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PhotoHubs 2019 - Coventry Portraits - Panikos Marketing Your Awards - Rob Hill Guild Spotlight - Arron Gent Newborn Photography - Elli Cassidy Black & White - Gavin Prest Magazine Worthy Shots - Guru Shots Issue 33

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Contents 14 24 36 56 60 66

Panikos Portrait Photography PhotoHubs Coventry 6/7th November 2019 Regional Meet-Up Jill Windmill Regional Meet-Up Yorkshire & Humber Region Gold Awards July & August 2019 Your Awards for Marketing Rob Hill

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Guild Member Spotlight Arron Gent

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Gavin Prest PhotoHubs Speaker

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Elli Cassidy PhotoHubs Speaker

Photo North Festival - 2019 Harrogate Guru Shots Magazine Worthy Shot!

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Steve & Lesley Thirsk

The Guild of Photographers

We’ve just read an article by David Kilpatrick about the value of print. He very sadly and recently lost Shirley, his lovely and very talented wife, and had to sort through certain items in their home. Whilst doing this he came across many old photographs, some of which hadn’t been viewed for over 30 years. They included photographs of their children, homes, gardens, events and holidays over the years. Interestingly, because David and Shirley were both photographers there were few of them together. This struck a chord with us. We too have boxes of family images taken some years ago, many when our children were young (and there aren’t many of us together as one of us was holding the camera) However, we have an acute shortage of boxes from more recent years. Like many we succumbed to the digital age, posting online and not printing….and that’s despite us being great advocates of printed products for our clients. We even referred to customers Wedding albums as future Heirlooms! Thankfully we realised this a few years ago, and now when we go on holidays we tend to have a Photobook printed – but we still don’t purchase enough prints, nor do we do anything with the more day to day ‘captures’. We should really, and David’s final paragraph has given us the kick we need to find some time to get some printed. He says … “For the future, for yourself and your families, and for your clients if you are a photographer remember one lesson. Absolutely no format of photograph, digital or real film, is better than a high quality longlasting print” The other thing that crosses our mind is to find time to label some of the older images we have of parents, grandparents and beyond. We know who the people and locations are but will our children or our grandchildren? We have a number of photographs left by our grandparents that aren’t identifiable in any way, so we may or may not be looking at distant family members – the reality is it’s very unlikely we’ll ever know now as they’re not labelled. We are all busy people but this is definitely something for us all to consider, isn’t it. Moving on to other things, PhotoHubs Coventry will soon be upon us, which we are very excited about, and we really hope you will attend. Sponsored by Epson, Profoto and Loxley Colour, it offers some amazing learning opportunities in the workshops, on the Main Stage and through the free mentoring sessions that are available. Equally important many of our Trade friends will be there and it offers a great social opportunity too, including a fun event on the evening of the first day. It’s a chance to meet friends old and new in a very relaxed environment. This year, we have a new addition too. Ann Aveyard, one of our members, suggested we have a ‘bring & buy’ opportunity for preloved kit. It sounds a great idea so we thought we’d give it go! Finally, this September marked the 10th Anniversary of us becoming the Directors of the Guild of Photographers. At that point we had just 80 members and we are now one of the largest associations in the UK with a membership in the thousands, the largest it’s ever been. The most pleasing factor about this growth is that most of it is down to members recommending the Guild! Despite it’s size the Guild still feels as friendly as it did when we just has 80 members – in fact it’s arguably more so. We’ve met some amazing people during this time and we’re excited about what the next 10 years will bring. We want to thank-you for your support and personal contribution to the Guild, making it the special place it is! 4

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JAYNE BOND Issue 33

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Editor It is October already and dare I say it only a couple months until Christmas. This year is flying by, and time doesn’t seem to stand still anymore. This edition of Creative Light features some fantastic photography from so many photographers and a close-up of three of the PhotoHubs speakers. A new feature we are introduction for forthcoming editions will be the ‘Guild Spotlight’. We will shine a spotlight onto one of our members to showcase their work. If you have a story or would like to see your photography featured on these pages, please get in touch with Head Office - info@photoguild.co.uk

julie oswin

“It must be October, the trees are falling away and showing their true colors.”

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editors choice Henry Ransby Awarded Silver - July 2019 The Hare prefers farmland and woodland habitats and can often be spotted in fields. Known for its long, black-tipped ears and is extremely fast. Hare’s can reach speeds of 45mph when evading predators. Introduced, but naturalised species. Conservation status the Hare is protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981.

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Front Cover “

With harsh, brutal and unforgiving mid-day sun for this July wedding at Eton College I searched for areas with top shade and soon spotted these stone arches. The curve of the flowing veil and train mirror the curve of the top of the arches and I wanted compositionally for the couple to be placed on the left edge of the left arch with good hand/arm placing. I am known for creating quite dramatic and moody black & white classical/ fine art wedding images from the many weddings I shoot in and around the beautiful venues and colleges of Oxford University but the incredible warm colours of the honey-coloured stone meant this one had to stay in the shade. The detail in the beaded bridal gown and texture of the stone architecture was enhanced in post-production and lifting the shadow detail on the engravings inside the arches adding a real sense of depth and interest.

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- David Bostock

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Do you sell Wall Art? Whitney and David felt they were leaving money on the table after they had made the Wall Art sale at their clients’ ordering sessions. Then they came across something that was a complete GAME CHANGER for their photography business.

Gary Box

How would you feel if you found an easy way to upsell more prints after you’ve made the Wall Art Sale? Whitney Scott found a way that’s so simple, 9/10 clients buy it. Click the button below to discover her secret to selling more prints. https://3xmsolution.com/whitREAD WHITNEY’S STORY ney-scott-photography-story.php Issue 33

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Panikos

PhotoHubs 2019 Speaker

Well, it was meant to be… with an interest in camera repair from the young age of 14, alongside a fascination with the art form of photography how could this not be a recipe for success… Multi award winning photographer and trainer, Panikos Hajistilly, specialises in capturing beautiful images of newborns, babies, couples, families, friends, loved ones, pets and anything and everything in between! He is passionate about crafting memories that will last for generations…immortalising those beautiful expressions our little ones give us, right through to the love we have for our elders. Based in London, running a successful studio (having over 8500 clients), not only does he provide his own photography service, he provides training in all aspects including the running your own photography business… Panikos Hajistilly is definitely worth the early get up – as he is literally going to kick start the whole Photohubs event with an inspirational and powerful presentation on how to ‘Pack more Punch in your Portraits’!

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Q: What motivates you to get up in the morning to create your beautiful portraiture? I always want to create imagery that will make people happy, that they will want to show off to their friends and family, that will be loved for many years to come.

Q: One piece of equipment that you couldn’t do without and why? For obvious reasons it has to be the credit card machine! Because I do have to feed my family with my earnings. But apart from that I have to be honest and say that my favourite item is my camera. I use a Canon 5DSR and irrespective of other people’s opinions I love the detail that gives me, I know my way around it, and it never ceases to impress my clients when they see the quality of images it produces.

Q: Your favourite lens for your portraiture and why? The lens I use for 95% of my portraiture is the EF 70-200 f2 .8 III. It’s astonishingly sharp, the almost perfect zoom range, negligible distortion, and beautiful bokeh. I have recently purchased the Canon EF 85 mm f1 .4, this is too is a breathtakingly sharp lens, getting incredible detail and wonderful background blur, I really love using this lens, but it isn’t as practical as the 70-200 zoom when doing family shoots in my day to day work.

Q: What have you found most challenging in your area of photography? Getting people to see the need and the value of high-quality photography for the families. We are creating wonderful imagery that should last generations, that should be hung with pride on the walls of people’s homes. Sadly, in our culture in the UK this isn’t deemed as important as in other countries. One day people will realise that digital files won’t last as long or be appreciated as a lovely portrait on the wall.

Q: Your preferred choice of camera equipment? Although I worked for Nikon for 15 years and opened my studio using solely Nikon gear, I switched to Canon because of Nikon’s insisting at the time (around 2006) that they weren’t going to go full frame with their digital sensors! They’ve obviously changed their tune since. I’ve been using Canon since I switched with the 1Ds Mk2, and have now gone to the 5DSR, and I use the 5D Mk4 as a backup. I do love Canon L series glass and have a nice set of lenses ranging from 1635mm to 300mm as well as a macro.

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Q: What advice would you give to members of The Guild shooting Portraiture?

Get to know your camera so that you can use it blindfolded! Too many times people get stuck on the operation of the camera rather than concentrating on the subject. Every photographer should literally know how to change shutter speed, aperture, ISO and mode (manual to aperture priority to shutter priority) with his eyes closed! Sadly, many menu systems also deep and complicated that it takes many months if not years to become truly accustomed to it. In fact, I would go so far as to say the many photographers are reluctant to change camera systems because of having to learn the new “language” of a different manufacturers menu system. Also, if you’re in the process of going full time with your photography, make sure you have so many paying clients, you couldn’t possibly carry on your day job as well. Taking good photos is the easy part. Making people pay is harder, so once you’ve mastered that, then go full time into your photography.

Q: Do you use a tripod? If so, how important is it to your work? 100% yes! I believe if you want to shot imagery you have to use a tripod. Sometimes it can be a problem to use a tripod in a rushed studio environment, however, given the opportunity I always use a tripod. I also use a very heavy Cambo stand which enables me to raise and lower camera height very easily. This is much easier then having to adjust three legs other tripod to raise or lower my angle of view. If I’m shooting landscapes I wouldn’t even think about taking a photo without a tripod.

Q: Post-processing and Photoshop, how important is it to your work?

I use Photoshop every day of the working week. For me it is the most important piece of software for my studio. Without exception all my clients want something done to them, whether it’s removing blemishes, scars, laughter lines, stray hairs or just a little slimming down, babies dribble or snot! Everyone wants something to make them look just that little bit “better” in their eyes. Of course there is also the need for the occasional “head swap” especially when taking photos of young children. This kind of thing can’t be done just in Lightroom. In the same way an interior designer can turn a “nice house” into a beautiful “Show Home” we can turn a “nice photo” into an Award Winner with some carefully considered and well executed post processing.

Q: Developing your marketplace, how important was it to create your brand?

Creating your own personal style and your own brand it takes time. It’s not an easy thing to do. You have to analyse what you like, what you create, what products to provide, work out if its appealing to your clients and then combine all that and present it in a way that all these things represent you. This would have to be evident on your website, and all your other social media channels. They will have to be a harmony of imagery and style across all of your methods of communication with your clients. Unless you’ve developed your brand and differentiated yourself from everyone else, you are in the end “just another photographer”. I’ve managed to hit on a style I like and can reproduce quite easily in my studio, and that clients are happy to spend on. Winning a few awards also helps. It is so important to think about this in the early stages of your photographic career. 16

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https://www.panikosphoto.com/

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Q: Lighting equipment, what is your preferred choice for your work? My preferred choice of lighting is a system that can: 1. Recharge quickly – ideally as fast as my camera can work (more than 6 frames per second) 2. Be battery operated – so I don’t have the wires dangling from the ceiling or sprawled across the floor, which would be a hazard for myself and my clients alike 3. Have a very short flash duration, ideally less than one 1/4000th of second. This would allow me to freeze movement. This is absolutely essential when taking photos of babies, young children and pets because they move so quickly from one incident to the next. 4. Have a consistent light output The only system that was able to tick all of the above boxes when I was looking to upgrade a few years ago with the Profoto B1. My studio is equipped with a set of six of these with a number of different modifiers including umbrellas, soft boxes (Square, rectangular, deep octas, with and without “egg crates”, large and small strips) beauty dishes, barn doors and snoots. Fortunately there are of course more and cheaper options in the market now that do the things I’ve mentioned above.

Q: Who inspires you? Albert Watson, Mark Seliger, Lindsay Adler, Ansel Adams and loads of others

Q: Can you recommend any books for our readers? Audrey Hepburn, Portraits of an Icon by Terrence Pepper Avedon Fashion 1944-2000 The Photographers Guide to Posing by Lindsay Adler Plus many, many more!

Q: Interesting facts about you? I was born in Cyprus and came to the UK in the early 60’s with my parents and am now very much a London boy. I repaired cameras for the first 25 years of my working life, working at Canon, Olympus and Nikon. I am a qualified advanced open water SCUBA diver, though I haven’t dived for a little while. I have a lovely wife Joanna, and six children!

Q: Favourite place in the world, and why? The Maldives. The only place in the world where I felt I truly “got away from it all”

Q: Three words that describe you? • Helpful • Meticulous • Knowledgeable

Q: Favourite food? Barbeque - my way! Whoever has come to one of my BBQ days will know what I mean…

Q: And, finally, where next? I’d like to develop my training courses to share my experience with other photographers and see them succeed. I also love travelling and photographing the beauty the world has to offer – before it is completely ruined by pollution and global warming!

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PhotoHubs - 2019

Photo Danny Clifford

INSPIRATIONAL SPEAKERS Two ‘DO NOT MISS’ Days - One Gre

Kate Hopewell-Smith

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Scott Johnson

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Tara Pretty

Jason Allison

Gavin Prest


eat Location

Charlie Waite

Ellli Cassidy

Ian Knaggs

Danny Clifford

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Photo: Charlie Waite

plus his work is held in private and corporate collections throughout the world. His bestselling book The Making of Landscape Photographs was ground breaking in the way that it addressed the ‘business of making landscape images’ and is now required reading for all students of landscape photography.

Photo: Scott Johnson

Charlie is the recipient of numerous and is frequently invited all over the world to give lectures on landscape photography. He has also written columns for newspapers and presented on TV, as well as starting the annual UK & USA Landscape Photographer of the Year Awards plus much more. https://www.charliewaite.com/

Panikos Photo: Scott Johnson

THE SPEAKERS Charlie Waite Firmly established as one of the world’s leading landscape photographers! Charlie actually started out as a professional actor and remained an actor for ten years, but soon began a sideline photographing his fellow actors including Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham-Carter, Amelia Fox and Catherine Zeta-Jones amongst others. Throughout his time in the theatre, Waite became fascinated by theatrical lighting and design, but gradually the landscape and the way it can be revealed through light and shade stole him away from the acting profession. As a professional photographer, Waite has established a worldwide reputation for his particular approach to his work. His style is unique in that his photographs convey a spiritual quality of serenity and calm. He has published no less than 28 books on photography and held over 30 solo exhibitions across Europe, the USA, Japan and Australia… 26

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One of the best ways to make yourself happy in the present is to recall happy times from the past. Photos are a great memoryprompt, and because we tend to take photos of happy occasions, they weight our memories to the good. - Gretchen Rubin Photographs are quite possibly our most valued possessions. We find ourselves getting lost in the minds that photographs evoke. As time moves on relentlessly, we all need to remember the old days – no matter how old we are. Panikos specialises in capturing beautiful images of newborns, babies, couples, families, friends, loved ones, pets and anything meaningful to you! There is no time like the present to do this, to immortalise those beautiful expressions our little ones give us, the innocence of our newborns, the beauty of our teenagers, and the love we have for our older ones. Panikos prides himself in producing beautiful, timeless images that last a lifetime and more.


Panikos has a passion for working with his clients to craft memories that will last for generations. Fellow of the Master Photographers Association - March 2018 Master Craftsman with The Guild of Photographers

Panikos

Associate of the Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers (SWPP) MPA UK Master Photographer of the Year 2017/18

Danny Clifford A world-renowned Rock and Roll photographer! Danny Clifford has spent his illustrious career as a ‘fly on the wall’ to the most iconic musical artists of the last 40 years. From his big break, aged 20, as Bob Dylan’s official photographer in the late 1970s, through his close working relationships with many ‘greats’ the stories he has amassed over the years are just as vivid, colourful and dramatic as his photographs. The countless shots taken on and offstage, behind the scenes and during historic performances are just a fractional glimpse into the Danny Clifford archive.

Photo: Panikos

Danny’s images are held in the highest esteem by artists and appreciators alike – plus they are rarely exhibited and highly collectible! He is a ‘great’ himself! His Clients include BOB DYLAN / THE WHO / STATUS QUO / QUEEN / ERIC CLAPTON / RORY GALLAGHER / IRON MAIDEN / SQUEEZE / OASIS / JOHNNY CASH / PINK FLOYD / DAME SHIRLEY BASSEY / AMY WINEHOUSE / BEYONCE / SIR PAUL MCCARTNEY / PAUL WELLER / LILY ALLEN / NELSON MANDELA / KINGS OF LEON / THE BOOMTOWN RATS / LADY GAGA / ALICE COOPER / BRITNEY SPEARS / PIXIE LOTT / FREDDIE MERCURY / FRANK SINATRA / KATY PERRY / MADNESS / MICHAEL JACKSON / PHARRELL WILLIAMS / RINGO STARR /  MADONNA / BOY GEORGE / PINK / PETE DOHERTY / PALOMA FAITH / TOM JONES / JESSIE J / CHRISTINA AGUILERA / ANNIE LENNOX / DIANA ROSS / RIHANNA / ADELE / ELTON JOHN / JOHNNY CASH / JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE / JAY-Z / MARILYN MANSON And many many more … http://www.dannyclifford.com/

Photo:Elli Cassidy

Photo: Gavin Prest

Photo: Tara Pretty

Photo: Jason Allison

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Elli Cassidy A highly regarded specialist newborn, maternity and portrait photographer! Elli run a s portrait studio. She is a Fujifilm X-photographer and a Loxley Colour and Elinchrom Ambassador.  As well as teaching newborn posing and portrait lighting, Elli teaches business skills, recognising that this is one of the most important elements of running a successful portrait studio and one that is frequently overlooked.  

Photo: Panikos

Elli is highly valued for her style and approach in providing carefully crafted training courses. She mentors many professional photographers each year both in the UK and overseas. Her classes are relaxed and welcoming, yet no nonsense and straight to the point, giving real help and advice that will make a difference to your portrait business.  http://www.minimemories.co.uk/

Gavin Prest A Master of narrative based black and white images of people! Gavin started his photographic career shooting with film, which he feels gives him a fundamental grounding in photography. After having several years away from the camera Gavin started creating images again in 2011 only this time digitally. With a passion for capturing people and story telling in his images this has led to Gavin receiving international recognition in photographic circles. He is a winner of several National and international photography titles and is a two time Master Craftsman with the Guild of Photographers. He has a passion for ‘paying it forward’ and educating others, mainly through direct mentoring, and he is also an internationally respected Judge

Photo: Elli Cassidy

However, Gavin is best known for his individual approach to creating powerful black and white images of people which tell stories, yet leave you asking questions! https://www.gavinprest.com/

Ian Knaggs An internationally recognised creative commercial photographer and educator! Ian has been recognised with national and international recognition for his highly creative still life and product images. High quality images are borne from shaping and controlling light, and Ian is known for his deep understanding of the behaviour and control of light – as well as his unique creativity. Generous with his knowledge, Ian is a talented educator too, delivering many online tutorials and articles, including for the highly respected Photigy photography school website. He not only holds Craftsman status with the Guild of Photographers but is the current Image of the Year title holder in the Commercial category for the 2nd successive year! https://ianknaggs.com/ 28

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Photo: Tina Eisen


Photo: Kate Hopewell-Smith

Kate Hopewell-Smith & Brent Kirkman Storytellers and specialists in luxury photography and cinematography, as well as global educators and European Imaging Ambassadors Kate has a background in TV marketing, fine art publishing and brand consultancy. She has run her photography business specialising in Portraits, Weddings and Boudoir since 2010 and since then has always played an active role in the photography industry, establishing a huge following and regularly writing features for magazines and talking at events. Brent, her husband, also had a strong entrepreneurial spirit – building and running companies in Europe, Africa and the Middle East before finally focusing on his true passion of cinematography, photography and aerial film. He is a man who can multi task - flipping from stills to film without hesitation. He loves to fly and now uses his pilot’s license when drone work is commissioned.  Together, Kate and Brent are directors of the photography school Training byLUMIERE, including a luxury destination brand, and they represent Sony as European Imaging Ambassadors. www.trainingbylumiere.co.uk

Jason Allison One of the UK’s most talented Pet Portrait photographers! Although Jason has been a photographer since he was a child, it is only more recently that he has achieved National and International recognition from The Guild of Photographers for his studio Pet photography. Jason not only holds Craftsman status with the Guild but is their current Image of the Year title holder in the Pets genre. He is known for consistently delivering timeless images of exceptional quality…and whilst pets are his main interest, Jason also likes people portraiture and other forms of photography. In short, for Jason photography is both a full-time business and a lifelong hobby, with a contagious passion at the centre of all he does. http://jasonallison.co.uk/ Issue 33

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Scott Johnson A contemporary and fine art wedding photographer and educator respected worldwide, as well a Fujifilm X-Photographer. Scott Johnson is an Internationally recognised, award-winning photographer who has photographed weddings across most of Europe. Known for being fun and energetic, Scott also travels the world as an educator, judge and mentor. He is also one of only a handful of official Fujifilm X-Photographers. Also known for his fine art wedding portraits, he is still as passionate about photography today as he was when he first started back in 2003. He has been fortunate enough to win a few awards along the way, and most recently, was the only British winner at WPPI in Las Vegas where he won first place in the Wedding Contemporary category at their annual print competition, receiving plaudits from across the photography world. He holds two Fellowships with the British Institute of Professional Photography (BIPP) and was made ‘Master Photographer’ with The Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers (SWPP) in 2018. He is also the current overall Wedding Photographer of the Year with The Guild of Photographers, and one of only four photographers to hold two Master Craftsman qualifications with them. https://www.theedgephotography.co.uk/

Tara Pretty A highly successful photography studio owner who really understands the practicalities of business Over the years Tara and her team have won over 25 photography awards in multiple genres for her photography – including portraits, fashion, boudoir and pets. However, it is her business approach she is best known for, with a primary focus on the sale of high quality Wall Art to families. She has an Honours degree in Fashion Design and Marketing and opened her studio in Chelmsford in 2010. In the 9 years since, her Studio has photographed over 7000 families…a figure that speaks for itself in many ways! Tara is passionate that photographers can, and should, make a good living from their skills, and generously shares her knowledge as to how this can be done. https://www.hammonds-studio.com/

Tina Eisen An editorial and commercial beauty and fashion photographer, as well as a global educator for many major photographic brands Tina Eisen is an editorial and commercial beauty and fashion photographer based in London, UK. With over 10 years of experience in the industry, Tina has worked with clients such as MaxFactor, Sephora, Ciate, Superdrug, Harvey Nichols, ASOS, Marks & Spencer, ITV, Amazon, Barbour and numerous other well-known global brands and magazines. Tina’s Beauty Photography workshops in Europe and North America, her publications and online tutorials are popular amongst a global audience. Tina is a regular speaker and educator for photography equipment and software brands such as Canon, Profoto, Capture One and Three Legged Thing and is regularly showcasing her craft at national and international tradeshows. http://tinaeisen.com/ 30

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DAY ONE - MAIN STAGE TIMETABLE 0930-1030 - Panikos Hajistilly ‘Pack more Punch in your Portraits’ How to light, compose and retouch images to make them a whole lot more powerful.

1100-1200 - Tara Pretty ‘Make Money Selling Your Wall Art’ Learn how just £9 could generate a great income, selling your work as Wall Art

1300-1400 - Brent Kirkman ‘Take Your Photography To New Heights’ Learn how drone photography and filmmaking can give you a new perspective. Also find out what’s involved to add it to your portfolio.

Photo: Charlie Waite

1430-1530 - Kate Hopewell-Smith ‘Shedding Light On Weddings And Portraits’ Light is the most fundamental element of photography and weddings are full of challenging scenarios.  Kate will explain when and how to use artificial lighting across the day for both photography and videography.

1600-1700 - Danny Clifford ‘Rock Stars Don’t Smile!’ Persistence and Self-Value are so important as you will find out in this ‘World First’ – a seminar by probably the most in demand fine art music photographer. A photographer to so many legends!

Photo: Brent Kirkman

DAY TWO - MAIN STAGE TIMETABLE 0930-1030 - Charlie Waite ‘Great Landscapes - The Importance Of Light And Shade’ Charlie will show images he has taken around the world in city and rural environments, demonstrating the importance of contrasts when creating great landscape images.

1100-1200 - Tina Eisen ‘Shaping The Light’ Tina will give a demonstration on how to use light to create impact!

1300-1400 - Elli Cassidy ‘Profitable Portraits’ Elli will explain how small changes to the service you provide can make a big difference to the profit you make!

1430-1530 - Gavin Prest ’32 Shades of Grey’ Gavin will demonstrate how he gets his black and white images to look the way they do (something he’s regularly asked)!

1600-1700 - Gary Hill ‘Basics, Basics, Basics – Let’s get this light up and running quick-sticks!’ In this demo you will see how very quickly you can set up simple effective lighting to get32effective portraits. : Creative Light Magazine - Issue 33

Photo: Gary Hill


Photo: Ian Knaggs

DAY ONE - WORKSHOP TIMETABLE 0900-1200 Danny Clifford ‘Getting THE Shot’ 0900-1200 Kate Hopewell-Smith & Brent Kirkman ‘Where there is darkness, let there be light’ 0900-1200 Ian Knaggs ‘Making The Ordinary EXTRA-ORDINARY’ 1300-1600 Jason Allison ‘Timeless Dog Portraiture, From A-Z’ 1300-1600 Elli Cassidy ‘Magical Maternity’ 1300-1600 Scott Johnson ‘Lighting On Location’ IN ALL CASES LUNCH INCLUDED 1200-1300 FREE DRINKS AVAILABLE AT 0900, 1030 AND WITH LUNCH

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FOR ALL details and how to BOOK

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Blow your clients away with the iconic Bellissimo album range from Loxley Colour. Choose from this award-winning selection of albums to find the perfect keepsake that will stun your clients.

• Seven albums • Huge range of sizes • Wide selection of cover styles, materials and colours • Optional personalised covers • Turnaround between 7 and 10 working days

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Bellissimo Perfetto • Sizes 6×6” to 20×20” • Three print finishes • Six cover materials • UV print and laser etching personalisation

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Regional Meet-Up Where: Jill Windmill, Clayton, West Sussex When: 2nd September 2019 Author: Chris Waddell

The venue for our meet-up was ‘Jill Windmill’ in Clayton and just four of us, in the end, attended who were Ann, David, Pete and I. It was a gorgeous day up on Clayton Hill, if slightly breezy at times. Our jackets were on and off, all day long! We had loads of fun taking a few selfies of our little band photographers. We all experimented with high-speed Sync off-camera flash and got some interesting moody skies. Simon kindly started the sweeps turning (commonly known as sails). What a magnificent and majestic sight it was too especially being so close to the windmill. Ann, David and I experimented with a ten stop ND filter capturing movement with long exposures. We mixed in the occasional use of external flash. I played with the images I had taken later, focus stacking some of these images in Photoshop. Pete went inside the windmill’s beating heart and made some superb 360° panoramas. A big thank you to Simon from the Jack and Jill Windmill Society for kindly hosting us. We all came away, having had a brilliant afternoon. - Chris Waddell

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Be free to create Profoto Connect & A1X Profoto Connect and the A1X are a powerful and easy to use combination. Profoto Connect is a button-free trigger with just three settings; auto, manual and off. So it’s never been easier to be creative and make the most of the natural and beautiful light of the A1X. Discover more at profoto.com 38

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LAURIE CAMPBELL

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Jonathan Yearsley

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer

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STUNNING NEW

A C RY L I C WA L L A RT Clean, sleek edges and high-gloss, contemporary finishes are the hallmarks of these stunning Acrylic wall art products. Discover more at www.digitalab.co.uk acrylic-and-metal-wall-art

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ACRYLIC SPHERE The Acrylic Sphere is a show-stopping, high-gloss alternative to our award-winning Birch Spheres. www.digitalab.co.uk/acrylic-sphere

ACRYLIC PRINT Our crystal clear, ultra-high clarity Acrylic Prints are the perfect choice for modern homes, galleries and workspaces. www.digitalab.co.uk/acrylic-prints

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Lorraine Dale

Qualified Guild Photographer

July 2019

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TRANSFORM YOUR CREATIVE WORKFLOW WITH LOUPEDECK+

MEET ADAM KARNACZ OF FIRST MAN PHOTOGRAPHY

of natural talent, hard work is the key to everything. Ever since I

Adam is a British landscape photographer and filmmaker. It was

creation of art and the business sides of being a pro photographer.

in North Yorkshire, England where he developed a true passion for

Its a journey that requires patience and a pragmatic approach to

nature and the outdoors. Adam’s professional experience ranges

opportunities both big and small.

merely considered going professional, working harder than the next guy or girl has been my base ethos. This includes with my

from wedding photography to developing himself into a full-time landscape photographer, which he enthusiastically documents on

How would you describe your style of photography?

his Youtube channel, @FirstManPhotography. Every Sunday, Adam

I am not sure the word “style” is descriptive enough. My “photographic

shares with his fans inspiring content from his travels and provides

personality” is made up of various styles that consists of using

a calming approach to technical processes such as composition,

different focal lengths, long exposures, and capturing new locations.

lighting, and editing.

Natural landscapes are definitely a signature of my work, but I aim for my images to tell the story of the landscape and evoke emotions

Like Adam, Loupedeck+ the photo and video editing console, strives to evoke creativity and enthusiasm by providing a faster

The videos I create have also become a big part of my

and more intuitive approach to the editing workflow.

photographic personality. The videos allow me to expand the story around the image and serve as a documentary on how the

Are photographers born or made, and can you describe

image was made. It also gives me a platform to talk about key

your successful journey?

areas related to landscape photography such as the environment,

Some people are definitely born with a bigger artistic streak,

conservation and the positive benefit doing landscape

with a natural appreciation of story. Even with a small portion

photography can have on your mental health.

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DISCOVER HOW ADAM TRANSFORMED HIS CREATIVE WORKFLOW WITH LOUPEDECK+ What sparked your interest in Loupedeck?

What technical element of Loupedeck+ improved your editing experience? The placement of the controls is very well thought out straight out of the box. For example, the controls for white balance, that include temperature and tint, are located right next to each other.

For a while I had been looking for a control surface to introduce

Without thinking I started controlling both at the same time,

into my workflow for post-production in both photography and

using only one hand, which further increased my efficiency and

video. I wanted to move away from the mouse and keyboard in

creativity. It’s a really natural experience!

the hope of increasing productivity and making the connection between my hands and my work on the screen feel more natural. My search for this led me to Loupedeck+.

What key functions of Loupedeck+ would you recommend to other professional photographers? I was a big fan of the control settings straight out -the-box but

How has Loupedeck+ affected your creativity when editing?

the software allows the photographer to customise the controls

Using the Loupedeck+ has been an exciting experience. Having

as they see fit using the custom mode. The additional dedicated

used a keyboard and mouse for many years, improvements in

custom buttons are also extremely useful and all my most regular

efficiency were not immediate, as it took some time to learn the

Lightroom functions can be added to them such as changing

new console. Creatively, the improvements were immediate.

between the Library and Develop module.

Having the tactile connection to individual controls produced a more natural and artistic experience. I am now able edit without taking my eyes off of the image, which has become an invaluable part of my creative process.

...INDIVIDUAL CONTROLS MADE POST PRODUCTION A MORE NATURAL AND ARTISTIC EXPERIENCE.

Loupedeck+is available for purchase on Loupedeck.com,

Be sure to check out Adam Karnacz’s personal website and

Wex Photo Video, Amazon.co.uk.

subscribe to his social channels! firstmanphotography.com

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LEMONADE DESIGN CO We bsites and B ra nds for P hot ograph er s

Written by Yvette Craig Do you ever look at other Photographers and think why are they so busy and wonder why? I know its so easy to get hung up wondering what someone else is doing and what makes them so popular! Well there are three things that you can do today that will help your businesses visability...

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Top notch service. Friendly, professional and most importantly very patient! Would highly recommend!


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James Heaton

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer

September 2019

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PROFESSIONAL FRAMING SERVICE HANDMADE PROFESSIONAL FRAMES Every incredible image deserves to be printed and displayed, so ensure your best photography takes pride of place with our bespoke professional printing and framing service. Highlight your favourite space or dress your studio with our incredible choice of traditional frame mouldings and contemporary stylish wall art. Here at Sim Frame, we provide you with the ultimate professional photo framing products you need to showcase your clients’ valuable photography and imagery.

FRAMING FROM START TO FINISH With a choice of 10 styles of frame mouldings in multiple colours, a selection of 6 high grade professional paper options and a fully handcrafted process from start to finish, our professional framing service is second to none. Create studio sets perfect for in-person sales with your favourite image displayed in a matching moulding, with chevrons of each available frame colour so clients can see and feel the finish in person. Our bespoke photo framing goes hand in hand with our state of the art professional printing services. By using the highest quality Hahnemuhle and Fuji art paper, the latest printing technology and vivid & powerful inks, Sim Frame’s professional printing services produce stunning results on a variety of surface textures so you can pick the perfect paper for every photo. Order a paper sample pack with your new studio samples so you can showcase available texture options to clients during those all important viewing sessions.

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BESPOKE & CONTEMPORARY WALL ART As well as a range of traditional frame mouldings, you can also choose from 9 different collections of custom photo wall art ranging from contemporary to classic. Our professional wall art products include our stunning floating picture frames, brilliantly modern circular metal prints and acrylic prints as well as traditional high quality canvas prints and wedding or event signing boards. Our unrivalled professional framing service allows photographers to offer Framed prints to customers during their in-person sales with confidence knowing their client will love their new incredible wall display. We offer an extensive range of standard sizes but a selection of our products are available in a completely bespoke finish, so if you can’t see what you need online, simply get in touch.

PACKAGED BY HAND Sim Frame offers a fully finished framing service from order to delivery. Once you’ve uploaded your image online and selected your perfect moulding options, we will begin working on your new handcrafted frame. With a turn around of only 5 working days, in a little over a week you’ll receive your stunning new framed photograph, complete with hangers mounted to the rear so it’s ready to display straight on the wall. Supplied in an individually made to measure box and wrapped in protective film, we take extra care with each and every order from printing to packaging.

info@simframe.co.uk

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Regional Meet-Up Who: Yorkshire and The Humber Regional Group Where: Hirst Priory, Scunthorpe When: 4th June 2019 Author: David Linford QGPP (organiser) Attendees: Caro Dell, Rita Morley, Timothy Teasdale & Gavin Prest

The focus of the day for our Yorkshire and Humber hang out was fashion. Our model for the day was the gorgeous Kasey Claybourne. Hair and Make-up Artist, the talented Hayley joined us, and she created swift, beautiful makeovers and touch-ups throughout the shoot. Using the stunning interiors as a backdrop at Hirst Priory, we gathered early and checked the venue for ideas. We hit the ground running at 10 am and started with natural light captures in various rooms. With nobody particularly at the reigns, everyone was having creative input (not to mention Gavin’s excellent array of props). We captured lots of beautiful images as well as learning from each other. The ideas flowed, and the fun escalated - it was a truly remarkable camera fest. Just before lunch, we managed to capture Gavin in one of his famous setups, and he also adorned the black wig for good measure! Along with the belly laughs and lunch, we all sat outside eating the cake that Caro had bought along - it was a successful morning shoot. After lunch, Kasey changed her look, and we ventured into the cellars of Hirst Priory and engaged in capturing amazing Chicago style images using more props and lighting. We used the hall with it’s incredibly large and beautiful windows. As with all enjoyable shoots, the time did get the better of us. The day was fantastic, and such a great experience, we learnt lots, laughed lots and added more precious images to our portfolios. We will be doing this again soon, watch this space! - David Linford 54

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... AND TIME “Shuttertax have a very straight forward and efficient way of working which requires very little effort from me.” We wanted to tell you what a fantastic online accounting service we provide for photographers but we decided to let Guild members tell you for themselves.

“The process of switching was painless and it has made me more productive, saves time and costs far less.”

INVALUABLE “I’ve found Paul's knowledge of tax issues invaluable, and he responds quickly to any questions I've asked. I've absolutely no regrets signing up with Shuttertax.”

NO ‘ACCOUNTANT JARGON’ “Any questions I had were answered fully without the use of 'accountant jargon'.” “He goes out of his way to explain things to me in a way that I will understand and answers my questions quickly.”

UNDERSTAND MY BUSINESS “They both completely understand my business, having "been there, done that!" themselves.” “Paul and his wife know the business too which he tends to keep quiet! They were excellent togs so know what hurdles we all face with running our business.”

PASSIONATE TO HELP “Paul is a brilliant guy, extremely helpful, understanding, and within minutes you will realise that you've found someone who's passionate to help other photographers.”

SAVED ME MONEY “Shuttertax has definitely saved me money in my first year and with Paul's help, I am sure my business will grow and grow.” “Paul took most of the tedium of accounting off my hands, and in completing two tax assessments for me so far, has certainly saved me more money than I've paid Shuttertax.” 56

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NO QUESTION IS TOO STUPID “No question is too stupid, communication is excellent and my tax returns have been painless now for two years.” “Paul patiently and expertly answered every single 'daft question' I threw at him and due to his expertise and patience my self assessment return has now been filed in record time and with the minimum of stress on my part.”


TOP NOTCH SERVICE “Their customer service and professionalism is top notch too, after only a couple of months of working with Shuttertax I can see it has been a great decision and I can highly recommend them.” “Their professionalism and customer service speaks volumes about how they view you as a client.”

FRIENDLY “It felt like talking to a knowledgeable friend who's keen to help, rather than an accountancy firm who only see me as a commercial opportunity.”

UP TO DATE INFORMATION “Paul assured me that I would have up to date account information at my fingertips but without all the hard work getting there.”

ACCOUNTANT WAS CHARGING ME A FORTUNE “I recently switched from a High Street accountant who was charging me a fortune and had me typing up spreadsheets and labelling invoices every month - time consuming and tedious!”

EXTREMELY REASONABLE FEES “They have simplified how information is recorded through the use of QuickBooks Online, providing access to information and reports I didn't previously have.”

“As if their friendly, professional service wasn't enough, I think their fees are extremely reasonable with no hidden costs which have resulted in reducing my accountancy fees by more than two thirds.”

TRANSFERRING IS SEAMLESS “The process of transferring my accounts to Shuttertax has been seamless. I cannot thank him enough and hope he won't regret all the extra transactions I get in as I have more time to focus on the business!”

WOW! “Wow, I wish I’d found Shuttertax years ago!” “I am definitely a customer for life!!”

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JULY - AUGUST 2019

Chris Chambers

Claire Norman

Karen Riches 58

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Lynda Haney

Sarah Wilkes

Ian Knaggs

Heather Burns

Helen Trust

Lynne Harper Issue 33

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Cliff Spooner

Kendra Eastwood

Helen Trust

Jason Allison

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Debbie Longmore

Lynne Harper

Lynne Harper

Sarah Wilkes

Duncan Graham

Stacey Joiner Issue 33

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Are awards any use for your Business? Rob Hill

Rob Hill is a Master Craftsman with the Guild of Photographers and a member of the Guild’s panel of judges. He spent 25 years in global technology marketing and now runs a small but successful marketing consultancy writing marketing copy for high-tech companies around the world. Alongside his marketing work, Rob also has a growing product / commercial photography business - www.marketingshotz.com

At the risk of giving the answer first and stopping you reading the rest of the article – the answer is the same as many things in life – “it depends”. I’ll try and explain….. If you simply add ‘award winning photographer’ to your website, email footer and other marketing efforts, then the positive impact on your business is likely to be minimal, at best. Almost every photographer who wants to be can be an ‘award winning photographer’ – they could have had an award from a prestigious organisation such as the Guild, or maybe their town’s camera club, or just one of the many websites that accepts images from anyone. In fact, technically, you can be an ‘award winning photographer’ if you have received an award which is completely non-photography related. And this is the problem that the public have. My just making the ‘award winning photographer’ claim, they don’t know whether this relates to a prestigious industry award – or getting second prize in a cake-making competition – so they tend to ignore the claim. Few people set out to find / hire an award winning photographer – they look for people by their style, skill set, specialisms, location, price, personality and other factors. So, based on this it seems that one could deduce that awards have no positive impact on your business. But that need not be the case – it comes back to the answer above – ‘it depends’.

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These days, one essential element of marketing is creating content to engage with your clients, and your prospective clients. You should have a GDPR-compliant mailing list of these people to market to, along with active and engaging social media profiles. If you’re a social photographer the list could contain people you met at a wedding show as well as past wedding clients that may well have a newborn on the way. In the commercial space, this could be a mix of past, current and prospective clients. Unless you’re in direct contact you won’t know when these people are ready to buy – when the baby is due, when the next product is being launched, when the current photographer lets them down – or any other event that triggers the need to engage your services. But, if you can keep in contact regularly with informative marketing, the hope is that when they are ready, they will at least consider you. And here’s where the awards come in. They are an excellent trigger for some marketing. Instead of just adding ‘award winning photographer’ to your website and emails, write a short blog and explain more about the awards. If I were to write this, I would talk about how the images are judged by a panel of experienced photographers and how the results are scrutinised so that they are consistent and accurate. If I’d got a gold award in IOM, then I might also point out that out of around 1250 images entered each month, only a dozen or so get a gold. If you had won an ‘Image of the Year (IOTY)’ category, then you could point out that it was selected as the best from thousands of images entered over the period of a year. The point is, to make your claim of being an ‘award winning photographer’ valuable you have to make the awards credible. Fortunately, the Guild has one of the most structured judging processes of any organisation, so this helps you establish credibility. When you’ve told everyone just how tough and challenging getting the award is, then show them your lovely award-winning image(s) and tell them how proud you are. While being an award winning photographer may not be a primary decision making criteria for many customers, it can certainly help them reinforce their decision knowing that you are capable of reaching these levels of achievement. It gives the client bragging rights – being able to state to friends that their wedding photographer has a number of national awards – or telling colleagues that the person shooting their latest campaign has been recognised in a prestigious photography organisation. So – do awards help you promote your business? They can, it all depends on how you use them. - Rob Hill

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https://info.nphoto.com/uk/protip-promo

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GUILD SPOTLIGHT Arron Gent

The first of many ‘Guild Spotlight’ interviews that Creative Light magazine will be featuring in the up and coming editions and we kick off with a Sports Photographer! Arron Gent is predominantly a Sports Photographer and his studio, most weekends, is football stadiums in the Essex and London area. His photography covers football matches from League Two to the Premier League with occasionally photography coverage at Wembley Stadium of European and International games! Arron is an Arsenal fan, of course.

Q:

What did you do before working in photography?

Sadly I am not in a position to say that I work in photography currently. My full-time job was/is working for a well-known insurance company in London! I’m trying, though!

Q:

What was your first camera?

My first real camera was a canon 1000d a present from my then-girlfriend (now fiancé and mother of my children) who thought I had a ‘good’ eye for a photograph when using a point and shoot!.

Q:

How did you get to this point?

I’m sure there will be many others in a similar position as myself, I started just taking photos of random stuff, my first “love” was HDR, then someone asked me to do a wedding, then someone else! I gave that up and decided to do newborn photography, became qualified with the guild in that genre and then had kids and ran out of time and space! It was then that I got into sports photography, I always loved sport, and so that was a perfect combination for me.

Q:

What have you found most challenging photographically? Business! I have a terrible business brain, and I think that’s the biggest reason I have not made it as a full-time photographer to date! Confidence! I lack confidence in my self and my ability to make it work! Money! I find the photography industry very tough in that nobody ever seems to want to pay for good photography, this could mean different things depending on the genre, but if you know sports photography you’ll know what I mean!

Interesting facts about you? With the power of social media, not sure there is much in the way of little known facts anymore! Here’s one, I was the same height at 13 as I am now! I’m a shy personality and quite a sensitive soul with a big heart! I once had trials to play football at Dagenham Redbridge and Woking! 68

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Q:

If you were castaway on a desert island and only be able to take one each of the following, what would you choose – Tipple/ Musical album / Film / Luxury item? Tipple would have to be a well-made mojito! Must be well made, if ‘sit’s not they are awful! The album that that’s a tough one because I like so many different types of music, but I will go with my dad’s album he was in a band called force five that were relatively famous although not on the Beatles level! The film would be bad boys because it’sits easy-going and funny but also action-packed! ‘sIt’s one of the only movies I’veI’ve been able to watch more than once. The luxury item I guess would be my kit bag, obvious I know but imagine the ‘sky’s you would be able to photograph on a deserted island day and night.

Q:

On a similar theme, if you could share one piece of advice with other photographers, what would it be? Follow your dreams and believe in yourself!

Q:

You’ve been a Guild member since 2013 – What have you got most from your membership? As a proud winner of two prestigious Photographer of the Year Awards, I guess I have to say first and foremost the Image of the Month [IOM] competition. Yes, it can be very challenging and very frustrating, but the IOM has helped me look at my work differently. Also, it is great to be a part of a community where you can learn and draw inspiration with so many other like-minded creatives.

Q:

What is in your kit bag?

I shoot all Canon, with two 1DX’s bodies, a 400mm F2.8 70-200mm; F2.8 1740mm; F4.0 Fisheye. I also have card readers, memory cards, a laptop and other random accessories, but one key element is waterproofing!

Q:

Do you prefer Colour or Black and White images?

For me, the choice all depends on the image, the subject and the context. Photographs containing emotion and contrast work best for black and white conversions! In terms of sports photography, I prefer colour and not many images do get converted. Football is a colourful game, the kits, the grass, the colours in the stands.

Q:

What is your best editing tip?

Don’t be afraid to experiment! With modern technology, anything can be done and undone at the click of a button, with layers and copies. Give it a try if it doesn’t work, try something else.

Q:

How do you like to relax after a busy day?

Relax? With two young kids!!! Joking apart, at the end of my busy day I sleep! I like to kick back and watch a bit of TV, whether it’s a Netflix series or something else.

Q:

What is your next photographic goal, and why?

This is a tough one; ‘mI’m signed up to an agency who are growing within the industry, my goal is to build with them, ‘dI’d love to reach the very top In my genre, but I still have a lot to learn! I’dI’d also like to gain the highest qualification possible within the guild as much as my ability allows.

Thank you Arron for sharing an insight into your Sports Photography! - Creative Light Magazine Issue 33

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Digital FineArt Collection Turning Images into Art

Making paper since 1584 Hahnemßhle Bamboo is the world’s first inkjet paper made from 90% bamboo fibres and 10% cotton, offering an environmentally friendly alternative. Available in rolls & sheets. Discover more at: www.hahnemuehle.co.uk

01603 759266 | hello@hahnemuehle.com | Follow 72 : Creative Light Magazine - Issue 33 us on Twitter and Instagram: @Hahnemuehle_UK


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20% off any CEWE PHOTOBOOK and any CEWE WALL ART* Exclusive offer for Guild Members Offer available on any size or format using the CEWE Design Software. For information on how to redeem this offer, log in to The Guild website and view the Partners and Discount section.

XXL Landscape Photo Book

XL Square Photo Book

Our largest landscape photo album is perfect for those projects

Ideal for professionals and talented hobbyists alike, our XL

that deserve no expense spared. Suitable for full-page prints

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every detail of your most stunning panoramic pictures and group

our most popular books for creating a unique wedding album.

portraits.

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CEWE are proud to be a trade partner of The Guild of Photographers

We are a European market and technology leading, innovative photo printing and online service provider. With over 50 years of experience, we are renowned for our dedication to outstanding print quality.

Gallery Prints Our high-quality photo printing process includes UV printing directly onto acrylic glass which is then strengthened with aluminium di-bond. This means the brilliance and depth of your photos are secured with the gloss of the acrylic and strength of the aluminium.

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*T’s and C’s apply. Offer available on any size and format CEWE PHOTOBOOK and any size or format CEWE WALL ART until 31st January 2020. Does not include p&p and cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer.

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Gavin Prest PhotoHubs 2019 Speaker

Gavin Prest started his photographic career shooting with film, this gave him a fundamental grounding in photography. It was during 2011, after having several years away from the camera, Gavin began creating images again only this time digitally. Gavin’s passion is for capturing people and storytelling in his photographs Gavin has received international

recognition

in

photographic

circles and being awarded several National and International Photography titles and a Master Craftsman with The Guild of Photographers. Gavin is best known for his approach to creating a narrative based black and white images of people.

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Q:

As a Speaker at this year’s PhotoHubs, what will be the primary directive of your talk?

The Photohubs talk is about my workflow and how I process my black and white images. Iʼm always being asked how do I manage to get 32 shades of black in my pictures. I hope this will help people to improve their black and white processing and add punch to their images.

Q:

As a Master of narrative-based black & white photographer, how do you prepare for a shoot? I always prepare with a story-board and an idea. I often put a Pinterest board together with inspirational images on as this is an easy way to share your thoughts with the other people involved in the shoot.

Q: What inspires you to create the foundation of your narratives? Iʼm inspired by several different things, Images, films, poems, quotes, life and lifeʼs experiences. This leads me to a train of thought, and I then translate that into an image.

Q: Originally a photographer on film what inspired you to return to photography in 2011 and the use of a new medium with digital cameras?

In 2011 my life changed quite dramatically both with business and personally. I was working on the beach with the lifeboat crew when I met a photographer who is based in Paris called Iain Holmes, who was working on a project about coastal erosion. We started talking, and he re-lit the spark and passion for photography which I had lost. I went home and started looking at photography. I did a little bit of shopping, updated my camera and started taking images again and I was instantly hooked.

Q: Are you a Mac user or PC? Iʼm a Mac user and have been since I came back to photography. Peter Morgan, a Guild member has looked after me for the last few years and saved me a lot of money with quality used machines.

Q: What is your preferred editing software? Iʼve has always been an Adobe user, so my editing software of choice is Lightroom and Photoshop.

Q: Is black and white photography your chosen medium for creativity? Although the colour does have its place, I have never really been able to settle with colour images. I havenʼt found a style or look that I have been happy comfortable with Saying that my last Master Craftsman panel was colour based. With a black and white the image you are not distracted by colours, and I think you focus more on the subject matter. I also believe that you can create more drama with a black and white image, but these are my personal views; they also seem to be more timeless as colour trends change dating images.

Q: Your favourite lens, and why? I am very particular about verticals, straight lines and symmetry and I do confess I am a little OCD about it. This being the case, I very rarely shoot wide-angle lenses. I would say my favourite lens would be a 50mm. I have been shooting with the Sigma Art series of lenses for several years and found them to be everything I need. You will find a 35mm, 50mm and an 85mm in my bag as these are my holy trinity of lenses.

Q: Tripod, love or hate them? And, do you use one and if so, why? I tend to use a tripod most of the time when Iʼm on-location shooting ( its a love them from me ) and I have a studio stand in my studio with I use all the time. When I moved to the bigger sensor camera bodies, I noticed that I was suffering from what looked like camera moment when I handheld them even with fast shutter speeds and this was one reason I started using them more. Itʼs also so much easier when youʼre composing an image to keep the camera in the same position when you go to adjust something in the shot. Issue 33

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Q: Do you shoot mirrorless and if so, which camera system did you choose and why?

Yes, I do, I have been with Canon for several years and enjoyed the experience, but I found myself shooting in live-view more and more as my eyesight was changing. I looked into the mirrorless systems, and I gave Sony a try. One of the advantages of the Sony A7 series is that the camera works with my current lenses with the use of an adaptor with a relative low-cost changeover, that始s if anything ever is low cost in photography - lol

Q: As a Panel Member and Judge, what do you look for in an image?

Apart from judging by the 12 criteria all the judges do, I want to see photographers being creative, setting trends and not following them. An image that keeps you involved and asking questions. Or an image that upsets you and makes you want to look away but manages to hold you.

Q: Your favourite food? As a Yorkshire lad, it will have to be a roast dinner and with Yorkshire puddings.

Q: Where next? This is an interesting question! A few years ago, I was finding myself shooting all sorts of images and all kinds of subjects, and this wasn始t, helping me discover who I was as a photographer. Then one day, the penny dropped, and I realised who I am as a photographer. I decided to follow my heart and imagination and become the lens-based artist I always wanted to be and proved to be a very steep learning curve but one I始m very happy to pursue.

Q: Who inspired you to become a photographer?

Apart from Iain, I mentioned earlier, who made me pick the camera up again. Bob Carlos Clark has always been an inspiration to me, as has Helmut Newton. Having been compared to both these chaps in various magazine articles which is quite humbling given their place in photographic history. Jack Vettriano is an inspiration, not because of his painting but because of his attitude to the art world.

Q: Favourite place in the world?

It doesn始t matter as long as it has got a bar!

Thank you Gavin for giving the readers an insight into your photography and we all look forward to your workshop at PhotoHubs in November. All details can be found on the PhotoHubs website {click here} - Julie Oswin

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World Renowned Photographers Emerging Artists | Film Screenings | Talks Q&A’s | Workshops | Book signings | Meet the Artist | Live Pop-up Portrait Session Student Competition | Live music | Indie Market Stall Traders | Portfolio reviews 30th November - 2nd December 2019 Photo North Festival, run by a small team of photography

and curatorial professionals, is back for a second year and will be held at the Harrogate Convention Centre. Building on the success of the inaugural festival in Harrogate, this unique photography event is aimed at the professional photographer, art-enthusiast, keen amateur and students. The festival brings together a sensational display of exhibitions, talks, workshops and portfolio reviews from highly respected and emerging artists. The Photo North team aim to create a lively festival where everyone feels welcome and engaged and leaves feeling nourished and inspired. Visitors can browse the industry trade stands and bookstalls or relax with friends or make new ones. This year’s artists include Mik Critchlow, Getty Images Gallery, Document Scotland, Portrait Salon, Jim Mortram, Carolyn Mendleshohn, Denise Thorpe, Lens Think, Runway Gallery, Ed Kashi, Peter Dench, Craig Easton plus many more. Peter Dench, co-founder and curator of Photo North, said “The driving force behind Photo North was our desire to keep exhibitions on the road and outside of the South and to get world-class work out to a northern audience. We also want to showcase the work of up-and-coming photographers to give them a leg up. We don’t want the festival to be sniffy or static; we want it to be inclusive. We want people to walk through the door and feel welcome.” For its second year, the event takes up a full exhibition hall and includes a theatre area, trade stalls and the exhibitions. Aspiring photographers can take advantage of portfolio reviews, and there will be a free-to-enter competition for students. Peter said the festival would also feature harder-hitting exhibitions of works highlighting social issues. He added: “Photo North Ltd is a not-for-profit organisation and has ambitious plans to help the unfortunate, marginalised and the homeless through several ongoing photography projects throughout the year. The majority of events throughout the festival will be free of charge upon entry. We offer a full and diverse programme of events which will vary each day, including film screenings, talks, book signings, meet the artist, live music, food and drink, portfolio reviews, trade stands and independent traders.” continued... 86

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“Cleaning the Cuverie” 1st - Jon Wyand


“What a fantastic and inspiring weekend at Photo North Festival. Well done Photo North and all involved for curating something so wonderful. After spending the whole weekend chatting with some brilliant minds what little is left of my own, has now imploded! However, the number one thing, what it has inspired me to do is to come up with a new project of my own for next year...� - Amy Davies, Amateur Photographer Magazine

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One of this year’s highlights will be the exhibition of work from the Pink Lady Food Photography of the Year Award. The award is open to professional and non-professional, old and young – the awards celebrate the very best in food photography and film from around the world. The categories cover the full cultural range of the depiction of food in society – there is something for everyone. From styled food for magazines to images of families eating together in celebration of religious festivals, from depictions of the realities of food production to food growing in its natural setting. Monday 2nd December will become our Education Day with participation and presence from education organisations and students from across the north of the UK. The show will once again be running a student competition, the theme this year being ‘Family’. Photographs of the family were once intimate albums to be selectively shared. The revolution in image-making means we can now share sacred family moments and memories of our nearest and dearest in an instant, with sometimes barely known ‘friends’ and followers. The show invites students to share through photography, what family means to you - students can embrace one photographic genre, or mix them up: portraits, still life or documentary. Homes for Students sponsor the competition, and full terms of entry can be found at https://www. photonorthfestival.co.uk/student-photo-competition To keep up to date with Photo North Festival’s latest bookings and events, please visit our website www.photonorthfestival.co.uk. Tickets are available via the website. Early bird prices are available, and tickets include a free sample of Yorkshire Gin, and a complimentary, signed copy of Dench Does Dallas book, while stocks last.

Comments from the 2018 Show “Bye-bye Photo North Festival. It’s been an amazing few days. Big love and thanks to Peter Dench and Sharon Price, who believed in me to give me this exhibition opportunity which is now leading me onto a bigger platform. For the first time, I have something tangible to work towards with an endpoint, and the support of some key photographers who I admire immensely. Watch this space, it’s been almost overwhelming at times, and now I am excited about the future.” - John, 2018 Exhibitor

“Food Processing” 1st - Avishek Das

“I thoroughly enjoyed this inspiring festival with the many thoughtprovoking exhibits. It made me want to find ways to capture the people, places and slices of life moments that I have encountered in my own life. Thank you also for Peter’s wonderful book! As a fellow creative, I enjoy seeing what inspires other artists and the work they produce. With an impressive array of artists and seminars, I hope to return for future festivals!” - Rebecca, 2018 Visitor “As someone growing up in North Yorkshire, I felt I needed to leave the region to access the Arts. Events like Photo North are so important for young people in the area who can see their work on the walls. To be able to attend and have portfolio reviews; get access to the arts, talks, screenings and to meet other creatives is vital Not only in the aspect of their careers but to empower and stimulate them socially.” “Photo North was a very welcoming event. It was a hub of creatives, bookmakers, curators and more. It was fun and educational.” - Joanne Coates, Photographer and Founder of Lens Think

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“Vigneron pruning vines” 1st MICK ROCK


“Bonda Tribe” 1st Sanghamitra Sakar

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“Big cauldron surface� 1st - Jianhui Liao

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MAGAZINE WORTHY SHOT!

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Adrian Lazare

Rune Askeland

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Sergey Serge ~ Russia ~

Adam Rubinstein

Lynroy

Betsy Armour

Catherin

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Aaron Gray

Anja Heinrich

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Brian Keener

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Bruno Scliffet

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Naser Tamimi

Brian Mumaw

Jay McCartney

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AndrĂŠ Miranda

Anthony Kimber

Alexis Kapsomenos

~ Brazil ~

~ Canada ~

~ Greece ~

Caterina Ottomano

Omar Bariffi

Maria Ulanova

~ Italy ~

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~ Russia ~

Fowlie

Christian Brogi

Agnieszka Dietrich

Javad Ju

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Carin Milling

Janine Phillips

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Lori Ellis

Vikram

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Dominik Behr

Margarida Afonso Silva

Margie Troyer

Mishchen

~ Botswana ~

~ Portugal ~

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Image Film Works

Martin Eriksson

Matt Nixon

~ United States ~

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Artur Jaszcz

Merethe Nielsen

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Giles Pettipher

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tralia ~

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Velociraptor

Montanna Mottly

Evgeniy Lyukhanov

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nko Olga

Michael Hemming

Susan Sayers

Dimitris Georgoudis

d States ~

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Franklin

Oxana Muzyka

Pavlína Rolincová

Fek Berci

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Gabriel Fox

Hazelle Yong

Bart Buckalew

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Kevin Towler

Slawek Goral

Joe DeSanto

Glen G

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Kuriene

Joscelin Soares

Vlada Nesterov

Svenja

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Matthew DiGiacom

Terry Leake

Yair Tzur

Sven

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Pierre Lagarde

Matt Specht

Konrad Kehrer

Nemo

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Joel Carlson

Roxanne Collins

nada ~

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Tomas Dervinskas

Thomas Patrice

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Steven Hulton

Ăžorsteinn H Ingibergsson

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Silvio Leal Junior

Kristila Singkoh

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Behind The Shot: Richard Peters’ wildlife photography Everyone appreciates a great photo, but only the photographer really knows what went into capturing that perfect image. In Datacolor’s Behind the Shot series, accomplished photographers share their stories of exactly what went into getting that perfect shot. And as UK-based wildlife photographer and former Nikon Ambassador alumni, Richard Peters, tells us, it’s almost always a balance of patience, preparedness and providence. Richard is a UK based wildlife photographer and Nikon Ambassador alumni best known for a style that often favours dramatic light. His work has received numerous accolades, including being one of the only British wildlife photographers to be named the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year, alongside winning several awards in the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

‘Little owl’ Not pictured: A 1-month wait for the perfect shot A weekly hour and a half drive Lots of used batteries < 2 minutes to calibrate your monitor

“I had long wanted a more interesting perspective on a little owl photo, one of my favourite of the owl species. My opportunity came with a nesting pair in an old abandoned farmhouse I had access to. In order to capture this image I had to leave a camera trap in position for 1 month, around an hour and a half drive from home, checking in on it once a week to change batteries. During that month, the camera only recorded two photos that were usable. This one at sunrise was the most striking of the two.” 98

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© Copyright 2019 Datacolor. Datacolor Inc. All rights reserved. Datacolor and Spyder are registered trademarks of Datacolor.


‘When I grow up’ Not pictured: A once in a lifetime opportunity A chance taken with a 400mm lens A single lucky shot < 2 minutes to calibrate your monitor “Photographing giraffe, and showing their height, can often be tricky due to their awkward shape and size. To include the full height of the giraffe and something of scale can result in messy background elements. When I spotted these two at some distance from our jeep, I had time to only frame up and fire one single image before they parted ways. I didn’t even have time to look at or change my settings. I realised I had shot at f2.8 with my 400mm but thankfully this provided enough depth of field to render both mother and young sharp.”

‘Steve’ Not pictured: A cafe owner with an unlikely friend A few enticing crumbs A deceptive angle < 2 minutes to calibrate your monitor With wildlife photography, it’s important to take advantage of any opportunity you can. This Raven was actually photographed on top of a cafe in Montana, USA. The cheeky chap, named by the cafe owner as Steve, was frequently seen by locals as he hung around in the hope of a few crumbs left behind. The image was actually taken with Steve about 12 feet above me, so I stepped back a little in order to reduce and disguise the steep angle I needed to shoot at as he called out.” Richard Peters uses SpyderX to calibrate his monitor.

Meet SpyderX - our best Spyder ever With SpyderX, you can be sure that what you see on screen is the most accurate representation of the shot you took. When you start editing and you know the color on your monitor is accurate, you can confidently control every aspect of your image. And when it’s time to print, your output will match what you are seeing on screen and better reflect your creative vision. For more information: http://bit.ly/meetSpyderX

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Christopher Hall

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer

July 2019

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Elli Cassidy

PhotoHubs 2019 Speaker

Elli is a highly regarded specialist newborn, maternity and portrait photographer. Elli runs a successful photography business from her dedicated Newborn Baby Studio in Swaby, near Louth, Lincolnshire. She is a Fujifilm X-Photographer, an Ambassador for both Loxley Colour and Elinchrom Lighting and one of the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading newborn photographers. Elli has photographed hundreds of babies for families in Lincolnshire, Grimsby and beyond.

Little hands and little feet, little toothless grins so sweet, Little eyes that shine so bright, little arms to hug you tight.

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Q:

What advice would you give to a photographer setting out in Newborn Photography? Start simple (and safe) and then grow and perfect. Creative a simple, perfectly executed portrait for a client will help your business flourish more than half achieving a mass of shots. Take your time to learn your camera and your lighting, knowing why we do what we do and how our equipment works can help you when a shot isn’t looking right.

Q: What start-up kit would you recommend as essential purchases?

Q:

Your inspiration for the design of a newborn shoot, and where do you start? For regular client shoots, I have a set workflow that I follow, which includes an opportunity to get creative too. In chatting with the parents at the start of the session, I can find out their priorities for any particular set-ups and products and ensure I shoot for those. I like to get models in from time to time to give myself creative freedom to try new things, and know there’s no sales pressure if it doesn’t work out. I think you often learn the most when you give yourself the freedom to play.

Q:

How do you build the newborn shoot, do you start with the subject, the set or the colour pallet? A little bit if all of those. I use the workflow I created, and on almost every shoot, it ensures I can deliver a consistent set of portraits to each client both in terms of style and quality. However, which colour and props I use depend entirely on the baby, their skin tones and of course, their size, and not forgetting the client’s preferences too. I tend to discuss this with parents at the start of each shoot while they are feeding their baby.

Q:

Your favourite go-to lens, and why?

That depends on the day you ask me, currently, I’m loving my 80mm 2 Fujifilm macro, it gives beautiful close-ups but is also a superb portrait lens. For newborns, though I also like a lens that lets me shoot within arms reach if the baby, so either my 35 1.2 or 16-55 2.8 (I’m using a Fujifilm mirrorless, so you have to remember it has a different crop factor to full-frame DSLRs). I don’t work with an assistant, so keeping my tiny clients safely next to me is vital.

Q:

Who or what has influenced you the most with your photographic journey? So many people and styles. I’ve often tri d to look outside the newborn genre for inspiration and influence, there are some fantastic photographers within my genre, but it’s hard to keep a clear head sometimes and not to feel you have to jump on the latest trend. I trained with the Yerbury’s in Art Nude as I knew it would help my maternity posing if you are nude and have nothing to hide behind then you have to learn to nail the pose. All those techniques carried across into posing my regular client work. 106

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To buy a few items of props, experiment with looks, textures, colours etc. and then start investing once you’ve begun to develop your style. I’ve worked with so many photographers who don’t have a definite style as they have bought a little of everything they’ve seen others use and it doesn’t always gel well together. Decent lighting though would be high on my list, great lighting and control of it help sculpt great images. An amazing prop but poor lighting won’t achieve the same.

Q:

What advice would you give with regards to Health & Safety of newborns? There is so much available to access now, it’s online, in literature and available with in-person training that it’s easy to learn how to be safe. Learn what you can and if in any doubt about something, use your common sense and don’t do it. This is a massive area to answer in just a few words.

Q:

What editing software do you use for your workflow and post-production? I use Lightroom for 90% of my images, batch editing the basics and then using the adjustment brushes for any localised skin work. Photoshop I mainly use for any composites, and also for Imagenomics Portraiture plugin.


Q:

Camera equipment, what do you use, and why?

Fujifilm XT3, it’s the perfect tool for the job. Small and lightweight with a brilliant tilt screen, live view, and touch responsive too. It enables me to shoot onehanded, to never have to stand on anything to get an overhead shot (something I wouldn’t recommend over newborns) and to see exactly what I’m getting, complete with colour profiles. I can see a live view in black and white if that’s what I’m shooting, which makes a big difference. There are all sorts of excellent smaller mirrorless cameras on the market now, but it’s the ease of use and the file colours that drew me to Fujifilm

Q:

Do you use a tripod?

Rarely, I move around lots of see different angles and feel a tripod would be far too restricted for me.

Q:

Lighting? What is your preference for your studio? I mainly use Elinchrom ELCs, or a D-lite 1; both go super low power enabling me to shoot wide open with lovely soft light, perfect for newborns. I use Rotalux Softboxes too, easy to set up and down, and high-quality modifiers.

Q:

Do you photograph on location and if so your lighting preference? No, I’m studio based for my clients. I do have an old quadra I use for play shots outside though.

Q:

One of the best gadgets you have bought?

My Spider belt, it has saved my back, I think every photographer should try one. I use the dual one with the lite hand straps. I think they look pretty good in use too.

Q:

What is your least favourite piece of equipment that you have bought? Um...will be one of the many props I’ve bought and never used. (See I need to take my advice!) Most recently, a newborn posing bucket that seems too small to fit a baby in... Issue 33

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Q:

Average newborn sessions do you book/target per month?

Ten a month, alongside a few maternity shoots and also training days for photographers.

Q:

Are in-person sales your preference for your clients?

I believe in-person sales are fundamental to building a successful portrait business, and it benefits both the client and the photographer. You get immediate feedback on your work, and you can help guide your clients to the best suitable products for them. Sales are one of my favourite things to teach as I find it all exciting and the psychology of a sale is fascinating. The biggest realisation is that the sales session is just the final element; the sales process starts from before they even have their shoot.

Q:

Favourite Food?

Anything sweet. Not the healthiest but I have such a sweet tooth.

Q:

Three words that describe you?

Hmm... Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to say adventurous, spontaneous and empathetic. My partner would probably say loving, stubborn and wild!

Q:

Favourite place in the world and why?

Zanzibar in Africa is up there, but anywhere by the coast helps. I live near the sea and go several times a week; it grounds me and motivates me at the same time. I spent two years living in Africa, and I felt so at home there that I often think I was born on the wrong continent!

Q: Where next in your photography?

I have many plans in place, one is to progress further with my photographic qualifications, and another is to expand my studio team. I work with an editor in my busy seasons but am looking to build a more permanent team around me.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank you Elli for sharing with Creative Light Magazine an insight into your successful Newborn Photography. Elli is one of the speakers at PhotoHubs 2019 which is being held over two days in November. Please visit the website for more details and how to book! [click here] - Julie Oswin, Editor

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mer cr ƒ t C MAY/JUNE 2019

Cmercrƒt MAY/JUNE 2019

MAKING THE BIG TIME

FIGHTING EXTINCTION

PHOTO BUSINESSES WHICH PROVE YOU CAN MAKE IT – GILES CHRISTOPHER DAVID HICKS WILLIAM BARRINGTON-BINNS

CHRIS TAYLOR TAKES A TRIP TO AFRICA TO BENEFIT WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

YERBURY SILVER

FOTOSPEED LEGACY GLOSS 325 PERMAJET FB PEARL 300 BARYTA THRIFTY FIFTIES – THE BASIC STANDARD NIKON Z6 HANDS-ON & P1000 TEST ENGINEERING BETTER SUPPORT SONY A6400 IN ACTION

A PORTFOLIO FROM THE LIMITED EDITION BOOK OF THE FILM

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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Sony a6400 action and

f you've been readin online g any photo discus for eve sion for n six min no do utes, you um ubt 've new Alp heard about Sony's ha 640 0, a low E-mou nt cam -end Son era wh tracking y ose foc capabi us that the lities are ir At firs so good t it wo the Alp flagship spo uld sim rts cam ha 9, had shooti ply sto era ng, updat to get , e just a firm camera because I had p to cat ware set to the ch up So do "Don't . unless es it live take a you thi Yes, bu up to pic nk it's t I fou cha the nged hype? nd a few in focus! ture should this set " So I caveat know Emph ting to s abo asi you "Balan s" ut. I tested and the ced gettin n I sta g out-o track and its capabi rted litie f-fo as I sta s at a rted zoo cus shots as at a loc field meet I was cov soon al colleg ming the seq out du ering opportu e. It pro uence. ring This is vided suppo nities not ho for tra sed to throw cking w it's happen ers, using javelin . And Son hurdlers pole vaulter I was s, sprint lens wh y's 70-200 ƒ4 , discus ers/ putters ich is a throw G OSS ers and of the parfoc the foc shot (th al lens us point of wh ich occ (i.e., e last as you doesn urred 't chang zoo protec behind tive fen e have con m), so that a ce, should those tribute were wh so photos not have dis When d to the of I starte olly un tracte proble Let's sta d using intere d the RX-10 m. In ma rt with sting). ath the IV consid lete bridge ny of the Sony the s. erable sequen compla camera test sho suc of the ces, the int abo , my on oti box the cesses. Rig ng ut this flawles camera perfec ly ht out otherw camera t bri sly as the sub perfor obsta ise med will ide ject usi passer you cou dge camera cle s and ntify s-by cam ng Ph AF, and camera was tha ldn't zoo ase De it will camera e betwe stayed contin t m wh tect focus uously. on its is closes ile sho and ath en the The cav on wh target oting And her facing t or on had fou lete (se atever eat? If . ) but in e e sequen the clo there's zoom nd an you ma all but out wh sest eye inexpe I thought I a face to tha nually one cas ce in the ile con nsive t proble if it will shooti solution fra tinuousl e the attem ng a m. (Sequ pt a sec me. Then y ence 10) Guess not. of objec tracking moving ob ondar ject, the t recog algori y step In all oth thms nition on con get con er respec , based trastin A6400 fused. g color ts, the is the backgr wit equ ound, A6300 and the h the but wit ivalent of the track it n start h the as it tra featur to new tra es and vels aro frame cking . It rec new me und the (and mo ogniz nu sys on col re assign es sub tem or con The 30jects bas trast, so shooti minute able features) ed if you ng som lim len . it gth were on vid e troop s has als camou eo clip s we flage as o bee (due to n rem they we aring basic the exp oved trainin iration trade g, it mig nt through law) and of an EU to track ht not be the cam that sub overhe able at agg era do ject we For the ressiv esn't sho ll. se oti ely shots ng vid when camera I used eo as 's Silent predec the so ma essors where Shooti ny of its did. Ma ng mo the cam review de, ny s com era op silentl plain tha online y at 8 erates image frame t the insta Norm s per ally thi body they squ bilization fea s can be second. when tur eezed danger sho into the e that is mis ous sing on that mo oting sports, A6 500 the A6 since ve acr comple 400, wh thing oss quickly tely ign ile can app the frame ver s oring stabili that ima zation howe y ear dis happen ver in ge torted fine wh this cas , s per runnin en fectly image e athlete g tow are att stabili ard the s were ached. not acr zed len camera oss the ses The imp and fra minimi roved zing the me, comple of Eye tely AF is ano implement distor tion. Ha incidences ation headlin ther ma of d I cho witho e-grab jor sen to ut sile ber wh indeed shoot nt sho ich is there a wond oting would erf imp mode, ul rovem be distor ent. Wh (yet subtle) tion, and no chance introd en of Sony firs uce I could as fast as 11 have sho t back in d Eye AF to frame the wo but the 2014, t s per sec rld you had sound it to a ond, butto of the to ass n and shutte butto then pre ign r might n in ord 12 Ma ss er for y/June thing. it to do the 2019 And if its Came there the fra racraf wasn' me the t t a fac n it wo not foc uld giv e in us e up, give you on anything at all, a flashin and find foc g green us" err "can't or. Thi to no s frustra end – the cam ted me era has face

Gary Frie speed dman likes sequ the im pr new su ence and AF trac oved high b-£1k king of APS the enhanc -C model – and its ed Ey e-AF.

iles Christopher is very much a classical commercial photographer, who has made his name working for blue chip clients from a large studio in London. While some other photographers say they can’t get the budgets or find the clients, he definitely can because he’s offering them superb facilities and high-level technical skill. He is a true example of how thinking big – and shooting bigger – can really pay divides. Having spent the first twenty years of his working life in the film industry, Giles and his partner, Abi Cockcroft, set up Media Wisdom Photography in 2001 and have gleaned enormous experience and gained huge success working in large spaces. “We used to have a 700 square foot studio, which was inside a much larger film studio near Shepperton. When we needed the big film studios, we would rent those for furniture shoots. The film studios closed down and so we rented a 1,000 square foot studio. It has a kitchen unit in it, and we do a lot of food and drink photography, as well as small furniture, and big product shoots here”, he explains.

3: Media Wisdom – a studio built for big commercial clients

Giles and Abi with a still life set-up in progress.

Giles got his first camera as a thirteenth birthday present from his father, a film producer who was very interested in photography, and his mother who was a film production coordinator. “My father always saw the value of taking family photographs, and

I loved the fact that he took so much care over them. He would often take me to the publicity stills department in the film studios, where he would have them developed. I have had a fascination with stills photography ever since”.

Silver

After spending his earlier years “hanging around studios and film sets”, Giles went to Watford College of Art to study illustration, graphic design, fine arts and photography. While there, he took up photography on a larger scale than he had as a boy. He was inspired by a particular lecturer at college who encourage the students to find their own unique style, while simultaneously being fascinated by ground-breaking landscape photographers of their day, such as Faye Godwin. “I never thought I could make a career out of that, but I did go back into the film industry, with a plan to go on to a career in graphic design. I started working with the film publicity stills department, with David James and David Farrell as mentors. It was the era where you had to be an assistant to learn anything, rather than nowadays when you learn everything online”, says Giles. This was a period when movie film stock was improving in quality at a rapid pace, making it possible for stills to be framegrabbed from film stock, rather than have the images shot separately. This, coupled with depleted

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Printing for the look and feel – classic papers Cameracraft May/June 2019 29

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budgets, reduced the need for stills photographers. Giles moved into the movie camera department. Here, he worked his way through the ranks, as a clapper loader, focus-puller and assistant cameraman. Giles and Abi began building up Media Wisdom while he was still working in the film industry and she was working in television. “It was difficult at first, but yearon-year it’s got better and better with bigger and bigger clients”, he says. Because Giles and Abi were, as he puts it, “both never scared of film sets” they focused on ‘big production’ style photography. “We both had contacts in the

A typical large roomset built at the Shepperton studios where Giles was familiar with the space, and with movie and TV industry methods and costs. Below, stages in transforming a hangar-like space into a bedroom furniture interior. The finished composition is partly an illusion – note how the chandelier hangs in front of the suspended ceiling flat.

film industry and with film studios and so being given a 7,000 square foot stage or even bigger, didn’t concern me. I knew that I needed more light and more equipment to work in such a large space, but I had the contacts in the industry; we just didn’t have the budgets at the time. We started getting steady work, but not the big stuff I was craving for”, he says. A lot of networking brought them bigger clients and eventually to the attention of Made.com and an Irish furniture company called Easy Living. It is likely that Giles’ work with Made.com contributed to the company’s increased sales figures (this definitely applied

Trevo r & Fa ye Yer bury

30 May/June 2019 Cameracraft

Top quality printed 68-page bi-monthly magazine, £8.50 cover price, included with your Guild of Photographers subscription. Back issues and non-member subscriptions are available from: www.iconpublications.com email editor@iconpublications.com for advertising and editorial enquiries IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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William has now moved home to Thailand, so his immediate plans include “getting our house in order over here” and updating the studio after the process of selling up in England – “the container with our belongings has only just arrived and I’ve got things in boxes that I haven’t even opened yet”. In addition, he has exhibitions in June and July, and more work for hairstyling awards amongst many other plans. Whatever the future holds for this incredibly talented and successful photographer, it’s going to be big.

David Kilpatrick looks at inkjet media which come close to matching silver darkroom printing and historic processes. From the fragile softness of Amalfi hand-made paper to premium Permajet FB Pearl and Fotospeed’s Legacy Gloss fibre-based, your choice of paper can give your work lasting value.

A large studio space makes shooting with people, props and sets possible and gives room for expertly controlled lighting.

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CAM ERAC RAFT PORT FOLIO

Cameracraft 2019 1 PHOTOGRAPH BY WILLIAM BARRINGTON-BINNS • ISSNMay/June 2514-0167 • £8.50

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Kabuki Seasons – Winter and Spring, from a new series of work. Director and photographer: William Barrington-Binns. Creative Director: Tia Oguri . Stylist: Dandy Kimono of Uber. Set , First Assistant and Technician: Rob Youngson. Lighting: David Levy and Lee Romney of Arri Lighting. Hairstylist and co-stylist: Mamiko Sato of Kimono de Go. Makeup: Anastasija Potjomkina. Models: Filantropi Lu and Nange Magro. Assistants: John Gabriel Lopez and Mai. Collaboration with ARRI PCA and Phase One Photo, thanks to Drew Altdoerffer.

“There are still female Kabuki artists and may this continue. Though all-women troupes, or at least troupes having a female leader, are becoming more common in Japan they are still looked down upon. They will never be able to reach the same status as that of an all-male cast if the strict tradition of the onnagata is to continue. The doors of big theatre in Japan, especially on the National stage, are barred and locked to women. “In conclusion, although women are not held in the same status as they were held when Kabuki was first born, they still play an important part. From being the cause of a long tradition of the onnagata to slowly trying to ease their way back onto the stage, feminine presence never really left. The story of Kabuki must continue on, and women may just have to be the ones to pick the torches back up and carry it. They are still evolving.”

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his test started out with an experimental order to Italy for two A3 packs of Amalfi paper by Amatruda paper mills. The superbly packed, sealing-wax fastened papers arrived in under a week in perfect condition with heavy card used to ensure it, and a generous protective wrapping. The cost was £42.15 by credit card including shipping for two packs of 15 sheets, 150gsm. This weight is deceptive, as 150gsm can be a fairly stiff photo paper but handpressed fibre is much softer. The mould edges are not all the same, one side looks more ragged, and it’s not identical to a ‘hand-torn’ effect. Ideally any print made on this paper needs mounting to show all the edges, with a matte overlay and perhaps 2cm of space all round. It’s also good to see the paper itself, and it does not take kindly to bleed printing on an inkjet. Using my trusted and now ancient ColorMunki Photo device, I produce my own paper profiles using Marrutt bulk replacement inks in an even older Epson Stylus

Pro 3800 printer. It’s fourteen years since I visited the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris for the launch of the Epson 4600 which followed the 3800. Used in bursts of activity, the 3800 nevertheless keeps going well. Since the Amalfi paper really doesn’t work well with conventional colour images, the profile was hardly needed. Just using Epson Colour Controls works fine for the sepia, blue-tint and line art tests which really suited the paper. It’s not the same as Amalfi paper when used by Graphistudio for albums even though it comes from the same maker. With two new papers on the market from British world leaders in the field, I also decided to test Fotospeed Legacy Gloss 315gsm and Permajet FB Pearl 300. These are updates on earlier materials, not surprising when you remember that Epson, Marrutt and others have all been revising their ranges as the European mills and converters introduce new substrates. These tests follow.

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AMATRUDA AMALFI paper – a single weight, warm parchment coloured, handmade paper with a laid texture and the hand-torn effect of mould edges. This paper is not sold through photo dealers and doesn’t seem to appear in craft shops either. It’s made in the Italian town (which can be seen in the cyanotype-effect print, central of the samples from my printing here). It seems best printed using the Singleweight Matt setting for Epson, as the paper is under 0.1mm thickness (on this setting, it transports and prints well). It works best for engravings and line art, sepia or antique effects. 46 May/June 2019 Cameracraft

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Nikon Z6

hroug hout the digita l photo history of SLRs graph ha y, Nik role; the firs ve played on’s a piv t Koda deriv Cam otal ing fro k erac m the DCS mode raft recog ls May/Ju F3 nisab le ‘mod , the first of co ne 20 urse, ern’ DS 19 37 Cameracraft May/June 2019 31 a long profes line of LRs and siona accessi l DSLR with the D1 ble, s tha t bega 20 ye of inn n ars ov right and au ation to pe ago. Deca shed des rfect tofoc be pu or me us, fas shutt d can the body er an ter, mo tering al en is d mirro nd of vertic ay. 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Profile for Guild of Photographers

Creative Light - Issue 33  

Creative Light Magazine brings together people interested in the craft of photography.

Creative Light - Issue 33  

Creative Light Magazine brings together people interested in the craft of photography.