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The Machine

Figure 11.  In a major-sales environment there are two approaches to the avoidance of hand-offs. In the default approach, the salesperson remains engaged through delivery. This results in a reduction in the salesperson’s selling capacity and, consequently, late engagement with potential clients. It also defers resolution of the inevitable tension between sales and production until after the sale is won.

In this alternative approach, the project leader and the BDM work side by side for most of the opportunity-prosecution workflow. Here are the essential characteristics of this approach: Because the BDM has no postsale responsibilities, they have more selling capacity. This enables them to engage earlier with clients than they otherwise would—meaning that initial contacts are conceptual in nature. At the point at which the client wishes to discuss (in concrete terms) their requirements, the BDM introduces the project leader. The project leader takes responsibility for requirement discovery and for solution design (in many cases, these will occur in the form of a formal solution-design workshop). From this point until the point of sale, the BDM and the project leader work together. The project leader is responsible for the technical component of the engagement, and the salesperson tends to the commercial component. After the sale, the project leader champions the project as it moves through production. This means that the project leader replaces the BDM as the primary point of contact for both production and the client.

The Machine (First Four Chapters)  

The Machine (First Four Chapters)

The Machine (First Four Chapters)  

The Machine (First Four Chapters)

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