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There is a knowled by fighting tooth an believe to be good an


dge only arrived at nd nail for what you nd right...  and losing.


Listening to “M,” the second installment of Justin McRoberts CMY(K), I’m amazed by the way a determinedly hopeful affirmation of the always-redeeming presence of God in every aspect of everyday existence can sit alongside a derisive skewering of the easy “Praise God” talk that abides--and even sustains--everyday, human injustice. With an ear for righteous indignation, dark humor, and all the ways we pull the wool over our own eyes, Justin documents his own ambivalence and offers a lyricization of Flannery O’Connor’s adage, “It’s harder to believe than not to.”

David Dark author of “The Sacredness of Questioning Everything”


We know that the whole creation has bee and not only the creation, but we ourselv Spirit, groan inwardly while we wait for a


en groaning in labor pains until now;  ves, who have the first fruits of the adoption, the redemption of our bodies. Romans 8:22,23


All those years  I had only to say  Yes.      But I couldn’t.

Finally, I said Maybe But even then I was filled with dread.

I wanted to step carefully. I didn’t want to leap.


What if the beloved Didn’t catch me? What if the world  Disappeared beneath my feet? Gregory Orr from “How Beautiful The Beloved”, Copper Canyon Press


You have asked me to feed them With my blood and my bones

You have asked me to follow To believe and obey

But my body is burdened

But the very thought of it

with concerns of my own

is what keeps me away

Heaven knows that I want to I want to but I just can’t

“Do you want to get well?” It always seemed like the strangest thing to ask a man.


...there is no “what” that can be called God. There is “no such thing” as God because God is neither a “what” nor a “thing” but a pure “Who.” He is the “I Am”   before whom, with our most personal and inalienable voice, we echo, “I am.”

THOMAS MERTON


All rise and sing These mysterious things On which we all agree That’s why we sing

And though that might be worth something It isn’t worth my heart So this is where believing ends and knowing has to start

If all you are is all we say and nothing else Than you’re just one more sad projection of ourselves

Some things revealed Some mysteries sealed So, we make a deal And just go on what we feel


THE NAME BE NAMED THE ETERN


THAT CAN D IS NOT NAL NAME TAO TE CHING


33


At 33 I climbed

You were scattered at his feet

the devil’s mountain in your clothes

but I was standing on his neck

And stood there choosing to believe what I had come to know

So, I carried with me everything of yours that I had left

To say, And reeling from the truth that I would heretofore live in That some good thing must always die for some new good thing to begin


You are in the praises of your people You are in the silences between You are in the wars between the nations You are in the wars we fight for peace

You are in the midst of all who gather You are in the bread and in the wine You are in the gifts we come to offer You are in

You are in the absence of a father

our sacrifice of time

You are in a mother’s patient love You are in dreams of friends who wander You are in worlds they’re dreaming of

You are in the neighborhoods we live in You are in the one’s we’re driving by You are for the one’s

Lord give me eyes to see Lord give me strength to lead You give me all I need So give me courage to believe

we call our neighbors And the ones who still escape our eyes


“Conversion isn’t, after all, and it keeps happening, wit and resistance, epiphany an


a moment: It’s a process, th cycles of acceptance nd doubt.” from “TAKE THIS BREAD” BY SARA MILES


I wrote a letter to you Not unlike the one You sent to me Not to explain myself

But if I stand here still and wait here long enough The sun will also go away

or anything I think Just to tell you what I see

Which brings us to the place we find ourselves Where I don’t know how to begin You won’t explain Yourself to satisfy my mind And I simply won’t give in.

All you’ll say is...

You say your love is great With Your body broken, Your spirit faint For your world turned over and laid to waste While your people treat each other

They say Your love is great But maybe they should wait Until it’s their child dying of diseases that have cures

They say you’re faithful like the sun I watch it rise most every day

like it’s some damned game Because they’re all Your children aren’t they? They are all your children anyway Yes, they are Your kids dying of diseases that have cures.


“At the heart of every well-m how dark or disturbing it m


made work of art - no matter may be - is an act of praise.� Gregory Wolfe


JUSTIN MCROB


BERTS

Since 1999 Justin McRoberts has been a constant and noteworthy presence on the independent music scene. A songwriter, storyteller, teacher and an advocate, he is one of those rare artists who blends artistry, honesty and humor seamlessly. ”In and through art,” Justin writes “we learn to see ourselves and our world as part of a cohesive, Divinely-orchestrated story.” Sharing songs and stories with an audience is where Justin’s gifts are most fully realized. His live shows strike a delicate balance between intellect and emotion. While his audiences are diverse, from congregates in a small rural church to young professionals in DC, most of Justin’s schedule is made up of appearances on college campuses in the continental US. Including early releases with 5 Minute Walk Records, McRoberts has consistently made thoughtful and well crafted albums. His catalogue currently includes 7 full-length projects and handful of EP’s. Central to Justin’s work is advocacy on behalf of the poor and oppressed through Compassion International. “Not only do the poor need us,” he writes “we need the poor to remind us what being human is about. In the same way that the poor learn to identify themselves with their lack, the wealthy learn to identify themselves with their wealth. It is in the meeting of the two that we can recognize ourselves and one another as human.”


Produced by Dustin Smith and Justin McRoberts @ Stillwater Studios in Concord CA Mixed by Masaki Liu @ One Way Studio in Benicia CA Photography and Artwork by Greg Madsen Justin McRoberts -Guitars, Vocals Audrey Richter - Background Vocals Lyndsie Smith - Background Vocals Max Butler - Pedal Steel Lewis Patzner - Cello Brian Vargas - Piano Dustin Smith - Percussion Lori Chaffer - Guest Vocals on “Deseases That Have Cures”


M: Album Booklet