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summer 2014

DOCTORS life + leisure

the view from Berkeley

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+ is FAMILY

PRACTICE a dying art? + medical relief post Typhoon Haiyan + TRANSATLANTIC crossing on the Queen Mary 2 + Targa Florio in SICILY

3 different views of the

bay area

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Just for C

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DOCTORS life + leisure

contents

summer 2014

summer 2014 Editor Barb Sligl

Art Direction BSS Creative Contributing Editor Janet Gyenes

Editorial Assistant Adam Flint Contributors Michael DeFreitas Dr. Holly Fong Dr. Chris Pengilly Manfred Purtzki Dr. Kelly Silverthorn Roberta Staley Cover photo B. Sligl Senior Account Executive Monique Nguyen Account Executives Wing-Yee Kwong Lily Yu Sales, Classifieds and Advertising In Print Circulation Office 200 – 896 Cambie St. Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada Phone: 604-681-1811 Fax: 604-681-0456 Email: info@AdvertisingInPrint.com

Associate Publisher Linh T. Huynh

Circulation Fulfillment Shereen Hoang

CME Development Adam Flint Founding Publisher Denise Heaton

Just For Canadian Doctors is published 4 times a year by Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. dba In Print Publications and distributed to Canadian physicians. Publication of advertisements and any opinions expressed do not constitute endorsement or assumption of liability for any claims made. The contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. None of the contents of the magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of In Print Publications. In Print Publications 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada clockwise from top left: b. Sligl (3)

FEATURES

17 flavour trail on the east coast of the west coast 21 stellar views of San Francisco are found just outside it

Production Manager Ninh Hoang

21 17

COLUMNS

DEPARTMENTS

8 motoring

5 summer mix

Retracing a racecourse in Sicily

27 CME calendar

10 photo prescription

34 employment opportunities

It’s in the details

37 sudoku

13 the hungry doctor

It’s still spot prawn season… until the end of June

38 small talk with Dr. Chris Pengilly

14 the thirsty doctor

cover photo

Absinthe 101

20 doctor on a soapbox

www.justforcanadiandoctors.com

Is the art of family practice dying?

25 pay it forward

Printed in Canada.

miss an issue? check out our website!

Dr. Luella Smith of MSF brings medical relief to the Philippines post Typhoon Haiyan

36 the wealthy doctor Boost savings with a line of credit

Get a different perspective of the Bay Area— from the Presidio, Sausalito and Berkeley, where the University of California Berkeley campus is a bit of bucolic escape from the sensory overload of San Francisco. Story on page 21.

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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from the editor clockwise from top Scenes along the east coast of Vancouver Island. Low tide in Parksville at Tigh-Na-Mara resort leaves undulating patterns of tidal pools; porthole-style window at the Oceanfront Suites in Cowichan Bay; soaking up the Cowichan Valley sun at Merridale Ciderworks. Story on page 17.

endless summer

G

o for the unexpected. Discover something new. Seek new shores. Take a different path and make it a summer of endless exploration. In San Francisco that might mean seeing this megalopolis from a different perspective. Like from a seaside perch in Sausalito, across San Francisco Bay. From here, at the Inn Above Tide, you’ll actually get to see San Francisco’s glittering skyline from a quieter and oh-so-comfortable distance—just a 15-minute ferry ride away—while sea lions swim by and kayakers glide past mere metres away. Whether in Sausalito or the university scene of Berkeley on the eastern shore of the bay or the outpost of one of San Francisco’s oldest neighbourhoods, the Presidio, we set up base at three Bay Area spots that offer a fresh view from which to

explore anew (page 21). Up the west coast and across the Georgia Strait is another shore to explore. On the west coast, stay east, where on Vancouver Island there’s a flavour trail from Cowichan Bay—which became North America’s first Cittaslow community in 2009, recognized for fostering community relationships, history and traditions, while promoting craftsmanship and environmental stewardship— north towards the Comox Valley, where the sunrises are spectacular and ocean waters are warm and teeming with life (page 17). Stay in a yurt, sip cider, slurp oysters, meander through seemingly unending tidal pools and then spa it and do it all over again. On another ocean, it’s the season for

seek

new shores!

NYU’S Clinical Imaging Symposium Four Seasons Hualalai • Kona, Hawaii February 2-6, 2015 http://www.med.nyu.edu/courses/cme/hawaii15

Upcoming NYU Radiology CME Meetings www.radcme.med.nyu.edu 4

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

transatlantic crossings. Don’t think cruise. This is a crossing. A mode of transportation that was once the only way to get across that “pond.” Today, the allure remains, if only as forced relaxation. The week-long crossing on Cunard’s Queen Mary 2 retains the romance of bygone days…after all, where else can you sit back in a deck chair and gaze upon Manhattan’s skyline as you depart for Southampton, England? And sailing through the misty North Atlantic, with no sign of civilization for days, certainly provides yet another kind of perspective (page 5). Once in Europe, if you make it to France this summer, do try the tradition of absinthe drinking (page 14). Or partake right here at home, where North American distilleries are reviving the spirit. We like Vancouver bartender Cooper Tardivel’s take on the Sazerac (he uses Rittenhouse 100-proof rye whiskey, Arabic gum or gomme syrup, which adds a touch of orange blossom, and coats a rock glass with an absinthe spray rather than a rinse so that you get just the right bit of the green fairy with each sip). It’s Seal-of-theSazerac approved (see page 16)…and that’s how to start the season off right. Here’s to an endless summer! feedback@InPrintPublications.com


what/when/where > summer

style | food | shows | festivals | places | getaways | gear…

sail away

mix

cross the

B Sligl

pond!

ahoy!

This summer, start off the trip to Europe in proper fashion. That is, start slow. Instead of flying the red-eye and arriving bloodshot and weary, adjust an hour a day as you cross the Atlantic over a week on the hallowed Cunard line’s Queen Mary 2. You’ll sail out of Red Hook, Brooklyn, past Manhattan’s skyline and Lady Liberty before passing under the Queensboro Bridge (clearing by just 14 feet!) into open waters. Last summer was the QM2’s 200th crossing­—and umpteenth since the line first set sail in 1840. Worthy of some bubbly on deck… see page 6 >>

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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mix

cork it & run

summer

sail away

It’s a bit of a bygone lifestyle, when games and drinks took place before lunch and dinner, gossip was shared and books read on deck, high tea served— all in luxury akin to a grand hotel in the city…but on a ship. Although, please note, the Queen Mary 2 is no ordinary ship, she’s an ocean liner, and most certainly not a cruise ship. Aboard her, you can get a proper pint and ploughman’s lunch in the ship’s pub, and then, after an Old Speckled Hen ale, visit deep space in the planetarium. Or listen to Juilliard School students play jazz by Duke Ellington (who was once a passenger). Or listen to star authors (P.D. James, for one) and entertainers (John Cleese, for another)… Or, to get the full essence of the grand scale of the QM2, take the Back of the House tour (book far in advance!), where you’ll get to see the inner workings on the crew deck and walk the Burma Road (fondly named for its constant hustle and bustle the length of the entire ship). This grand dame is a modern-day floating palace yet living monument to the glory of Britain’s rich maritime history. Thankfully, these days there’s no worry of “keel haul” punishment (just as it sounds). Now it’s just the misty magic of the North Atlantic and the occasional dolphins leaping off starboard—or port. The journey is other-worldly, melding past and present, civilization and vast oceanscape, passing over where the Titanic sank while celebrating modern oceanography, travelling between the New World and Old. Ahoy! ­—B. Sligl

fun run! mustdo

if you GO 6

TRANSATLANTIC CROSSING The Cunard Line celebrates its 175th anniversary in 2015. On July 4, 2015, the Queen Mary 2 will recreate the original Transatlantic Crossing in 1840. > cunard.com

Cork it or Cook-off?

Wine country is a one-stop destination that blends imbibing, dining, agritourism, scenery and even some exercise (kind of) and fashion (see above). Here are two wine-fuelled events—a marathon and cook-off—that just happen to take place amongst the vines… Cork It in British Columbia Pavement-pounding might sound like a running term, but it’s more likely about making a pitstop at one of the winetasting stations at the Half-Corked

(so register as soon as possible for next year or recreate its scenic route this summer or fall by bike or otherwise), seduces runners and oenophiles—dressed in zany costumes (see above, past participants channel-

Marathon in Oliver Osoyoos Wine Country. This annual event, which takes place end of May and sells out immediately

ling Marilyn)—with its 18-km route that winds through the region’s unique Sonoran Desert landscape. While

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

inspiration for the architecture (it’s event comes from California’s first Bordeaux’s Marathon winery to achieve du Médoc LEED® Gold (which takes Certification) place on fest and grounds September 13 dotted this year, so with art get your marathon installations (left). fix there next), the At the annual HALL award-winning Cabernet Cookoff, wines, paired with held here every May, dishes created by guests get to feast the area’s celebrated on farm-to-table chefs, showcases the cuisine crafted by best of BC. oliverCalifornia’s culinary osoyoos.com/ tour-des-force and halfcorked paired with HALL wines, of course. This Cook-off in year it was the newly California: released HALL 2011 Who wouldn’t want Napa Valley Cabernet to be a judge at an Sauvignon. The event event where 15 teams may be over, but the of chefs from San wine still demands Francisco and Napa tasting—and Valley square off in the winery itself a culinary-pairing is a destination throw-down? Luckily, anytime of year. you can—and amidst cabernetcookoff. HALL Wine’s gorgeous org —Janet Gyenes

clockwise from top: B. Darren Robinson; Mitch rice; b. Sligl

smooth sailing

getaway


renewed, refined drink

If you change your perspective, you might experience something new, whether revisiting an old haunt or discovering a new fragrance or flavour Written + produced by Janet Gyenes

POP-UP ROOFTOP

Northwest Passage 1 oz Ungava gin 1 oz Cointreau 1 oz Lillet Blanc 1/2 oz Thai basil syrup 1 oz lime juice Shake ingredients together with ice; strain into a large cocktail glass and garnish with Kaffir lime leaf. tasting notes > Smooth, fresh, floral, spicy

black arts

pick

For many, Canada’s north, especially the Arctic, remains a mystery, aside from archetypal images of treeless tundra, 24-hour daylight and explorers seeking the Northwest Passage. Ungava* Premium Canadian Gin, crafted from hand-foraged botanicals, offers people a chance to taste the terroir from its namesake land, a peninsula at the tip of Quebec. Ungava gin is infused with six rare plants and berries, including wild rose hips, Arctic blend, crowberry, Labrador Tea, Nordic juniper and cloudberry, which gives the gin its glorious sunshine-yellow hue. $34.90, lcbo.com

where “Ungava” is * an Inuit term meaning “towards the open water”

Who hasn’t gazed up at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver’s pitched roof with its characteristic dish green-copper patina and wondered about the editor’s view from the top? You can now see the sweeping panoramas for yourself, from the windows just beyond the sunken bar that’s the showpiece of The ROOF Restaurant + Bar. It’s a spanking new act for the hotel’s former Panorama Roof Ballroom, a dine and dance-floor club that, in recent years, has been largely used as a catering kitchen. At the sneak peek for the pop-up ROOF, we nibbled on tasty bites, including prawn “vile” shooters served with a test-tube of hot sauce and morel mushrooms tucked into a light tempura and slurped Moscow Mules (out of authentic copper It courses through our veins, pumps cups)—all while through our hearts, draws a line to our watching the sun’s scent lineage and leaves a metallic taste in our last dance across the mouths when we bite our lip in angst. But city core. what effect does blood have on fragrance? Plenty, according Don’t dally to Italian duo, Giovanni Castelli and Antonio Zuddas who before making created Blood Concept, a series of synthetic perfumes based your way to the on different blood types, forgoing conventional floral fra15th floor, whether grance notes. The Black Series is said to manifest our darker for an early business sides. B, for example, a unisex fragrance for the nomadic breakfast, Afternoon identity and is described as, “An endless journey. Tea with the in-laws or A trip into yourself. With no escape.” Dark, indeed. a seafood dinner of Haida $160/60 ml; bloodconcept.com for retailers Gwaii halibut. The restaurant is cHEEKY only open for a limited engagement, Cocktail > while upgrades in excess of $12 million Ask the bartender to are made to the hotel, including the oblige with a Hanky 900 West Restaurant and Bar. And be Panky cocktail— sure to have something to sip and linger Beefeater gin, sweet a little longer. Our insider choice? The vermouth and Fernet Hanky Panky cocktail. It’s got a great Branca—invented story (left)—and tastes like it sounds— by a barmaid in 1903 especially while looking at that sweeping at the American Bar city view. The Fairmont Hotel Vancouver; in The Savoy hotel, fairmont.com/hotel-vancouver London. The Fernet Branca, an Italian Top notes > Gunpowder tea, Earl Grey tea digestif, lends a hit middle notes > Rooibos tea, hinoki wood of bitter to the classic base notes > Ambroxan, guaiac wood, leather sweet martini.

taste of the tundra

mix

true north

fresh take

summer

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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motoring

D r . k e l ly s i l v e r t h o r n Dr. Kelly Silverthorn is a radiologist and Just For Canadian Doctors’ automotive writer.

Sicilian soliloquy

Following the stunning twists and turns of a storied racecourse on an Italian isle

N

ote to self…scrutinize the cruise itinerary more carefully! Giardini Naxos’ only descriptor in the promo literature is “Italy.” So with just a day’s sail to a short nine-hour Sicilian port-of-call, I’m scrambling to determine if a Targa Florio pilgrimage is even possible. Camera ready, check. Google Maps,

check (though I never fully trust its brochure that states, “Sicilian traffic is so directions!). Sufficient time…uh, maybe, horrendous and drivers are so maniacal that if all the planets align. Rental car available car rental is not recommended.” For pilgrims portside Sunday at 8 am…uh, no way of of conviction, it’s all-systems-go then… knowing. Wife willing to ride shotgun… Sicily’s iconic Targa Florio automobile uh, last-minute high stakes negotiation race ran annually between 1906 and 1977. underway. I’ll confess here In its early years it was typical of to hiding the cruise-line auto racing pre-WWI—closing public roads between cities Tim Layzell’s for the racecourse. Targa painting, Snakes and Florio outlived all of the Ladders, in which the other such races by 20 racecars in the 1964 Targa Florio are the years. During the 1970s snakes and the ladders I eagerly followed the are the mountainous Targa coverage in Road & switchbacks… Track magazine. All of the timlayzell.com great post-WWII racing teams contributed to Targa’s magical lore: Ferrari and Porsche especially, but also Mercedes-Benz, Maserati, Alfa Romeo, Jaguar, Aston Martin, Ford, Shelby and Chaparral. In the last 40 Targas the competition consisted of as many as 14 laps of the same 45-mile quadrangular loop between and through four stakeholder towns: Campofelice on Sicily’s north coast, Caltavuturo inland in the mountains, Cerda on the west and Collesano on the east. Sequentially numbered cars were

“Here, during the 1964 Targa Florio, Innes Ireland wrestles the big, 289 Cobra through the Sicilian mountains in pursuit of the Ferrari GTO of Luigi Mosca and Fortinbras while in the background a Porsche 904 spins. The Cobra was unsuited to the sinuous mountain circuit and Ireland charged to no avail— his Kansan teammate crashing the Cobra through a wall and into retirement. The Ferrari also retired while the race was won by the small, nimble 2-litre Porsche 904 GTS of Pucci and Davis. There's no substitute for cubic inches...?”

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Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

Tim Layzell

Tim Layzell sets the scene of his painting of old-school racing driver Innes Ireland (part of team Shelby American):


motoring [continued] THE REVOLUTIONARY

released at one- to two-minute intervals to race against the clock and each other. By noting the car numbers, drivers (and spectators) judged their progress through the long day. Every two to three laps, cars would stop for re-fuelling and a fresher driver. And, while a professional factory race team always proved victorious, the vast majority of entries were Italian enthusiasts in the fastest private car they could risk destroying. In many cases, that car was the family Fiat. Which is apropos as our rental car is just such a Fiat—an underpowered Punto. Targa roads are so twisty and narrow that even racing speeds never get that high. Passing other competitors is a great challenge. The roughness of the Sicilian roads wantonly broke cars and shattered dreams. Injuries were plentiful, but thankfully deaths were almost unheard of…amazing when you mix the day’s fastest Ferraris and professional drivers with some of the slowest Fiats on rough narrow public roads surrounded by up to 700,000 zealous tifosi. My wife and I had no maniacal fan base to worry about during our spirited Targa tour, but the roads were rougher than anything I’ve encountered in Canada. Thankfully the Fiat must have been engineered with Targa roads as a design parameter as we neither hit the bump stops nor dragged any of the key oily bits. A Targa Florio pilgrimage isn’t recommended with any vehicle large, sporty or loved. But it is flowery. On a non-automotive note, wild and semi-wild blooming plants were copious and gorgeous: azaleas, bougainvillea, cactus, palm, locust and olive trees. Landscape-wise, I recognized topographical features from the many original Targa photographs in my library. These scenes are a favourite of today’s motorsport master artists and being immersed in them gave me an even greater appreciation of Nicholas Watt’s The Final Targa, Graham Turner’s 1966 Targa Florio and Tim Layzell’s Snakes and Ladders. The local communities here still

embrace that Targa heritage. Outside Cerda the permanent pit/garage/grandstand structures gather a sad patina. Throughout Collesano, mosaic-tile public-art murals depict famous close-finishes. Fading “Viva Vaccarella” graffiti is just visible, while the legend of the 1960-70s Sicilian Targa racing ace only grows. Living in Sicily, Nino Vaccarella trained on the circuit year-round and was the only driver thought to have memorized the entire 45-mile course and its 709 turns and other perils—delivering him three Targa victories. For me, the other pinnacle of Targa history was in 1973, the final year of the event’s inclusion in the World Championship of Sports Cars. Italian brands Ferrari and Alfa Romeo were both desperate to win bragging rights as victors of the “last Targa.” Yet, the Martini-liveried, production-based Porsche 911 RSR of van Lennep and Muller bested the purpose-built Italian prototypes to achieve the most important competition victory for the world’s most important production sports car (Porsche 911). Our Targa Floria pilgrimage was as much a trip back in time as a trip along a storied racecourse through stunning geography. Surprisingly little has changed in the look of the roads, towns or countryside since the last event ran here over 35 years ago. Having survived our 45-mile Targa lap we jumped back into the present and onto AutoStrade A19 for a 130-kph blast to Giardini Naxos and our awaiting cruise ship. I was even happy to have some extra time to deal with the cruise line’s accurate assessment of maniacal drivers and getting lost near port (my fault). Post-pilgrimage, the effort and expense to experience Sicily’s historic Targa Florio racecourse route was definitely worth it. A special thanks goes out to my longsuffering wife/co-driver. I’ll be sure to scrutinize future cruise itineraries more zealously.

Our Targa Floria pilgrimage was as much a trip back in time as a trip along a storied racecourse through stunning geography

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SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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p h o t o p r e s c r i p t i o n m i c h a e l d e f r e i ta s Michael DeFreitas is an award-winning photographer who’s been published in a wide variety of travel publications. With his initials, MD, he’s been nicknamed “doc,” making his photography prescriptions apropos.

Paying attention to minutiae puts intrigue into travel photographs

O

Send your photos and questions to our photography guru at feedback@ inprintpublications.com and your shot may be featured in a future issue!

n a recent visit to Israel, I watched dozens of travellers standing back to snap pics of the worshipers at the Western Wall, also known as the Wailing Wall. After shooting a few wide angles, I moved closer. That’s when I noticed the tiny bits of cloth crammed into cracks in the wall—handwritten prayers and requests placed there by visitors. After shooting these notes, I switched my attention to the beards, hair curls and shoes of the worshipers and to the shadows cast on the wall by the late-afternoon sun. Two hours later, I had a good collection of intriguing detail shots, including one showing only a pilgrim’s lower legs and coat hem. (Apparently I wasn’t the only one captivated by this image because it won a silver at the prestigious Society of American Travel Writers awards.) the detail So what’s a detail shot: In travel shot? Well, in travel photography, it’s the photography the tightly focused image simple definition is a of something that is symbolic of a tightly focused image of destination. something that is symbolic of a destination. Toy llamas at a stall in Peru, a fancy sombrero in Mexico, a bottle of wine in Israel, a gun and badge in Texas—all help to define the place and its culture. And, yes, wooden clogs in Holland, hieroglyphics in Egypt and carnival masks in Venice are also good examples of details. The great thing about shooting details is that you don’t really need any special equipment—other than maybe a tripod or separate flash. Most lenses focus close enough for you to isolate a detail. My preferred lens for capturing this type of shot is a mid-range zoom around 24mm to 70mm. For details of people I use a longer, less in-your-face 70mm-to-200mm zoom. When shooting details, try to include just enough information to get your point across. It’s in the details Too tight and you’ll have everyone confused. above Look down. The less-obvious viewpoint can make an arresting image, as with this photo that zooms in on a Too wide and you lose the mystery by devotee’s feet at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem. above right Hone in on details like this Texan’s ivory-handled gun and making the subject too obvious. Start wide, holster and costume. top left Lost in a wider shot, the bits of handwritten prayers and messages on cloth and paper then zoom in, bit by bit, checking your LCD tucked into cracks in the Wailing Wall are details worthy of a close-up. top right Focusing on toy llamas at a roadside after each shot. stall in the mountains of Peru adds some levity and cultural interest to an otherwise standard landscape shot.

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Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

michael defreitas

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PRO TIPS for shooting details > Research a destination before leaving home and see what symbols best define it, and capture those while there.

> Shoot details in vertical and horizontals. Sometimes it’s not obvious which orientation will work until you see the result.

> Try to shoot the detail square on. It will yield the best depth of field over the entire subject.

> Shooting close-ups with a camera’s pop-up flash can cast an

unwanted lens shadow on your detail. If this happens, try backing off a bit.

> When photographing details in a market, remember to ask permission before shooting or relax the vendor by first purchasing something.

> Refrain from dialing up your ISO in low light because you’ll end up with grainy photos.

Ready to take it to the next level?

© Andrew Stewart

gear up When you need flash and your camera’s pop-up flash doesn’t do the job, it’s time to think about buying a speedlight. These flashes fit in your camera’s hot shoe and sit higher, allowing you fullsubject coverage without any shadows, even in close quarters. Nikon, Canon, Olympus and other brands all have speedlights ranging from $150 to $500. Others, such as Metz, Sigma and Nissin, run $100 to $300-plus. You may also consider getting a handy flash extension cord. One end of the cord slips into your camera’s hot shoe and the other end attaches to your speedlight enabling you to hold it well away from your camera and do some dramatic side lighting. Cords run $30 to $60.

You could zoom in on the sesame seeds atop a bagel in the Old Jerusalem market, but it may be too difficult and frustrating for the viewer to make the connection. (Where am I? What am I looking at?) Shooting the bagels wide, with lots of the background from the surrounding market, leaves the viewer wondering Capture cultural symbols of what the focal point is. A few a destination, like elaborate bagels, however, and part of the Carnival masks in Venice. vendor’s decorative wooden cart makes for just the right amount of drama. Except for some food shots, sharply focused details tend to work better. This means having good depth of field. Set your camera to aperture priority mode and f11. Take a variety of shots increasing your aperture setting to f22; monitor your results. Not only will shooting details spice up your travel photography, it will also get you up close to a region’s culture, broadening your understanding and appreciation for it.

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michael defreitas

photo prescription [continued]


the hungry doctor Dr. fong Dr. Holly Fong is a practising speech-language pathologist with three young children who’s always trying, adapting and creating dishes.

hit the spot

A wild-caught spot prawn. below A dish at C Restaurant in Vancouver, featuring BC’s wild spot prawns. The Chefs’ Table Society of British Columbia celebrates the Annual Spot Prawn Festival every May (spotprawnfestival.com), when harvest season starts and runs up to simple by eating sautéed eight weeks. But if you miss out prawns with a soy citrus sauce on fresh spot prawns, frozen and cooked multigrain rice or ones are still available crusty bread to soak up the sauce. year round.

Indulge in the briny pleasures of spot prawns

F

resh prawns are usually available in some form almost year round from along Canada’s West Coast. But during the months of May to early July, it’s spot prawn season. And, while these prawns with side stripes are similar to their cousins, they have a firm, sweet taste that’s full of oceany flavour. Buy fresh, now, while in season. Prawn heads and shells are treasure chests of flavour, which is why they taste best when cooked in their shells. If you’re a wee bit squeamish, ask your fishmonger to remove the heads (whatever you do, save the heads and shells in a freezer bag and then sauté in a little butter and garlic to make shrimp butter, or simmer with herbs, carrots, onions and celery for instant shrimp stock). Although spot prawns are mild, they can take on strong seasoning. So keep it

For the wine, choose something crisp with plenty of acidity and citrus flavours to complement the sauce. This is not the time for a big oaky Chardonnay. I recently paired this dish with the Tolloy 2012 Pinot Grigio from the Alto Adige Südtirol region of northernmost Italy. The wine opens with floral aromas of pear and hints of melon, followed by a fresh taste of grapefruit, lime and white peach. This medium-bodied wine has good acidity with a lasting finish that enhances the prawn flavours and citrus sauce. Buon appetito e salute!

Fresh Prawns with Dipping Sauce (serves 8 – 10) 1 – 2 pounds of fresh prawns, unpeeled (depending upon your appetite!) 1 inch knob of peeled ginger, coarsely sliced into rounds 5 cloves of garlic, peeled and smashed 2 stalks of lemongrass handful of cilantro, rinsed, root ends trimmed and cut into 4 segments lengthwise juice of 1 lemon minus amount used for the dipping sauce 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon fish sauce (Nuoc Mam) lots of freshly ground pepper 1 ½ tablespoons oil

Karen Hamilton

dipping sauce

2 inch knob of peeled ginger 1 medium clove of garlic grated zest of 1 lime 1 tablespoon, packed with chopped cilantro leaves 1 green onion, rinsed, ends trimmed and thinly sliced on the diagonal 3 tablespoons mandarin orange juice 3 tablespoons white grapefruit juice 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon of fish sauce (Nuoc Mam)

Toprepare the sauce, finely grate ginger over a mediumbowl. Gather upall the gratedginger andsqueeze the liquidintothe bowl. You should haveabout ¼teaspoonof juice. Using the same grater, finely grate garlic intothe bowl. Addlime zest, cilantro andgreen onions. Addcitrus juices, soy sauce andfish sauce. Combine to mix well tomake a little more than½ cupof sauce. Cover andset aside. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, soy sauce, fish sauce and pepper. Rinse lemon grass andtrim tough ends. Peel the outer fewskins until you reach the pale core. With the back of your knife, bangalong the stalk torelease aromaticoils. Thenslicealongthediagonal tomake ½-inch thick slices. Put oil intoa large fryingpan set over high heat. When the oil is shimmering, addlemongrass, ginger andgarlic. Stir fry for about a minute tolightly brown the garlic. Addprawns andstir. Pour lemon soy mixtureover theprawns. Addcilantro andcover with a lidtocook for about

a minute. Open lidandstir toturn prawns over, addingsome water if pan is dry. Cook the prawns until they are pink on both sides (1 – 2 minutes more, dependingupon the size). Donot overcook. The flesh should be firm, not rubbery. Remove pan fromheat andput prawns on a big platter, discardingherbs andginger.

Serve with dippingsauce anda large bowl for the shells. Pour the sauce intoindividual condiment saucers for double dipping. Toeat, simply holdthe prawns by the headandtail, givinga twist topull off the head. Peel off the shell anddipthe meat intothe sauce. Yum.

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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the thirsty doctor janet gyenes Janet Gyenes is a magazine writer and editor who likes to dally in spirits, especially when discovering something like corenwyn jenever (a gin-like Dutch spirit)—straight or in cocktails like the “bramble.” Have a boozy idea or question? Send it to feedback@inprintpublications.com

absinthe for beginners A brief history of the once-banned spirit—and how to drink it

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n oil painting hanging in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris portrays a couple sitting in a café, “…their eyes empty and sad, with drooping features and a general air of desperation,” the museum notes read. This description of Edgar Degas’ 1873 oil painting, entitled In a Café or Absinthe, continues: “The painting can be seen as a denunciation of the dangers of absinthe, a violent, harmful liquor, which was later prohibited.” It’s also indicative of an era when

which ranges from 55 to 72% ABV. It’s made absinthe was revered by many artists and by distilling a neutral spirit (think vodka) reviled by members of the Temperance with three principal botanicals: grand movement, who said that people who wormwood (artemisia absinthium; the spirit’s imbibed a little too enthusiastically Latin namesake), green anise and sweet would become afflicted with an alcoholic fennel, often described as “the holy condition called absinthism. In fact, some trinity.” Together the botanicals people pointed to absinthe as the balance the intensity of the culprit for Vincent van Gogh’s earThe traditional liquorice flavours with lopping incident, among other method of drinking absinthe is with sugar and a the bitterness of the horrors. slotted spoon; the ritual (see below) wormwood. Absinthe then—and is certainly fun, but today’s micro Since the spirit now—is a high-proof spirit, distilleries, like Pemberton Distillery in is potent, it’s meant BC, are producing high-end absinthe to be diluted with that doesn’t need sugar-coating. And that makes it a go-to ingredient a three-to-one or for cocktails with some serious five-to-one ratio of depth. pembertonwater to absinthe or distillery.ca mixed in a cocktail. It all sounds simple enough but science and sensation made things more complicated at the turn of the 19th century.

From madness to malaria

THE RITUAL Use a drip fountain (filled with ice water), a perforated absinthe spoon, sugar cubes and a traditional glass. Method: Pour 1 oz absinthe into a glass. // Put the spoon on the glass; place a sugar cube

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*

Absinthe, an aperitif, is often compared to pastis, but this French spirit is sweeter and has a lower ABV. A slight bitterness is pleasantly present in absinthe, along with the expected herbal nuances.

on top. // Let the cold water drip slowly onto the sugar cube until it melts. // Continue adding 3 to 5 oz water and watch the louche form (Can you spot the green fairy?) // Stir in sugar and start sipping. THE SHORTCUT Follow the same propor-

tions above, but instead of a fountain, use a carafe to pour the water. Any glass that can hold 6 to 8 oz of liquid will work. No spoon? Use a fork, tines curved upward. Sugar is optional—it was used to mask the bitterness of poor-quality absinthe.

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

THE COCKTAILS

a little >

Sazerac Muddle together a sugar cube, 2 dashes Angostura bitters and 3 dashes Peychaud’s bitters. Add 2 oz rye whiskey and ice; stir. Strain into an absinthe-rinsed rock glass (or absinthe-sprayed,

as per Cooper Tardivel’s Seal-of-the-Sazerac take; see page 16.)

more >

Death in the Afternoon Pour 1 to 1.5 oz absinthe into a flute glass. Top with 3 to 4 oz champagne.

a lot > The Green Beast Mix 1 oz each Pemberton Distillery Organic Absinthe, fresh lime juice, simple syrup and 4 to 6 oz water in a highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with a thin slice of cucumber and stir.

editor’s

pick

far left: Eric Litton

{how to drink}

Thujone is the naturally occurring active ingredient in wormwood that was said to cause “mind-altering madness,” but history also tells a different tale. Greeks, Egyptians and Romans reportedly used wormwood for its healing properties and there’s evidence that doctors prescribed it to soldiers to ward off malaria. Modernday science also indicates that thujone levels in absinthe would have been quite low, thanks to the distilling process. The ill


thirsty [continued]

effects were real; however, they were more likely a result of old-fashioned alcohol abuse. Fact, however, is boring. The tall tales are part of absinthe’s allure, even today. There’s the literary angle: Hemingway, Zola and Wilde were all said to be inspired by the fée verte—green fairy—as the revered spirit was named. There are the horror stories depicting hallucinations. And, of course, government’s “scared straight” health warnings stating that “…the skin turns the colour of green coffee, the mucus membrane assumes a violet hue … the hair falls off…,” according to an 1861 newspaper article posted on the Wormwood Society’s website. Perhaps some of this was to appease French wine producers who noticed wine sales plummet as absinthe became the drink of choice during the Belle Epoque. Like many great books, absinthe was once banned. The US and much of Europe cut off production. Switzerland, where absinthe was invented, only lifted its ban in 2005. The US followed suit two years later, but the anise-flavoured spirit has always been legal in Canada.

Artisanal absinthe in Canada

At present, there are just three distilleries in Canada making artisanal absinthe, all in British Columbia. Okanagan Spirits is renowned for its range of spirits, especially eaux de vie made with 100% BC fruit. Since 2007 it has been making Taboo absinthe, with active operations in Vernon and Kelowna. Not surprisingly, its base spirit is made from fruit, not grain. Along with the holy trinity, the botanicals petite wormwood, hyssop and lemon balm are added to the mix. The latter botanicals are added after the distilling process and their natural chlorophyll gives the spirit its distinctive green hue, hence its name: absinthe verte. Absinthe was still made post-ban but distillers left out this last step as a way to hide the spirit, and the French “blanche” and Swiss “la bleue” versions emerged. Another important ingredient is star anise, which is one of the botanicals that contributes to the “louche” or cloudy effect that results when water is added to the spirit, releasing its aromatic oils. (See sidebar, How to Drink Absinthe.) At Pemberton Distillery north of Whistler, BC master distiller, Tyler Schramm, grows most of the herbs for The Devil’s Club organic absinthe, including wormwood, on

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thirsty [continued]

interesting. Schramm decided to play on the medicinal quality of wormwood and also downplay the typical anise-forward flavour with Devil’s Club root bark, Oregon grape root, hops and roasted hemp seed. “Devil’s Club is the most valuable

We asked…

head bartender Cooper Tardivel, of Hawksworth Restaurant in Vancouver, about absinthe… As the winner of the prestigious Seal of the Sazerac—his Sazerac is the only one outside of New Orleans to have won—we wanted his take on its special ingredient: “It is indeed fitting that absinthe is lovingly known as ‘the Green Fairy.’ Specifically with regard to the Sazerac cocktail, the fairy’s aromatic is whimsical and elusive, while her profile is balanced with playful sweetness and dry transgression. A few dashes of the Green Fairy in a well-made Sazerac adds a wonderfully delicate je ne sais quoi to the bold foundation of American rye whiskey.”

medicinal and spiritual herb in the Pacific Northwest and offers an earthy, pungent sweet aroma and taste,” says Schramm. “Hops are very aromatic and offer fresh, citrus notes. Roasted hemp seed gives a round nutty, oily flavour and mouthfeel. These combine to create an absinthe that has a totally unique West Coast character.” Drop into a specialty liquor outlet to find a few good-quality bottles of French or Swiss absinthe and mint-green Czech-style “absinthe,” which the Wormwood Society maintains is no more than coloured vodka (and lacks louching). Travel to the US and the selection broadens, though domestic distillers are still in short supply. While Schramm’s absinthe may have a spiritual homage to the area, people like Brian Warner, better known as rocker Marilyn Manson, are still trading on its mystique. His Absinthe Mansinthe, which is made in Switzerland, earned gold at the San Francisco World Spirits competition in 2008. Perhaps the green fairy has been replaced with a darker, if not still delicious, spirit once again. And who knows, it may inspire a painting or two.

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hawksworth restaurant

MUST-TRY

The Sazerac at Hawksworth his small botanical farm. It’s Restaurant won the Seal of the distilled in the traditional Sazerac at Tales of the Cocktail 2012. manner with an organic High honours. As head bartender, potato spirit base (that’s Cooper Tardivel, says of the absinthetinged concoction (note the spray of used for his awardabsinthe on the glass), “The Sazerac winning vodka) and lives as deep in any bartender’s naturally coloured using soul as any cocktail could.” specialty aging herbs. hawksworthrestaurant.com Here’s where it gets really


travel at home

ast on th go e ew es t

c

t as o

d t l r e i i p f d n a l is

couver isl a van nd of

The view from Oceanfront Suites at Cowichan Bay

From the Cowichan valley towards the comox valley, the east coast of vancouver island offers a bounty of food + drink >> story + photography by barb Sligl SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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travel at home if you go

Discover Vancouver Island’s wine, culinary + spa spots at vancouverisland.travel or Tourism BC’s HelloBC.com website. And for the best intro to the island’s scenery, fly there from Vancouver by seaplane with harbourair.com. Bon appétit!

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ere, we’re all about the quality over quantity.” So says Andy Johnston, winemaker and owner of Averill Creek Winery in the Cowichan Valley 1 {averillcreek.ca}. A retired MD, he claims that right here on the southeast coast of Vancouver Island is the best place in Canada to grow Pinot Noir, “the prima donna of grapes.” There’s something about the soil and climate here that has

fostered a primo product and passionate community of like-minded growers and farmers. Johnston’s Pinot Noir is his “pièce de résistance,” winner of a gold medal award in Wine Access magazine, and a wine of which he says, “If I don’t sell it, I don’t care. I’ll drink it.” It’s a common refrain in the Cowichan Valley. Those who grow food here, partake in it themselves—because it’s damn good. Not far from Averill Creek is Venturi Schulze Vineyards, where, as

Johnston says, “they make brilliant, world-class vinegar.” Here, you can taste vinegar that goes for $65 a bottle (it made Oprah’s list) or the Maranello rosé, a dry wine that Garry Garneau 2 behind the tasting bar describes as “a really good looking crazy girl.” If you want the wine that’s the “nice girl you take home to mom,” there’s Millefiori. Whatever your preference, take home the taste-explosion of the balsamic vinegar {venturischulze.com}. The Venturi Schulze

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farm began as a “field of dreams” but today is touted as one of the top food artisans in Canada. And yet it’s still very much family-run, as are most such establishments on the island. Owner Marilyn Venturi says she and husband Giordano still get in the dirt and recline amidst the vines, taking in the sky while sipping the wine they make. Her daughters and their partners take part in every process, and daughter Michelle Schulze even raises falcons on the side. Another family-run

operation and neighbour is Merridale Ciderworks, where Janet Docherty and Rick Pipes produce award-winning cider and spirits from their fruit orchards {merridalecider. com}. There’s classic English Scrumpy cider made from crab apples, Project Q bubbly made from quince and artisan distillery brandies that have won gold, silver and best-in-class from the American Distilling Association. After a tasting flight of cider and locally sourced charcuterie, it’s all about kicking

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4 back in the orchard 3 , and staying overnight in the property’s rather luxurious yurts. 4 5 Still in the same hood, Unsworth Vineyards produces the stellar port-style Ovation, one of two Cowichan wineries to make a port {unsworthvineyards.com}. And, maybe even better, there’s a port-infused sea salt made in partnership with Vancouver Island Salt Co. (Unsworth coowner Sarah Cosman’s tip: sprinkle kale chips with the sweet-and-salty flakes…divine.)

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From there it’s an easy drive to the town of Duncan, where dinner at Hudson’s On First is haute cuisine of the 100-milediet kind 6 {hudsonsonfirst.ca}. Set in a centuryold house (complete with original tin ceiling 7 ), it was recently opened by Top Chef Canada competitor, Dan Hudson 8 , and has since been named one of Canada’s best new restaurants by enRoute magazine. Before heading north, the tiny enclave of Cowichan Bay is a must-stop—the nucleus

7

of the Cittaslow movement in the Cowichan Valley, which is the first North American community to be recognized by the international organization for fostering local relationships, history and traditions, while also promoting craftsmanship and environmental stewardship. A very healthy mouthful. While here, buy wild salmon off the dock and take home a handmade Sacre Bleu or Camembert-style wedge from Hilary’s Cheese. 9

For a super-sweet treat, head north to Nanaimo, known as one of the island’s ferry terminuses…and an infamous gooey-good confection. 10 Just about every eatery here has a version of the Nanaimo bar, from deep-fried to the martini at Acme Food Co. 11 {acmefoodco.ca}. The goodness continues north near Parksville, where the sunrises are worth getting up for 12 , the ocean’s warm and the tidal pools seem endless. 13 Set up base at the

Tigh-na-mara Seaside Spa Resort. After walking unheeded for miles of beach, settle in for an evening at the Grotto Spa. Post-treatment, shuffle in your robe and slippers to the Treetop Tapas & Grill for an “endless” assortment of tasting plates in which, once again, local produce is front-and-centre, from Little Qualicum cheese to Nanoose Edibles’ wild garlic 14 {tigh-na-mara. com}…and this might just be as good a place as any to end this flavour trail—for now.

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d o c t o r o n a s o a p b o x D r . c h r i s p e n g i l ly Dr. Chris Pengilly is Just For Canadian Doctors’ current affairs columnist. Please send your comments to him via his website at drpeng.ca.

going, going gone

Is the family practice a dying art?

A

t last I am heading towards retirement. It is a time when I am drawn to reflect on the changes that have happened over the almost half century since I graduated. More specifically the changes that have occurred since 1978 when I acquired my current family practice. I first saw Victoria in May having come from the Prairies. I left snow and brown grass and landed in Victoria—the daffodils had already come and gone, and the rhododendrons were in full bloom. Living near the ocean is always something which has been particularly dear to my wife’s heart. So, of course, I began to look towards moving there permanently. I had to come back a few months later, and by good luck a practice had just been posted with the College. Literally hours before. I contacted the physician, and to cut a very long story short negotiated taking over the practice. It cost me $15,000—$7,000 for equipment and $8,000 for “good will.” I found out afterwards that no fewer than 40 other physicians had contacted this doctor and would probably have paid considerably more. Victoria remains as beautiful as ever and the provincial government is indiscriminately pouring money into family practice, and yet many of my colleagues are having to walk away from their practices because nobody—absolutely nobody—is interested in taking on a family practice. There is no one single cause for this change, so there will be no one single solution. One cited cause is the disparity of incomes between specialists and family physicians. Since the original fee schedules were drawn up so much has changed, leading to a widening of the gaps in incomes. Here in BC the paediatricians

are doing particularly badly while the interventionists are thriving. We are not a profession of Albert Schweitzers, but if you went into family practice to make a lot of money then you have made a bad choice. Younger medical graduates, quite understandably, do not want to work the brutal hours that I can remember. In my particular province this is even worse when 24/7 on-call is entirely, actively and intentionally unpaid. This is because it is a mandatory part of licensing. It is interesting, however, that there is now over 70% noncompliance with this licensing requirement. Another major reason is the overwhelming and ever increasing amount of paperwork involved in family practice. I am encouraged to see that the Canadian Medical Association is actively working on this; it now has negotiated a single unified form for short-term, longterm and ongoing disability insurance claims. Redundant information has been pared out. Insurance companies are obliged to accept these forms. This is a small start but at least it is a start. I think a major drawback, which was expressed to me today by one of the medical students I teach, is that there is nothing in the medical school curriculum concerning the business side of running a practice. The current situation lends itself to the venomous combination of responsibility without control. A recipe for depression and stress if ever there was one. Physicians are paying dearly for hanging on to the myth that we are an independent profession.

Physicians are paying dearly for hanging on to the myth that we are an independent profession

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time to hang up th e stethoscope ?

I hope that the next generation coming into medicine will be able to work in clinics where they can practice medicine without the hiring and firing, negotiating leases and other nonmedical and time-consuming chores for which most have no aptitude and all have no training. One step towards this would be fairly easily achieved if a percentage (say 80%) of overheads is paid by the health authorities in exchange for a fair roll back in fees. This would enable physicians to hire more secretarial and nursing staff to help out with the paperwork and much of the routine medical work. Even though I am losing out bigtime, one good change is that incoming physicians are no longer burdened by acquiring further debt to purchase a practice. Notwithstanding all the abovementioned problems, I must say that I have never regretted for a moment my choice of profession, my choice of family practice and my move to Victoria, BC. Are you interested in moving to the end of the rainbow? After 45 years I am ready to hang up my stethoscope.


bay area bliss

travel the world

From Sausalito to Berkeley to the Presidio, gain a different perspective of the Bay Area story + photography by barb sligl

The view from the Inn Above Tide in Sausalito, with Alcatraz and the San Francisco skyline beyond‌ and a full moon rising above. SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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I

travel the world t’s twilight. The sun’s gone and ment—The Bay Lights. A light sculpture the sea and sky appear as one. orchestrated by artist Leo Villareal, it glitters There’s no line on the horifrom dusk ‘til dawn on the San Francisco Bay zon but the rocky outpost of Bridge West Span (through to March 2015) Alcatraz is just visible in the hazy and I trip the light fantastic. blue-grey and pink-tinged light. In the morning, I jog along the marina A group of kayakers glide past, walkway past Sausalito’s world-famous their wake and paddles dipping house-boat community. Post-breakfast, into the water the only break on I hop on one of the inn’s complimentary the surface of an über-calm San bikes, but rather than explore the quiet Francisco Bay. Far above all this a side of the bay to Tiburon Uplands Nature full moon rises over a metropolis just visible Preserve I gather the courage to climb up from under a gauzy mist. It’s hard to believe this tranquil refuge is a 15-minThe Wood Line ute ferry ride from San artwork in the Francisco proper. Here, in Presidio. Sausalito, the harshest din is the blast of the ferry’s horn and the bark of the resident sea lion who drapes his hefty and languid figure across the end of the dock, eliciting double-takes from ferry passengers who are just discovering this secret-like cove for the first time. Amidst the mouthswide-open newcomers are local commuters who know a good thing and forgo dealing with rush-hour traffic in the city by living in this coastal community. It’s a bit of Bay Area bliss. And the best place to take it in is from the Inn Above Tide. Perched right over the water, the 31room boutique hotel likes to boast that it’s “your box seat on the bay.” Because, yes, it’s all about that view. As a former condo development (Clint Eastwood was once a resident), each room has panoramic views and is just a little different, refurbed to luxe standards (think Bvlgari amenities and high thread-count). After settling in, there’s wine and cheese from Napa and to and cross the Golden Gate Bridge to Sonoma just north of here, and dinner at a the west side of San Francisco and down go-to “trustafarian”-packed spot, Fast Food to Baker Beach. Buffeted by bay winds, the Français, where the fare is anything but fast ride is exhilarating. And the unimpeded food…Cali-chic kale Caesar, house-made views—there of the city skyline and back paté and Brussels sprout chips with butof the Marin Headlands—come so fast and termilk dip. furious, it’s almost too much…not a chance! Sated, I return to my private deck in the After getting my coastal-chic fix in appropriately named Skyline Suite and take Sausalito, I cross the bay again by ferry and full advantage of the in-room binoculars take the BART (part of the Bay Area’s public for some prime-time bay-watching. As transportation system, courtesy of which the night chill sets in, I get the fire going I’m able to get across the water, to and and settle in for my evening entertainfrom the airport and everywhere else) to

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Berkeley for my college-cool fix. It’s known as the “city of learning,” and I certainly gain a lesson or two here…like how to taste sake, from dry to sweet, at Takara, one of only five sake distilleries in the US. Kanpai! Sufficiently fortified, I take the University of California Berkeley tour (free and daily) with a student ambassador who tells it like it is: “Welcome to our beautiful campus.” It’s spring and trees are blooming, students are lounging on lawns and the promise of summer break is in the air. Even with 25,000 undergrads and 10,000 grad students, the campus feels rather bucolic. And yet the Golden Gate Bridge is just visible from the campus’ hilltop. It’s very much an urban campus, linked to the city (Berkeley has grown up around UC since it was founded in 1863) and politically charged (some 1,100 student groups are involved in all sorts of causes), where you can go grab a horchata and torta vegetariana at farm-totable Sabor Mexicano just off the university grounds. The organic, granola vibe is strong here—this is where Alice Waters, “mother of California cuisine,” first opened Chez Panisse with its sustainability ethos. Along Berkeley’s so-called Gourmet Ghetto on Shattuck Avenue, I walk past its sacred doors and the Juice Bar Collective, Cheese Board Co-op and even one of America’s first microbrew pubs, Triple Rock Brewery Alehouse, where, I’m told, “They have an IPA, IPAX, that is religion for some.” But granola has grown up. As Berkeley’s tourism office puts it, “come for the culture, stay for the food.” In the artisan enclave of West Berkeley, lunch at Riva Cucina in a refurbed warehouse includes fresh-caught calamari from Mendocino to Monterey. The rosemary-infused olive oil is sourced nearby and the organic bread is from Acme, which supplies the best Bay Area restaurants. The founder, of course, started at Chez Panisse and is “driven to bake.” The bohemian counter-culture vibe of Berkeley, which has welcomed and fostered so many forward-thinking minds (from now-professor Robert Reich to formerstudent Steve Wozniak), finds it way to bakeries, distilleries, eateries and the hip


travel the world

>>

Rocking chairs on the porch of the Inn at the Presidio; UC Berkeley campus; graffiti in Berkeley; the Golden Gate Bridge shimmers in the far distance from the vantage of Berkeley’s turn-of-the-century, almost-kilometre-long pier; the view biking across the Golden Gate Bridge; the Inn at the Presidio; Yoda Fountain at Lucasfilms campus in the Presidio; the Inn Above Tide in Sausalito.

clockwise from top left


travel the world

clockwise from top The view of the Golden Gate Bridge and the Marin Headlands from Baker Beach in the Presidio; Fourth Street boutique in Berkeley; nautical-themed, oldschool keys at the Inn Above Tide.

boutiques along Fourth Street. “Flower power and free speech is in our DNA,” says one local, but Berkeley is now also a sophisticated culinary and arts destination… with a green bent, of course. Oozing student cool, I need a dose of more traditional history. Back across the bay, I find it in the Presidio, San Francisco’s oldest settlement. Founded in 1776 as a Spanish imperial outpost, it’s far older than the state itself. Once California joined the US, the Presidio became a US Army post from 1846 to 1994—and the most important base on the west coast. When the army left it became part of the National Park Service and today the Presidio Trust oversees 1,491 acres, where you’ll find Crissy Field, which Amelia Earhart once flew in and out of, as well as one of Lucasfilms’ campuses, complete with its iconic Yoda fountain.

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I hole up in the boutique Inn at the Presidio, the last hotel before you cross the Golden Gate Bridge north. Once Pershing Hall, the rather posh home built in 1903 for bachelor officers stationed at the Main Post, this historic building was revamped in 2012 to become a LEED-certified 22-room bolthole minutes from San Francisco’s hubbub yet ensconced in the Presidio’s sanctuary. Since opening, the inn has been on many a top-hotel list, from Fodor’s to Travel & Leisure. Outside, there’s a front porch with rocking chairs and backyard with firepit. Inside, army-era memorabilia, historic photos and original hardwood floors mix with modern décor and contemporary regional art. I stop and gape at the photo in the lobby of Andy Goldsworthy’s Wood Line, a piece of art that snakes through a grove of eucalyptus trees. When I find out I can walk

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

its undulating path and immerse myself in the photo’s scene, I head out into the wilds of the Presidio. From the backyard I take a trailhead that leads to grassy meadows with birds chirping in the Tennessee Hollow Watershed, butterflies flitting about, the oldest golf course west of the Mississippi, peek-a-boo views of the Golden Gate and that grove of eucalyptus trees. Here, alongside the Presidio’s oldest path of Lovers’ Lane, I stand at the foot of Wood Line and gaze up through the tunnel of mottled trunks. The trees were planted as the army’s defense against pervasive Pacific winds over 100 years ago; today, the not-indigenous trees are an indelible part of the Presidio or, as Peter Ehrlich, the Presidio Trust’s forester describes the man-made woods: “It’s a work of art; it’s actually an artifact.” And it’s surreal. A stunning stand of arboreal beauty that I can’t quite believe is minutes from San Francisco’s financial district. I continue my meandering through the Presidio, past the solemnity of the military cemetery, to watch the sun go down from Immigration Point (come morning, the place to watch the sunrise over Alcatraz Island is from Inspiration Point). As twilight settles over the Bay Area again, I meander down Presidio Boulevard to Building 563, where the Presidio Social Club serves barrel-aged spirits and old-school cocktails that those bachelor officers would have likely appreciated. I sip an Aged Reasons Rye as my nightcap before walking back to the inn to sit by the fire pit and glimpse the Big Dipper suspended as if trying to sample a big scoop of the Bay Area itself. It seems I’ve found yet another perspective.

if you go

3

bay-area bases 1 In Sausalito, stay at the Inn Above Tide {innabovetide.com} and, after partaking in the inn’s wine-and-cheese spread, go for casual Cali-style French fare at Fast Food Français {eatf3. com}. Then watch The Bay Lights {thebaylights.org} from your “box seat on the bay.” 2 On the east side of the bay in Berkeley, stay seaside at the DoubleTree by Hilton Berkeley Marina {doubletree3.hilton.com} or near campus at the boutique Hotel Shattuck Plaza, a fixture since 1910 {hotelshattuckplaza.com}. Sip sake at Takara {takarasake.com}, walk the Gourmet Ghetto {gourmetghetto.org}, sample seafood at Riva Cucina {rivacucina. com} or Mexican at Sabor Mexicano {sabormexicano. com/cancun} and make like a student at UC Berkeley {berkeley.edu}. For more on the Berkeley scene go to visitberkeley.com. 3 In the Presidio, stay at the Inn at the Presidio {innatthepresidio.com} and sip cocktails at the Presidio Social Club {presidiosocialclub.com}. From your swanky outpost, let loose and explore—from milelong Baker Beach to the oldest golf course west of the Mississippi. For more info on the Presidio: presidio.gov.


pay i t f o r w a r d

r o b e r ta s ta l e y

Roberta Staley is an award-winning magazine editor and writer with experience reporting from the developing world and conflict and post-conflict zones. She is the editor of the Canadian Chemical News and a graduate student at Simon Fraser University.

homeless—but not hopeless

An Ontario physician goes to the Philippines to provide post-typhoon medical assistance

Médecins Sans Frontières

L

ast December, about a month together from the storm debris. In all, MSF after Typhoon Haiyan pummelled treated about 300 patients a day in the Southeast Asia, Dr. Luella Smith of outpatient unit and maintained a 50-bed Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) set down in-patient unit for treating those afflicted in the Philippines. Smith had prepared with pneumonia, physical injury, infection, herself for destruction, but even she hadn’t tetanus and psychiatric disorders. “It was imagined a landscape so totally razed. “It amazing to hear all the horror stories that was completely flattened, especially the every survivor had to tell. It’s admirable how slums with their tin-roof shacks,” Smith people manage to carry on. I always find it says by phone from Parry Sound north of so humbling,” says Smith. Toronto, where she works a locum as an MSF workers also saw the emergence emergency physician at West Parry Sound of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A Health Centre. woman who had lost two of five Smith had been flown in by MSF as part of the second wave of aid workDr. Luella Smith ers to relieve the first, exhausted of Médecins Sans team, who had set up a tent hosFrontières with a pital in the parking lot of a private young boy she’s hospital in Tacloban, the worst-hit treated on one of her city along the Philippines’ remote many missions with MSF—from Niger eastern seaboard. As medical dito Tacloban in the rector of the Tacloban MSF hospital, Philippines. Smith was responsible for overseeing the operating theatre, delivery room, obstetrics, pediatrics, surgical and medical and psychiatric wards, as well as the outpatient department of the temporary facility. If the tortured landscape was an eye opener, so too were the medical challenges, says Smith, who emigrated from the Philippines as a child and became a physician in 1980 in Albert County, NB, where she also raised six children. The first responders had dealt with critical injuries—the super typhoon killed an estimated 10,000 people in Tacloban alone when powerful winds and giant waves pounded the city on November 8. By the time Smith arrived, survivors had developed infections requiring surgical debriding. Diabetics developed complications due to a lack of insulin. The drug, of course, requires refrigeration and, due to the lack of electricity, diabetchildren in the typhoon, then gave birth to ics couldn’t keep their insulin cold. The a newborn a month later under Smith’s care, unfortunate consequence was the need for saw her infant turned over to social services amputation of lower limbs due to ulcers and when she spiralled into depression. nerve damage. “The city’s electricity didn’t In the face of widespread suffering, come on until Christmas,” says Smith. The there often emerges small but gallant MSF facility, which was powered by generasymbols of optimism and fortitude. Despite tors, kept the diabetic patients in hospital as everything, “people were still able to smile. they couldn’t take proper care of themselves There was a slogan, ‘Rise Up Tacloban,’ that in the makeshift shacks that people cobbled was plastered all over the city. And there

were t-shirts reading, ‘We may be homeless and roofless but we’re not hopeless,’” says Smith, whose own extended Filipino family escaped the typhoon’s wrath. Smith has always been drawn to the challenges of emergency medicine, with its complex cases and life-and-death dramas. With her children grown up and starting families of their own, Smith, who was in her 50s at the time, was finally able to embrace a long-held desire to practice humanitarian medicine among the truly needy. She has done many MSF missions—some

nearly seven months long—since 2005 and been recognized with the Helen Karounis Memorial Award for Professionalism in Emergency Medicine from the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians. There have been several missions as challenging as the Philippines, says Smith. These include malnutrition projects in Niger and Central African Republic, where she dealt with >> continued on page 26 kwashiorkor and

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

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>> continued from page 25 marasmus— two devastating outcomes of starvation that often spell death for a child. “You see kids come in really sick and they walk out—so that part is satisfying—but there’s also kids who don’t do well. I see kids die who, if they would have been in North America, they would have survived.” When she isn’t abroad on MSF missions, Smith can be found in different emergency wards around the country. One of her favourite places is Yellowknife, NWT. Since the hospital services a vast area, many patients arrive via medevac from dozens of tiny scattered communities in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The people of the North have their own challenges: tuberculosis is still a scourge here, as are problems associated with alcohol and substance abuse and suicide. Smith is returning to the Philippines later this year. But this time it’s social; she will attend her high school reunion. It is comforting, occasionally, to travel somewhere there isn’t death, devastation and suffering awaiting her upon arrival. Such luxuries are rare—and Smith wants to keep it that way. “I’m always on the look-out for another mission,” she says.

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nashville / tuscany / jersey city / london / whistler … | c a l e n d a r

cme

A n intern ation a l guide to c ontinuing Medical Education

summe r 2014 + beyond 6

5

8 1

9

4

3

2

7

nashville is music city Everyone from Johnny Cash to Jack White has been drawn to this hotbed of music-making, but it plays more than one tune…

B. Sligl

N

ashville is all sorts of cool. It’s the epicentre of American music, whether old-school or newfangled. You could be dining in a hip restaurant next to where Taylor Swift lives or bump into Justin Timberlake in the charming village of Leiper’s Fork, just outside the city (where Carrie Underwood has “a couple cabins”). While conversations are peppered with “y’all,” you’ll also hear New York and LA banter. “Welcome to hick-hop nation,” as one local says. SEE This being music city, a visit to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is paramount. It has some 40,000 square feet of exhibit space showcasing everything from the Bakersfield sound to Dolly Parton’s bejewelled costumes—with some dapper duds for purchase in the gift store 1 (countrymusichalloffame. org). Then there’s the recently opened Johnny Cash Museum, showcasing the Man in Black (johnnycashmuseum.net) and Hatch Show Print, America’s oldest letter-press print shop, producing posters for the likes of Elvis and Led Zeppelin 2 (hatchshowprint.com). On a different note, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, housed in a gorgeous art-deco building that was once a grand US Post

(CME events in Nashville are highlighted in blue.)

Office, has an outstanding collection of contemporary and classic art (fristcenter.org). Even grander is the city’s Parthenon. Built for the Tennessee Centennial Expo in 1897, it’s an exact-to-scale replica of the Greek original, complete with a gargantuan Athena inside (she’s the tallest indoor structure in the western world) 3 (parthenon.org). And a walk away is the pretty campus of Vanderbilt University, the south’s Ivy League-like school, or Vandy as it’s affectionately called 4 (vanderbilt.edu). LISTEN Broadway is home to Nashville’s infamous honky-tonk scene—think music, dancing, beer—but there are limitless venues (and street corners!) for all types of music. If you go to one show, make it in the hallowed walls of the Ryman Auditorium, known as Nashville’s “Mother Church” and the Grand Ole Opry’s original base (ryman.com). Smaller and more intimate is the Bluebird Café, where songwriters jam in a round. You never know who may show up, as Steven Tyler did one recent night… (bluebirdcafe.com). Outside Nashville in Leiper’s Fork, where, after picking up a kick-ass pair of cowboy boots at one of its boutiques 5 , there’s open-mic night at Puckett’s Grocery & Restaurant, which draws mega talent,

young and old, from hit-TV-show Nashville players to musicians who’ve backed up Elvis 6 (puckettsofleipersfork.com). SAMPLE But Nashville is more than its music scene and becoming known for its food and drink. The Patterson House (thepattersonhouse.com) has been at the forefront of reviving Prohibition-era cocktails in a speakeasy setting (Jack White’s a patron) and Rolf and Daughters was named one of America’s best restaurant’s by Bon Appétit magazine last year (rolfanddaughters.com). But there’s also classic southern cooking—grits, fried chicken, catfish, beer in a mason jar—at Puckett’s Grocery 7 (puckettsgrocery. com). And, of course, there’s the Jack Daniel’s distillery, in a dry county, no less, so be sure to book the tour that allows tastings of the world-famous Tennessee whiskey 8 (jackdaniels.com). Even better, in another county, is Short Mountain Distillery, featuring authentic small-batch Tennessee moonshine and bourbon…the real deal 9 (shortmountaindistillery.com). Cheers! —B. Sligl For more on Nashville go to visitmusiccity.com; for more on the surrounding Tennessee environs go to tnvacation.com.

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

27


c m e calendar

Cardiology

Anesthesiology

Alternative Medicine

Aesthetic Medicine

cme

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Jul 21-25

Barrie Ontario

One Week “Everything” Training Course In Botox, Fillers And Medical Aesthetics

Dr. Martin’s Training Centre Canada

800-627-3309 See Ad Page 35

botoxtrainingcanada.com

Aug 18-22

Barrie Ontario

One Week “Everything” Training Course In Botox, Fillers And Medical Aesthetics

Dr. Martin’s Training Centre Canada

800-627-3309 See Ad Page 35

botoxtrainingcanada.com

Sep 20-21

Vancouver British Columbia

Professional Facial Aesthetics Training

The Physician Skincare and Training Centre

877-754-6782 See Ad Page 30

ptcenter.org

Oct 18

Vancouver British Columbia

Advanced Filler Techniques

The Physician Skincare and Training Centre

877-754-6782 See Ad Page 30

ptcenter.org

Jul 12-19

Tuscany Italy

EatBreatheThink Mindfulness Retreat

EatBreatheThink

416-910-4513

eatbreathethink.com

Dec 05-07

Las Vegas Nevada

12th Annual Dr. Roizen’s Personalized, Preventive, And Integrative Medicine Conference

Cleveland Clinic Foundation

800-238-6750

clevelandclinicmeded.com

Jul 18

Clearwater Beach Florida

Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia And Vascular Access Workshop

Northwest Anesthesia Seminars

800-222-6927

nwas.com

Nov 14-16

Disney World Florida

43rd Annual Refresher Course For Nurse Anesthetists

Frank Moya Continuing Education Programs

800-425-1995

currentreviews. com

Jun 23-27

Orlando Florida

C3 Complex Cardiovascular Catheter Therapeutics: Advanced Endovascular And Coronary Intervention Global Summit

The Academy For Continued Health Learning

773-714-0705

c3conference. net

Sep 28Oct 12

Japan and China Cruise

Cardiology, Diabetes, Obesity, Geriatrics

Sea Courses Cruises

888-647-7327

seacourses. com

Oct 10-11

Amelia Island Florida

Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging 2014: Interactive And Case-Based Review

Mayo School of Continuous Professional Development

800-462-9633

mayo.edu

Oct 25-28

Vancouver British Columbia

The Canadian Cardiovascular Congress

Canadian Cardiovascular Society

877-569-3407 See Ad Page 9

cardiocongress. org

Feb 13 2015

Australia and New Zealand Cruise

2015 Updates In Pulmonary And Critical Care Medicine For Primary Care Providers

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 39

continuingeducation.net

27-29

Charleston S. Carolina

Dyslipidemia Conference

Continuing Education Company

800-327-4502 See Ad Page 37

cmemeeting. org

CMEatSEA

888-523-3732 See Ad Page 31

cmeatsea.org

McMaster University

905-525-9140

mcmaster.ca

For:Jan 30-

Diabetes

Issue: Jun

Sep Fax: 06-20

Just For Canadian Doctors

Summer issue Diabetes And 18th2014 Annual Hypertension,

European Explorer Cruise

604 - 681 - 0456 Diabetes & Obesity Update 2014

Nov

Toronto Ontario

Aug 11-15

Hawaii Hawaii

Emergency Medicine Update: Hot Topics 2014

UC Davis Health System

916-734-5390

ucdmc.ucdavis. edu

Nov 01

Toronto Ontario

Critical Care Canada Forum

University of Toronto

519-263-5050

criticalcarecanada.com

12 Attn:

Emergency Medicine

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calendar

Geriatrics

General & Family Medicine

Gastroenterology

Endocrinology

cme

cme

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Jul 04-11

Alaskan Cruise

Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Physician Health

Sea Courses Cruises

888-647-7327 See Ad Page 28

seacourses. com

Sep 04-06

San Francisco California

Clinical Endocrinology Update

The Endocrine Society

888-363-6274

endocrine.org

Oct 17

Nashville Tennessee

Pediatric Allergy In A Nutshell: Food Allergy & Skin Disease

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

615-322-4030

vanderbilt.edu

Jul 19-20

Monterey California

2014 Update In Gastroenterology And Hepatology For The Primary Care Practitioner

UC Davis Health System

916-734-5390

ucdmc.ucdavis. edu

Oct 17-22

Philadelphia Pennsylvania

ACG Annual Meeting & Postgraduate Course

American College of Gastroenterology

info@acg.gi.org

acg.gi.org

Dec 04-06

Orlando Florida

Advances In Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s Clinical & Research Conference

Imedex

800-233-0957

imedex.com

Jul 09-11

Nashville Tennessee

Prescribing Controlled Drugs

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

615-322-4030

vanderbilt.edu

Jul 15-18

South Carolina

Practical Advances In Musculoskeletal And Sports Care

American Academy of Family Physicians

913-906-6000

aafp.org

Sep 13-17

London England

XXXII Congress Of The ESCRS

of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons

353-1-2091100

escrs.org

Oct 15-28

Asian Cruise (Diamond Princess)

Medical CBT For Depression: Ten-Minute Techniques For Real Doctors

CBT Canada

877-466-8228

cbt.ca

Oct 29Nov 01

Savannah Georgia

AANEM 61st Annual Meeting

American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

507-288-0100

aanem.org

Nov 17-20

Calgary Alberta

Family Practice Review & Update Course – Pearls For Practice

University of Calgary

403-220-7240

cme.ucalgary.ca

Dec 13-20

Caribbean Cruise (Disney Fantasy)

Medical CBT For Anxiety: Ten-Minute Techniques For Real Doctors

CBT Canada

877-466-8228 See Ad Page 26

cbt.ca

Apr 16-17 2015

Calgary Alberta

32nd Annual Calgary Therapeutics Course

University of Calgary

403-220-7240

cme.ucalgary.ca

Aug 10-17

Alaskan Cruise

Geriatrics & Cardiology Update 2014

CMEatSEA

888-523-3732 See Ad Page 31

cmeatsea.org

Sep 08-19

France and Iberian Discovery

Caring For An Aging Population & Practice Management

Sea Courses Cruises

888-647-7327

seacourses. com

Dec 04-07

Walt Disney World Resort Florida

Geriatric Medicine For Primary Care

Medical Education Resources

303-798-9682

mer.org

Myrtle Beach

new CME list fromTheAdam European Society

VicHospiceJFCDadQuarterBannerAutumn2014.pdf

1

24/02/14

2:07 PM

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

29


c m e calendar

Neurology

Legal and Ethics

Infectious and Chronic Diseases

Hematology

cme

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Boston Massachusetts

Cancer Medicine And Hematology

Harvard Medical School

617-384-8600

harvard.edu

Aug 06-09

Amelia Island Florida

24th Annual Mayo Clinic Hematology/Oncology Reviews, 15th Annual Fellows’ Research Presentations

Mayo School of Continuous Professional Development

800-462-9633

mayo.edu

Oct 31

Toronto Ontario

Update In Thromboembolism

Thrombosis Canada McMaster University

905-525-9140 See Ad Page 32

mcmaster.ca

Nov 01

Toronto Ontario

Thrombosis Canada Annual Conference

Thrombosis Canada McMaster University

905-525-9140 See Ad Page 32

mcmaster.ca

Aug 15

San Diego California

Chronic Disease Management In Diverse Populations

Scripps Conference Services and CME

800-727-4777

scrippshealth. org

Sep 10-20

Ireland Cruise

Updates In Disease Prevention & Public Healthcare Delivery - Explore The Emerald Isle

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Nov 08-15

Tahiti Cruise

Updates In Disease Prevention & Public Healthcare Delivery

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Aug 03-10

St. Petersburg Russia

East West Medical & Legal Conference

Conferences 21

011-61-7-32543331

conferences21. com

Sep 19-25

Costa Navarino Messinia Greece

The 9th Greek Legal And Medical Conference

Eugenia Mitrakas

613-9690-2033

greekconference.com.au

Sep 25Oct 03

Florence Italy

Europe Pacific Medical & Legal Conference

Conferences 21

011-61-7-32543331

conferences21. com

Nov 06-08

Las Vegas Nevada

Birth Injuries, The Law And Perinatal Safety

Contemporary Forums

800-377-7707

contemporaryforums.com

Aug 08-10

Walt Disney World Resort Florida

Neurology For Primary Care

Medical Education Resources

303-798-9682

mer.org

Sep 15-19

Boston Massachusetts

The Michael J. Bresnan Child Neurology Course

Harvard Medical School

617-384-8600

harvard.edu

Sep 25-27

Amelia Island Florida

Mayo Clinic 6th Annual Stroke And Cerebrovascular Disease Review 2014

Mayo School of Continuous Professional Development

800-462-9633

mayo.edu

London England

Sub Specialty Day

World Society of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

353-1-2091100

wspos.org

Sep 13-17

London England

XXXII Congress Of The European Society Of Cataract And Refractive Surgeons

European Society Of Cataract And Refractive Surgeons

353-1-2091100

eucornea.org

Jul 27-30

Jackson Hole Wyoming

Office Gynecology

Contemporary Forums

800-377-7707

contemporaryforums.com

Jul 28-31

Kiawah Island South Carolina

Focus On The Female Patient Conference

Southern Medical Association

800-423-4992

sma.org

Ophthalmology

Sep 12

Obstetrics & Gynecology

30

when

Sep 14-19

new CME list from Adam

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014


Psychiatry Psychology

Primary Care

Pediatrics

Oncology & Palliative Care

cme

cme

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Ongoing

Online

Modernizing The Code Of Medical Ethics: Chapter 5 - Ethical Issues In Caring for Patients At The End Of Life

American Medical Association

800-621-8335

ama-assn.org

Oct 17-18

New York New York

Mindfulness, Listening And Communication: Training For Providers Caring For The Seriously Ill

New York University

855-395-9659

cme.med.nyu. edu

Oct 18-25

Tahiti and Society Islands Cruise

Primary Care Including Topics In Palliative Care

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 39

continuingeducation.net

Oct 20-24

Victoria British Columbia

Psychosocial Care Of The Dying And Bereaved Course

Victoria Hospice Society

250-370-8283 See Ad Page 29

victoriahospice. org

Nov 17-21

Victoria British Columbia

Palliative Care: Medical Intensive Course

Victoria Hospice Society

250-370-8283 See Ad Page 29

victoriahospice. org

Mar 2015

Richmond British Columbia

Palliative Care: Medical Intensive Course

Victoria Hospice Society

250-370-8283

victoriahospice. org

Ongoing

Multiple Cities Colombia

Capacity Building Internship For HIV/AIDS Orphanage (Volunteer Opportunity)

The Humanity Exchange

778-300-2466

thehumanityexchange.org

Nov 04-07

Las Vegas Nevada

Pediatric Critical Care Nursing

800-377-7707

contemporaryforums.com

Jun 30Jul 04

Kiawah Isl. South Carolina

22nd Annual Primary Care Conference

Continuing Education Company

800-327-4502 See Ad Page 37

cmemeeting. org

Jul 14-18

Palm Coast Florida

5th Annual Essentials In Primary Care: Summer I

Continuing Education Company

800-327-4502

cmemeeting. org

Jul 28Aug 01

Big Island Hawaii

5th Annual Essentials In Primary Care: Summer II (New Location)

Continuing Education Company

800-327-4502

cmemeeting. org

Aug 01-03

San Diego California

31st Annual Primary Care Summer Conference

Scripps Conference Services and CME

858-652-5400

scrippshealth. org

Aug 03-10

Bermuda Cruise

Primary Care, Gastroenterology, Physician Leadership

Sea Courses Cruises

888-647-7327 See Ad Page 28

seacourses. com

Mar 23-26 2015

Maui Hawaii

20th Annual Primary Care In Paradise

Scripps Conference Services and CME

800-727-4777

scrippshealth. org

Oct 18

New York New York

Psychocardiology: Treating Mood Disorders While Minimizing Cardiovascular And Metabolic Risks

New York University

855-395-9659

cme.med.nyu. edu

Jan 08-10 2015

Whistler British Columbia

Medical CBT For Anxiety: Ten-Minute Techniques For Real Doctors

CBT Canada

877-466-8228

cbt.ca

Feb 16-26 2015

Tahitian Cruise (Ocean Princess)

Medical CBT Tools: Ten-Minute Techniques For Real Doctors

CBT Canada

877-466-8228 See Ad Page 26

cbt.ca

APR 21 – MAY 7, 2015 LIMA TO NEW YORK

s ur ho

Celebrity Silhouette

Celebrity Constellation

E CM

Dermatology & Gastroenterology Update 2015

Panama Canal

46

MAR 15-22, 2015 ROUNDTRIP FT. LAUDERDALE

s ur ho

s ur ho

Diabetes & Obesity Update 2014

Eastern Caribbean

E CM

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SEP 6-20, 2014 AMSTERDAM TO ISTANBUL

new CME list from Contemporary Adam Forums

18

42

European Explorer

Chronic Disease Management & Pain Management Update 2015 Oceania Marina

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SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

31


c m e calendar

Wilderness Medicine

Technology

Surgery

Radiology

cme

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Jul 18

Nashville Tennessee

ESP Ultrasound PHYSICS

ESP Ultrasound

615-320-1700

esp-inc.com

Aug 11-15

New York New York

Comprehensive Training Program In Gamma Radiosurgery

New York University

855-395-9659

cme.med.nyu. edu

Oct 20-24

Santa Barbara California

NYU’s Fall Radiology Symposium In Santa Barbara

NYU Department of Radiology

212-653-1277 See Ad Page 4

nyu.edu

Dec 15-19

New York New York

NYU’s 33rd Annual Head To Toe Imaging Conference

NYU Department of Radiology

212-653-1277 See Ad Page 4

nyu.edu

Feb 02-06 2015

Kona Hawaii

NYU’s Clinical Imaging Symposium In Hualalai

NYU Department of Radiology

212-653-1277 See Ad Page 4

nyu.edu

Sep 17-21

Vancouver British Columbia

Canadian Surgery Forum 2014

Canadian Association of General Surgeons

613-882-6510

canadiansurgeryforum.com

Sep 19-21

Orlando Florida

Advances In Dermatologic Surgery

Florida Society of Dermatologic Surgeons

904-292-0051

fsds.org

Nov 02-07

Boston Massachusetts

ObesityWeek 2014

Society For Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

212-266-0062

obesityweek. com

Sep 11

Toronto Ontario

EMR: Every Step Conference And Vendor Showcase

OntarioMD

416-623-1248

ontariomd.ca

Sep 20-21

Jersey City New Jersey

2014 Laser Aesthetics Course

American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery

877-258-6028

aslms.org

Oct 30Nov 01

Atlanta Georgia

Contraceptive Technology

Contemporary Forums

800-377-7707

contemporaryforums.com

Jul 19Aug 01

Kimberly Australia

Wilderness Medicine Conference

Expedition Medicine

44-0-129720583

Sep 22Oct 05

Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan

Bhutan Mountain Medicine CME Conference

Andes Mountain Guides

Nov 08-11

Windhoek Namibia

‘Wild Medicine’ - A Conservation Medicine Conference

Expedition Medicine

Jan 11-30 2015

Aconcagua Mendoza Argentina

Aconcagua Mountain Medicine CME Conference

Andes Mountain Guides

406-539-5091

andesmountainguides.com

12 Days Aug 2015

Bariloche Argentina

Argentina Ski/Avalanche I Mountain Medicine CME Conference

Andes Mountain Guides

406-539-5091 See Ad Page 15

andesmountainguides.com

11 Days Sep 2015

Papau Indonesia

Raja Ampat Liveabord Dive And Marine Medicine CME Conference

Andes Mountain Guides

406-539-5091

andesmountainguides.com

new CME list from Adam

See Ad Page 33 406-539-5091 See Ad Page 15

44-0-129720583

See Ad Page 33

expeditionmedicine.co.uk andesmountainguides.com expeditionmedicine.co.uk

For feedback, requests or to have your course featured please email cme@inprintpublications.com or submit your course via www.justforcanadiandoctors.com

32

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014


EXPLORING THE WORLD OF EXTREME MEDICINE Sir Ranulph Fiennes is delighted to endorse the Extreme Medicine Conference Series. The subject matter, close to his heart, brings together the disparate but complimentary, and often overlapping fields, of Extreme & Expedition, Humanitarian & Disaster and Pre Hospital Care medicine. It is medicine that saves the lives of not only the most remote explorer but also populations devastated by natural disasters, covering the most in need in the most vulnerable of places. The conference serves to bring global leaders in these areas to share knowledge, network and introduce new equipment and techniques as well as presenting cutting edge research. It is this excellence in extremes which Sir Ranulph is proud to be associated with.

8-11 November 2014 Royal Society of Medicine London, UK

Š Martin Hartley

JUSTFOREMEXPO14

www.extrememedicineexpo.com


opportunities employment

Healthy People, Healthy Communities and Service Excellence in an Enduring Health System Heartland is located in west-central Saskatchewan and provides health care services to a population of 44,100. Heartland is home to some of the friendliest communities in the country! We have excellent healthcare services and programs, great recreation, leisure services and schools. Heartland Health Region is seeking dynamic and committed family physicians to provide services to clients in various communities. Physicians will provide patient care, on call emergency coverage and backup to the physicians in the other areas of the Region if needed. Vacancies: 7 Permanent Full Time Family Medicine Positions Communities: Rosetown, Davidson, Unity, Wilkie, Kindersley, Outlook, Macklin Health Region: Heartland Posting Period: Open October 25, 2013 until filled Minimum Potential Salary: $250,000.00 Method of Payment: Fee For Service Education/Work Experience: All candidates must be eligible for a license by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan and have completed an internship/residency/post-graduate training in family medicine. Internationally trained physicians must have passed the MCCEE Exam and practices as an active family physician in the last three years. Job Duties: Provide patient care, on call emergency coverage and backup to the physicians in the other areas of the Region if needed. Visit our website www.hrha.sk.ca for further details on these Family Physician opportunities.

EXPLORE OUR OPPORTUNITIES FOR FAMILY PHYSICIANS

RURAL FAMILY PHYSICIANS Prince Edward Island, Canada

Practicing Family Medicine in Prince Edward Island has been described as ‘much more than a job’ by Dr. Peter Hooley, Family Physician of the year 2011. “It’s a calling and a passion and a

privilege partnering with PEI patients and families.”

PEI offers: - Lowest housing costs in the country - Short commute to work - Low crime rates DID YOU KNOW? In 2013, Prince Edward Island has been ranked as Top Island in Continental US & Canada and, with over 30 golf courses, known nationally as Canada’s #1 golf destination. We have full-time and locum opportunities for Family Physicians in the West Prince area. Go to healthjobspei.ca. Ask Sheila about incentive packages. smmaclean@gov.pe.ca 902-368-6302

Live Island Style

healthjobs pei.ca

34

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

Have a successful career. Achieve balance in your life. Choose New Brunswick! www.gnb.ca/health Ayez du succès dans votre carrière et un équilibre dans votre vie. Choisissez le Nouveau-Brunswick! www.gnb.ca/santé


employment

Guide Weight Loss & Help Change Lives

ct e f r e p e h t r e v o c Dis . place to call home

full and part-time Physicians

opportunities

THIS PATIENT LOST 57.6 LBS IN FOUR MONTHS. This is a typical result. This patient was impressed with the rapid weight loss and the encouragement and support of the nurses and doctor.

Photo Credit: Picture BC

Building supportive and safe weight-loss environments is what we do. We are currently looking for Physicians to join our team who are ready for a rewarding change of pace. Utilize your experience by treating obesity and managing related diseases, and have great success practicing good modern medicine on some of society’s most chronic problems. Not only will you no longer work on call or on the weekends, you will work closely with your patients, build meaningful relationships in a flexible environment, and help change lives. For more information, please contact:

r Isla nd Va nc ouve

e rio T he In t

The Nor th

r

Michael McGuire, Director of Human Resources 21 Kern Road, Toronto, ON, M3B 1S9 ph: 416-447-3438 ext 232 fax: 416-447-0702 e-mail: Michael@DrBDiet.com

www.DrBDiet.com

at yo u r

Enrich your career. ISTER TODAYrg! G E R Enhance your c.o healthmatchb quality of life.

FIND A JOB IN BC

healthmatchbc.org Health Match BC is a free health professional recruitment service funded by the Government of British Columbia, Canada

TOLL-FREE: 1.877.867.3061

TEL: 1.604.736.5920

EMAIL: welcome@healthmatchbc.org JOB #H104-15919 CLIENT: HEALTH MATCH BC PUBLICATION: JUST FOR CANADIAN DOCTORS AD INSERTION DATE: TBA

s ervice

Join the many physicians who have moved to British Columbia (BC), Canada to enjoy a quality of life that is envied around the world. Find out how our allied health services team can assist you in matching your lifestyle interests with exciting career opportunities. Visit our website to view current opportunities.

! e r e h d a r u yo Use this space to deliver your message to 28,000 doctors across Canada.

Call 604-681-1811 now.

SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

35


t h e w e a lt h y d o c t o r

Manfred purtzki, c.a. Manfred Purtzki is the principal of Purtzki & Associates Chartered Accountants. You can reach him at manfred@purtzki.com.

boost your savings

Take on a line of credit as a motivator and forced retirement-savings vehicle

D

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r. Bob is worried that he’ll never be able to have the lifestyle during retirement that he currently enjoys. At age 55, he has accumulated investments of $1.5 million, a nest egg that most Canadians can only dream of. Dr. Bob’s accumulated savings of $1.5 million, according to his financial planner, will only provide him with $75,000 of disposable income during retirement. This amount is considerably less

office space / positions/locums BARRIE, ON — FAMILY PHYSICIAN: The Barrie Area (City of Barrie, Township of Oro-Medonte, Township of Springwater, Town of Innisfil) has an immediate need for Family Physicians with a broad range of practice opportunities available including: locums, starting a new practice, taking over an existing practice, or practice sharing with another Barrie Area Family Physician. Family Physicians are supported through the Barrie Community Family Health Team (FHT) and the Family Health Organization (FHO). Permanent Position. Fee for Service or Blended Capitation Model. For information please contact: Jaclyn Bell bellja@rvh. on.ca or (705)728-9090 Richmond, BC — Physician Recruitment: Very busy group practice in south-east of Richmond BC (juncture of Richmond, Ladner and Tsawwassen) with easy highway access requires a physician that must be comfortable with good primary care, women’s health and EMR skills. Fast paced, friendly environment, supportive staff, 4 working days, competitive split. Seeking a long term associate to build up your practice or transitioning practitioner to relocate practice within Richmond/ Tsawwassen. www.mydoctor. ca/drsinghal For information please contact office number: (604)-448-9595 or email: msinghalmd@ gmail.com Richmond, BC — Psychiatrist Recruitment: Very busy group practice in south-east of Richmond BC (juncture of Richmond, Ladner and Tsawwassen) with easy highway access, requires a psychiatrist to replace psychiatrist on permanent medical leave. Plenty of patients, friendly environment, excellent support staff, flexible hours, and competitive split. Seeking a long term associate. www.mydoctor.ca/drsinghal For information please contact office number: 6044489595 or email: msinghalmd@gmail.com

36

than the $200,000 of disposable income that he is generating now from his family practice. In order to retire at age 60 and be able to draw a minimum income of $100,000, Dr. Bob would need an extra $500,000 of capital. The slim income he now generates from his investments will likely not contribute much to reduce the $500,000 shortfall. What annoys Dr. Bob the most is that when he paid off his house mortgage three years ago, he promised himself to put aside $5,000 each month of the mortgage savings. Three years have gone by and his net worth has not changed. Throughout his career as a doctor, Dr. Bob felt the burden of carrying a large mortgage debt that forced him to work extra hours in his family practice and put in weekend shifts at a walk-in clinic. With the weight of the mortgage off his shoulders, he felt a huge sense of relief, not realizing that he took the foot off the accelerator of his big revenue-generating practice. Dr. Bob reduced his office hours and dropped the shifts at the walk-in clinic. As a result, he saw his income decline by about $100,000 annually. Dr. Bob is really enjoying his new lifestyle now with more leisure time and less work stress. He does not cherish the thought of going back into the coal mine and putting the shoulder to the wheel again. Like so many colleagues in his position, you cannot blame Dr. Bob for taking it a bit easy. Since he started as a resident and throughout his medical career, he always felt under the gun to generate lots of income to support a young family, paying off student loans, house mortgages and loans for the children’s education. Now Dr. Bob is facing a tough choice. He continues on the present course, and pos-

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

sibly sacrificing $25,000 each year of future retirement income. This means giving up on the little luxuries of life and exotic travels that extra income can provide. Alternatively, he has to force himself to resume his old work habits to generate extra income needed to reach his $2 million investment goal in five years. If Dr. Bob is willing to trade in his leisure time to spend more time with patients, here is a strategy to help him reach his goals: His medical Corporation arranges for a line of credit (LOC) of $400,000 – $500,000. The funds are used by the Corporation to purchase investments. The LOC is connected to his business account, which means that patient deposits reduce the LOC, and likewise expenses and personal draws will increase the LOC. When Dr. Bob looks at his bank statement it will always show an overdraft, which provides him with the constant reminder of how much more income Dr. Bob needs to generate to eliminate the debt. We all hate line of credits, particularly doctors. While doctors are generally not involved in the accounting or finance of the practice, they always look at the bank account and their LOC. The LOC is similar to a personal fitness trainer, keeping track of your progress and making sure that you reach your goal. As a result, Dr. Bob will find the renewed energy and focus to put in the extra shifts and do whatever it takes to reach his retirement goal. If you find yourself in a similar situation as Dr. Bob in my illustration, consult with your advisors regarding taking on a LOC as a motivator and forced retirement-savings vehicle.

While doctors are generally not involved in the accounting or finance of the practice, they always look at the bank account and their line of credit


diversion

Reserve Your Spot Today!

sudoku

Solve puzzle #2 for a chance to win a $50 VISA gift card! Each Sudoku puzzle has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 square contains the digits 1 through 9.

CME Conferences NEW LOCATION

October 20-24, 2014

July 28-August 1, 2014

Maui, Hawaii

Kohala Coast, Hawaii

Dr. Donald Westby of Weymouth, NS

(Big Island)

4th Annual Primary Care Fall Conference Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa

5th Annual Essentials in Primary Care Conference II Mauna Lani Hotel & Bungalows

Duck Key, Florida (Florida Keys)

November 3-7, 2014 5th Annual Essentials in Primary Care Fall Conference Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key, Florida

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sudoku 1 easier solution on page 26 sudoku 2 harder solution in next issue

October 13-17, 2014

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CREDITS

2 2 Y E A R S O F P ROV I D I N G L I V E C M E P RO G R A M S

Winners of last issue’s contest:

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20 CME

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February 2-6, 2015

Clinical Issues In Primary Care Wailea Beach Marriott Resort & Spa

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Primary Care Winter Conference Hilton Marco Island Beach Resort & Spa February 16-20, 2015

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entry form (please print clearly): Name: __________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________ City, Province, Postal Code: _____________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________ E-mail: ________________________________________________________________ Tel: ______________________________ Fax: _________________________________ Sudoku Puzzle Contest Rules: 1. Entry form must be accompanied by solved puzzle. Only correctly solved puzzles entered into random draw. 2. Send puzzle and entry form to Just For Canadian Doctors, 200 – 896 Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 2P6 or by fax to 604-681-0456. Entries must be received no later than September 3, 2014. 3. Prize: $50 Visa gift card. Odds of winning dependent upon number of entries. Winner contacted by telephone and announced in Fall 2014 issue. 4. Contest can be changed and/or cancelled without prior notice. 5. All entries become property of In Print Publications. Employees of In Print Publications and its affiliates are not eligible to participate. SUMMER 2014 Just For Canadian Doctors

37


s m a l l ta l k

doctors share their picks, pains, pleasures + fears

Dr. Chris Pengilly is a long-time columnist of this magazine. He’s our doctor on a soapbox (see page 20). And as such, rather opinionated—in the best of ways. If he had to change one thing about himself, he says he’d be “more relaxed and accepting of people and situations.” And yet we find our favourite Tilley-hat-wearing MD anything but difficult, as he describes himself. He’s also the author of a book, The Successful and Audit-Proof Medical Office, and we hope his pending retirement allows ample playtime with words (and the time to write another book!) and more dream vacations (his pick: a European river cruise, despite an abject fear of water).

I live and practise in: Victoria, BC My degrees / training: MB. Ch.B. Leeds UK 1969 Anaesthetics then Family Practice (CCFP) Why I was drawn to medicine and my specialty: I was in hospital four times by the age of 10; my

The best souvenir I’ve brought back from a trip: Neckties from Venice and Croatia My ultimate dream vacation: Almost any river cruise in Europe If I could travel to any time, I’d go…: Nowhere—

The gadget or gear I could not do without: My iPhone 5 My favourite room: The den My car: Toyota RAV4 with all the bells and whistles My last purchase: Karcher Window Cleaner (works great) Last splurge: CanonEOS-60D camera

Most-frequented store: A close contest between London Drugs and Canadian Tire My closet has too many: Clothes that I should have given to Goodwill My fridge is always stocked with: Milk My medicine cabinet is always stocked with: DMRDs Guilty pleasure: Listening to audiobooks My favourite exercise/ sport: Exercising at the gym while listening to audiobooks My favourite sport to watch: Soccer (it is one of the few sports that I can actually see the ball)

*

DOCTORCUM-WRIT ER! Dr. Pengilly is the author of a book on preparing new MDs for all the behind-thescenes stuff of running a family practice— Something he had to learn by trial & error.

father died of gastric cancer when I was eight. We had a great GP at that time whom I admired and who helped the family through all this. My last trip: Venice on a river cruise The most exotic place I’ve travelled to: Provence, particularly Aix en Provence

38

left Dr. Chris Pengilly in his signature Tilley hat and snappy tie (the best souvenir he’s brought back from trips to Venice and Croatia). below Dr. Pengilly with his wife in Venice, Italy, on his most recent trip.

I’d want this item with me if stranded on a desert

island: A spare pair of spectacles A talent I wish I had: Ability to public speak My scariest moment: Tipping in a kayak My fondest memory: Finding out my wife was pregnant My biggest challenge: Psoriatic arthritis and/ or aphakia (congenital cataracts) One thing I’d change about myself: To be more relaxed and accepting of people and situations The word that best describes me: ‘Difficult’ I’m inspired by: Anyone who naturally excels at their job, be it janitor or Prime Minister My biggest ego boost: Passing the UBC Clinical Competence Exam at the age of 55 and being invited to be an examiner My biggest ego blow: My abject failure to overcome my phobia of water I’m happiest when: I am at home My greatest fear: Water as in ocean, rivers and swimming pools

I like the here and I like the now A favourite place that I keep returning to: Puerto Vallarta My favourite book: Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss

My motto: Don’t say in 10 words what you can say in 50 (tongue in cheek) A cause that’s close to my heart: Hospice Victoria

Must-see TV: Doc Martin

On my must-do list: Cross Canada in a railway train

Favourite album/song: I have the misfortune to be tone deaf

If I wasn’t a doctor I’d be: Alternative energy engineer

My first job: Making Cornish pasties

Just For Canadian Doctors SUMMER 2014

photos courtesy Dr. chris pengilly

My name: Chris Pengilly


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October 8, 2014 Family Medicine and Palliative Care 16 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ 16 Contact Hours 11-Night Mediterranean Explorer from Rome to Barcelona Holland America’s ms Noordam

February 22, 2015 Preventive Cardiology 14 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ 14 Contact Hours 7-Night Southern Caribbean from San Juan, Puerto Rico Royal Caribbean’s Adventure of the Seas

November 7, 2014 Emergency Medicine 16 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ 16 Contact Hours 10-Night Panama Canal from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Holland America’s ms Zuiderdam

March 2, 2015 Infectious Diseases 21 CME Category 1 Credit(s)™ 21 Contact Hours 14-Night Far East Explorer Hong Kong to Singapore Holland America ms Volendam

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March 14, 2015 2015 Updates in Primary Care & Ophthalmology 14 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ 14 Contact Hours 7-Night Western Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Royal Caribbean’s Oasis of the Seas Course Fees vary based on number of hours and year. Please visit our web site for current fees and cancellation policies.

Accreditation: Continuing Education, Inc is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Designation: Continuing Education, Inc. designates these live educational activities for a maximum of 11-21 AMA PRA Category 1 credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Florida Seller of Travel Reg. #14337

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