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January 2016


Dear readers,

The start. A thought catalog which couldn’t have born unless something has ended. We celebrate the poem in the corner of agenda, the inaccurate song, an inappropriate erotic innuendos, mindfulness and tenderness, the conspiring smirk across the hall. Perhaps you’ve already noticed a hidden code, underlying topic for our very first issue which will revolve around the recent events of multiple deaths in contemporary Western celebrity scene, with David Bowie as a central figure of the massive outcry. The death of the artist appears complex as it signifies the passing of time, the stop of creativity for an artist and most importantly, passing the torch to coming generations. We reflect on ways of mourning, since it’s also about inspirations, assembling, cutting and confronting ideas to the daily life. In this issue there is hope to synthesize artistic expressions, media sources such as blogs or social networks, literature and academic content, crop and present them to convey both objective and subjective insights to the topic. Trying to provide a kaleidoscopic angle and recollect important thoughts and cultural content and hope to guide any reader to create his own mourning. Therefore, this project mingles knowledge and savoirfaire for and together with the reader. A do-it mag(a)/zine as an open exhibition space to apprehend social phenomenon through art.

Being confronted to death breaks through intense quite contradictory feelings, from anxiety and pain to ecstatic remembrance and pleasure. As the act of mourning is played upon something that is not over there, something we cannot show visually and directly and that is perhaps why death has been a core element of depiction in art history. The sublime enlightens the threat of nothing further happening, a dark cave. Now the sublime is like mourning.

Yours sincerely,

Justine Junie Gensse is driven by the bike, dancing about French literature and dada. She’s up to exploring radio and gasoline station narratives in the other part of the planet, namely, Seoul.

Gabriele Cecilia Krapikaite insists on calling herself a talent scout, because that’s what she’s best at: spotting things. Bounded by her somewhat closed Lithuanian nature she enjoys observing art scene from the furthest corner of the gallery.

Content From the Sublime experience of mourning to David Bowie Contemporary twists : the kitsch and new media Poetry and Pre-raphaelite avant-garde Photography, historicity and participative art


Extract from Cronopes et Fameux

Julio Cortazar

1977

……… //////// ……………


Lyrics of My Death

by David Bowie

Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars 1973

My death waits like an old roue' So confident, I'll go his way Whistle to him and the passing time My death waits like a Bible truth At the funeral of my youth Are we proud for that and the passing time? My death waits like a witch at night As surely as our love is right Let's not think about the passing time But whatever lies behind the door There is nothing much to do Angel or devil, I don't care For in front of that door there is you My death waits like a beggar blind Who sees the world through an unlit mind Throw him a dime for the passing time My death waits there between your thighs Your cool fingers will close my eyes Let's think of that and the passing time My death waits to allow my friends A few good times before it ends So let's drink to that and the passing time For whatever lies behind the door There is nothing much to do Angel or devil, I don't care For in front of that door there is you My death waits there among the leaves In magician's mysterious sleeves Rabbits and dogs and the passing time My death waits there among the flowers Where the blackest shadows, blackest shadows cowers Let's pick lilacs for the passing time My death waits there in a double bed Sails of oblivion and my head So pull up your sheets against the passing time But whatever lies behind the door There is nothing much to do Angel or devil, I don't care For in front of that door there is, Thank You

……… //////// ……………

David Bowie and mourning part of his self …………….. adieu to Ziggy Stardust…...


a

retranscription

about the avant-garde creative artist

Retranscription of Hermann Vaske's interview with David Bowie

HV: Why are you creative David? DB: I think it has something to do with wanting to find a place where I can kind of set aside and know that I won't really fall of the edge of the world when I get to the end of the sea. There are more and more oceans to navigate. The idea that being creative is one of the few human endeavor you can get involved in, where you can as Brian Eno would say in art you can crash your plane and walk away from it. I think it is a sort of intellectual field of adventure that can either be played or it can be war or maybe a hybrid of both. I find it an intoxicating parallel to my perceived reality where you can explore anxieties and fears. I think that's probably why. For some people creativity is life blood. HV: Marcel Duchamp said a painting that does not shock is not worth anything. Does it apply to art of today ? DB: I guess in such a fast event, society, we want provocations and confrontations immediately it is very hard to make money out of the intellectual side of art it is very easy to make money out of the obvious painting and I think until there's real commerce that is going to be unacceptable for a lot of people. I would like to see the big eye become reduced to a little eye, i think it's probably exciting the idea of an artist meandring into areas where he's not supposed to. I think rising about your station in life is something everybody should aspire to. I think it is happening to a certain extend. Brian tends being a trained conceptualist under Richard Hamilton what he tends to do is to take things in the streets and elevate them to fine art whereas me and working class arrogant nonchalents tends to steal from fine art and diminish it to the street level.

HV: Looking back you did as and where certainly one can packaging, always coming up it the content or the style

a concept in the past call you the master of with new concepts. Is that is more important?

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a ……………

retranscription

about the avant-garde creative artist

……… //////// ……………

DB: Content is one thing and packaging, style and framing is another. Sam Keyne once said something that is really interesting he said, product + personnality = brand, I thought that was really cool and I think i tried to apply it. And once your work is done you then create a personnality and hopefully it becomes as sort of Bowies.

HV: You are acting You work with different directors, you just finished a film with Julian Schabel and Andy Wahrol you did picture with Tony Scott called the Hunger, he was a commercial director, did you find differences between in working who come out of advertising filmakers that are features filmakers like David Lynch or painters originally painters like Julian?

DB: The most interesting thing, the difference between those perticular two to take Tony Scott and Julian is that Tony is priority was creating a complecated and asymmetrical frame and the visual was neraly all of waht he was doing, he did not have great idea of the throughline of story, it was moving one interesting visual against another. One would have thought that's how Julian works as well but he did not. Julian had in fact had a far more traditional idea of film making about narratives and performance. I would not say that the visual was secondary with Julian but defenitely the momentum of the story he was trying to tell people had equal priority to the visual. There was something almost Hemingway about each novel and not just in size and dogmatic vast gregarious personality. He's sort of, really, has almost a pioneer instinct for narrative telling, it's cool. He is a cool guy.

HV: What kind of coffee and why?

DB : Lavazza.Coffee is really good for you. It does not put your cholesterol down it does not give you heart desease and It is quite qltogether auite a good choice of drink. UI have been drinking 8 – 10 cups a day all my life, I feel find, my blood pressure is perfectly fine, I don't beleive into the fact that it kills you (David Bowie pretending to strangle)


the kitsch

the new medias

&

mourning nowadays

……… ////////

Contemporary twists on the familiar : Memorial Today How we deal with death tells us a lot about how we think about life. No surprise there, right? More interestingly: Almost all the ways we apprehend death are changing, especially when it comes to contemporary commemorative culture. Up until now, urban mourning was placed to art-like spaces, such as parks or squares with often sculptural memorials designed by architects or artists (think, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin). In Martha Rosler words, “those who wished to engage in mourning were directed there rather than to actual religious structures” (think, Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris). However, over the past few decades we have witnessed a rise of public monument-making: from the monument to the memorial; from the pioneering of the genius narratives of highbrow art to the mainstream and perhaps, more subjective opinions of multiple masses. So what’s going on? Probably a bunch of things, from decreasing appeal of traditionalism to what Erika Doss call a “memorial mania”: “the contemporary obsession with issues of memory and history and an urgent, excessive desire to express, or claim, those issues in visibly public contexts”. Western world have seen its share of temporary shrine sites: those momentary altars made of bouquets , candles, hand-written postcards, and plush toys usually following unexpected, highly mediatized, accidents, etc., often on the site where those traumas have occurred… or just any walls.

~The act of public mourning is not confined with a set of taste rules anymore ~

~those momentary altars made of bouquets, candles, hand-written postcards, and plush toys ~


the kitsch

the new medias

&

mourning nowadays

……… ////////

What can be argued is that such transition in (public) memorial custom gave rise to kitsch and in a sense to a form of community art. The act of public mourning is not confined with a set of taste rules anymore (e.g. such as wearing dark colors, bringing particular breed of flowers, usually white), everyone is free to materialize their associations with the deceased in any form. A new mourning tradition emerging as a rather kitsch expression of the self by the very aspect of repetition, as many people reproduce and besides, an unsettled balance between tradition and innovation, which is the core dilemma of mourning, the tension between remembrance and moving on. Yet the question lingers: why is that we commemorate someone in the flashiest way possible? Generally, the kitsch is considered as an exaggeration of feelings (especially sentimentality and melodrama) even as a fake emotion, and in this case, it seems appropriate to use this form of art in a moment of mourning, when there is an unusual confrontation to death whether that is to cover insincere emotion or express it in an overly intensive way. Kitsch reflects a profound narcissism – a desire to be place yourself into a bigger, perhaps more notorious context. To draw a connection between oneself and a traumatic event, we collectively reflect on what has happened by finding our role, our contribution within this scene. This is the defining aspect of kitsch. Ultimately, the message that kitsch addresses is that of homogeneity (we can all be ONE) and belonging. As a result, mourning space balances between public and private motives, an expression of the kitsch which is crucial to sublime the pain and the confusion.

~ Ultimately, the message that kitsch addresses is that of homogeneity (we can all be ONE) and belonging ~


the kitsch

the new medias

&

Another realm where mourning culture has been redefined in profound ways is the Internet. Online networks and digital media have been integrated into contemporary processes of life: such as birth, death and everything in between. We now have new electronic spaces for the communication of all that’s happening in our lives. Here too, the rise of online memorials supports new possibilities for relationship maintenance and self-portrayal. One of the best social media examples is that of Facebook, where we can showcase our grievance or support by updating our status or hitting the “Like” button. An instant support system which elevates (with its speed) our memorial mania to the new heights. Not surprisingly sometimes resulting in this:

mourning nowadays

……… ////////

What will happen to my Facebook account if I pass away? You can tell us in advance whether you’d like to have your account memorialized or permanently deleted from Facebook.

Memorialized Accounts Memorialized accounts are a place for friends and family to gather and share memories after a person has passed away. Deleting Your Account You can choose to have your account permanently deleted should you pass away. For Friends and Family

In a time of cultural change, any commemoration practice is trending up or down, if we relate to the ritual in that way – there are many possibilities to apprehend it. Or in words of Boris Yellnikoff (main character in Woody Allen movie “Whatever works”): “whatever love you can get and give, whatever happiness you can filch or provide, every temporary measure of grace, whatever works”.

If you'd like to create an additional place for people on Facebook to share memories of your loved one, we suggest creating a group.


Poetry

&

contextualized collages ……… //////// ……………


Pre-raphaelite

(a) muse

avant-garde

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From Highgate cemetary exhumation to the Pre-raphaelite avant-garde In February 1862, when Dante Gabriel Rossetti found his muse Elizabeth Siddal, also known as Lizzie, dead from an overdose of laudanum, he decided to bury his manuscript of poems under her iconic red hair. Seven years later, Rossetti had her exhumed in order to publish his work and asked Charles Augustus Howell to open Lizzie’s grave, who famously said that her body resisted decomposition. An ecstatic state in between death and life recalls Sir John Everett Millais’ painting Ophelia (1821-52) of the drowned Shakespearean maiden, whose model was Lizzie.The interplay between the inside and the outside, the water and nature propels a facial expression of confusion. A feeling particularly evocative of the women’s passivity as an artistic muse, reflecting hard Victorian times of industrial and societal changes. Ophelia is the most sold postcard by the Tate. She becomes mad when her father Polonius is murdered by her lover Hamlet, dying in madness like Lizzie. Lizzie’s depression was carried by the trauma of her stillborn daughter. In Victorian times, the amount of dead-new born babies was exponential and traditions of mourning developed. It became a tradition to make-up dead people and especially new-born babies and photograph them at a time when photography medium started to be popular. A growing progress that Pre-Raphaelites rebelled against. Indeed Pre-raphaelite avant-garde art and secret society of young artists and writers founded in London in 1848 opposed to the Royal Academy’s promotion of the ideal exemplified by the work of Raphael. Mingling realism, beauty and a

desire to go back to nature, inspired by the theories of John Ruskin.

Hamlet, Act IV, Scene VII Laertes: Drowned? O, where? Queen Gertrude: There is a willow grows aslant a brook, That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream. There with fantastic garlands did she come Of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples That liberal shepherds give a grosser name, But our cold maids do dead-men’s-fingers call them. There on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke, When down her weedy trophies and herself Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide, And mermaid-like awhile they bore her up; Which time she chanted snatches of old lauds, As one incapable of her own distress, Or like a creature native and indued Unto that element. But long it could not be Till that her garments, heavy with their drink, Pulled the poor wretch from her melodious lay To muddy death. Laertes: Alas, then she is drowned? Queen Gertrude: Drowned, drowned Laertes: Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia, And therefore I forbid my tears. But yet It is our trick. Nature her custom holds. Let shame say what it will. When these are gone, The woman will be out – Adieu, my lord. I have a speech of fire that fain would blaze. But that this folly doubts it.


Ophelia

1821-52

John Everett Millais

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Omfg hamlet

Do i look like i care


Aleksey D’ Havlcyion

photography

the modern muse ……… //////// ……………


Poetry

&

contextualized collages ……… //////// ……………


The Kanaks, peoples of New Caledonia originally created masks from mid to late 19th Century. Masks’ eyes are typically not pierced and the one wearing the mask needs to look through the mouth. A beard of hair is usually attached, also adding black and brown feathers of the notou (large dove) is required. This mask was used during mourning rites of chiefs, whose authority was celebrated.

DO IT YOURSELF Kanak Mourning Mask


a ……………

collective

participatory

artistic remembrance of WWI - photography ……… ////////

The Rencontres d’Arles photography festival in Arles and the First World War Centennial Mission, together with the artist Raymond Depardon, decided to create a photographic survey of all memorials in France in order to awaken consciousness about the First World War trauma. Raymond Depardon thus opened-up the project to everyone who could send photographs.

Raymond Depardon & people’s photographs of French memorials from WWI

MAKE NOT

A memorial stands as a place to meet and commemorate, where lists of names engraved on the stone give an identity to the 1.35 million French people who died on the battlefield or in the trenches. Even though it remains a place to go on the 11th of November, the day of the armistice, the social aspect of monuments has however faded away.


With

Raymond Depardon

Les Rencontres d’Arles 2014……… //////// ……………

In order to contextualize such a wound from the past that has been anchored in daily life and with the city, giving a creative perspective to historical elements obstrudes. The medium of photography has enabled people to send pictures from 40, 000 monuments from their towns to be projected during the festival. The participatory element of the work underlies the plurality and differences of memorials which emerges as a celebrative and contextualized understanding of remembrance.

Inspired by the Depardon’s project, participants and avant-garde readers of the mag(a)zine gave their own interpretation of a jorney into a memorial in the following pages

ART WAR

Blink of an eye, don’t let me die Click the camera, another era


23rd of January 2016

a further journey into the Necropolis of Glasgow

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within the cinematrographic-filtered mind of Lucas Jeay ……………

student of Philosophy & Mathematics

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January 2016

contemporary mind-set poetry

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The wrinkles of my body, the coffin cracks Drops of oyster opening to a life ocean, a door exit _ Will my plastic surgery survive the heat of the tomb ? Getting until 99% years old discount on breast operations, a sustainable neckline, until death do us beyond the grave The story of a Woman showcasing beauty_ And even when She dies They will use-up the make-up cream spread on her face - and scape the powder incarnate the power Don’t shroud my last thrill I will be incinerated

(es)

part, and


Do-it yourself

scope

don’t let time pass horoscope

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References Allen, W. (Writer), & Allen, W. (Director). (2009). Whatever Works [Motion Picture]. Block, D. (2007, June 8). Christina Rossetti's "Song" ("When I am dead, my dearest") and Wordsworth's "A Slumber Did my Spirit Seal". Retrieved from Victorian Web: http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/crossetti/block.html Bowie, D. (2007, November 11). Hermann Vaske's interview with David Bowie in mid-90s. (H. Vaaske, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjNmYIVESsE Camus, A. (1942). L'Étranger (The Stranger). éditions Gallimard. Cortazar, J. (1977). Cronopes et Fameux. Paris: Gallimard. D'Havlcyon, A. (2016). Artiste polymorphe . Retrieved from Aleksey D'Havlcyon Wix : http://alekseydh.wix.com/adh Doss, E. (2008). The Emotional Life of Contemporary Public Memorials, Towards a Theory of Temporary Memorials. Amsterdam University Press. Retrieved from https://books.google.nl/books?hl=lt&lr&id=ThtJ9of7mvsC&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=funeral+mourning+kitsch+pl ush+toys&ots=nZ9UxbURsQ&sig=XjpH8CQpYkGtfSMyVidhxgCtSYU#v=onepage&q&f=false Engle, K. J. (2007, January). Putting Mourning to Work, Making Sense of 9/11. Theory, Culture & Society, 24(1), 61-88. doi:10.1177/0263276407071570 Greenbert, C. (1939). Avant-garde and kitsch. Partisan Review, 6(5), 34-49. Hutchings, T. (2012). Wiring Death: Dying, Grieving and Remembering on the Internet. In Emotion, Identity and Death– Mortality Across Disciplines. Ashgate. Retrieved from https://books.google.nl/books?hl=lt&lr&id=2P2hAgAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA43&dq=internet+tribute+memor ials&ots=tdJsqLBtSw&sig=n4RriUwHEvLjLi3W6M5Nta3sq0&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=internet%20tribute%20memorials&f=false Krauss, R. E. (1986). The Originality of the Avant-Garde and Other Modernist Myths . MIT Press, 151-165. Les Rencontres de la photographie d'Arles. (2014, June). 40 000 monuments pour 1 350 000 morts de 14-18 (40 000 memorials for 1, 350, 000 dead of 1914-18). Retrieved from Rencontre Arles: http://www.rencontresarles.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=ARLO62_3&VBID=2UNJA4TGBO&IID=2UN7A203QU&PN=2 Lyotard, J.-F. (1991). The Sublime and the Avant-Garde. In The Inhuman, Reflections on Time (G. Bennington , & R. Bowlby, Trans.). Polity Press. Met Museum. (2016). Mask (Dagak). Retrieved from The Metropolitan Museum of Art: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1983.17/ Pina, S. (2015, November 2015). Lizzie's Death and Exhumation Archives. Retrieved from Lizzie Siddal: http://lizziesiddal.com/portal/elizabeth-siddal-july-25-1829-february-11-1862/ Rosler, M. (2011, May ). Culture Class: Art, Creativity, Urbanism, Part III. Retrieved from E-flux Journal Culture #25: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/culture-class-art-creativity-urbanism-part-iii/ Rossetti, C. (1848). Song (When I'm dead, my dearest). In 1st (Ed.), Goblin Market and Other Poems. London : Macmillan . Tate Museum London . (2013). Pre-Raphaelite. Retrieved from Tate: http://www.tate.org.uk/learn/onlineresources/glossary/p/pre-raphaelite#about



How to mourn?