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JUSTIN BANDA

GRADUATE PORTFOLIO 2017


CONTENTS CURRICULUM VITAE Background 04 AUTOMATA The Kanye West Gallery 08 BABEL Kaira Looro Senegalese Worship Competition 20 MORPHOSES Gowanus: From Resilience to Sustainability 24 BEACON Mathare Community Outreach School 34 FLUX Chi-Design Competition Entry 40 HIVE Elgin Tower Revitalization Project 42 CONNECT Non-Denominational Relocation Project 48 BIOSHELL Eli Whitney Elementary School Expansion 54 SENTINEL Kane County Ecological Center 58 HEX World Vision Disaster Relief Shelter 62 SERPENTINE Sit/Set Furniture Design Project 66 BUBBLE Everyday Carry Product Design 68 ILLUMINATE Installation, AIAS Fabricate 2015 76 OBELISK Interpretative Light-Masking Exercise 72 SIMULACRA Dimensional Compositional Exercise 78 BONES Interdimensional Form Constructs 80 SKETCHBOOK From Reality to Page 82


Justin Banda Education

219.776.9267 justinjaybanda@gmail.com

justinbanda.us

364 Algona Ave Elgin, IL 60120

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE JUDSON UNIVERSITY ELGIN, IL 2016 - 2017 3.8 GPA Concentration in Sustainable Design EUROPE STUDY TOUR JUDSON UNIVERSITY ELGIN, IL 2014 4.0 GPA Two month study-abroad program BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE JUDSON UNIVERSITY ELGIN, IL 2011 - 2015 3.2 GPA SUMMER ACADEMY IN ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN AUSTIN, TX 2010 Two month intensive-immersion program

EMPLOYMENT

LEGAT ARCHITECTS CHICAGO, IL Project Associate May 2017 - Present Responsibilities: Assists with product coordination from design development through contract administration. Participates in project planning, coordination, and delivery, as well as in the preparation of construction documents, and conducts on-site observations and reports.

JUDSON UNIVERSITY ELGIN, IL Graduate Teaching Assistant August 2016 - May 2017 Responsibilities: Worked as a TA for two undergraduate classes: junior-level Digital Tools,

and freshman-level Design Studio. Assisted the Digital Tools professor with class registry and headcounts each class, and taught class on several occasions in her absence. Taught AutoCAD, Revit, and Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign to students. Held informal office hours where students could ask follow-up questions and learn extra tools and tricks.

CHIPMAN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE DES PLAINES, IL Architectural Intern May 2015 - October 2016 Responsibilities: Created Revit models for the creation of construction documents and

technical drawings and worked within a Revit worksharing network. Corrected redlined drawings and created specification sheets in both Revit and AutoCAD. Interfaced directly with clients in order to produce cost-effective design solutions. Hosted product representatives for small presentations and line updates. Performed code and zoning research for corporate clients, as well as calls to building departments and local municipalities.

ASSOCIATION OF LICENSED ARCHITECTS PALATINE, IL Marketing Intern December 2014 - March 2015 Responsibilities: Assisted the ALA with Young Architect (YA) initiatives and helped compile

a database of contacts within the emerging professional community. I designed and created marketing materials, posters, and email blasts for members. I also created and managed the YA Facebook page and suggested technical improvements for the ALA website.

DH2W, Inc. MICHIGAN CITY, IN Architectural Intern May 2013 - August 2013 Responsibilities: Converted drafting files from DataCAD to AutoCAD and SketchUp, created

basic plans, elevations, and sections. Created renderings in Podium. Assisted with site visits and measuring trips, and assisted in client meetings and served as reference for code citations.

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AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS ASSOCIATE MEMBER CHICAGO, IL CONGRESS FOR NEW URBANISM IL CHAPTER CHICAGO, IL

INVOLVEMENT

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS JUDSON AIAS ELGIN, IL 2016 - 2017 Graduate Representative | 2013 -2015 Director of Communications BUILDING PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS CERTIFIED [BPAC] AUTODESK Public Speaking Pecha Kucha Infographics ∙ Layout Graphic Design Digital Rendering Studio Watercolor Photography Field Watercolor Hand Rendering Model-Making ARCHITECTURAL Autodesk Revit 2013+ High Autodesk AutoCAD 2011+ High Rhinoceros 5 (Windows and Mac) High Trimble SketchUp 8+ High RENDERING Autodesk Revit Cloud Render High Cadalog SU Podium Render High Twilight Render Med VRay for SketchUp Low Autodesk 3DS Max Low

High High High High High High High Med Med Low

POST-PROCESSING Adobe Photoshop CS5+ High Adobe Illustrator CS5+ High Adobe InDesign CS5+ High Adobe Lightroom CS5+ High Adobe After Effects CC+ Med Adobe Bridge CS5+ Med PARAMETRICS T-Splines for Rhino High Grasshopper for Rhino 5 Med Dynamo for Revit Low

THE COMMON YEAR VOLUME 2 CONTRIBUTOR Published January 2018

Collected by Ian Simkins

THE COMMON YEAR CONTRIBUTOR Published January 2017

Collected by Ian Simkins

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CERTIFICATIONS SKILLS

SOFTWARE

PUBLICATIONS


Justin Banda HONORS

219.776.9267 justinjaybanda@gmail.com

justinbanda.us

364 Algona Ave Elgin, IL 60120

BEST IN ARCHITECTURE 2017 SOADA JURIED STUDENT EXHIBITION May 2017

Each year, the faculty of the JudsonU nominate the student works that best exemplify the gold standard for academic achievement in the School of Art, Design, and Architecture. This year’s guest juror was Jim Dunigan, an Associate Professor and the Program Director of Visual Art Education in the College of Education at DePaul University. He is also the founder of the Stockyard Institute. For the 2016-17 academic year, Justin Banda’s capstone graduate studio project, “The West Gallery,” took home the top prize in architecture.

HONORABLE MENTION 2017 SOADA JURIED STUDENT EXHIBITION May 2017

At the same event, the academic committee, staff, and faculty also awarded the Fall 2016 Urbanism Graduate Studio with their first-ever bestowal of the Honorable Mention Award, to Justin Banda, Kay Havlicek, Tyler Hopwood, Marvin Reyes, Tyler Wade, and Andrew Witek for their collective work in studying the environmental and socioeconomic repercussions of the ongoing environmental disaster in Gowanus, Brooklyn, New York.

SoADA PROFESSIONAL PROMISE AWARD JUDSON UNIVERSITY May 2017

The Judson University School of Art, Design, and Architecture faculty nominate best-in-class students annually with recognition prior to graduation. The department chair confers 19 different awards and recognitions including the undergraduate professional promise award, bestowed upon the student whom the chair feels best exemplifies professional preparedness.

ACADEMIC CHARTER AWARD CONGRESS FOR NEW URBANISM-IL December 2016

Each year, CNU-IL awards projects and people that best fulfill and advocate the restructuring of public policy and development practices to support neighborhood diversity in use and population, and designed communities made for pedestrians and public transit.

SoADA PROFESSIONAL PROMISE AWARD JUDSON UNIVERSITY May 2015

The Judson University School of Art, Design, and Architecture faculty nominate best-in-class students annually with recognition prior to graduation. The department chair confers 19 different awards and recognitions including the undergraduate professional promise award, bestowed upon the student whom the chair feels best exemplifies professional preparedness.

SHOWCASE SELECTION HOUZZ + AIA FUTURE OF RESIDENTIAL DESIGN December 2014

The Houzz+AIA Future of Architecture Residential Design Contest and Showcase is an architecture contest and showcase program designed to enable emerging architects to visually and directly engage tens of millions of people - from future clients to design enthusiasts to residential design and construction professionals - across the country and around the world. The work by the Judson University sophomore design studio on disaster relief housing was selected for the showcase.

AIA LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE GRADUATE AIA ILLINOIS August 2014

The biennial AIA Illinois Leadership Institute is a day-long event convening emerging Leaders for a professional development event focused on empowerment training as part of a major call for civic engagement between architects and Illinois communities. Attendees are invited to attend after a nomination process.

NTMA CHARETTE AIAS FORUM December 2013

Participated in and won a design charrette held by the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) and the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association at AIAS FORUM in Chicago, IL. The winning team consisted of Justin Banda, Josh Tindall, and Lan C. Lee.

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BETWEEN STATES CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION September 2017

Exhibitions

Legat Architects was one of fifty Chicago firms invited to participate in a competition hosted by UrbanLabs and the Chicago Architecture Foundation in honor of the second Chicago Architecture Biennial. The competition asked firms to explore Chicago’s fifty wards and propose an infrastructural, architectural, or social solution to an existing problem. The project team was comprised of Loren Johnson, Justin Banda, Vuk Vujovic, Ted Haug, and Evan Menk.

THE WEST GALLERY DRAEWELL GALLERY, JUDSON UNIVERSITY May 2017

A selection from Justin Banda’s capstone graduate studio project, “The West Gallery,” was chosen for display at the 2017 Juried Student Exhibition in the Draewell Gallery at Judson Univeristy. The project later won the “Best in Architecture” award.

GOWANUS: FROM RESILIENCE TO SUSTAINABILITY DRAEWELL GALLERY May 2017

A selection from the fall 2016 graduate studio project, “Gowanus: From Resilience to Sustainability,” was chosen for display at the 2017 Juried Student Exhibition in the Draewell Gallery at Judson Univeristy. The project later won the inaugural “Honorable Mention” award.

ARC381 EUROPE SKETCHBOOK BOWTIE GALLERY, JUDSON UNIVERSITY September 2014

Selections from the School of Art, Design, and Architecture’s ARC381 Europe Study Tour class were chosen for display in the Judson University Bowtie Gallery, to demonstrate the quality of student hand-sketching work and the merits of the program. Justin Banda’s sketchbook was one of four books of student work chosen to be displayed in their entirety,

2013 WORLD VISION SHELTER COMPETITION JOHN BROWN UNIVERSITY April 2013

The Judson University sophomore design studio presented a full-scale model of their HEX disaster relief and housing shelter at John Brown University. The students, along with engineering students from other programs, tested their various full-scale models against gale-force fans, an earthquake simulator, and livability factors. The HEX was on display for four days.

KEELAN KAISER CALIFORNIA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY Graduate Advisor/Professor

kkaiser@judsonu.edu 847-826-0807

JAY MIRANDA CHIPMAN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE Principal/Supervisor

jmiranda@chipman-design.com 847-298-6900

IAN HOFFMAN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Undergraduate Advisor/Mentor ihoffman@jhu.edu 224-717-0757

JOEL KERNER ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL Graduate Technical Instructor joelkerner@gmail.com

STACIE BURTELSON JUDSON UNIVERSITY Graduate Teaching Assistant Supervisor

sburtelson@judsonu.edu 847-628-1022

DAVID MWALE OGOLI JUDSON UNIVERSITY Chair, Department of Architecture

dogoli@judsonu.edu 847-628-1018

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ENDORSEMENTS


AUTOMATA

THE KANYE WEST GALLERY SPRING 2017 ∙ GRADUATE SUSTAINABILITY STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR KEELAN KAISER, AIA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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AUTOMATA represents the final studio project made towards my graduate studies in the pursuit of my M.Arch degree, and as a result I was given the freedom to explore topics of interest to me within the confines of academic research, and the framing device of a museum or gallery set somewhere in the city of Chicago.

of information filtered through chaos. In much the same way, Kanye’s music is about overload— verbally, lyrically, politically, economically, religiously— so it would seem apropos that his gallery would function the same way. In his turn of the century novel “The Jungle,” Upton Sinclair described Fulton Market’s meatpacking warehouses as a chaotic landscape of sensory overload.

The decision to make Kanye West the focus of a Chicago-based museum in the Fulton Market district in the West Loop is a creative decision made simple by virtue of his larger-than-life presence, which originated in Chicago.

The resulting architectural composition creates layers of information filtered through chaotic arrays. By drawing from the distortion and frenzy of the neighborhood’s history as well as the dissonant music of Kanye himself, I attempted to form a sterile framing From an architectural standpoint, the other major draw device— in this case, the resulting obelisk— to process is the site of Fulton Market itself, which has a historically this new landmark and point of reference. From a violent background. AUTOMATA is an attempt to design standpoint, the building attempts to process capture the feeling of sensory overload from the site, multiple nodes and touchstones to form a machine by blocking out the city as a whole, then focusing and understanding, wrapped around a core of vulnerability., zooming in on multiple, autonomous points, layers represented by the glowing winter garden rising above.

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CUBE ROTATE 10° PUSH PULL

ROTATE 15° INSERT NOTCH PUNCTURE ACTIVATE

ABOVE The formal evolution of the concept as a monolithic object that punctures with views to the city. BELOW Two conceptual compositions that triangulate the site and inform the multinodal strategy. That heart and attempt at architectural vulnerability— the animus of the machine— drew inspiration and guidance from external sources, as well. Sekou Cooke, an assistant professor of architecture at Syracuse University, argues that hip-hop architecture is an imminent cultural movement that has been simmering for the better part of two decades.

distinction is, in many and fundamental ways, about the disruption and interruption of the capacity to breathe in the flesh,” while Katherine McKittrick writes in her examination of blackness Demonic Grounds that “black matters are spatial matters.” While this gallery originated as a simple architectural tribute to a prominent artist from Chicago, the themes that kept recurring in and around Kanye’s life and work, like racial profiling, police brutality, and the black experience as it relates to the city of Chicago, all burst to the forefront of the project. This led to the 9th and 10th levels being reimagined from museum and gallery spaces into youth outreach and educational spaces, specifically for the Donda Foundation’s use.

In his symposium, Cooke cites Craig Wilkins from the University of Michigan, who argues that spaces are designed either for inclusion or exclusion, otherness, and the potential for “hip-hop architecture” to be inclusive to underrepresented groups, while Ashton T. Crawley writes in his book Blackpentecostal Breath that “racial categorization and distinction is but one way to think of the world, one way to consider organizing, and racial categorization and

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WINTER GARDEN

DONDA FOUNDATION

OUTREAC H ZONE 9F-10F / DONDA FOUNDATION + WINTER GARDEN

GALLERIES

GALLERY ZONE 5F - 8F / GIFT SHOP + GALLERIES GIFT SHOP

ADMI NIS TRATIVE ZO NE 3F - 4F / OFFICES OFFICES

C ON C E RT ZONE 1F - 2F / LOBBY + AUDITORIUM AUDITORIUM

ABOVE The programmatic breakdown showing the building’s multiuse function employed via cutaway. MIDDLE The sustainability strategies employed included nightflushing, thermal mass, and passive solar. BELOW The outreach strategies intended to create an equitable, accessible space for the entire city. RIGHT A map showing the racial breakdown of the West Loop neighborhood. WHITE / CAUCASIAN

N IGHTFLUSHING OVERSIZED CORE + DEEP FLOOR PLATES

BLACK / AFRICAN-AMERICAN ASIAN-AMERICAN HISPANIC / LATINO

PASSIVE SO L AR OR IE NTATI ON WINDOW PLACEMENT + FREQUENCY + ORIENTATION

OTHER

G R EE N PL AZ A SHADED RAMPED GATHERING SPACE + VEGETATION

T HERMAL MASS SUBTERRANEAN VENTILATION MAZE

OUTREAC H NEW HEADQUARTERS FOR THE DONDA FOUNDATION

VIEWS TO THE LOOP TELESCOPING WINDOWS WITH FRAMED VIEWS OF CHICAGO

EQUITABLE INCLUSIONARY SPACES THAT WELCOME RATHER THAN EXCLUDE

ACCES SIB LE CTA / L-ACCESS [GREEN + PINK LINES]

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ABOVE A rendered site satellite image showing a bird’s eye view of the site, including I-90/94 below. BELOW Various site diagrams showing highway access, Divvy stations, “L” lines and stations, CTA stops, and POIs.

DIVVY STATION DES PLAINES + RANDOLPH

INTERSTATE 90/94 WEST/EAST DIVVY STATION DES PLAINES + KINZIE

PINK LINE EL

GREEN LINE EL

THE PARKER APARTMENTS

CARNIVALE RESTAURANT

MOMOTARO RESTAURANT

740 W FULTON APARTMENTS

THE PUBLICAN RESTAURANT THE MID NIGHTCLUB

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EAST

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ABOVE Wind and solar studies done on the site. Further research (not shown) included a full Sefaira study. BELOW The west and north elevations of the building, showing both window punctures and the video wall.

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Kathleen M. Kirby writes in Indifferent Boundaries that “Space, and where we are in it, determines a large portion of our status as subjects, and obversely, the kinds of subjects we are largely dictates our degree of mobility and our possible future locations.” This gallery is an attempt to reconstruct the experience of black artists in Chicago, and create an equitable space that empowers inhabitants to create transformative art.

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There are three primary sustainability drivers: nightflushing, using a combination of subterranean ventilation mazes and underground thermal mass; a green plaza for gathering and events that takes up roughly 2/3rds of the site, and direct solar orientation and gain tactics that shield the building’s interior from overpowering east and west sunlight.

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The program is tightly divided into four distinct zones, meant for as many uses: the concert zone on the first and second levels for events and community engagement; the administrative zone on the third and fourth floors for offices; the gallery zones on the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth levels, for museum-type areas; and an outreach zone on the ninth and tenth levels for the Donda Foundation and special exhibits.

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OPPOSITE PAGE The ten building floor plans, showing core location, egress, structural grid, program layout, water lines, and inaccessible/open-to-above spaces. LEFT The first two stories of the building, showing parking access, delivery/shipping access, bike storage, the auditorium, and the lobby. BELOW A section perspective of the interior, showing the intersection of architecture with the programming’s social engineering and the art of Kanye West.

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ABOVE Exploded axonometric drawings of the southwest corner (left) and the northeast corner (right). BELOW A section perspective showing a cutaway of the building, including the winter garden glass-box detailing. OPPOSITE A complete section of the building, showing the subterranean nature of the frst floor, as well as the complete parking garage and massive sloping green plaza.Above and below depict various construction details.

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BABEL

KAIRA LOORO SENEGALESE WORSHIP COMPETITION SPRING 2017 ∙ INDEPENDENT COMPETITION ∙ TEAM LEAD JUSTIN BANDA [TEAM PROJECT: LEAD DESIGNER, TEAM LEADER]

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The Kaira Looro project, sponsored in part by the Italian relief organization Balouo Salo, seeks to impart a similar divine blessing, etched in permanent architectures, onto the arid Senegalese landscape of the Tanaf Valley, some forty miles west of the Atlantic Ocean. In this context, “kaira looro” is not mere architecture, but rather the expressed blessing of a culture and the spirituality of interiority. The Kaira Looro project seeks to celebrate this philosophy by designing a sustainable and vernacularly-sympathetic worship space for the Tanaf Valley, in a place of scarcity.

expression of Senegalese spirituality, that can serve as a symbol of union between the mundane and divine.

This project is an exercise in scarcity, meaning that both land and resources are stretched thin. The site itself is bound to a single 61’x60’ SF lot in the center of town, while the height is capped at 50’, though extant local buildings do not exceed 20’. Balouo Saolo recommends that the materials remain lowtech and water-independent, and requests that the worship space be able to accommodate worshippers of all faiths, including the majority Muslim population The goal is to design a new multifaith worship hub and minority Christian, Orthodox Christian, and local that also serves as both a new landmark and a graceful animist worshippers.

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The design uses 35 corten steel panels, lightly rusted to resemble the red laterite soil of the Tanaf Valley. Each panel is equal in profile yet each is hollowed out differently, to form a series of hollowed-out spaces that represent the separate yet equal types of worship ongoing in the space.

characteristics. Using local earth-berming techniques, the panels are driven into the earth and angled at 12° to “push” worshippers forward to the eastern-facing prayer wall.

The program is divided into three primary spaces: a squatter, wider primary worship hall; a narrower, taller The worship hall is simple given the scarcity of the secondary worship space, and an ancillary gathering or context. Drawing material inspiration from the local meeting space. As a mosque, the twin parallel spaces landscape, it uses the 35 corten panels measuring can serve as either men’s and women’s prayer halls, roughly 12 by 30 meters in profile, braces with HSS divided yet together, or the neighboring worship space beams and inlaid with intricate metal screening panels, can serve as a Christian or animistic meditation, prayer, to create a layered space with exquisite yet simple light or gathering hall. OPPOSITE The new space offers unique cultural and light characteristics that inspire both solitude and equality. ABOVE The effect of the panels to a passer-by is that of a book with the pages flipping open.

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MORPHOSES

GOWANUS FROM RESILIENCE TO SUSTAINABILITY FALL 2016 ∙ ADVANCED URBANISM STUDIO ∙ DR CHRISTOPHER MILLER, Ph.D [TEAM PROJECT: COMMERCIAL TRANSIT DISTRICT DESIGNER; RENDERER]

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Gowanus is a neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York, which was established surrounding a 1.8 mile long canal which gave the area its name and empties into New York Harbor.

A large portion of Gowanus exists within the IBZ, the Industrial Business Zone. Set up in 2006 in 16 NYC neighborhoods, the IBZ was established to protect manufacturing and industrial jobs citywide.

The Canal was used in the 20th century as an industrial transportation route and dumping ground, creating an ecological disaster that remains one of the U.S.’s most severely contaminated body of water. In 2010, the EPA declared the Canal a superfund site, and cleanup began just this past September. The community is concerned that developers will purchase decontaminated waterfront property to gentrify industrial areas for residential use.

In 2013 the Gowanus community came together to form an organization called Bridging Gowanus, which outlined six community priorities for the neighborhood’s future, that eventually became the groundwork for our urban response in three areas: the residential narrative, the transit-oriented development narrative, and the IBZ narrative. Our team approached the canal itself as the primary feature, turning most of our developments to face the water.

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+

1.Connecting C

Streets

+

1.3 Surrounding N Neighborhoods

+

=

1.Industrial I Business Zone

1. Subway Lines L to Gowanus

1. C

C

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Existing Zoning anu ac u ing Manufacturing Zoning ning

1.1 G

e i en ial Residential Zoning ning

C

EGI NAL ANAL

n n Downtown Zoning ning

I

PREVIOUS PAGE A view of the new 9th / Smith MTA station at the end of the canal TOP Gowanus is located in western Brooklyn, about forty minutes southeast of Manhattan. RIGHT The proposed master plan highlights the canal as a feature, turning the morphology to face the water.

Noted on the graphic above is the project area, which includes the extents of Gowanus and a small portion of Red Hook in the southwest. Note that the existing lots bordering the Canal were rezoned in the 1940s and 50s to break the residential fabric to make way for indsutry. After the industry’s exodus, the contaminated canal was left behind, creating vast swaths of non- or underutilized lots.

while adhering to strict type definitions. New York’s current employment of use-based zoning has resulted in the heavily-segregated building types you can see above. A negative byproduct of use-based zoning is that it unnaturally mandates lots into specific types without consideration for the urban fabric.

On the right, we implemented a form-based code, The guiding element to our mature plan was to embrace restoring the torn urban fabric and creating a the newly-cleaned canal by placing a series of nodes comprehensive, sustainable walking path centered of public spaces and buildings, strung along the Canal around six nodes along the canal. We attempted in a continuous path. We employed a new form-based to incorporate all six of Bridging Gowanus’s goals code, based on existing building types in Gowanus and throughout the plan, incorporating a beautiful riverwalk neighboring areas, to guide development and infill that jumps the canal in several locations. 26


Head of Canal Head of Canal

Market Market Center Center

Arts District Arts District

Industrial Industrial District District North North

Transit TransitOriented Oriented Development Development

Commercial Transit Transit District District

3.1

MAKING PLACE: Shaping The Public Space

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4th Avenue TH A

DA 3rd Avenue

Nevins Street T 2nd Avenue

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Bond Street

Hoyt Street

Smith Street

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C T6 .Urban Center . . T.O.D. NION T Union Street

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Civic/Institutional Buildings Special i ic llege a pu Special District: College Campus i ic n i u i nal ea u e uil ing

: Special District I Industrial Zone

AN EC

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Waterfront Park . P G Green Space Waterfront Plaza . P Square

.3 C Covered Promenade P

Esplanade . E

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CANAL C NNEC I N : Public Space T pe

Curbless Street . C

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Pioneer Plan

Existing Population Density

Intermediate Plan

29

Mature Plan

Proposed Population Density


Head of Canal Historic Pump House : Community Center and i ic PuPublic p uPark e Redeveloped uni en e an Ceremonial Plaza e e el pe Public Pa Interactive Water Feature .1

e e nial Pla a an n e ac i e a e ea u e

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e i en ial l ng he anal

.3 Arts District A Historic Renovated “Batcave� : Artist Lofts and Educational Facilities The hi ic a ca e Basin Re-opened Flood-Preventing

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30


.1Industrial District North I Multi-Purpose Park and Pavilion NIndustrial District Revitalized New Home for Gowanus : Conservancy

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. Transit-Oriented Development Inclusionary Housing (Varying Density) : Education Center featuring Library, nclu i na u ing a i u en i ie Music, and Elementary School uca i n en e i h ib a Curbless Street

u ic an

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.3 Commercial C Transit District Redeveloped Transit Station Commercial Transit Retail Center T an i S a i n High-Density Mixed-Use Housing e cial T an i en e Satellite MetroTech Campus

igh en i i e e Sa ili e Tech a pu

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COMMERCIAL The new transit model is geared towards young urban professionals who live in the neighborhood and either work in Brooklyn or commute to Manhattan.

TRAFFIC Placed at a difficult crossing, the new station circumvents the tight intersection by bending back away from the corner and instead leaving space for a green plaza.

WORK The bridges formed near the transit center create new pedestrian nodes for increased walkability as well as a needed separation between walkers and drivers, while maintaining a multilevel field of view that slowly reveals the New York skyline. 32


RESIDENTIAL Part of the process was to design cheap workforce housing for the workforceage middle-class (roughly 21 to 50), for whom Manhattan would be too expensive. The designed solution adheres to New Urbanist principles of height, scale, and walkability.

INDUSTRIAL Part of the Bridging Gowanus neighborhood association’s goals were to maintain Gowanus’s current level of industrial warehouse and mixed-use space-- to that end, the new IBZ features exactly that, providing work for nearby Millennial residents.

ICON As new construction in a competitive Brooklyn district, the new station functions as both a visual callback to Calatrava’s Oculus (which the ‘F’ and ‘G’ lines it houses connects to), as well as a new icon for Brooklyn and the highway just to the south. 33


BEACON

MATHARE COMMUNITY OUTREACH SCHOOL SUMMER 2016 ∙ GRADUATE OUTREACH STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR KEELAN KAISER, AIA [TEAM PROJECT; LEAD DESIGN; RENDERING; CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS]

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The Mathare Valley is a slum on the outskirts of Nairobi, capital city of Kenya on the African continent. It is also one of the most densely-packed placed locations on planet earth. Home to over 800,000 residents packed into less than 1 square kilometer, the Mathare Valley is divided into six sub-regions; slums where the rule of law holds no sway and an estimated 1 in 3 adults is HIVpositive.

their meager means. Our task as designers was to design a net-zero school that could function off the grid, and could accommodate two elementary education tracks. Our building aims to be both protective and proactive, and in doing so become a beacon of hope in the desperate Mathare Valley. Our goal was to create a secure space that put the computer lab and library elements out of the reach and visibility of passers-by for security reasons; offer students unprecedented views of the Mathare Valley and of Nairobi proper; and lastly, to create a sense of openness from inside while carefully guarding the internals of the building from outside.

Without public infrastructure basics like running water, roads, or electricity, life in the slums is bleak. Mathare Community Outreach is an organization trying to pull as many children off the streets and into a regular school cycle as it can manage, and they have already outgrown

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The structure of our building is fairly simple: cast-inplace concrete slabs rest on top of 18”x22” concrete beams, and 12”x12” columns reinforced with rebar. Local quarried stone in 200mm and 400m dimensions in lls the spaces between the columns. The stair core is exposed to the elements on both sides of the building, and is made of steel. Wooden louvers block sightlines to the stair from the exterior, although these are not structure. The roof is supported by 2x wooden beams set 4’ apart from each other, and is made of clay tiles. The roof supports the weight of the clay tiles, as well as solar photovoltaics.

the thickness of the exterior wall (400mm vs 200mm). The exterior wall acts as a light and wind buffer, while the interior functions as a calculated release of light and air pressure. The large, colorful viewing windows telescope light into the rooms in which they appear, and the metal ashing draws heat, which increases pressure inside the rooms, assisting with natural ventilation.

The east walls are designed to absorb direct sunlight with a porous face, and then allow the heat to dissipate inside the gap between walls. This keeps the classroom The inside wall is made of a local quarried stone at twice interior cool and diffusely daylit at all times of the year. 36


ABOVE The proposed BEACON building would be one of the tallest buildings in the Mathare slum, when complete. BELOW The design process emphasized security at the ground level and openness for ventilation higher up.

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A

B

C

A

D

B

C

D

1

1 STORAGE A 27 BABYCLASS 21

Redundant Room

STAGING 19 664 SF

KITCHEN 20

STANDARD 40

370 SF

STANDARD 55

528 SF

Redundant Room

630 SF

BABYCLASS 24 314 SF

2

2

STORAGE B 61 Redundant Room

NURSERY 23

STANDARD 57

PREUNIT 25

324 SF

656 SF

313 SF

3

3

NURSERY 22 PREUNIT 26

325 SF

4

4

312 SF

658 SF

TEACHERS LOUNGE 29 346 SF

BOYS 64

GIRLS 28

115 SF

116 SF

STANDARD 56

STANDARD 39

ADMIN 31

BOYS 67

GIRLS 62

116 SF

116 SF

608 SF

302 SF

TOILET 65 46 SF

5

5

To capture the maximum amount of wind, our mass forms a wall on the west side that forces the wind into either the courtyard or chases. The east and north walls are heavily porous, and allow maximum ventilation through the classrooms into the courtyard.

neighboring building, forms a perfect reflective surface for diffused light. The courtyard and stair cores are wide-open, while interior walls are shaded using an advanced dual-wall system. This allows light to scatter once inside, and for high-quality interior light while still providing security.

The west wall, sandwiched between chases and a

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ABOVE The classrooms are well-lit, thanks to an innovative double-wall design, high ceilings, and large windows. BELOW The open-air multi-level courtyard maximizes daylight and natural ventilation.

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FLUX

CHI-DESIGN CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION COMPETITION FALL 2015 ∙ CHIPMAN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE ∙ TEAM LEAD DIANE KONECKY, IIDA [TEAM PROJECT; LEAD DESIGNER]

In August of 2015 the Chicago Architecture Foundation released a call for entries for the design of a new midrise tower in the south loop of downtown Chicago. The new tower’s program included new offices for the CAF, as well as a new magnet school specializing in STEM education. Other program requirements included gallery space and a room from which to view the CAF’s famous 3D-printed model of the city of Chicago.

The Flux tower is designed as a blooming gem for the city, inspired by the traditional Chinese finger-trap toy, meant to evoke the imagery of motion. The word “Flux” is defined as “The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as of a flowing stream.” The tower twists upward, blossoming from an oval flared base to a larger oval that expands the square footage, before closing in an elegant circle that results in a rooftop winter garden and event space.

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HIVE

ELGIN TOWER REVITALIZATION PROJECT SPRING 2015 ∙ SENIOR DESIGN STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR SEAN GALLAGHER, AIA, ALA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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The Elgin Tower Building, currently the icon of the city in both literal and metaphorical senses, was originally constructed to house a bank and several offices. Since it opened it’s doors in 1930, the Elgin Tower has seen dozens of tenants filter in and out, most rarely staying for longer than a few years. Currently, the Elgin Tower is completely blocked o from the rest of the city by a chain- link fence and warning signs; it has sat vacant for the past two years, undergoing a seemingly endless cycle of construction and repair. Unfortunately, the Elgin Tower never quite reached the heights it was intended to inspire.

level retail, a fitness center, leasable office spaces, and residential units of varying sizes.

For my interpretation of the project parameters, I explored various precedents both in biology and in postmodern architecture. In particular, what struck me the most about the project was to explore the image of the city as a hive of activity: people living, working, and playing at various levels of the tower in a cohesive addition to a relatively inactive existing condition. My goal was to restore a sense of urgency and pride in Elgin’s residents by offering a cultural landmark for the future while acknowledging To that end, and to restore to Elgin a piece of her history, the towers Elgin has lost. To that end, I believe the HIVE the Judson University ARC452 studio bypass. has set TOWER is a battery in a static landscape, a solution to about exploring various options to return the site of a problem Elgin has forgotten it has. HIVE is a line in the the Elgin Tower Building into an economic, cultural, and sand between the past and the future, linking the two residential powerhouse, with programming elements towers across time in a dramatic attempt to re-envision such as a small theater, a conference center, street- the city of Elgin and all it could become.

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44


AIA Illinois Office 2547 SF

Mechanical 2429 SF

Fitness Center 3725 SF

LEFT The conceptual process I went through in Rhino to envision the tower’s unique fluctuating hexagonal shape. ABOVE The first two stories feature a state-of-the-art retail center, while upper levels have smaller footprints. BELOW (L) The residential floors are protected from direct light by the hexagrid structure’s aluminum screens. BELOW (R) An early 3D printed model of the tower I made about midway through the design process.

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ABOVE The HIVE was designed to be seen from miles away, like a lighthouse at night. BELOW A detailed look at the unique hexagrid structure via section cut.

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ABOVE The tower’s apartments are each unique, but feature incredible views of northwest Illinois. BELOW (L) A diagram showing every single floorplate used in the tower. BELOW (M) An example of the planned HVAC system, from the tower’s core to individual apartments.

LEVEL 38 - ROOF - 520’ LEVEL 37 - WINTER GARDEN - 504’ LEVEL 36 - RESIDENTIAL - 490’ LEVEL 35 - RESIDENTIAL - 476’ LEVEL 34 - RESIDENTIAL - 462’ LEVEL 33 - RESIDENTIAL - 448’ LEVEL 32 - RESIDENTIAL - 434’ LEVEL 31 - RESIDENTIAL - 420’ LEVEL 30 - RESIDENTIAL - 406’ LEVEL 29 - RESIDENTIAL - 392’ LEVEL 28 - RESIDENTIAL - 378’ LEVEL 27 - RESIDENTIAL - 364’ LEVEL 26 - RESIDENTIAL - 350’ LEVEL 25 - RESIDENTIAL - 366’ LEVEL 24 - RESIDENTIAL - 322’ LEVEL 23 - RESIDENTIAL - 208’ LEVEL 22 - RESIDENTIAL - 294’ LEVEL 21 - RESIDENTIAL - 280’ LEVEL 20 - RESIDENTIAL - 266’ LEVEL 19 - RESIDENTIAL - 252’ LEVEL 18 - RESIDENTIAL - 238’ LEVEL 17 - RESIDENTIAL - 224’ LEVEL 16 - RESIDENTIAL - 210’ LEVEL 15 - RESIDENTIAL - 196’ LEVEL 13 - OFFICE - 168’ LEVEL 12 - OFFICE - 154’ LEVEL 11 - OFFICE - 140’ LEVEL 10 - OFFICE - 126’ LEVEL 09 - OFFICE - 112’ LEVEL 08 - OFFICE - 98’ LEVEL 07 - OFFICE - 84’ LEVEL 06 - OFFICE - 70’

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LEVEL 05 - OFFICE - 56’ LEVEL 04 - OFFICE - 42’ LEVEL 03 - OFFICE - 28’ LEVEL 02 - CONFERENCE + DINING - 14’ LEVEL 01 - RETAIL + DINING + THEATER - 0’


CONNECT

NON-DENOMINATIONAL RELOCATION PROJECT FALL 2014 ∙ SENIOR PROGRAMMING STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR R. THOMAS JAEGER, FAIA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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The CONNECT Church is designed to be a haven of community between man and God, man and man, and man and the outsider. Based on early conceptual studies of the Hebrew Tabernacle, this center for liturgical worship was designed to enhance community by inclusion and drawing the outsider into a circle while maintaining the divine sovereign nature of the sanctuary as a holy place, set apart for liturgical activities and sanctified to mankind. Thus, the goal was to give prominence to the sanctuary itself while binding the community into itself in communion between God and man.

movement. The dark star condenses into the center which in turn unfolds as a light star. This may be compared to breathing: it is as if earth and people were being breathed in and out from the center. The completed figure is the structural image of the inhabited earth: it renders people and land in the form of the spoked wheel.”

The stated goal of this project was to provide a new home for a Chicago-based church body that has outgrown it’s building in the city and is looking to expand into the Illinois northwest suburbs. The church building I’ve designed is located in Hoffman Estates, The primary inspiration for the circular design comes about ten minutes from Schaumburg and forty-five from the text of an early 20th century book by Rudolph minutes from Chicago proper. Schwarz, translated into English by the renowned German-American architect Mies van der Rohe. The project parameters were to provide two designs: Schwartz hypothesized that in ecclesiastical design, one for an initial phase, and one for a mature phase. the community should gather not in a linear orthagonal Though most of the design work focused on the initial space, but in a ring, which he called “the divine form.” phase, the intent was to provide a building that could be easily expanded onto without a much greater cost. Schwarz writes: “Ring, center, and star are interrelated, the one grows out of the other. The circling movement This is CONNECT, the spiritual made architectural, the produces the motionless pole, the pole the circling community expressed in given form.

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The centerpiece of the building, around which all the other parts orbit, is the sanctuary, a massive, singlestory space for worship, built of cast-in-place concrete, glulam timbers, and sound-absorbent fabric. The seating arrangement revolves around the stage, and can accommodate 200, with a separate chapel built in the rear that can hold another 40 congregants or visitors. A series of classrooms dialed around the side adds to the

number for a total of 1700 SF. The phasing plan breaks down a temporary wall in the southeast corner of the sanctuary to bring in an additional hundred seats in the mature phase, while a gym and additional classrooms are added to the southwest quadrant. Additional office and recreational spaces are added to the square footage as well.

CIRCULATION PRIVATE SPACES COMMUNITY EDUCATIONAL WORSHIP

Pioneer Phase

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Mature Phase


OPPOSITE The building’s orientation allows for plenty of diffused interior light in the sanctuary during daylight. ABOVE At night, the interior of the santuary is lit by a starlight-like array of powerful warm-colored bulbs. BELOW Four elevations from the cardinal directions, showcasing the building’s unique spiraling footprint.

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The sanctuary incorporates multiple acoustical and The southwest and southeast walls both allow diffused passive environmental tactics. sunlight into the space through refraction and deflection. Stationary louvers both shield from direct Because pure forms, such as circles, are more suscepti- sunlight, while also bouncing the light back against the ble to abnormal sound de- fects such as focusing and louver behind it, to finally send the diffused light into echoing, the outer walls feature small acoustical ridges: the sanctuary space. simple hemispherical fabric ridges on the walls to diffuse the sound better. This creates a high-quality space for sound and light.

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BIOSHELL

ELI WHITNEY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EXPANSION SPRING 2014 ∙ JUNIOR SUSTAINABILITY STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR ROBIN RANDALL, AIA, LEED AP BD+C [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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The BIOSHELL expansion to the Eli Whitney Elementary School is a bridge between the Little Village neighborhood in inner-city Chicago and the undersized existing school.

This project was designed as a response to the 2014 Living Building Challenge, which encourages participants to design a completely net-zero building that contributes to the energy grid, rather than competing for resources.

The expansion provides an additional 17 classrooms at We adhered to rigorous program requirements in this 900 square feet each; a new art studio; a science lab; a expansion, adding no more than 25,000 square feet 2000 square foot cafeteria; and a three-story library. while adding six new classrooms, a multipurpose space, and usable outdoor space. We estimated spending The centerpiece of this living building is the courtyard, approximately $480 per square foot, fitting cleanly into which acts like an artificial canyon and absorbs the Chicago Public Schools average budget of $12 million direct sun, water, and wind in order to repurpose per school, per year. The other major requirement was contribute to net zero waste, water, and energy, all of to meet all twenty imperatives of the Living Building which combine for a true school of the 21st century. Challenge while promoting environmental awareness.

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TRANSIT

SERVICE

COMMUNITY

EGRESS

LIBRARY

CLASSROOM

ECOSPACE

OPPOSITE An exploded axon showing the full extent of our expansion; three possible classroom layouts. ABOVE The three floor plans and roof plan, demonstrating the sawtooth pattern used for maximum daylight. BELOW Two perspective views of the roof and library; the physical model with and without the shell feature.

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LIGHT STACKS

SUMMER SUN

IN CHICAGO THE ANGLE OF THE SUN IN SUMMER IS 72°.

SIX LIGHT STACKS DROP FROM THE ROOF TO THE FIRST FLOOR, ALLOWING AMBIENT DAYLIGHT TO FLOW INTO THE CORE OF THE SCHOOL, THUS REDUCING THE STRAIN ON TRADITIONAL LIGHTING SYSTEMS.

SOLAR PANELS

WINTER SUN

IN CHICAGO THE ANGLE OF THE SUN IN WINTER IS 25°.

WIND FLOW

THE SITE’S NORTH / SOUTH AXIS ALLOWS FOR NATURAL VENTILATION WITHOUT OVERUSE OF TRADITIONAL HVAC SYSTEMS, REDUCING THE NEED FOR COSTLY A/C IN THE SUMMER.

T

LIVING BIOSHELL

THE PROTECTIVE BIOMIMETIC SHELL ACTS AS A WIND AND SUN BARRIER, RESISTING WIND, SUN, AND SNOW LOADS WHILE PROVIDING A GREENHOUSE EFFECT WITHIN THE SHELL. THE VEGETATION PANELS ALONE PROVIDE THE REQUIRED 25% URBAN AGRICULTURE REQUIRMENT.

O

GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP

A FIELD OF 40 DEEP-GROUND HEAT PUMPS LIES ON THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SITE, PROVIDING A CONSTANT SUPPLY OF WARM WATER THAT IS MUCH EASIER TO HEAT AND COOL AS NECESSARY THAN TRADITIONAL CITY-PROVIDED WATER.

PHOTOVOLTAIC

MORE THAN 30% OF THE PANELS ON THE BIOSHELL COLLECT SUNLIGHT THROUGH ADVANCED PV TECHNOLOGY. TRADITIONAL PV PANELS ARE RETROFITTED TO FIT INTO THE UNORTHODOX FORM, AND THE CORNERS ARE INFILLED WITH GLASS. THE PANELS PROVIDE THE MAJORITY OF THE BUILDING’S POWER IN THE SUMMER, FALL, AND SPRING MONTHS.

OPEN-AIR COURTYARD

THE ENCLOSED OPEN-AIR COURTYARD IS A SAFE OUTDOOR SPACE WHERE CHILDREN CAN PLAY AND LEARN ABOUT NATURE. THE SPACE ACTS AS AN ARTIFICIAL CANYON, AND MIMICS THE NATURAL EFFECTS OF WATER-FLOW AND NATURAL OVERGROWTH.

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SENTINEL

KANE COUNTY ECOLOGICAL CENTER FALL 2013 ∙ JUNIOR SUSTAINABILITY STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR IAN HOFFMAN, AIA, ASA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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The SENTINEL Riverkeeper project was designed to maximize sustainability awareness in downtown St. Charles, Illinois. The building functionsw as an ecological haven, a research center, an art gallery, and a community center. Encouraging sustainability awareness for the betterment of the community was the major priority.

a system of louvers and man-made dams that were designed in the 1970s to raise or lower the water level based on needs.

The SENTINEL was designed to be a 21st century response to the Fox River Valley and Kane County’s poor understanding and management of the Fox River. Part-ecological center, part-laboratory, and part-public The Fox River has historically been prone to flooding gallery, the SENTINEL is a riverkeeper that was designed due to poor water management. The existing system to become a new base of operations for Kane County for water retention and overflow is essentially just to observe and study the river from.

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TOP A series of heat-gain studies performed in Autodesk Vasari to determine the feasibility of the orientation. ABOVE A series of wind-flow studies performed in Autodesk Vasari to determine wind effects on placement. BELOW The site plan indicates the riverkeeper’s placement along the Fox River in downtown St. Charles.

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BOARDWALK + DOCKS

BOARDWALK + DOCKS

BOARDWALK + DOCKS

EXTERIOR BALCONY 03

BOATHOUSE BAY

EXTERIOR BALCONY 03

LIBRARY 2F CATHEDRAL CEILING

LIBRARY

PRESIDENT’S OFFICE MECHANICAL MANAGER

LOADING BAY

VICE PRESIDENT

MAIL ROOM

WORDS

ROOF PATIO

LABORATORY 01 EXTERIOR BALCONY 02

ELEVATORS

CAFE FOX

ENTRY PAVILION

VERTICAL GALLERY

BIKE CLOSET

EXTERIOR BALCONY 02

ELEVATORS

LIGHT CORE

LIGHT CORE

FOYER

RESTROOM F

RESTROOM M

EXTERIOR BALCONY 01

EXTERIOR BALCONY 01

OPEN GALLERY ORATORY

ROOF PATIO

RESTROOM F

FILE ROOM

LABORATORY 02 WORDS

RESTROOM M

The SENTINEL is broken into two stories and one publicly-accessible roof for galas and events. The first floor was designed for public vistors and interaction with the river itself, and hosts a series of docks for Kane County to use for wildlife studies. The rest of the first level is dedicated to ecological awareness, and features a public gallery, an ecological library, and observation decks.

The second level is dedicated to private research of the river, and features several laboratories and offices for wildlife officials and researchers, as well as a private observatory. The roof level features event space for warmer months, while in the winter it transforms into outdoor storage for boats and other outdoor equipment.

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HEX

WORLD VISION DISASTER RELIEF SHELTER SPRING 2013 ∙ SOPHOMORE OUTREACH STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR STACIE BURTELSON, AIA, RIBA [TEAM PROJECT: GRAPHICS AND BUILD DESIGN]

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The HEX shelter was the Judson University sophomore big disaster, World Vision opened a competition up to architecture studio’s entry for the 2013 World Vision architecture schools, attempting to find a design that disaster relief competition, hosted in Siloam Springs, could be easily manufactured and deployed. AK by John Brown University. The entire sophomore architecture studio worked The setting for the hypothesized shelter is Jakarta, together over the course of the semester to design Indonesia, following the events of the 2004 tsunami the most weather-resistant, cheapest, and easilythat left 230,000 dead and 500,000 displaced or constructable shelter, through a series of individual and otherwise in need of shelter. In preparation for the next team-based charettes that refined a singular core idea.

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ABOVE A series of photos showing the design and construction of the physical full-scale model that we packaged and took to the World Vision competition at John Brown University in Arkansas. Photos show the size of the module, as well as the capability to withstand gale-force winds at the hands of the Bad Wolf fan. MIDDLE Two axonometric views demonstrating a single module and a double module. A diagram showing a community layout using only double modules, and a single-family conlgomeration. BOTTOM Two perspectives showing the interior of a double-unit, and the custom four-way joint we designed.

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We designed a modular hexagonal tent-like structure, using basic PVC parts for the skeleton and customwelded steel for the joints. Other materials used included a military-grade canvas for the tent fabric, army cord to bind the canvas to the skeleton, and cheap, rollable bamboo slats for window shades.

number of modules, either to satisfy cultural or family requirements or to form makeshift villages. We discovered during live testing with a Bad Wolf fan that the dual-strength tensile- and compression-design added additional strength against racking, and when two modules are used together, the structure can withstand gale-force winds, meeting all design requirements in a way that was culturally-driven.

The modules were designed as individual rooms, that could be used solo or in conjunction with any Module Connection and Shape Diagram

+

=

+

=

Wind Racking (No Tensility)

Wind Flow (No Porosity)

Wind Racking (With Tensility)

Wind Flow (Partial Porosity)

Daylight (No Porosity)

Wind Racking (With Tensility and Anchoring)

Wind Flow (Full Porosity)

Daylight (Controlled Porosity)

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Water Retention Diagram


SERPENTINE

SIT/SET FURNITURE DESIGN PROJECT SPRING 2017 ∙ FULL/SMALL SCALE STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR ALAN FROST, AIA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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SERPENTINE is a full-scale furniture project intended to solve the problem of ‘sit’ versus ‘set.’ Although the program outline essentially describes a chair, the majority of the challenge lay in the exploration of what ‘sitting’ and ‘setting’ actually entails, and whether that necessarily requires human involvement or activity.

objects on top of.

The project then became an exercise in scarcity. With rapidly depleting resources, I challenged myself to building my design using only four 4’x4’ panels of pine plywood-- and bolts. My design had to adapt to the new imperatives, which entailed shrinking the amount I began by exploring the concept itself as “sit + set,” of formwork pieces from twenty to six, and then “sit - set,” “sit / set,” and “sit x set;” essentially asking figuring out how to use the remaining 4’x4’ board to whether the two functions were exclusive, inclusive, bridge the cutout shapes. or independent of each other. My research and scale builds led me to design a flexible, lightweight bench- Ultimately, I designed and built the form seen below, type object, that is large enough for one person to staining the “panel” pieces to differentiate them from sit, with enough room and flat space left over to set the “form” pieces. The end result is a cozy garden bench. OPPOSITE The IKEA-style instructional foldout, showing the four 4’x4’ panels as well as an exploded axon. MIDDLE A series of conceptual studies done in Rhino to calculate the amount of wood needed. BELOW The finished product, including the bolts used to prevent racking and shifting between panels.

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BUBBLE

EVERYDAY CARRY PRODUCT DESIGN SPRING 2017 ∙ FULL/SMALL SCALE STUDIO ∙ PROFESSOR ALAN FROST, AIA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

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BUBBLE is an everyday carry prototype designed to serve as both a tray for personal belongings at the end of a day, and as a sleek, high-end display product. The BUBBLE was designed for the Judson University graduate-level elective “Full/Small Scale,� intended to educate participants on product design and foster conversation about the furniture that supports our everyday lives. My concept for this project was simple: as a standalone tray designed for mass-production, it had to be simplyproduced and function as top-shelf item display and holder. Using Rhino, I experimented with a variety of smooth, curvilinear forms, such as the one seen on

the opposite page. Eventually I landed on a form that roughly aligned to the shape and size of an average paperback novel. Using the 3D printers at Judson, I printed the mold in four parts, which I then welded together with epoxy, finished with bondo paste, and sanded to create a smooth, sinuous mold of the inverse shape. After spraying the mold down with cooking spray and rubbing it with vaseline, I placed the mold into a particleboard frame that matched the edges of the 3D printed form, and cast it with a custom blend of concrete and white pigment. After a bit of sanding, the finished form came out looking like the product on the opposite page.

OPPOSITE The finished cast concrete product, with the initial concept beside it for comparison. BELOW (L) The process used to cast the complex concrete form, using a negative 3D-printed imprint for support. BELOW (R) The items contained within my personal everyday carry, and orthogonal views of the final tray. Negative

Divide

Split

Imprint

Clad

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Part of the process was to test various blends of concrete additives, including a number of household chemicals, powders, oils, solutions, and adhesives. The opposing page shows a series of these tests, which included casting various objects into the pour, including 3D-printed PLA parts, laminated wood, and plastics.

plastic, whether through heat or the additive.

The mold was printed in four parts, after which I used a chemical weld to melt the pieces together in place. Once the piece was solid, I gave it six coats of bondo putty to seal it and erase the striation of the printing lines. After sanding, I rubbed a thick coating of vaseline Ultimately, I decided to only use a single additive, a onto the plastic, then sprayed down the edges of the bleaching powder that turned the concrete mixture mylar sides (held in place with a complex particleboard a smooth, whitish-gray color. For the mold itself, I formwork and clamps) with cooking spray. Once the decided to 3D print a negative of the shape I wanted, concrete was poured, I formed the underside with a using Rhino and our fabrication lab’s custom software. lasercut acrylic piece. Creating the mold was the most involved part of the process, as it involved a lot of guesswork and As the piece was curing, I formed matching laminated assumptions about how the PLA plastic would react to wood sheathing using the negatives of the particleboard the concrete mixture. I had a number of concerns prior formwork, which I attached to the concrete using liquid to casting that the concrete might melt or dissolve the nail and clamps. ABOVE The finished cast concrete product shown from the opposite side. OPPOSITE Various process images showing experimentation with different concrete additives and claddings. BELOW The items contained within my personal everyday carry, and orthogonal views of the final tray.

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OBELISK

ADAPTABLE LIGHT INSTALLATION SPRING 2015 ∙ AIAS MIDWEST QUAD “FABRICATE” ∙ INSTRUCTOR BRIAN WAGNER [TEAM PROJECT: LIGHT PROGRAMMING, ASSEMBLY]

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OBELISK was inspired by the idea of the perfect divine interacting with and becoming one with the mundane imperfect. The mysterious black OBELISK hovers above the surface of the world, emitting a dull glow that simultaneously invites and repels. The switch, the source of the light, is hidden beneath it, inviting a hand to reach below into what cannot be seen, in order to make a change.

wraps the light into itself. This light is then diffused by an internal paper-based wrap.

“In many ways the hand understands the world better than the eye,” writes Rudolph Schwarz. “It ‘sees’ the world from all sides. The hand can grasp. Its fingers close around the thing, forming a vault. The power of the hand to radiate streams back into itself and in a dark current this power flows around the clasped thing, OBELISK consists of twelve black, 3D-printed PLA parts, awakening the answer within it. Thus the thing is taken 0.2mm in height in the center and 1/8th of an inch at the to the circulation of the body; it is buried in the hollow edges. Each piece contains a slot for a custom locking of the hand-- the hand can conceal.” mechanism that binds each piece to its neighbor. The PLA is thin enough in the center to transmit light, in OBELISK is the attempt to capture that same air of this case an LED band wrapped around a 3D-printed otherness and unease into a light-giving element that gear part that both holds the OBELISK in the air and ultimately shapes the character of it’s surroundings.

PERSPECTIVE

FRONT

TOP

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BACK

RIGHT

LEFT


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D

B

A

B

A

E

F

C

C

D

E

ABOVE The wiring diagram instructional I created to show the electrical layout of the lamp. OPPOSITE TOP The formal evolution of the lamp, from cube to obelisk. OPPOSITE BOTTOM The foldout of the disassembled parts and pieces, including the light coil and pipes. BELOW An exploded axonometric showing the assembly of the parts and how they fit together.

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ILLUMINATE

ADAPTABLE LIGHT INSTALLATION SPRING 2015 ∙ AIAS MIDWEST QUAD “FABRICATE” ∙ INSTRUCTOR BRIAN WAGNER [TEAM PROJECT: LIGHT PROGRAMMING, ASSEMBLY]

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ILLUMINATE is a full-size light installation that was put installation, then turned our attention toward putting on display at the AIAS Midwest Quad “Fabricate” at the our newfound skills to use. University of Kentucky-Lexington in April of 2015. With limited materials and even shorter time, we raced Fabricate featured architecture students from all across to build a housing assembly using scrap wood, plastics, the midwest coming together in diverse teams to and trace paper, as well as the Arduino circuits and assemble a competition entry for a gallery exhibit that lighting we had been given. UK Lexington put on at the end of the weekend. At the end of the weekend, we had built a 6’ x 7’ The ILLUMINATE team had one day to put together installation with diffused backlighting that changed a full-scale gallery entry, after learning about Arduino color based on where it sensed viewers were standing, technology from instructor Brian Wagner. The team using a complex array of sensors and lights that we had worked intensely to learn the lighting and coding programmed, casting a colorful palette of cool blues, skills necessary to put together an adaptable light purples, and pinks across the space.

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SIMULACRA

DIMENSIONAL COMPOSITIONAL EXERCISE FALL 2016 ∙ GRADUATE RHINO STUDIO ∙ INSTRUCTOR JOEL KERNER, AIA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT] SIMULACRA is an exercise in real-life positioning and composition. We were instructed to take a 24” x 36” mylar sheet, lay it over a sheet of bond paper the same size, and somehow create an object-focused composition that forced the two sheets to interact and have dialogue. My response examines the visual layers that make up a

composition: a mechanical object of vast scale hovers over topographical, architectural, spatial, hue, and node information, the colors on mylar and the object below. The inspiration for this composition comes from a reinterpretation of ancient Chinese dragon mythology, turning the dragon into an otherworldly mechanical object passing over a map of modern-day Hong Kong.

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BONES

INTERDIMENSIONAL FORM CONSTRUCTS FALL 2016 ∙ GRADUATE RHINO STUDIO ∙ INSTRUCTOR JOEL KERNER, AIA [INDIVIDUAL PROJECT]

BONES is a visual study of the process of creation, from a single stroke or shape into fully-realized three-dimensional construct. The process I used to explore form-making was relatively simple: using a random shape-generating program called Alchemy, I constructed single-stroke shapes (top, on the following page).

I took those same shapes into Illustrator, simplified them and reduced them to their basic elements, and lastly brought them into Rhino, where I extruded points built from the shapes, and three-dimensionalized them as splines. The resulting three-dimensional shapes flow and billow, a far cry from their jagged, almostaccidental beginnings as a single stroke.

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SKETCHBOOK FROM REALITY TO PAGE 2011 - 2017 ∙ VARIOUS

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An architect’s sketchbook is one of his most valued possessions. I have maintained sketchbooks actively, almost since I first started out in architecture school, but I’ve filled the most sketchbooks through travel sketching and field watercoloring, two of my favorite pasttimes. This is a small selection of my more recent sketches, as well as some longer-form studio watercolors I’ve completed.

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To view Justin’s complete and most recent works and portfolio, scan the QR code above using a QR code scanner on your iPhone or Android device, or visit him directly at justinbanda.us


email justinjaybanda@gmail.com ∙ phone 219.776.9267 ∙ skype justin.banda home 364 algona ave, elgin, il 60120

justinbanda.us

Justin Banda Graduate Architecture Portfolio  

The collected works of Justin Banda in his undergraduate, graduate, and professional career.

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