Issuu on Google+

SKILLS:

Programs: Autodesk: AutoCAD, AutoCAD Architecture, Revit Architecture, 3D 570|574|9489 Studio Max tarrant.j35@gmail.com Microsoft: PowerPoint, Word, Excel Adobe: In-Design, Photoshop Google: Sketch-Up Freehand: hand rendering with various media, sketching, charcoal drawing, ink on Mylar drafting, pencil drafting, acrylic painting Modeling: basswood, foam core, cardboard, acrylic, plaster, clay, laser cut models, full scale prototyping Abilities: press release writing, programming document coordination, site/existing building planning and analysis, conceptual design, schematic design, design development, construction documentation, construction administration, programming with clients, code analysis, detailing, door/ window/room scheduling, project presentation, public speaking

EXPERIENCE:

Tarrant Construction , Wilkes-Barre, PA May 2012-present Intern, Draftsman For this residential construction company I work hands-on in the construction of additions and remodels, as well as drafting and design advice. Kesselman Architectural Design, Wyoming, PA May-August 2010 Student Intern For this small architecture firm I primarily assisted in the assembly of construction documents by drafting elevations and plans in AutoCAD, dimensioning and noting drawings, and creating window, door, and room finish schedules. In addition, I performed site measurements and communicated with clients in order to incorporate their vision for each project and adjusted drawings accordingly.

ACTIVITIES:

Member, AIAS Philadelphia University Chapter Member, Academic Achievement Program Member, Student Organization for Sustainable Action Coach/Judge, Elmer L. Meyers Speech & Debate Team Mentor, AIA Group Mentoring Program Greenfield Elementary Third Grade Teacher, Architecture in Education Guest Juror, Philadelphia University Architecture Design V

COMPETITIONS: 111th John Stewardson Memorial Fellowship in Architecture|Cinema ACSA/AISC Steel Design Student Competition|Homeless Assistance Shelter DVGBC Sustainable Design Competition|Bicycle Transit Center REFERENCES:

2007-2011 2007-2010 2009-2010 2007-2011 2011-2012 2012 2012 2012 DX 2011 D8 2010 D5

Susan Frosten, RA(NY), LEED AP 215|951|2595 Associate Professor of Architecture, Philadelphia University, frostens@philau.edu David Wilson, RA 570|575|0326 University Architect, Scranton University, david.wilson@scranton.edu David Kratzer, AIA NCARB 215|206|0962 Principal, BAU Architecture, kratzerd@philau.edu

PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 2012 College of Architecture & the Built Environment Bachelor of Architecture, Business Minor

J

arrant ustine


Portfolio Contents


2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

1


[FAMILY] Stasis Steel Design Student Competition H


Homeless Assistance Center

2

[FAMILY] Stasis

May 2011

D8 Duration: 2 months Prof. Jim Cassidy

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

2


[FAMILY] Stasis 30th & Walnut Street, Philadelphia


With the number of families and children without a home rising, Stasis will nurture existing families while constructing new bonds through the organization of prefabricated steel units. This homeless assistance shelter will prepare the resident children for re-integration with the community and prevent future homelessness through on site educational facilities. Each family unit is expressed both on the interior and exterior, accentuating the series of voids created by the sky scraping configuration. The solid units are linked on the interior by bridges ranging in size that create communal living spaces where adults could effortlessly observe their children at play throughout multiple levels, re-instilling the sense of security they lacked on the streets. Connected to the interior communal spaces are sequences of outdoor voids that pierce the building, making green space readily accessible and visible from the core of Stasis.

J

3


[FAMILY] Stasis Sectional Perspective


Located on lower 30th Street and Walnut Street, accessible from the newly constructed Penn Park, is a public library that creates an educational foundation for the homeless assistance center. It can be used by the surrounding community and by the residents of Stasis to continue their education outside of the classrooms, which are located in the residential tower. The library will help to connect the residents with the local community as well assimilate them back into society. This public space also contains the offices and counseling rooms for the center, allowing former residents to connect with and teach current residents in a public environment.

Floor Plans

J

4


[FAMILY] Stasis


The residential units are prefabricated to connect into the column superstructure, which then cantilever off on either side, helping to brace the building. This aids in the replication of Stasis by allowing the units to be assembled to suite the location and the need for housing. A unit on the North side connects to the unit directly across on the south side to create balance. Much like the units balance each other’s weight to support the building’s structural loads, the residents will support each other to find a balance in their lives of where they have been and where their futures can take them.

Structure

J

5


[FAMILY] Stasis


The bridges that connect opposing units give space for intimate gathering areas where residents can congregate. Because of the many voids within the building created by the units, children can stay within view of their parents while connecting with other residents. This allows for a dynamic space that is activated with residents. With each floor open to the above and below levels, a greater sense of community is achieved through the constant connection to the Stasis community. Light wells pierce the ground of the public park created for the children who are residents to play in and for the community to gather in. These light wells allow sunlight into the library below street level while offering those who use the park views into the program of the library. Using the same language as the cantilevered residential units, each light well is a vertical projection of a unit, and gives views of the residential tower from below street level.

J

6


[FAMILY] Stasis Physical Models


The units cantilever off of a central column grid that is then stabilized by the structure of the units themselves. This organization helps not only to support the structure but also the families by connecting them with families under the same circumstance. These bi-level units will reinforce the family structure by housing an individual family in each unit which contains private bedrooms, bathrooms, a kitchen, and an outdoor space. The ability of Stasis to be replicated and adapted in multiple locations allows for the spread of homeless assistance through the prevention of homelessness in future generations.

J

7


Ram Van Shelter Philadelphia University Ram Van


n Shelter

2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter February 2011

D8 Duration: 3 weeks Prof. Jim Cassidy

13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

8


Ram Van Shelter Henry Avenue, Philadelphia Univ


versity

This new Ram Van Stop will stand as a marker for Philadelphia University on Henry Avenue. It will become an entrance to the main campus through its gate-like appearance that welcomes visitors, students, and faculty to the threshold of the university. The “kit of parts” design can be reproduced campuswide to suite its site. In order to address the need for added seating at this Ram Van Stop, two structures interact with each other on the slightly sloped site. With the vertical steel tubing oriented perpendicular to Henry Avenue, vehicular traffic’s view of main campus is not obstructed. The heavy concrete walls help to block out the cold winds from the north, as well as to create space for signage.

J

9


Ram Van Shelter Campus Elevation & Henry Aven


nue Elevation

Because of the presence of this Ram Van Stop on Henry Avenue, I wanted to create a sense of privacy while not severely obstructing the view of main campus. In order to do so, I experimented with multiple louver schemes. I found that these thin members were practical for protection from the elements, in addition to not being too solid.

J

10


Ram Van Shelter


Through a progression of vertical, intersecting members, a minimalist approach was discovered. By subtracting unnecessary elements of the design, the Ram Van Stop became more affordable for the university. Similarly, by experimenting with how vertical and horizontal members interact with each other, the ultimate goal of the assembly was realized.

South Elevation & North Elevation

J

11


Ram Van Shelter Physical Model


Each Ram Van Stop is assembled using 4x4 rectangular steel tubing, L4x3x.25 and L3x2x.25 steel angles, 2x2 lumber for the benches, passive solar glass roofing, and a 1’ thick 7’x9’ concrete wall. These members are then connected using bolts. This versatile kit of parts allows for easy reproduction of the Ram Van Stop throughout the Philadelphia University campus.

J

12


Garden Cinema 111th John Stewardson Memoria


al Fellowship in Architecture Cinema

2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema January 2012

DX Duration: 10 days Prof. David Kratzer

17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

13


Garden Cinema Spring Garden & 9th Street, Phila


adelphia

A cinema is commonly an inward-looking building that focuses on the entertainment within, rather than viewing the world outside. However, by utilizing the existing viaduct which spans the two sites, users are able to circulate from the lobby to the theaters while experiencing the local neighborhood. This path of interior circulation coincides with the new biking and walking paths on the viaduct, creating a connection to the community. In order to help activate this section of the viaduct and bring in the local community, an outdoor public cinema will show free films regularly.

J

14


Garden Cinema 1st Floor Plan & 2nd Floor Plan


Cross Section & Longitudinal Section

The new access ramp from the Spring Garden Greenway connects bikers at the street level to the viaduct, offering a new connection to surrounding neighborhoods, A staircase to the green roof allows for open public recreation space as an extension of the viaduct. The green roof also aids in the collection of rainwater to minimize the nonporous materials of the Garden Cinema. At the street level, the abundance of new trees sets an example for the rest of Philadelphia in replenishing ground water and minimizing storm water overflow. The connection between the indoor cinema and outdoor viaduct will help to improve the Spring Garden neighborhood and continue the further reuse of industrial structure.

J

15


Garden Cinema


The interior program is organized by public and private spaces, with circulation spaces, like the main hall and lobby, remaining visible from the exterior. This is aided by the use of the existing Spring Garden Station which shelters private service zones, such as secured employee program, the concession stand, rest rooms, and a lounge. Opposite the old station is the theaters with parking concealed below on the ground level. The cafe remains a very public area, nestling into the main hall, providing views up and down Spring Garden Street, as well as of the viaduct. Because of this, users of the viaduct are invited into the cinema for increased use and users of the cinema are tempted to use the viaduct.

J

16


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Athenaeum


2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema

17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum December 2009 D6 Duration: 3 months Prof. Spence Kasse

24 Green Home Orphanage

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

17


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Grey’s Ferry Avenue &


This private facility interacts with the surrounding community by making it possible to view the main program of the atheneum, and, therefore, experience from the exterior what members can experience from the interior. By doing so, the Grey’s Ferry neighborhood can be enriched by and welcomed into the Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum.

South Street, Philadelphia

J

18


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Floor Plans


Program is stacked along the exterior walls in order to create a large atrium that pierces the building, and for organization in construction. The main staircase winds up the atrium and narrows in size as it approaches more infrequently used floors. Spanning the atrium is two glass floor artist studios. Members of the athenaeum are invited to do research in the library, produce their work in the studios, and display their work in the 2nd Floor gallery. This sequential process is visible from the exterior due to the void of the atrium.

J

19


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Longitudinal Section


Cross Section

The atrium allows for ample lighting within the central zone of circulation, while protecting the stacks of books from direct light. Because the athenaeum is located at the intersection of three streets, the support program, like bathrooms, fire stairs, and the elevator, are located where the building faces existing buildings because of their private nature.

J

20


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Grey’s Ferry Elevation


South Street Elevation

The change is size of panelled cladding transitions from the scale of the bricks on the existing buildings to a larger panel size on the corner of the athenaeum. This is also reflected in the location of the mullions on the large windows. The curtain wall on the front facade gives ample views of the interior program, while the curtain wall that wraps the corner of the building provides natural light in the smaller programmatic spaces located there. The large curtain wall located behind the multi-story louver system controls light into the stacks and gallery while still providing indirect sunlight and views to Grey’s Ferry.

J

21


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Solid/Void

Vie


ew Circulation

The void of the atrium accentuates the open public zones of the buildings, while housing the main vertical circulation. Circulation on each floor is also centralized around the atrium. Because two sides of the site face existing buildings, these walls are thick bearing walls that support the loads of the building and contain no openings. In the center, where the atrium and open program is located, like the auditorium, a column grid is employed to support the roof and floors that exist within this space.

J

22


Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum Physical Models


J

23


Green Home Orphanage Home for Children wit


thout Families

2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage March 2009

D4 Duration: 1 month Prof. Brian Szymanik

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

24


Green Home Orphanage 2nd & New Street, Ph


hiladelphia

With the closing of St. Vincent’s Orphanage, a new style of housing for children without families has been proposed by the City of Philadelphia. Using ‘house parents’ to care for six to eight teenagers in a home-like environment, the Green Home Orphanage incorporates greenery that is scarce in downtown Philadelphia into the home for both residents and the public to appreciate.

J

25


Green Home Orphanage Floor Plans


In order to bring light into this narrow row home, light wells pierce the concrete structure. Where each of those light wells touches a floor, a green space flourishes. These spaces are then accessible from the interior of the home to allow for each of the children to take care of and learn to respect and appreciate nature. Instead of traditional walls, the wells act to divide rooms within the building. This results in varying depths of the light wells to accommodate different program on each level. In addition to each child receiving their own private green space in their bedroom, they each have their own bathroom and bedroom. Something that these children have not gotten to experience living in St. Vincent’s is personal privacy and ownership. This new facility can provide them with this commodity.

J

26


Green Home Orphanage 2nd Street Elevation


Race Street Elevation

The exterior facade uses the simple concrete bearing walls to offset the unorganized appearance of the windows. These windows vary in size based on the needed privacy for the program within. Directly behind each window is a green space. As pedestrians look into the house, they will see the green spaces which shield the interior program.

J

27


Green Home Orphanage Longitudinal Section


Cross Section

The light wells not only extend to different levels, but also vary in size in order to accommodate the rooms that exist around them. When a light well is located along an exterior wall, the window tilts inward to give better views to those on the exterior looking in. These wells are lined with a naturally water resistant wood paneling to provide warmth to these sometimes tall and narrow spaces.

J

28


Green Home Orphanage Physical Models


J

29


Live.Work Residence


2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage 30 Live.Work February 2009

D5 Duration: 2 weeks Prof. Brian Johnson

J

33

Drawings/Models

36

Project H.O.M.E.

30


Live.Work Physical Models


The Live. Work Residence focuses on passive sustainable methods to heat and cool the building through day lighting and ventilation, while incorporating a living space and working space into a 16’x16’ footprint. As part of the Design V “Boot Camp,” drawings were reworked on the same paper and models were disassembled and reassembled in order to realize this fast paced sketch problem.

J

31


Live.Work Cross Section Front Elevation


Longitudinal Section

The skewed appearance of the facade allows a unique experience within. While the front facade is a glass curtain wall, there are no other vertically oriented windows. The angled walls provide lighting from above and below. The above skylights project in direct sunlight that is then filtered into the rooms with the assistance of the extension of the above angled wall. The windows located at floor level provide indirect light that floods the walls and reflects into the rooms. The front glass facade is shaded by the projections of the angled walls and by the stairs which line the curtain wall. By sinking the structure partially into the ground, program that is more private and does not need as much sunlight, such as the kitchen and bathroom, gain additional privacy.

J

32


Drawings & Models


2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage

J

30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models 2009-2011

36

Project H.O.M.E.

33


Drawings St. Albans Place, Philadelphia


This sketch assignment was focused on St. Albans Place in the Grey’s Ferry neighborhood of Philadelphia, where a central garden divides the corridor between rowhome facades instead of a street. It was a study of threshold comparing how different rowhomes uniquely encountered the issue while maintaining the overall uniformity of the street.

J

34


Models Urban Performance Skate Center


Through an exploration of model making methods, this theater inspired by, and in conjunction with, a public skate park was created. The most detailed model, which showed the mass of the building with interior spaces carved out, was modeled using 102 unique sections at 1’ increments through the building. The final massing model used a simplified amorphous shape modeled and sectioned in Autodesk Rhinoceros. Each models used the laser cutter to cut the thin sheets which were then assembled by hand. The basswood structure model was designed using unique cross sections and longitudinal sections which fit together to represent the location of steel beam and column construction.

J

35


Project H.O.ME. Women of Change Safe Haven


2

[FAMILY] Stasis

8 Ram Van Shelter 13 Garden Cinema 17 Grey’s Ferry Athenaeum 24 Green Home Orphanage 30

Live.Work

33

Drawings/Models

36 Project H.O.M.E. May 2012 DX

J

Duration: 4 months Prof. David Kratzer

36


Project H.O.ME. Transitional Living Booths


Working with Project H.O.M.E. at the Women of Change Safe Haven at 2042 Arch Street in Philadelphia, as a studio we have designed and constructed full scale prototypes. From there we created construction documents which are currently being reviewed and priced by a local steel fabricator. With the help of donations given to Project H.O.M.E., we will construct the 25 sleeping units in the dormitory area which houses chronically homeless, mentally ill women who have no time limit for how long they can reside within the shelter. The Safe Haven is a “wet shelter,� meaning that these women can continue to use alcohol and drugs while living in the shelter. Because of the mental state of these women, and the constantly changing conditions, the units had to be extremely durable not only to physical abuse, but also to bed bugs. This drove the use of metal and plastic to create a safe and hygienic space.

J

37


Justine Tarrant

75 Lockhart St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 tarrant.j35@gmail.com 570|574|9489


Portfolio