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Case Studies: The Study of Typlogies

Justin Boldon Michael Loussinian Desiree Shadi

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Habitat 67 ............................................................................................ 3 - 14 Hancock Lofts ..................................................................................... 15 - 24 Haarlemmer Houttuinen ................................................................ 25 - 36 Tango Housing ................................................................................... 37 - 51 Conclusion ........................................................................................... 52 2


HABITAT 67 3


HABITAT 67 Architect

Moshe Safdie

Date Built Location Unit Size Cost Typology

1967 Montreal, Canada 624 - 3000 ft

$22,195,920 Apartment Building

Units

158

Unit Types

5

Parking Spaces Private Outdoor Space

2

276 225-1000 ft

4

2


5


6


VERTICAL CIRCULATION

CIRCULATION

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN 7


TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

EMERGENCY CIRCULATION

PUBLIC SAFETY

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21’ 16’

16’

21’

16’

21’ 21’

16’

STRUCTURAL ORDERING SYSTEM

21’ 9


NATURAL LIGHTING

VENTILATION

NATURAL LIGHT & VENTILATION 10


UNIT VARIATIONS The apartment complex is composed of several rectangular modules that overlap with one another. Externally, the units have a very similar appearance, giving the complex a consistent and common appeal throughout. The units differ internally, transforming the use and layout of the space.

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11th 5th 10th 4th 9th

3rd

2nd

8th

7th

6th 1st

UNIT DISTRIBUTION 12


MATERIALS Habitat 67 is constructed through the use of prefabricated concrete blocks that are stacked arounda 3 buildding service cores. Each apartment unit was composed of 1 or two of these pre-cast blocks. Precast Reinforced Concrete Pile Foundation Aggregate Facade Exposed Structure

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PRIVATE VS PUBLIC

The receding components of the plan create 3 central courtyard that create open spaces for the public, addressing the urban issues of the site. These spaces also serve as turnarounds for cars and provide access to underground parking.

PRIVATE BALCONY SPACES 14


HANCOCK LOFTS 15


HANCOCK LOFTS Architect

Koning Eizenberg

Date Built Location

2009 West Hollywood, CA

Size

133,476 ft

Rent Cost Per SF

$3.70-4.00

Typology

Mixed-Use Housing

Units

38

Unit Types

9

Parking Spaces Private Outdoor Space

2

217 100-220 ft

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Located at the corner of Hancock Avenue and Santa Monica Boulevard, the Hancock Loft building presents mixed-use housing to a very busy and popular corner of West Hollywood. The project provides an economic mix to the city, encouraging density by offering a variery of diverse unit types and concealing the presence of both the commercial and residential parking. The project originated through the challenge and intent of addressing the parking shortage within the area.

SITE

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The development accomodates 217 parking spaces (156 commercial, 61 residential), 11,600 square feet of retail, 31 condos, and 7 affordable housing rental units. This includes an arrangement of townhouses, affordable studios and flats, creating a diverse range of housing .

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19


MEIER

NEUTRA

1 Bed 1 Bath 2 1,120 ft

2 Bed 2 Bath 2 1,486 ft

GEHRY 2 Bed 2 Bath 2 1,861 ft

HUNT

WRIGHT

1 Bed 1 Bath 2 1,103 ft

1 Bed 1 Bath 2 1,549 ft

GETTY

KOENIG

BECKET

1 Bed 1 Bath 2 1,032 ft

2 Bed 2 Bath 2 1,275 ft

2 Bed 2 Bath 2 1,217 ft

LAUTNER 1 Bed 1 Bath 2 1,199 ft

20 UNIT TYPES


Townhouses

Flats

Townhouses

Townhouses

Flats

Townhouses

Flats

Flats

Affordable Studios

UNIT TYPE DISTRIBUTION

HORIZONTAL & VERTICAL CIRCULATION 21


PARKING

PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION

PEDESTRIAN VS. AUTOMOBILE

PRIVATE RETAIL COMMUNITY

STRUCTURAL GRID 22


The building utilizes different facade types to express itself to the city and traffic. A combination of glass, metal, and Mangaris wood are used to achieve the unique elevation view. These materials are integrated throughout building’s facade to reflect the changes within the types of housing within the structure. 23

MATERIALS


The reapeating arrangement of units establishes a language that allows light to be present at crucial areas of the program while creating an orderly set of apertures that express the appeal of the design throughout the nighttime. The sliding wood screens provide shading from the light while the design of the units takes cross-ventilation into consideration.

LIGHTING

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HAARLEMMER HOUTTUINEN

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PROJECT NAME Haarlemmer Houttuinen ARCHITECT Hertzberger, Van Herk & Nagelkerke DATE BUILT 1988 LOCATION Amsterdam, Neatherlands COST IF KNOWN unknown TYPOLOGY Row Housing PROPERTY DENSITY unknown NUMBER OF UNITS unknown NUMBER OF UINIT TYPES unknown PRIVATE OUTDOOR SPACE unknown PARKING SPACES PER DWELLING UNIT Parallel Parking

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Concept / Idea

As the Haarlemmer Houttuinen sits between a busy road and railway, the linear housing buildings are seperated with a pedestrian street that connects Haarlemmerstraat by gateway buildings. The housing buildings contain projecting piers containing balconies, or terraces, that are treated as a rhythm to the street below. These piers are made strategically to frame the entrances to the four maisonettes as well as support the balconies above. The scheme of having a pedestrian street in the middle of the two rows of buildings targets a different function of the street which is to offer a place to meet and socialize between buildings. This idea exemplifies the streets as being a place that caters more towards pedestrians than the original function; it is meant to be a place where pedestrians can enjoy the protection from a busy street, and vehicular traffic.

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HAARLEMMER HOUTTUINEN

SITE PLAN LOGIC BUILDING PARKING PRIVATE OUTDOOR SPACE PUBLIC COMMUNAL SPACE

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SCALE

The Scale of Haarlemeer Houttenian shares strategic scale compared to its surrounding. The scale of the buildings sit low to the ground to offer maximum lighting into the interior communal space. Moreover, the scale is further achieved by the center tiles and granite use in addition to the tiles. The building itself , as it sits low, is also presenting its scale from its square windows which have a specific rhythm where the natural light is allowed inside along the ceilings by the window heads. Moreover, the systematic lighting design is complimented by the closed window heads to offer intimacy in the design.

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VERTICAL & HORIZONTAL CIRCULATION

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PUBLIC & PRIVATE PUBLIC SPACE PRIVATE SPACE

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1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

34. 35. 36. 37. 38.

6.

39.

7.

8.

9.

10.

40. 41. 42. 43.

11.

12.

13. 14.

15. 16.

44. 45. 19.

18. 17. 31.

20.

21.

22.

32. 46.

47. 48. 49.

LOWER UNIT

23.

24.

25. 26.

50. 51. 52.

27.

28. 29. 30.

53. ** NOTE: EACH NUMBER INCLUDES AT LEAST TWO UNITS, NUMBER OF TOTAL UNITS ARE UNKNOWN BASED ON RESEARCH

UPPER UNIT

2.

UNIT ANALYSIS

1.

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12’

8’

10’

PEDESTRIAN & BIKE PATHS

18’

18’

AUTOMOBILE PATHS

PEDESTRIAN & AUTOMOBILE RELATIONSHIP

STRUCTURAL ORDERING SYSTEM

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VENTILATION EXIT ROUTE

HUMAN SAFETY

NATURAL LIGHT

NATURAL LIGHT & VENTILATION

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MATERIALS

The materials used in the Haarlemeer Houttuinen shares similar materials to other housing projects in Amsterdam. Its brick build combined with outdoor balconies offer a systematic look when placed in row typology. Other materials in the project include tiles and granite pads in the center courtyard spaces as well as bay windows made from plastic that is appropriate for this specific project.

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Tango Housing 37


Project Name Tango Housing Project Architect MOORE RUBLE YUDELL ARCHITECTS Date built 2001 Location: city and country Malmo, Sweden Typology Towers Project Density– dwelling units per acre 67.5 Number of units 27 Number of unit types 27 Parking spaces per dwelling unit No parking for cars, only bikes

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39


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The Tango Housing project is divided into eight tower like masses which appear to stand out from the rest of the building, even though they are all connected together. These towers all face the interior courtyard, called “the yard,� which allows for all balconies to borrow space from this area. It also allows an abundance of light shine into the building. A prominent feature of this project is the cold coloring of this towers- each one is colored differently.

Concept

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Pedestrian access Private outdoor space Tango Housing Building

Site Plan

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In comparison to the projects surrounding it, the scale of the Tango Housing units is very similar in size.

Scale

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The circulation in this project occurs in a vertical manner. There are separate stairways and elevators for each of the towers. There are very minimal hallways leading from one front door to another, there is almost none. There are no more than three front doors in a hallway, and those doors are very close to one another. More vertical circulation occurs within each of the two story units. Some of the units have a lofted second story, with stairs leading up to it.

Circulation

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Private Semi-Private Public

Public/Private

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One story unit Two story unit

Unit Analysis

*No floor plans are repeated throughout the project.

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There is no on-site parking nor vehicular paths in the Tango Housing project. There is, however, bike parking underground. Being located in Sweden, there is only pedestrian access from the street into the site. each individual tower also has its own pedestrian path for access from the sidewalk, to the indoors, and to the courtyard.

Pedestrian and Vehicular Relationships

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The perimeter of the building is composed of ribbed precast panels. On the roof, there are solar energy panels which can also provide heating and cooling for the building. Additionally, roof surfaces are covered with grass to restore oxygen to the atmosphere. The architects added vibrant colored materials to different parts of the building. There is also a strong use of glass on the portions of the building facing the yard to also light in and to make the interior spaces seem bigger than they are.

Materials

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36 ft

12 ft

Structural Ordering System

40 ft

52 ft

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Human Safety

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Ventillation and Light

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Each of these projects took on a different aspect of livability as well as addressing different challenges of housing. In all these typologies (row, block, and tower) the architects took a fairly high density approach. Additionally, there is a repetition in the units and the stacking of units in all four projects, however, the term repetition is understood differently in each project; there is meaning in each variation within the repeating units. When looking at the Tango Housing floor plans, at a glance, all units seem to be identical. Once further studied, it is noted that not one of the unit plans are repeated. In the Hancock Lofts and Tango Housing, the units are mostly stacked on top of one another. The Haarlemmer Houttuinen has slightly more variation when going from the ground floor to upper levels. Habitat 67, on the other hand, uses clear repetition of unit modules, however, the stacking method used is not traditional, rather stacked in a strategic way based on the modules where it does not align on top of one another. However, a lot of the differences between these projects revolve around their location and context. The Hancock Lofts in West Hollywood provide a parking lot for their residents, considering most of them drive their own cars. The Tango housing in Sweden does not have a parking lot for vehicles. It is less likely for people, living in Malmo, Sweden, to have their own cars. Haarlemmer Houttuinen in Amsterdam has parallel parking on the street. This issue of parking shows that it parking is understood differently depending on its location of the project. In regards to the building’s relation to the street, the Hancock Lofts have a similar approach as the Haarlemmer Houttuinen. These projects both built their buildings close to the sidewalk, which could be a method to hide their parking in the rear. In contrast, the Tango Housing and Habitat 67 both create a courtyard or landscaped area at the front near the sidewalk, which is an approach to integrate the site’s context with the project.

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Profile for Justin Boldon

The Study of Typologies  

The Study of Typologies  

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