty Wee solidarity, and social justice.

What We Do

Christian Uy Ciriaco What Weand DoCrisanta Belleza Dennis Falcasantos JVP recruits, forms, and sends young Dr.trains, May Gonzalez men and women volunteers to work in underElaine which Navarro resourced institutions play a crucial role in the development Philippine society. Volunteers Eric & of Rachel Angulo are prepared Gabriel and assisted by the foundation in Mallilin developing the necessary skills to render effective & Rizalina Simpas service James as educators and capacity builders. Both the volunteers and the communities they serve are Janet Candido-Bernabe empowered byJeromeo the experience of taking part in the Jose work towards positive social change. Jessilee Lourdes Rivera-Pangilinan Julito Sarmiento JVP Batch 19 JVP Batch 22 JVP Batch 27 Leonora Cabanes

JVP Batch 34 Volunteers /Photo by: Gerlie Sianda (B19)

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Service is faith in action, using all talents and gifts for the greater good. Social Justice that empowers We are called to make a conscious and active choice to be involved in the promotion and development of just human structures and systems. Solidarity that unites Lester Luwie Bucang The choice to be in communion with those Lucia Loreli we work with and Mationg-Macrohon work for in promoting Ma. Cecilia Bulos social justice.

Ma. Leilani Andres-Relucio SimplicityMa. thatPacencia frees Fider The attitudeMa. to see all things as a gift. This Socorro Culanag lendsMaria to an appreciation of all that has been Cheryl “Shy” Calo-Santos given. Marie Shayne Perez-Bucang Spirituality Marietta that lovesLucas Marievic Montano We espouse the spirituality that appreciates Michael Corpuz all human God in all things, that respects beings and theMichele environment in which we Suazo live, inspiring us Najar-Fernandez to nurture ourselves and Mimi our world. Noelli Billena-Yap Rolfo C. Reta Roy Renconada Ruth Guerrero and Anonymous Donors


The National Office Staff

Nathaniel George A. Hipolito Martin R. Perfecto (until 30 April 2013) Executive Director Jo-ed C. Tome Rachel A. Angulo (until 30 May 2013) Pamela Joy M. Capistrano (until 30 May 2013) Program Officer for Volunteer Service Marvin Glenn F. Fernandez (until 15 March 2013) Program Officer for Network of Leaders Janeth E. Decipulo (until 29 October 2013) Resource Development Officer Angelita L. Jacinto Rez S. Oafallas (until 15 March 2013) Finance Assistant Mae A. Valbuena Program Assistant Local Executive Officers Phil Panamin B. Magtrayo Cagayan de Oro Ryan Rolf P. Fuentes Davao Henrico Rey B. de los Santos Manila

Shayne T. Bonavente Naga Ruth R. Guerrero Zamboanga 41


Cagayan de Oro | Davao | Manila | Naga | Zamboanga National Office

Room 220 MVP Center for Student Leadership Ateneo de Manila University Loyola Heights, 1108 Quezon City www.jvpfi.org jvpfoundation@gmail.com Telefax (632) 426 5908 (632) 426 6001 local 4880 0917 88 JVPFI


JVPFI Annual Report 2012 - 2013