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PhotoHubs 2019 - Crewe Hall Christmas Tree, Bethlehem - Mick Ryan Santa’s Stable - ANA Photography Guild Spotlight - Peter Farrington Guild Spotlight - Henry Ransby Guild Spotlight- Nikki Kirk Issue 34

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Contents A Grand Day Out! Guild Regional Meet-Up

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Mick Ryan My Journey into Photography

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AnA Photography Santa’s Stable

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Peter Farrington - The Falklands Guild Spotlight

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Gold Awards September & October 2019

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Henry Ransby Guild Spotlight

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Nikki Kirk Guild Spotlight

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National History Museum The Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Rise Hall Guild Regional Meet-Up

Photo: AnA Photography

Photo: Mick Ryan

Photo: Henry Ransby

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David Kilpatrick The Value of Prints

Photo: Nikki Kirk Issue 34

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Steve & Lesley Thirsk The Guild of Photographers

Well, the 2019 ‘Image of the Month’ competition has finished. This is the only competition of its type measuring both consistency and individual excellence together. As well as being a competition, everybody that enters has their own individual photographic journey! It assists everyone, as well as the industry, to push boundaries of excellence. We now have the unenviable task of aggregating all the scores and obviously double checking them, to see who has achieved membership of ‘The Photographers Bar’, a Top 10 place in each genre, and of course, we will discover who are this year’s ‘Photographer of the Year’ winners. An even more difficult task is going to be choosing our ‘Image of the Year’ finalists in each genre … and once we’ve done that, we will have to select just one winner in each section and then an overall winner of course. This year we had nearly 15,000 entries and the standard was consistently amazing. With that in mind, this will be incredibly hard and will no doubt take hours to reach final decisions. To get the final decision on the ‘Image of the Year’ competition, we bring all our Judges together from the UK and Ireland. They then collectively view all the finalists and make very difficult decisions, choosing the winner in each genre, as well as their overall ‘Image of the Year’. Guild members won’t get away lightly either, as they have the opportunity to choose their favourite image from all the Gold Awards that were awarded during the year. The one with the most votes will win the coveted ‘Image of the Year Members Choice’ Award. The results will be at announced at a spectacular Awards Evening held at Crewe Hall, a stunning Jacobean mansion in the Cheshire countryside. This takes place on the 1st of February 2020. It’s always a sell out! 2019 has been an exciting year for many other reasons. The Guild of Photographers was a trail blazer introducing PL&PI insurance for photographers nearly 30 years ago. In more recent years we introduced a comprehensive business protection package for those in business as well as a free Copyright Protection package. This year has seen a new first. The Guild has introduced an ‘Interest Free Credit’ service for photographers to offer their clients. This can boost both turnover and profitability significantly, as well as helping customers afford the product they want by paying monthly for their purchases, as so many of us do today. It’s not all been about firsts of course, nor solely looking after the interests of members in business. This year has seen a noticeable increase in the number of members taking up our unique mentoring scheme. The mentoring we offer is done on a one to one basis, usually via Skype on a similar communication system. This means direct questions can be asked and examples given. In short, it’s bespoke and everyone can work at their own pace – this has to be one of the best ways of learning! This has resulted in more people than ever pushing themselves and going for qualifications. The social side has developed considerably too, with the growth of regional groups, run by the members themselves, and supported by us. A new development being launched this month is the introduction of ‘Members Ambassadors’. The Guild is multifaceted and has so much to offer, so it can be easy to miss out on opportunities, discounts and so much more. ‘Members Ambassadors’ are members who know the Guild well, understand the benefits and are willing to share their knowledge with newer members, to ensure that everyone gets as much as possible from the Guild and it’s fantastic community. We are sure 2020 will be an equally exciting year and really look forward to the next 12 months. Meanwhile, we want to thank-you for your support and wish you and yours a peaceful festive period – as well as a very happy and healthy New Year! - Steve & Lesley Issue 34

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Editor “December’s wintery breath is already clouding the pond, frosting the pane, obscuring summer’s memory...” - John Geddes.

It’s the most beautiful time of the year...! I really can’t believe that it is only a few weeks until Christmas and the New Year 2020. Thankfully for all photographers, the ‘silly season’ of deadlines and orders will soon be over, and we can prepare for our Christmas. Highlighting Guild photographers with this edition just shows how much talent we have. There is a special time-lapse video of the decoration of the Christmas tree in Bethlehem captured by Mick Ryan. Mick Ryan ‘Spotlight’ also includes a link to a recent Channel 4 Documentary on the journey that Mick and The Christmas Decorators take to Bethlehem. Worth watching. The ‘Spotlight’ articles also shine on our member Ant Treasurer who shares his story of designing and building Santa’s Stable for the 2019 Christmas Sessions at AnA Photography Studio, Bodmin, Cornwall. Henry Ransby and his world of wildlife, nature and Kestrels. Peter Farrington on his recent tour to the Falklands with the RAF and finally an insight into the wedding photography of Nikki Kirk. The Natural History Museum has kindly shared their Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 competition winners chosen from 48,000 entries from over 100 countries. View the beautiful images on page 81, where you will also find details of the exhibition at the National History Museum. If you have a story or would like to see your photography featured on these pages, please get in touch with Head Office - info@photoguild.co.uk

julie oswin

Last but not least, I would like to wish you all Season Greetings and a Happy and a Healthy New Year!

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- Julie Oswin, Editor

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editors choice Helen Woodland Awarded Silver - October 2019

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A Grand Day Out ‘One for the album Gromit� Who: South West & South Wales Regional Group Where: Bristol When: 5th September 2019 Author: Glenn Parker Attendees: Eight Photographers and two models Members brought a plethora of strobes, speedlights and modifiers; Sharon and Clive Hall had arranged student models and after breakfast the work began.

Photo: Ann Aveyard

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Photo: Ed Burrows

We used the old dockside railway and rolling stock as our sets. Using a variety of lighting techniques, and although the weather had something to say about it - a little brighter than Sunny16 (In photography, the sunny 16 rule (also known as the sunny f/16 rule) is a method of estimating correct daylight exposures without a light meter) and breezy enough to make anchoring light stands a challenge. Not to mention Clive’s California Sunbounce which was blown about. The ‘Grand Day Out’ couldn’t have been better. Ann Aveyard had volunteered to share her knowledge with less experienced members and overall, with some great results. No Guild social goes without good food (breakfast long was forgotten) and this day was no exception with a sit-down lunch arranged by Ed. After much technical and not so technical, a mixture of friendly banter and laughter, we went walking to walk off our meal and captured what the City of Bristol had to offer. A few miles and hours later, people, architecture, graffiti and one of the models had become the subjects for some street photography. With a final call for coffees, the day was declared a success (albeit with a few tired feet). We all agreed that a similar event would be held in the spring. - Glenn Parker

Photo: Ann Aveyard

Photo: Antony Topham

Photo: Glenn Parker

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Photo: Glenn Parker

Photo: Sharon Lewis

Photo: Glenn Parker

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Photo: Glenn Parker


Photo: Ann Aveyard

Photo: Glenn Parker

Photo: Antony Topham

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Photo: Sharon Lewis

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Front Cover Our Daily Bread Back in December 2012, I was asked to travel to Bethlehem to photograph the decorating of the Christmas tree in Manger Square. A Liverpool firm called The Christmas Decorators had got the job and seeing as I was their resident photographer, I got the gig! I got a fair bit of free time while I was out there so turned my camera on the local life. This scene struck me when I saw it. The boy was standing not far from the Church of The Nativity ( built on the site it’s believed Jesus was born) selling loaves of bread. The title came into my head before I took the picture. I spoke to the boy, and he told me he tried to make some money selling bread to take home to his parents. All around Bethlehem you’ll see young children selling corn, chickpeas and bread to make a few pennies for their families.” Please view Mick Ryan’s interview on page 18.

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Mick Ryan My Journey Into Photography

It is a pretty unusual route that I took into my photography career. My Dad was a keen amateur, with his own darkroom. Which doubled up as our bathroom!!! But, as a child I didn’t take too much interest in it. I was a keen naturalist and traveller in my twenties, still, am! It was these interests that got me into wanting to record what I saw! So, I bought cheap cameras and learned how to use them before purchasing my first “proper camera”, a Canon EOS 500N film camera so I could capture my trip interrailing way back in 1994. I carried on with my photography throughout my Cricket career which by 2002 had taken me up to Scotland and coaching the national squad. Over the years I received a few prizes in Photography magazines, and other competitions so I gained a bit of confidence with my photography. My Cricket career came to an abrupt end in May 2005 when I snapped my ACL (the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint) celebrating Liverpool winning the Champions League Final in Istanbul. I was diagnosed with cancer just a week later. Spending the next 5 years getting over that, getting divorced and moving back to Liverpool. I got a job working in a school in Liverpool coaching but hated it and when I snapped my ACL for the second time playing cricket (which I shouldn’t have been doing) that came to an abrupt end! When I was wondering what my next move was a close friend said to me “Photography is what you are good at Mick”. The Christmas Decorators were my first clients... I still work with them today and appeared in their television Christmas Documentary in Bethlehem which was on Channel 4. Not sure I can say I’ve made it yet, but I’ve loved every mad minute trying!! - Mick Ryan www.mickryanphotography.co.uk www.instagram.com/mickryanphotography

www.instagram.com/monochromemick Watch the Channel 4 Documentary

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Q: What have you found most challenging about

Q: Post-processing and Photoshop, how important is

Working on the business as well as in it. Fitting 28 hours a day into 24 !!

Lightroom, essential, I shoot in RAW. I have created a range of my own presets to speed up the process. I don’t do composites so Photoshop is of minimal use and I use it for getting rid of sensor spots, resizing and sometimes use it to blend landscape shots.

running a photography business?

Q: What motivates you to get up in the morning? The sun, the rain, the wind, the frost, birdsong, the thought of spending another day on this earth and creating something new.

Q: One piece of equipment that you couldn’t do without?

It would be easy and obvious to say my camera, so I won’t!! My Ipod, music is important to me, I listen in the car, on the train, on the plane and also when I’m taking pictures… Pretty eclectic in my tastes but Paul Weller, Del Amitri, Kate Bush ,Amy Winehouse and Crowded House are often playing along with a mix of classical, Indian and Irish music!

it to your work?

Q:

Colour or Black and White?

Both.... I love black and white and have a separate Instagram page for my black and white photography but for travel and corporate work colour is king. I particularly love photographing during blue hour.

Q: Your favourite go-to lens for your your

photography especially for your location shoots? It really does depend what I’m shooting and where! My go to travel lens on my Fuji would be the 18-55 OIS F2.8-4. Light and sharp it really is the best kit lens ever. I usually have a 90 F2 for travel portraits too. It really does depend what I’m shooting

Q: Your preferred choice of camera equipment?

I shoot with canon 5D Mk3 and Fuji X-T3, best of both worlds. Full frame and mirrorless and I have an adaptor to use my ‘L’ lenses on my Fuji keeping auto focus capabilities.

Q: What advice would you give to members of The Guild starting out in photography?

Don’t listen to doubters, there is plenty of them! Believe in your abilities. Only do free shoots if it benefits you as much as it benefits the client or if it gives you a good fulfilling feeling. Be careful of setting your prices too low from the outset, work your prices out carefully and know your worth. Spend your money on good lenses!

Q: Lifestyle shoots, favourite time of the year for them and why?

That’s easy, Autumn. Colours, light, mist. Changeable days.

Q: Do you use a tripod? If so, how important is it to your work?

Yes… again it depends what I’m shooting. Its vital for my work with the Christmas Decorators as I shoot at blue hour and usually shoot between F8 -16 and ISO 100- 400 so impossible to hand hold. I take a travel tripod with me on my travels for the odd night and early morning slow shutter shots.

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Q: How important is it to create a brand for your photography business?

Oooh! I know its very important but I feel I need to work harder at that side of things! I’ve asked people about this and they always tell me that I’m my brand. It really is something I need to concentrate more on… but I just love being out with my camera too much!!

Q: Lighting equipment, what is your preferred choice?

Top shade, The sun, thin cloud cover and natural north light. If that’s not available I have canon speedlights and Bowen studio lights too. When I’m photographing headshots for actors, I tend to use my living room window which faces north and lights for a hair light and colouring the backdrop. I don’t tend to use much if any artificial lighting on my travel/street photography.


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Q: Percentage of your work that is dedicated to corporate photography? I’d say about 50%.

Q: Who inspires you?

Photographically - Sebastiao Salgado, Don McCullen, Steve McCurry and Robert Viglasky (you may not have heard of him, but I guarantee you’ll have seen his work). Artistically - Turner and Monet. Life in general - Jurgan Klopp for his never say die attitude.

Q: Can you recommend any photography books to the readers?

Genesis by Sebastiao Salgado it’s on my coffee table right now! Don McCullen by Don McCullen (vintage books), Steve McCurry A Life In Pictures. Robert Doisneau by J.C. Gautrand on Taschen books.

Q: To capture the time-lapse video of the christmas

tree in Bethlehem, how many photographs did you take and time involved? You know I can’t remember but I know it was in the thousands! It was shot over about 36 hours and a lot of stress!! I nearly lost my camera because security would not let me back up to retrieve it! I had to ask the mayor of Bethlehem to sort it for me!

Q: Interesting facts about you?

There are a fair few!! I once played cricket at Balmoral and the only two people watching were The Queen and Prince Philip!! I am a TV supporting actor and work on minor cast roles... I’ve been in the last three series of Peaky Blinders, I’ve got a cast role In a new Netflix series called The Stranger and I have appeared in three feature films. Photographically .... I was in the last two of National Geographic Traveller Travel Portfolio of the Year Competition, 2018.

Q: Three words that describe you? Witty, Passionate, Free Spirited

Q: What is your favourite meal?

That’s hard! A Roast Dinner is always welcome. I am partial to a nice venison steak and I never say no to an Italian.

Q: Favourite place in the world and why?

Again that’s such a tough question! The Amalfi Coast for its shear dramatic beauty and Italian cool. Marrakesh for its constant attack on your senses and Dumfries and Galloway for its unspoilt and undiscovered delights.

- Thank you Mick for sharing an insight into your photography and your journey with the readers of Creative Light Magazine- Julie Oswin, Editor

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A time-lapse video - Christmas Tree, Man


nger Square, Bethlehem

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Take a look inside as Ant builds the Santa’s Stables photography set for their Christmas shoots for 2019.

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Santa’s Stables Christmas Sessions 2019 Guild member, Ant Treasurer became interested in photography at the young age of 5 when he received a 110 film camera and his love for photography began. Ant went on to study A’ Level Photography at College, and it wasn’t until Ant met Aimiee that the couple’s interest in photography grew. In 2007, they opened their photography business, AnA Photography and they are based in the beautiful countryside of Cornwall, near Bodmin. Ant and Aimiee specialise in Newborns, Bump to Baby and children’s photography. The studio is fully equipped for Newborn and baby photo shoots. Ant and Aimiee have a six-year-old son Kieran and a pet dog called Charlie!

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Q: One piece of equipment that you couldn’t do

Q: Lighting equipment, what is your preferred choice?

The most important thing for me by far is our studio management software. With so many things to do when running a business, it is easy to forget things along the way. Our software holds our business together for us. From to-do lists, finances, calendars, shoots and even how our clients like their coffee, we couldn’t live without the information it holds for us!

Q: Do you prefer IPS (in-person sales) for your wedding

without?

Q: Post-processing and Photoshop, how important is it to your work?

As we are predominantly newborn photographers, Photoshop plays a crucial roll in our work. Many of our images are composites, and baby’s skin often needs a little airbrushing ready for the final image.

Q: Your 2019 Christmas scene? Where do you get your inspiration from?

At around Easter time each year, we come up with the overall idea for our Christmas set. We then brainstorm and sketch ideas until we have a solid plan. Some of the details in the set’s this year came from the film ‘Arthur Christmas’. For the first time, we already have our set planned for 2020, but that remains under wraps until next year!

Q: When do you start to build your Christmas set? How long does it take?

Our set gets built twice. The first time is at the beginning of September when we invite a family to come and test out the set, and we take photos so we can show everybody. It takes a couple of days to build the first time, as we still work things out as we go. This year we ended up leaving the studio at 1 am when we were finally happy with it. After that test shoot, the whole thing gets dismantled again and stored until we rebuild it when our sessions begin again in November.

Q: Do you offer Christmas collections or individual sessions and products?

Our Christmas Sessions work differently to our standard studio pricing, targeted at being affordable and quick. Our clients get to see their edited photos instantly and choose what they want to buy there and then. We offer digital images, print packages, canvas raps and also a ‘Christmas Collection’ which includes all of those together.

Q: What’s the favourite place/subject you’ve ever photographed and why?

Before our son was born, Aimiee and I went on a four-week road trip in South West USA in an RV. The photographic opportunities were breathtaking. Within a day we could be travelling from sunny beaches to snow-covered mountains. I could happily go back and do it all again!

Q: Favourite lens and why?

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customers or an online gallery?

[we don’t shoot weddings but for our Studio work:] We have been IPS photographers from the start, and wouldn’t want to do it any other way. Aside from the financial benefits, we love to see our clients reactions when they get to see the images we have created for them.

Q: What do you like most about being a member of the Guild of Photographers?

Aside from the free pens, I think it has to be the community. If anyone has a problem or a question there is such a massive wealth of knowledge within the group that someone will be able to help.

Q: Do you prefer colour or black & white images?

I’m a massive fan of black and white. Sadly in our line of work, we don’t get to do a huge amount of it, but seeing Gavin Prest’s talk at PhotoHubs made me want to go out and do some more black and white work.

Q: Who inspires you?

We live and breathe Newborns in our business, and I think Amy McDaniel is my biggest inspiration. As well as being an amazing newborn photographer, she is a pretty cool person too.

Q: If you could give your younger self one tip, what would it be?

Have faith in yourself. I think most photographers (and people in general) suffer from thinking that their work isn’t good enough or has any value.

Q: What’s your favourite bit of kit worth under £50?

It has to be our reflectors at the cost of £15 each. Over the last 12 years, we have gone through three! As well as being pretty good at reflecting light, they make great seats to stop a brides dress getting muddy, temporary covers to keep your kit dry in a rain shower and fairly decent frisbee’s if you’re bored!

Q: What did you do before working in photography?

I was an Audio Visual Engineer which entailed travelling the country (and world occasionally) installing things from broadcast studios to interactive museum exhibits. Skills that I have carried through to our business.

Q: Can you recommend any photography books to the readers?

I don’t think our Canon 24-70 F2.8L lens hasn’t been off our camera since we stopped shooting weddings two years ago. A versatile lens, and the image quality from it is stunning. 28

When we first started, we purchased some Bowen’s kits second hand. From there, we have stuck with the brand, buying our last set just before they shut down. It’s more a familiarity thing than a dedication to the brand. At the end of the day, if the tool does its job, we are happy with it!

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Although I love reading for leisure, it’s not how I learn best when it comes to training. I would rather watch training videos or attend a course.


Q: Baby Prop Shop, how did you get into it?

At PhotoHubs, our takeover was likened by Nik Proctor to ‘Victor Kiam’ with the phrase “I liked the product so much. I bought the company”. This is pretty much what happened to us. When Aimiee and I heard that Baby Prop Shop was closing its doors - we couldn’t bear to lose the supply of the backdrops we have loved and used for years - so we bought the company and moved it to Cornwall!

Q: As you are photographers, too – what is your favourite backdrop of choice?

I’m all about the wood! Our studio and home are both very rustic, and I love using wooden style backdrops and props within our work.

Q: Do you offer bespoke backdrops for your clients using their images?

Absolutely. From simple headshot backgrounds that need to be bespoke to full multi-panel studio setups, we have created a range of custom and bespoke backdrops and scenes. As well as Christmas sets like our own!

Q: Interesting facts about you?

I love wood! Wood is a big part of our lives both at work and at home. The garden is continuously full of off-cuts from the things I have made. I have no idea what I’m doing most of the time, and make it up as I go along - but there’s nothing more satisfying than building something yourself from scratch!

Q: Do you use a tripod? And, if so, how important is it to your work?

These days I only really use the tripod when filming. It’s probably only come out of its bag a couple of times over the last year, as most of our filming has moved over to iPhones on handheld gimbals!

Q: Three individual words that describe you and Aimiee?

Impulsive, Ambitious and Shy!

Q: Favourite food?

Nothing quite beats sitting in front of a decent film with a Domino’s pizza and a glass of Gin and Tonic!

Q: Favourite place in the world, and why?

It has to be my home county of Cornwall. Although I’m not technically Cornish, I can’t think of anywhere else in the country I would rather live!

Q: Where next?

To be honest, I don’t know. We are pretty happy right now, which I know is a luxury in life. I am excited to see where Baby Prop Shop takes us over the next couple of years and can’t wait for our yearly January’ planning month’ to see what we want to do for the following year.

Thank you for taking time out of your busy Christmas season to agree to be part of the Guild’s ‘Spotlight’. - Julie Oswin, Editor Issue 34

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*T’s and C’s apply. Offer available on any size and format CEWE PHOTOBOOK and any size or format CEWE WALL ART until 31st January 2020. Does not include p&p and cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer.

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GUILD SPOTLIGHT Peter Farrington

My photography started when I was a young boy. I My photography started when I was a young boy. I rememb remember sitting and watching my Grandad take pictures. only a few yearsonly agoathat realised I tooI enjoyed I was fascinated. It was few Iyears ago that realised taking pho I too enjoyed taking photographs and capturing memories. While I was atI loved school I loved food andsocooking, so that was While I was at school food and cooking, that the legendary GaryIRhodes tofantastic being lucky enough was the ing pathwith I ended up going down, had some times from working with the legendary Gary Rhodes to Aviation Photography photographic journey being lucky enough to cook withwas the where Jaguarmy Formula One Team. August 2001. They were also recruiting for chefs at the time andmy thephotographic Falkland Islands. AviationAfghanistan, Photography Cyprus was where journeyI have been PumaAir and Chinook started, Globemaster, and part of theC130K, reason C130J, I enlistedHercules, into the Royal Force in all August They were also recruiting formoments. chefs gave 2001. me some fantastic photographic at the time. During my eighteen years in the RAF as a chef, I have been Iraq, Afghanistan, Cyprusmy and the Falkland Overtothe last couple of years, interest has changed cours Islands. tours I haveI have been done so lucky overFalklands my time toand fly ainfew various in the Portraits. Photo aircraft from a Hawk Trainer, C17 Globemaster, C130K, C130J, Hercules, Puma and Chinook Helicopters as well Awarded the distinction of being a Qualified Photographer as VC10, Tristar and most recently the Voyager. They all have been awarded The Photographer’s Bar. gave me some fantastic photographic moments. Over the last couple of years, my interest has changed RAF Coningsby, home of the Battle Of Britain Memorial Fli course. I now photograph Landscapes, Wildlife which is lent opportunities coming myand way with the La thanks to thephotographic many tours I have done in the Falklands ting thePhotography Typhoon fast that wow airshow crowds every yea a few Portraits. is jet a big part of my life, and it’s great fun! Awarded the distinction of being a Qualified Photographer with The Guild of Photographers in 2018 and this year I was awarded The Photographer’s Bar. RAF Coningsby, home of the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight, is where I am stationed now. I know that there will be some excellent photographic opportunities coming my way with the Lancaster, Spitfire, Hurricane, Dakota and Chipmunk Aircraft, not forgetting the Typhoon fast jet that wow airshow crowds every year on my doorstep. I am fortunate. - Peter Farrington 34

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ber sitting and watching my Grandad take pictures. I was fascinated. It was otographs and capturing memories. the path I ended up going down, I had some fantastic times from workto cook with the Jaguar Formula One Team.

started, and part of the reason I enlisted into the Royal Air Force in e. During my eighteen years in the RAF as a chef, I have been to Iraq, n so lucky over my time to fly in various aircraft from a Hawk Trainer, C17 k Helicopters as well as VC10, Tristar and most recently the Voyager. They

se. I now photograph Landscapes, Wildlife which is thanks to the many ography is a big part of my life, and it’s great fun! with The Guild of Photographers in 2018 and this year I am delighted to

ight, is where I am stationed now. I know that there will be some excelancaster, Spitfire, Hurricane, Dakota and Chipmunk Aircraft, not forgetar on my doorstep. I am fortunate.

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The ‘Guild Spotlight’ interview focusses on Peter Farrington and his wonderful story of life in the Royal Air Force and the wildlife of the Falkland Islands.

Q: What have you found most challenging about

photographing Wildlife in the Falklands, especially in the cold weather? The wind. The cold biting wind has to be one one of the most challenges as well as sand and rain blowing into your camera. The beaches are very exposed and open on the Falkland Islands.

Q: The Falklands is remote landmass with hundreds of

islands and home to sheep farms and abundant birdlife, have you visited many of the islands? I have been lucky enough to go to a few of them, Both East and West Falklands, as well as Saunders Island, Sea Lion Island and Bleaker Island,

Q: Penguins? How curious were they?

The chicks are very interested in you and your equipment, so you have to watch out for that lol, however, if you stay still long enough the adults will approach you.

Q: Dolphins surfing in the waves, talk about the image you took?

The image of the Dolphins surfing in the waves is an image that I have tried to get on the last three tours to The Falklands since 2013. My last tour, earlier this year was my lucky day! The weather was great, -1c but sunny, dry and no wind. I knew they were about so I sat on the beach and waited for that perfect moment.

Q: What motivates you to get up in the morning?

The fantastic opportunities The Falklands has to take great pictures that you don’t get every day — meeting the locals who all have great tales to tell.

Q: One piece of equipment that you couldn’t do without? If I am honest, it has to be my iPod. My music gives me inspiration and motivation.

Q: Your favourite go-to lens for your photography, especially for your location shoots?

Has to be my Sigma 150-500mm lens, perfect for Wildlife and aviation.

Q: Your preferred choice of camera equipment? Sony A7 mk2

Q: What advice would you give to members of The Guild starting in photography?

Don’t ever give up, I am still learning loads from the amazing Guild family and seeing other photographers work you want to keep getting better and better. I would never have imagined getting some of the great images I have and trust me there have been days where I have wanted to put the camera down. But by not giving up is the only way it has happened for me. Issue 34

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Q: Do you use a tripod? If so, how important is it to

Q: Additional lighting, what do you use?

I do for my Milky Way and Moon shots, but because Aviation and Wildlife are always moving, I find it better to use a Monopod or just my trusty hands.

Q: Who inspires you?

your work?

Wildlife does not like a flash, so the majority of my photography is just using natural light.

My Grandfather, he died in 1989. I remember, as if it was yesterday, the days I spent going to the airfields with him and his camera. He was a great man who served his country in the Royal Air Force during WWII and worked hard to bring his two daughters up and then looked after us, “his runaway grandkids.”

Q: Three words that describe you? - Proud; Motivated; Focused.

Q: What is your favourite meal? Anything with pasta.

Q: Interesting facts about you?

Q: Post-processing and Photoshop, how important is it to your work?

Post-processing has a place in my photography, but where I can, I do try to do the majority of my photography in camera. But I do use it to add that extra wow factor to some of my work.

Q: Working on secondment for four months of the year, especially in the Falklands, what do you miss most from home?

My Wife and Family, just being able to chat to them all when you are having a bad day.

Q: Photographing at air shows what are you looking

to achieve with your shots and why? When it comes to my aviation photography I am just trying to capture the movement and the drama. The pilots do an amazing job and try to do them justice.

My Grandmother served in the Royal Air Force during WWII and sadly passed away in 2018 at the age of 98. She was, without doubt, an amazing lady and my soul mate. I could talk to her about anything, anytime; it was so hard going on tour this year and not getting my e-bluey from her. [An e-bluey now called the INtouch service enables personnel on operations to send and receive letters initially sent via email, but received in hard copy form]. Her belief in me and whatever I did was something to behold, not to mention she made the best Cornish pasties in the world. For two years at the start of my cooking career, I had the opportunity to work with Gary Rhodes. He was a great mentor and boss who sadly passed a few weeks ago. I will always remember the great times working for him and having the opportunity to learn from one of the best Chef’s in the UK. He will be sadly missed.

Q:

Favourite place in the world and why?

Cornwall, because it is where I was born, it is beautiful, has a fantastic coastline great for walks, and spectacular scenery for photography.

Q: Favourite animal?

Dog (Staffordshire Bull Terrier)

Q: Favourite bird?

It has to be Penguins

Q: Where next?

That is the 64 million dollar question, I have a few years left in the Royal Air Force so who knows, might get to the Falklands again or get to fly alongside the frontline fast jets with my camera. - Peter Farrington www.peterfarringtonphotography.co.uk 38

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www.hahnemuehle.co.uk

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Behind The Shot: Richard Peters’ wildlife photography Everyone appreciates a great photo, but only the photographer really knows what went into capturing that perfect image. In Datacolor’s Behind the Shot series, accomplished photographers share their stories of exactly what went into getting that perfect shot. And as UK-based wildlife photographer and former Nikon Ambassador alumni, Richard Peters, tells us, it’s almost always a balance of patience, preparedness and providence. Richard is a UK based wildlife photographer and Nikon Ambassador alumni best known for a style that often favours dramatic light. His work has received numerous accolades, including being one of the only British wildlife photographers to be named the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year, alongside winning several awards in the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

‘Little owl’ Not pictured: A 1-month wait for the perfect shot A weekly hour and a half drive Lots of used batteries < 2 minutes to calibrate your monitor

“I had long wanted a more interesting perspective on a little owl photo, one of my favourite of the owl species. My opportunity came with a nesting pair in an old abandoned farmhouse I had access to. In order to capture this image I had to leave a camera trap in position for 1 month, around an hour and a half drive from home, checking in on it once a week to change batteries. During that month, the camera only recorded two photos that were usable. This one at sunrise was the most striking of the two.” © Copyright 2019 Datacolor. Datacolor Inc. All rights reserved. Datacolor and Spyder are registered trademarks of Datacolor.

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‘When I grow up’ Not pictured: A once in a lifetime opportunity A chance taken with a 400mm lens A single lucky shot < 2 minutes to calibrate your monitor “Photographing giraffe, and showing their height, can often be tricky due to their awkward shape and size. To include the full height of the giraffe and something of scale can result in messy background elements. When I spotted these two at some distance from our jeep, I had time to only frame up and fire one single image before they parted ways. I didn’t even have time to look at or change my settings. I realised I had shot at f2.8 with my 400mm but thankfully this provided enough depth of field to render both mother and young sharp.”

‘Steve’ Not pictured: A cafe owner with an unlikely friend A few enticing crumbs A deceptive angle < 2 minutes to calibrate your monitor With wildlife photography, it’s important to take advantage of any opportunity you can. This Raven was actually photographed on top of a cafe in Montana, USA. The cheeky chap, named by the cafe owner as Steve, was frequently seen by locals as he hung around in the hope of a few crumbs left behind. The image was actually taken with Steve about 12 feet above me, so I stepped back a little in order to reduce and disguise the steep angle I needed to shoot at as he called out.” Richard Peters uses SpyderX to calibrate his monitor.

Meet SpyderX - our best Spyder ever With SpyderX, you can be sure that what you see on screen is the most accurate representation of the shot you took. When you start editing and you know the color on your monitor is accurate, you can confidently control every aspect of your image. And when it’s time to print, your output will match what you are seeing on screen and better reflect your creative vision. For more information: http://bit.ly/meetSpyderX Issue 34

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2020

VENUE - CREWE HALL 31st January - 1st February Well, what a line up we have for you! Photohubs Crewe is a celebration of the members of The Guild of Photographers. Recognising fabulous talent and brilliant achievements... So many wonderful people grace the Guild community, if only there were more hours in the day to celebrate them all... Don’t miss out on this opportunity!

“PhotoHubs are exciting regional events aimed at all passionate photographers looking for high quality, affordable training, and unique networking opportunities” The definition of a ‘hub’ is “the effective centre of activity, region, or network”. ‘PhotoHubs’ is THAT centre for all photographers! On offer at all of our PhotoHubs Events is high-quality training, seminars, workshops and intensive themed dedicated ‘Boot Camps’ at some of our two-day events, all designed to accelerate learning. Great trade suppliers are also present at some of our events offering 1-2-1 opportunities to speak to you and exhibit their products. Everyone is welcome.

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DAY PASSES are £45 each to the general public but there is a special DISCOUNT CODE for £20 saving for members of the Guild of Photographers and attendees of the Awards Evening. Email info@photohubs.co.uk for the code. WORKSHOPS are £95 each to the general public. As above, there is a special DISCOUNT CODE is availabile. (ticket includes day pass for rest of day). Email info@photohubs.co.uk for the code. SINGLE TICKET for print competition only is available for £10 for two entries. (Entry requirements must be adhered to). (Inclusive in Day Pass cost/workshop ticket). DAY ONE - FRIDAY 31st JANUARY 10:00-11:00 Emily Endean – ‘My Journey Through Landscape Photography’ Emily will be taking us through chasing light and interesting weather conditions to capture her favourite images; along with her journey of falling in love with nature and Landscape Photography. Emily’s passion for photography started not long after she turned 4(!!!), and after receiving her first DSLR in 2013, she lives and breathes photography claiming that she can’t quite remember what life was like before this!

11:30-12:30 Claire Osborne – ‘Creating Stories using the Ordinary…‘ Ever wondered what goes into Claire’s images... stapling fruit together, bleeding hearts…? All will be revealed as Claire will be talking about her brilliant IOM images; where her inspiration comes from, how concepts develop, planning and setting up the shoot along with the editing process… you won’t want to miss this! Claire has been shooting since her early teens; the birth of her son 16 years ago sparked her true passion for photography. A full time professional since 2013 with Newborns being the main focus, Claire has since fallen in love with entering the IOM competition for herself, in result of which her creativity and skills have flourished into works of art!

12:30-13:30 LUNCH HOUR* 13:30-14:30 Sharon Wallis – ‘When Lightening Strikes’ Sharon will be talking about the big issues behind being a creative particularly when life talks a turn; finding confidence, strength and inspiration to carry on. This talk is sure to get you thinking… Sharon’s professional photography career started in 2008 with the opening of her portrait studio, after running a small successful photography printing franchise. After a very traumatic end to 2017, she had two options… sink or swim! She totally changed her approach to business and introduced an exciting new concept that could help any business…

1500-1600 Clive Hall – ‘Walking in Their Footsteps – A Unique Master Craftsman Panel’ A Master Craftsman panel that you do not want to miss. Panel Member and twice Master Craftsman with The Guild of Photographers Clive Hall, will take you through the outstanding images he collated only made possible by a unique series of circumstances which resulted in a profound outcome in more ways than you might imagine! Come along and find out first hand how this award winning panel was shot; the emotion behind it and the techniques that made it possible. Find out why there are very few photographers in the country that could ever shoot this panel.

*

A drink on arrival is provided (up to 10am). Lunch is not provided but you can bring your own and there is a restaurant on site serving beautiful food and refreshments – we will have a facility to pre-order/pre-book at the beginning of the day as the restaurant can get busy. Issue 34

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Iain Poole

Sharon Wallis

Lee Hatherall

Sarah Wilkes

INSPIRATIONAL SPEAKERS Two ‘DO NOT MISS’ Days WORKSHOPS ‘COME AND COSPLAY AT CREWE!’ with Iain Poole Fancy shooting something completely different? Having a laugh and basically enjoying yourself for a few hours..? Then come along and join the ‘Cosplosion Extravaganza’ at Crewe Hall, led by Master Craftsman and Cosplay photographer, Iain Poole. During this 3 hour workshop Iain will give you his insight on how to work with this exciting and diverse genre; how to get the best from the subjects you are working with and how to find inspiration and create really cool images.

© Iain Poole

© Chris Chambers

‘DON’T FORGET THE GROOM!’ with Chris Chambers On a wedding day typically we spend a lot of time photographing the bride, preparations, details, poses etc. On this workshop Chris will concentrate on the often overlooked Groom to create a number of prewedding images that can be quick to set up, effective and will also increase album spreads and customer spend. You’ll start with Groom preparation photographs; looking at the best lighting, locations and poses to create WOW shots of the model as he completes pre-wedding preparations. We’ll then move onto Groom posing and ideas for creating striking images indoors and outside; utilising flash, natural and LED lighting to create images that will be certain to be included in the wedding album, and also help sell your services to future grooms.

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Emily


Endean

Clive Hall

Henry Ransby

DAY TWO - SATURDAY 1st FEBRUARY 10:00-11:00 Lee Hatherall – ‘30 Tips for Weddings… and how to get that Money Shot‘ Lee has been a professional photographer for nearly 28 years, he has been there, done that, got the T-shirt and read the book – now he wants to share that book with you! With plenty of experience under his belt – he’s shot over 1000 weddings in the UK and abroad – in this fast flowing session Lee is aiming to give 30 tips in 30 minutes which he feels are very important when taking images at weddings. Following that Lee will show some of his work and explain the importance of the ‘money shot’, his thought processes when creating his, and leaving time for any questions at the end.

11:30-12:30 Sarah Wilkes – ‘Male Faces’ The Project. Don’t miss this demonstration of Sarah’s Steam Punk character shoot using a 4 light set up right before your eyes! Sarah will be speaking about her Male Faces project and the work she has put in this year to achieve 9 Golds, 27 silvers, 10 High Bronzes and 8 Bronzes within the IOM! Sarah has always had an interest in photography, responding to her true calling in 2010 when Sarah Wilkes Photography launched! Her business specialises in Newborns, but over the past 2 years Sarah has been focusing on her passion for Fine Art Child Portraiture leading on to the Male Faces Project. She has won many accolades for her work with The Guild of Photographers, The MPA, and earlier this year she was awarded ‘Portrait Photographer of the Year’ from The British Photography Awards!

12:30-13:30 LUNCH HOUR* *

A drink on arrival is provided (up to 10am). Lunch is not provided but you can bring your own and there is a restaurant on site serving beautiful food and refreshments – we will have a facility to pre-order/prebook at the beginning of the day as the restaurant can get busy.

Jayne Bond

Claire Osborne

13:30-14:30 Jayne Bond & Henry Ransby – ‘Fur & Feathers’ In this fantastic session cram packed with stunning imagery and talent; Jayne Bond will be taking you through her images and experience from befriending a local fox family. Henry takes you through his images taken in his lovely area of the world; highlighting that it can be done with little more than observation and patience… Jayne retired in 2013 after 33 years of teaching. Since then she has travelled, photographing wildlife across Europe, India, Alaska and South Africa, but more recently her ‘happy place’ has been in a local graveyard where she has had the most amazing opportunity to watch a fox family grow. Jayne will tell you how this started, what was involved and lots about the whole experience. After 20 years in the market research sector, the birth of his first child finally gave Henry the opportunity to pursue his dream to be a wildlife photographer. Henry answers the call of nature by always having his camera at hand. In fact he regards himself as just ‘a Man on a walk with a camera’. He is far more than just that, as you will see and his passion oozes through his images whether taken abroad in amazing places such as Thailand and Australia, or at home in rural Bedfordshire. His passion for wildlife and photography is also something he loves to share with his children, just like his father did with him…

1500-1600 Live Judging Print Competition with Gavin Prest and Joanna Bradley Due to popular demand, the PhotoHubs competition is back again! This is a great opportunity to bring along your prints and have them judged LIVE. There is a great prize awaiting the winner! Included in your day pass is the option to enter up to 2 prints in to the competition – free of charge! This years judges are Gavin Prest and Jo Bradley. Images should be a minimum of 12″ X 10″ and placed on a 16″ X 12″ or 20″ X 16″ mount board and handed to Photohubs reception by 2:30pm on the day. Entrants should also send a high res digital version of their image to info@photohubs.co.uk by 9am on 27th January 2020 (simply for co-ordination purposes). Issue 34

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Blow your clients away with the iconic Bellissimo album range from Loxley Colour. Choose from this award-winning selection of albums to find the perfect keepsake that will stun your clients.

• Seven albums • Huge range of sizes • Wide selection of cover styles, materials and colours • Optional personalised covers • Turnaround between 7 and 10 working days

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Bellissimo Perfetto • Sizes 6×6” to 20×20” • Three print finishes • Six cover materials • UV print and laser etching personalisation

Bellissimo Fine Art • Sizes 8×8” to 16×12” • Cotton Smooth paper • Five cover materials • UV print, laser etching and debossing personalisation

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D I S CO V E R M O R E , V I S I T LOX L E YCO LO U R . CO M O R C A L L 0 1 2 3 6 8 6 2 7 2 0 .

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SEPTEMBER - OCTOBER 2019

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Anneka Harden

Deanne Ward

Lynne Harper

Chris Chambers

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Lynda Hayney

Lynda Hayney

Edward Payne

Chris Chambers

Chris Chambers

Henry Ransby Issue 34

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Sally Masson

Chris Chambers

Garry Bree

Heather Burns

Sarah Wilkes

Nick Brown

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Jason Allison

Henry Ransby

Chris Chambers Issue 34

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The Kestrel Family – Henry Ransby ‘Ever since I was a child, Kestrels have been a bird that always gets my attention, so when I got a text from a friend to ask if I’d be interested in seeing a nest site, I jumped at the chance. At first, I sat well back to assess behaviour patterns, but after a few visits, it was apparent that this family were used to human presence so I could pick my spot happy knowing they wouldn’t be bothered by me. At one point, the female even flew down to the ground feet away from where I was sitting. The site was in the middle of an estate, so I tried to keep my camera hidden while I sat there so not to attract too much attention to myself. On one occasion, two boys had noticed me sitting as they played football and came over to me. I confess I was a little apprehensive when they approached, but was amazed at what they then said. Instead of the usual “give us some money/fags” they asked me if I was ok and if I needed some money! My faith in humanity was firmly restored that day. Over the next two summers, I spent a fair amount of time observing and photographing my kestrels family. From when they first appeared at the nest hole right up to when they were learning to hunt in nearby fields. Sadly, the Kestrel family didn’t return this year, but it will be an experience that I will always cherish. - Henry Ransby

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M U LT I AWA R D W I N N I N I N G

WA L L A RT Digitalab offer a huge range of stunning, hand-crafted Wall Art products that are sure to show off your work to its full potential and add beautiful wall decor to any home. Every product is lovingly produced by our experienced and highly talented production team here in our purpose-built Lab and Workshop. We believe in providing beautiful, sustainable and saleable Wall Art that tells your clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; unique story and our easy to use ordering system allows you to create your stunning products in minutes.

www.digitalab.co.uk/wall-art

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ACRYLIC WA L L A RT Clean, sleek edges and a high-gloss, contemporary finishes are the hallmarks of these stunning products. www.digitalab.co.uk/acrylic-and-metalwall-art/

FRAMED WA L L A RT Choose from a stunning collection of hand-crafted framed wall art products. www.digitalab.co.uk/framed-wall-art/

C A N VA S WA L L A RT From beautiful and simplistic Canvas Wraps to our bespoke, hand-crafted Canvas Tray Frames, we have a stunning array of Canvas Wall Art to suit every budget. www.digitalab.co.uk/acrylic-octagon

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GUILD SPOTLIGHT Henry Ransby

The ‘Guild Spotlight’ interview focusses on Henry Ransby and his wonderful dedication to wildlife photography.

In January 2012 Henry’s career took a dramatic turn with the birth of his first child. A few months later, with his wife on maternity leave, a new baby to care for, bills to pay, he had to make the decision to close his business. Henry was a co-partner of a market research call centre and had worked in the market research sector for over 20 years. He turned his attention to photography which was his passion, creative outlet and small hobby business. Facing the decision to either use this opportunity to pursue his dream of being a wildlife photographer or resort to finding another office job. Photography won! Since then, Henry’s photographic portfolio of British wildlife and professional accolades has grown exponentially. Living in rural Bedfordshire, Henry has a wealth of opportunity to observe the animals and birds in their natural habitats. His photography has also taken him further afield to destinations such as Thailand, Australia and Africa where the wildlife was a lot more dangerous as well as being very colourful. Peering through the lens of the camera in Ngorongoro Crater as a full-grown bull elephant stared back is one of Henry’s most treasured memories and images. Capturing the photograph, Henry had just answered the call of nature which goes to show that he is never without a camera! Henry is no stranger to getting up at dawn to capture shots and seeing Kangaroos surfing in New South Wales, Australia as the tide came in was worth getting up for. Henry’s passion for wildlife and photography is something he loves to share with his children and knows how important it is to children to see the majestic beauty of red deer. Inspired by his father, Henry hopes that he can share his knowledge and teach his children about the value of nature in our lives. Henry and his wife Rachel have three children, Seth (7), Evie (5) and Maddie (2), all of whom can often be found out with their cameras under Henry’s supervision. 60

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Q: What have you found most challenging about photographing wildlife? Not falling asleep whilst waiting! Learning the behaviour of wildlife has taken patience and the need to sit or lie still for long periods in some not very glamorous places!

Q: What motivates you to wait for wildlife to get the shot? The satisfaction of creating a little of the beauty that I see when I’m there.

Q:

What is the best time of the day for your wildlife photography and why?

The two hours running up to sunset, mainly because I’m rubbish at early starts. But if I can get up in time the first two hours of light can be the most stunning.

Q: One piece of equipment that you couldn’t do without? My green hoody! Seriously one of the best things I have for remaining relatively out of sight.

Q:

Your favourite go-to lens for your photography especially for your wildlife?

I use a Canon 100-400mkii, if I had more (lots more!) money I’d buy the 600mkii as I prefer not to carry much kit when I’m out.

Q:

Your preferred choice of camera equipment?

Up until a year ago I was using a Canon 7Dii, but then switched to a Canon 5Div last Christmas. It copes in low light better, but I struggle more with speed of focus tracking on moving subjects. Either way, I’ve not picked up the Canon 7dii since.

Q:

What advice would you give to members of The Guild starting out in wildlife photography? Enjoy what you see and try and understand how it behaves, whatever it is. You’ll get better shots by having an understanding of what it’s likely to do and where to place yourself. Chasing things around will only move whatever it is on.

Q:

Do you use a tripod? If so, how important is it to your work?

I occasionally use a monopod, but only if I’m going to be stood somewhere for a long period. Otherwise no I don’t. I find the extra weight a burden and prefer the freedom of handholding.

Q:

Post-processing and Photoshop, how important is it to your work?

It’s always used, 99.9% of the time I use Lightroom though, but if I want to remove a branch I’ll use photoshop.

Q: Additional lighting if required, what do you use? Never used for wildlife

Q: Who inspires you? Firstly, David Attenborough for his amazing work. Secondly, my dad. He is the person who introduced me to the wonderful world of birds. I’ve spent many hours in the past with him seeking birds out. The photograph on the left is of my Dad when we were bird watching in Thailand - he was a big influence in my love for wildlife.

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Q:

Interesting facts about you?

• I got the bends in 2001 whilst doing a night dive on a wreck on the barrier reef. • I collect skulls. • I was a county board diver in my teens

Q: Three words that describe you? •

Friendly (hopefully!)

Accident prone

Stubborn

Q: What is your favourite meal? A fry up!

Q:

Favourite place in the world and why?

There are so many, all for different reasons. Australia for the heat and diversity. Thailand for the birds. England has to be up there though as we have so many fantastic places to see if you can be bothered to find them.

Q:

Favourite animal to photograph?

It has to be the Hare, it pulls some brilliant poses.

Q:

Which has been your favourite bird to photograph and why?

The Kestrel. Ever since I was a boy I’ve loved this bird. To come across a nest and be able to watch a pair of them bring up 2 broods over 2 years was a real treat.

Q: Interesting facts about you? I was given the wrong suit for the Guild of Photographers awards in 2017 and had to use a bulldog clip to hold up the trousers. Won a drag competition aged 15 in St Lucia. I have broken my nose four times and my leg once. Did a tandem parachute jump in New Zealand. Swam with Gray Nurse Sharks in Manly aquarium, cutting my finger on some coral just before entering the water. (The Gray Nurse Shark became the first protected shark in the world in 1984 when the New South Wales Government declared it a protected species). Flew over the heart-shaped reef in the Whitsunday Islands, Australia in a helicopter.

Q: Where next? A hedge near you!

Thank you Henry for sharing your stories with the readers of Creative Light and wish you every success in the New Year!

- Julie Oswin, Editor

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GUILD SPOTLIGHT Nikki Kirk

The ‘Guild Spotlight’ interview focusses on Nikki Kirk, a Wedding and Commerical Photographer based in the Cotswolds.

“Photography is my Plan B! I’ve always loved photography from a young age and was given my first camera at the age of six. After graduating, I found that corporate life sucked me in. Although I thoroughly enjoyed what I did for 15 years, I was always interested in photography. I left London and moved back home to the Cotswolds. It was here that I met my husband. We live in this beautiful part of the UK with our two spaniels Harper and Marmaduke. I set up my Wedding Photography business eight years ago after starting out as a weekend warrior. Two years ago, I launched the business photography company, Carlé & Moss. The two are a perfect balance of time and creativity. I have worked incredibly hard to create a full-time photography business. I’ve never looked back” - Nikki Kirk www.nikkikirkphotography.com 68

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What advice would you give to a new starter?

Give yourself a break. You are unique. Don’t try and be someone else. Photography is an art and art is subjective. Therefore, not everyone will love what you do, and that’s OK. If something scares you, then give it a go. And if you want to connect with someone pick up the phone. The worst they can do is say no, and that’s not that bad!

Q: What do you find is a useful company to use and why? I work with South West Photo Mounts and home for Jorgensen UK. Great products and a fantastic team. They take the time to get to know you and their attention to detail is second to none.

Q:

What is your best editing tip?

Turn the image upside down! You’ll see things like highlights that you won’t notice when editing the right way up. It’s a bit like when you proof read a document backwards.

Q: What is your primary field of photography, and why did you get into that area specifically?

Wedding photography is my main field of photography, and I love it! I think you have to be a real wedding-a-holic to do this job. You are photographing someone on the most important day of their life to date, and you have to be passionate about what you do and enthusiastic about their day. For me, it’s essential that my clients feel safe, comfortable and well looked after from day one. I photograph a maximum of twenty weddings a year so that I can dedicate and invest a really good amount of time in my clients and their day. I started Carlé & Moss a couple of years ago to give me a better balance creatively and have found that the two businesses complement each other. For example; I’m well known for my detail work at weddings.

Q: What’s your preferred camera equipment and why? I’ve always used Canon cameras camera system that I am comfortable with and enjoy using.

Q:

How has your style of photography developed?

I’m known for thoughtful photography. My work has more finesse than when I started, but that’s to be expected. I’ve been told it has a natural, timeless elegance to it. I take my time. My clients know to expect this, and they like that they aren’t rushed.

Q: What have you found most challenging photographically?

I think for me who is not particularly excited about the technical side of photography; I used to find things like offcamera flash, the sparkler shot, etc. challenging. So I set aside some spare time and learnt how to do it, and I then practised and practised some more.

Q: What is the funniest image you have ever taken?

I was at a wedding a couple of years ago, and I saw a sign on the walk from the church to the reception for ‘Butts Lane’. Well, I couldn’t resist! And the cheeky Scotsmen, including the Groom, played up for the camera! The Bride thought it was hilarious, and I had to use a tripod as I was laughing so much. The image then went onto win a Bronze! continued...

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Q:

Is a Jaffa cake, a cake or a biscuit?

Obviously, it’s a cake! My Great Grandmother always had Jaffa Cakes as part of afternoon tea for me when I went to visit. It’s also one of my earliest memories of her.

Q: What’s your favourite bit of kit worth under £50?

My mini screwdriver set and blue decorators’ tape – it can hold up anything and not leave a mark!

Q:

If you were to write a book about your life, what would the title be? “Facing into the Wind” My late father, who I adored said to my husband in one of the last conversations they had before he passed away - “keep Nikki facing into the wind, help her to face challenges and not hide from them and when there are storms, keep her moving forward. She will come out the other side where there is always sunshine. And, remember that without rain, there can be no rainbows.” He was a wonderful man.

Q: What is your favourite combination?

My favourite combination - my husband and me! We are a great team and have been through some ups and downs but always come out stronger. We are definitely better together. Randomly (and this is another childhood thing – my parents have a lot to answer for...) the combination of cheddar cheese with strawberry jam on a cream cracker!

Q:

Is there a particular photograph or photographer (or both) that has inspired you? Photographers and their stories inspire me. I love the work of both Sarah Ferrara and Maryna Halton, and the encouraging work ethic of Jasmine Star.

Q:

If you were to be on a desert island and only be able to take one thing, what would it be? My husband! Although I don’t think he would appreciate being classed as a ‘thing’ so perhaps a dictionary so that I could learn every single word in our incredible language.

Q: What training do you think you’ve got the most from and why?

I had the best training session with the master that is Damien Lovegrove. I love his approach, we have a similar pre-photography background, and I could ask him anything I wanted to. And believe me, I did!

Q: What is your next photography goal, and why?

I want to give something back to the industry. Be it through teaching, mentoring, somehow inspiring the next generation of photographers. ~•~

- Nikki, thank you for sharing an insight into your photography life with the readers of Creative Light Magazine

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Ian Austin

Qualified Guild Photographer

October 2019

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National History Museum - Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 Now in its fifty-fifth year, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the Natural History Museum’s showcase for the world’s best nature photography. The Natural History Museum’s acclaimed Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition and exhibition ignites curiosity about the natural world by showcasing Earth’s extraordinary diversity and highlighting the fragility of wildlife on our planet. The competition inspires people to think differently about for their relationship with nature and use the emotive power of photography to become advocates for the planet. This years Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition attracted over 48,000 entries from professionals and amateurs across 100 countries. The overall winners were announced at the Natural History Museum on 15 October 2019. Hailing from the Chinese province of Qinghai, Yongqing Bao has won the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 title for his extraordinary image, ‘The Moment’ which frames the stand-off between a Tibetan fox and a marmot, seemingly frozen in life-or-death deliberations. A powerful frame of both humour and horror, it captures the drama and intensity of nature. Chair of the judging panel, Roz Kidman Cox, says, “Photographically, it is quite simply the perfect moment. The expressive intensity of the postures holds you transfixed, and the thread of energy between the raised paws seems to hold the protagonists in perfect balance. Images from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are rare enough, but to have captured such a powerful interaction between a Tibetan fox and a marmot – two species key to the ecology of this highgrassland region – is extraordinary.” EXHIBITION INFORMATION Dates and times: Friday 18 October 2019 – Sunday 31 May 2020 10.00-17.50 (last admission 17.15) To book tickets: www.nhm.ac.uk/wpy Prices from: Adult £15.50*, child £9.25*, concession £12.25* Free for Members, Patrons and children under four Visitor enquiries: 020 7942 5000

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Capturing the perfect moment!

© Yongqing Bao, China

‘The Moment’ © Yongqing Bao, China Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019, Grand Title Winner It was early spring on the alpine meadowland of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, in China’s Qilian Mountains National Nature Reserve, and very cold. The marmot was hungry. It was still in its winter coat and not long out of its six-month, winter hibernation, spent deep underground with the rest of its colony of 30 or so. It had spotted the fox an hour earlier and sounded the alarm to warn its companions to get back underground. But the fox itself hadn’t reacted and was still in the same position. So the marmot had ventured out of its burrow again to search for plants to graze on. The fox continued to lie still. Suddenly, she rushed forward. And with lightning reactions, Yongqing seized his shot. His fast exposure froze the attack. The intensity of life and death was visible on their faces – the predator mid-move, her long canines revealed, and the terrified prey, forepaw outstretched, with long claws adapted for digging, not fighting. Such predator-prey interaction is part of the natural ecology of the plateau ecosystem, where rodents, in particular, the plateau pikas (smaller than marmots), are keystone species. Not only are they the main prey for foxes and nearly all the other predators, they are vital to the health of the grassland, digging burrows that also provide homes for many small animals including birds, lizards and insects, and creating microhabitats that increase the diversity of plant species and therefore the richness of the meadows. - Yongqing Bao

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Night Glow Š Cruz Erdmann, New Zealand Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019, Grand title winner

Show Time by Jasper Doest, Netherlands Winner 2019, Wildlife Photojournalist Stor

The Equal Match by Ingo Arndt, Germany Joint Winner 2019, Behaviour: Mammals

Pondworld by Manuel Plaickner, Italy Winner 2019 by. Behaviour: Amphibians an

Another Barred Migrant by Alejandro Prieto, Mexico 80 2019, : Wildlife Creative Light Magazine Single - Issue Winner Photojournalism: Image34

The Architectural Army by Daniel Kronauer Winner 2019, Behaviour: Invertebrate


ry Award

The Garden of Eels by David Doubilet, USA Winner 2019, Under Water

nd Reptiles

The Rat Pack by Charlie Hamilton James, UK Winne 2019, Urban Wildlife

r, USA

Land of the Eagle by Audun Rikardsen, Norway Winner 2019, Behaviour: Issue Bird 34 - Creative

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Early Riser by Riccardo Marchgiani, Italy Winner 2019, 15-17 years old

Frozen Moment by Jérémie Villet, France Winner 2019, Rising Star Portfolio Award

Creation by Luis Vilariño Lopez, Spain Winner 2019, Earth’s Environments

Snow Exposure by Max Waugh, USA Winner 2019, Black and White

Tapestry of life by Zorica Kovacevic, Serbia/USA 82 : Creative Light Magazine - Issue Winner 2019, Plants and Fungi

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Humming Surprise by Thomas Easterbrook Winner 2019, 10 years and under


k, UK

Face of Deception by Ripan Biswas, India Winner 2019, Animal Portraits

Snow-Plateau Nomads by Shangzhen Fan, China Winner 2019, Animals in Their Environment

The Huddle by Stefan Christmann, Germany Winner 2019, Wildlife Photographer Year Portfolio Award Issue 34 of - the Creative Light Magazine

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Haleana Knights

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer

October 2019

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LEMONADE DESIGN CO We bsites and B ra nds for P hot ograph er s

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Top notch service. Friendly, professional and most importantly very patient! Would highly recommend!


THREE TOP TIPS 1:- Install Facebook Pixels on your website and set up your marketing audiences so that any Facebook or Instagram Marketing is accountable and works for you. If you do not have your Pixel installed you are wasting money and a valuable marketing resource. 2:- Create a marketing Funnel, with a Lead Magnet free downloadable e-brochure that captures names and emails and gives them something of value, this could be a top tips on planning your perfect wedding, or planning the perfect lifestyle shoot.

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Haleana Knights

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October 2019

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Regional Meet-Up Who: Yorkshire and The Humber Regional Group Where: Rise Hall When: 21st October 2019 Author: Iain Poole You may have read a few posts in the Guild Facebook about a little event called Elegance, at Rise Hall, where a group of Guild members with a final ratio of 2:1 members to models (five professional models and two Steampunks) had an epic day of shooting! So how did this fun little event come about? I had a contact from the Hall, Stewart, back from mid2018 when I was asked to shoot a charity calendar (yes you all know the type); we got on really well, so much so that when Sarah Beeny was leaving the Hall, he asked if I could take some pictures of the move. It’s was only when he asked, ‘how much?’ I cheekily offered my time in exchange for two days shooting. Months passed by and work/life/kids kept getting in the way of arranging a shoot when Stewart announced he was leaving soon! So, time was tight to get my two days in (…the new owners now want £1500 to hire the venue per day...) I quickly managed to arrange a shoot for myself, so I’d already had my fun. With one day left, I set out on the venture to create an event for my fellow Guild members.

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Photo: Mark Lynham

Photo: Gavin Prest

This day at Rise Hall was the first photographic event I had ever organised, so nerves were running high. I was worried that models wouldn’t appear and photographers may drop out at the last minute! Did I have my trousers on… you name it, I probably thought it!

Photo: Iain Poole

All my worry was for nowt! We had an exceptional bunch of people who came with a mix of talent and experience. What completely blew me away was how everyone came together and just gelled. It was brilliant to see members of the Guild all working together and being so creative. I have seen so many different images created in so many different styles. The whole process gave me a warm ‘Ready Brek’ feeling inside, although that could have been because I didn’t stop all day, making sure everyone was happy and managing to create the images they wanted, as well as bonding overloads of tea and cake.

Photo: Mark Lynham

A special mention has got to go to Pip Bacon, for not only making the journey but also for her fantastic packing skills getting a whole wardrobe into her soft-top Cooper-S!! I’m already planning the next shoot, staying in Yorkshire, and I think we will open it up to all again, so if you couldn’t make the last one, we would love to see you on the next one! - Iain Poole Photo: Pip Bacon

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o: Pip Bacon

Photo: Gavin Prest

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Photo: Phil Yale

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PASSIONATE TO HELP “Paul is a brilliant guy, extremely helpful, understanding, and within minutes you will realise that you've found someone who's passionate to help other photographers.”

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NO QUESTION IS TOO STUPID “No question is too stupid, communication is excellent and my tax returns have been painless now for two years.” “Paul patiently and expertly answered every single 'daft question' I threw at him and due to his expertise and patience my self assessment return has now been filed in record time and with the minimum of stress on my part.”


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WOW! “Wow, I wish I’d found Shuttertax years ago!” “I am definitely a customer for life!!”

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The Value of Prints David Kilpatrick “Absolutely no format of photography, digital or real film, is better than a high-quality, long-lasting print”

As you’ll realise from the content of this article, I lost my

David & Shirley Kilpatrick

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wife and editorial partner Shirley early in July. The magazine, Camercraft of course, had to go ahead but for a full month I was completely occupied by the necessary administration which follows a death. That actually proved to be less troublesome than trying to switch our business energy contracts and took six days rather than six months. The red tape associated with bereavement is finely tuned and combines respect and care with efficiency. What followed after was far more work than I would have imagined, and left to myself, it would never have happened. Shirley left a huge collection of material things filling all the available storage spaces in a very large house, with hardly anything thrown away in over 50 years, from before I ever met her. Cancer Research UK’s local charity shop has been overloaded, and the recycling centre kept busy. Our daughter Ailsa and her husband and sister-in-law set a storm of clearing, identifying and cleaning going to last three full weeks. During this time we uncovered many caches of old photographs some of which had been lost for over 30 years, and one or two not seen ever going back to the 1960s – Shirley had filed away assorted envelopes and folders from her pre-married life. Included in these were prints, negatives and also many slides. For 30 years from 1969 to 1999, and bit beyond, Kodachrome and the various E-processes (E4 and E6 for certain) were the main recording medium. This also included photographs of our children, homes, gardens, events and holidays over the years.


Negatives are almost impossible to judge by eye, and unmounted rolls of E6 don’t even have any indication of the date on them. Fortunately, many mounted slides whether from labs or the film manufacturer’s own processing do have a date on the mount and my own negative files have dates and notes on enough of the sheets to identify when and where pictures were taken.

But there are thousands of negatives and slides to search through to find pictures I might now really want to see again, and the process of viewing 35mm film with or without a lightbox is tiring and neck-aching work. I can only thank Shirley herself for carefully stowing away many pictures I thought we had lost or destroyed, including Hasselblad Fujichromes which look as good as the day they were first seen. But it’s the prints which are the heroes – and some of them are pictures we very nearly refused to have taken. Because we were both photographers, and often aiming the camera at others, pictures of us together are very rare and with the family even more so. We didn’t often hand a Hasselblad or Mamiya, or even a 35mm SLR, to someone and ask for a shot to be taken though during our travels we took countless pictures of strangers on their own cameras. They saw our pro gear and asked if we could. Sometimes they got real crackers, not snaps and were amazed at what their little camera could do. That happened in the digital era when reviewing the image was possible. Pre-digital, I hope they were delighted when their films were processed.

So, in all those photos, some of the ones I now value most are things like the two of us posing for the obligatory shot before boarding a Mark Twain paddle steamer trip on Lake Tahoe, playing the fool in the Edinburgh Dungeon or lining up next to stalagmites in the caves at Nerja. The staff photographers often got the best expressions from us together, and the dye-sublimation prints turned out from systems familiar to events and party photographers have all lasted really well. Shirley’s MSc was all about dye sublimation versus inkjet and other printing methods, back in 1994 when the technology was rare and new and expensive. Even her own thousands of test patch prints have lasted well stored in filing cabinets, but I’ll be glad to recycle them along with tens of kilos of paperwork she created during her MSc year. I’ve kept her degree certificate and the gown for the graduation ceremony she never attended because she hated crowds. But it’s actually the photographs with her college friends and our office staff which are the treasure.

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So, I begin a slow process of finding as many prints as possible scattered throughout the home and the business and scanning or having new C41 prints made from slides and negatives. I’ve been taken to task for the number of 7 x 5” and 10 x 8” prints instead of 6 x 4”. Why? Because they are really difficult to fit into albums or store. If only there were postcard or enprint (remember those terms?) copies of everything they could be kept more easily. Print albums or photobooks also have their appeal, but the best thing is a print box, and getting a consistent size of print allows a box to be much neater. So I may copy some oversized prints and make a box. I like 7 x 5” personally and so many of my darkroom or lab prints were that size. They will be inkjet printed as all the old inkjet ones have lasted perfectly too, even going back to 180dpi 1990s HP output. In addition to making and keeping prints for myself and the future, I have gathered as many digital images as possible into a folder, and I will continue to move or copy others as I come across them. They won’t be left on the iMac though, I’ve already written one CD and put it in her life archive box and made one USB stick (a 3XM one in a neat black presentation case). They’ll also live on cloud storage with Apple, Google and other services and her Facebook page has been memorialised as well as downloaded. But for the future, for you, your families and your clients, if you are a photographer, remember one lesson, absolutely no format of photography, digital or real film, is better than a high-quality, long-lasting print.

– David Kilpatrick www.davidkilpatrick.co.uk

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I

Sony a6400 action and

f you've been readin online g any photo discus for eve sion for n six min no do utes, you um ubt 've new Alp heard about Sony's ha 640 0, a low E-mou nt cam -end Son era wh tracking y ose capabi focus that the lities are ir At firs so good t it wo the Alp flagship spo uld sim rts cam ha 9, had shooti ply sto era ng, updat to , get a firm e just camera because I had p to cat ware set to the ch up So do "Don't . unless es it live take a you thi Yes, bu up to pic nk it's t I fou chang the hyp nd in focus! ture ed thi should a few e? s settin " caveat know Emph g to "Ba So I s you abo asi s" ut. I tested and the lanced gettin n I sta g out-o track and its capabi rted litie f-fo as s at a cus I starte at a loc field meet I d zoomin shots as soo was cov al colleg the seq n g ou erin opportu e. It pro uence. t durin g This is vided g suppo nities not ho for tra sed to throw cking w it's happen ers, using javelin . And Son hurdlers pole vaulter I was s, sprint lens wh y's 70-200 ƒ4 , discus ers/ putters ich is a throw G OSS ers and of the parfoc the foc shot (th al lens us point of wh ich occ (i.e., e last as you doesn urred 't chang zoo protec behind tive fen e have con m), so that a ce, should those tribute were wh so photos not have dis When d to the of I starte olly un tracte proble Let's sta d using intere d the RX-10 m. In ma rt with sting). the Son IV bridg consid ny of the athletes. the y erable e cam sequen compla test sho era, my suc of the ces, the int abo oting on box the cesses. Rig ut flaw cam per ly this oth fect bri ht out lessly era per camera the sub erwise as obsta forme will ide ject usi passer you cou dge camera d cle s ntify s-by cam ng Ph and AF, and camera was tha ldn't zoo ase De it will camera e betwe stayed contin t m wh tect focus uously. on its is closes ile sho and ath en the The cav on wh target oting And her facing t or on had fou lete (se atever eat? If . ) but in e e sequen the clo there's zoom nd an you ma all but out wh sest eye inexpe I thought I a face to tha nually one cas ce in the ile con nsive t proble if it will shooti solution fra tinuousl e the attem ng a m. (Sequ pt a sec me. Then y ence 10) Guess not. of objec tracking moving ob ondar ject, the t recog algori y step In all oth thms nition on con get er , based trastin respec A6400 confus g color ts, the is the backgr ed. wit equ ound, A6300 and the h the but wit ivalent of the track it n start h the as it tra featur to new tra es and vels aro frame cking . It rec new me und the (and mo ogniz nu sys on col re assign es sub tem or con The 30jects bas trast, so shooti minute able features) ed if you ng som limit on length . we e troop re s has als camou video s we flage as clip o bee (due to n rem they we aring basic the exp oved trainin iration trade g, it mig nt through law) and of an EU to track ht not the that sub ove be abl camera rheat ject we aggres e For the doesn shooti ll. sively 't se sho ng wh camera ts I use video 's Silent predec d the as so ma en essors where Shooti ny of its did. Ma ng mo the cam review de, ny s com era op silentl plain tha online y at 8 erates image frame t the insta Norm s per ally thi body they squ bilization fea s can be second. when tur eezed danger sho into the e that is mis ous sing on that mo oting sports, A6500 the since ve acr comple A6400 thing oss quickly tely ign , while can app the frame ver s oring stabili that ima zation howe y ear dis happen ver in ge torted fine wh this cas , s per runnin en fectly image e athlete g tow are att stabili ard the s were ached. not acr zed len camera oss the ses The imp and fra minimi roved zing the me, comple of Eye tely AF is ano implement distor tion. Ha incidences ation headlin ther ma of d I cho witho e-grab jor sen to ut sile ber wh indeed shoot nt sho ich is there a wond oting would erf imp mo ul de, rovem be distor ent. Wh (yet subtle) tion, and no chance introd of uced Eye en Sony firs I could as fast as 11 have sho t back in AF to frame the wo but the 2014, t s per sec rld you had sound it to a ond, butto of the to ass n and shutte butto then pre ign r might n in ord 12 Ma ss er for y/June thing. it to do the 2019 And if its Came there the fra racraf wasn' me the t t a fac n e in not foc it would us give up give you on anything , at all, a flashin and find foc g green us" err "can't or. Thi to no s frustra end – the cam ted me era has face

Gary Frie speed dman likes sequ the im pr new su ence and AF trac oved high b-£1k king of APS the enhanc -C model – and its ed Ey e-AF.

iles Christopher is very much a classical commercial photographer, who has made his name working for blue chip clients from a large studio in London. While some other photographers say they can’t get the budgets or find the clients, he definitely can because he’s offering them superb facilities and high-level technical skill. He is a true example of how thinking big – and shooting bigger – can really pay divides. Having spent the first twenty years of his working life in the film industry, Giles and his partner, Abi Cockcroft, set up Media Wisdom Photography in 2001 and have gleaned enormous experience and gained huge success working in large spaces. “We used to have a 700 square foot studio, which was inside a much larger film studio near Shepperton. When we needed the big film studios, we would rent those for furniture shoots. The film studios closed down and so we rented a 1,000 square foot studio. It has a kitchen unit in it, and we do a lot of food and drink photography, as well as small furniture, and big product shoots here”, he explains.

3: Media Wisdom – a studio built for big commercial clients

Giles and Abi with a still life set-up in progress.

Giles got his first camera as a thirteenth birthday present from his father, a film producer who was very interested in photography, and his mother who was a film production coordinator. “My father always saw the value of taking family photographs, and

I loved the fact that he took so much care over them. He would often take me to the publicity stills department in the film studios, where he would have them developed. I have had a fascination with stills photography ever since”.

Silver

After spending his earlier years “hanging around studios and film sets”, Giles went to Watford College of Art to study illustration, graphic design, fine arts and photography. While there, he took up photography on a larger scale than he had as a boy. He was inspired by a particular lecturer at college who encourage the students to find their own unique style, while simultaneously being fascinated by ground-breaking landscape photographers of their day, such as Faye Godwin. “I never thought I could make a career out of that, but I did go back into the film industry, with a plan to go on to a career in graphic design. I started working with the film publicity stills department, with David James and David Farrell as mentors. It was the era where you had to be an assistant to learn anything, rather than nowadays when you learn everything online”, says Giles. This was a period when movie film stock was improving in quality at a rapid pace, making it possible for stills to be framegrabbed from film stock, rather than have the images shot separately. This, coupled with depleted

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Printing for the look and feel – classic papers Cameracraft May/June 2019 29

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budgets, reduced the need for stills photographers. Giles moved into the movie camera department. Here, he worked his way through the ranks, as a clapper loader, focus-puller and assistant cameraman. Giles and Abi began building up Media Wisdom while he was still working in the film industry and she was working in television. “It was difficult at first, but yearon-year it’s got better and better with bigger and bigger clients”, he says. Because Giles and Abi were, as he puts it, “both never scared of film sets” they focused on ‘big production’ style photography. “We both had contacts in the

A typical large roomset built at the Shepperton studios where Giles was familiar with the space, and with movie and TV industry methods and costs. Below, stages in transforming a hangar-like space into a bedroom furniture interior. The finished composition is partly an illusion – note how the chandelier hangs in front of the suspended ceiling flat.

his test started out with an experimental order to Italy for two A3 packs of Amalfi paper by Amatruda paper mills. The superbly packed, sealing-wax fastened papers arrived in under a week in perfect condition with heavy card used to ensure it, and a generous protective wrapping. The cost was £42.15 by credit card including shipping for two packs of 15 sheets, 150gsm. This weight is deceptive, as 150gsm can be a fairly stiff photo paper but handpressed fibre is much softer. The mould edges are not all the same, one side looks more ragged, and it’s not identical to a ‘hand-torn’ effect. Ideally any print made on this paper needs mounting to show all the edges, with a matte overlay and perhaps 2cm of space all round. It’s also good to see the paper itself, and it does not take kindly to bleed printing on an inkjet. Using my trusted and now ancient ColorMunki Photo device, I produce my own paper profiles using Marrutt bulk replacement inks in an even older Epson Stylus

film industry and with film studios and so being given a 7,000 square foot stage or even bigger, didn’t concern me. I knew that I needed more light and more equipment to work in such a large space, but I had the contacts in the industry; we just didn’t have the budgets at the time. We started getting steady work, but not the big stuff I was craving for”, he says. A lot of networking brought them bigger clients and eventually to the attention of Made.com and an Irish furniture company called Easy Living. It is likely that Giles’ work with Made.com contributed to the company’s increased sales figures (this definitely applied

Top quality printed 68-page bi-monthly magazine, £8.50 cover price, included with your Guild of Photographers subscription. Back issues and non-member subscriptions are available from: www.iconpublications.com email editor@iconpublications.com for advertising and editorial enquiries IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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46 May/June 2019 Cameracraft

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Nikon Z6

hroug hout the digita l photo history of SLRs graph ha y, Nik role; the firs ve played on’s a piv t Koda deriv otal ing fro k erac m the DCS mode raft recog ls May/Ju F3, the nisab le ‘mod first of co ne 20 urse, ern’ DS 19 37 Cameracraft May/June 2019 31 a lon LRs an profes g line d siona of ac l DSLR with ce ssi the D1 ble, s tha t bega 20 ye of inn n ars ov right and au ation to pe ago. Deca shed des rfect tofoc be pu or me us, fas shutt d can the body er an ter, mo tering al en is d mirro nd of vertic ay. Th re rob all to r mech me left ha further aw us anism t to the photo et the de be dscape mand s graph ted to h from lan jus the s ad ers we of lookin itc ving t an g s a sw ut mo heigh allow the cu through the ed on witho tripod rrent rtrait lens its eding subjects range to po could elf; is or ne of cro be sai ra d to ha Nikon DS lens ax ent for ma tation. techn came LRs ical pe ve rea tm orien , on the right, adjus ched solid ging allRig Which ak. a low g; very chan of is wh es – Sm ded; be Rig is lockin ay when ions upsta class lat all a rat y, ten firm d L-p Sm fac ex rt bra an no for taw ed wi gene The ras, end nds lik l but ished work th cu system th three with came fits-al Fittest wi ks e the thly fin rrent metal UGH rless ric an oo rro ne RO ris d So Fuji t m, sm ge t to Nikon TH ies mi of cu botto l end tha k. es. No ’s newe ny’s Alpha X 7 ser rner ca ample unting. loc L-plat rti lea ex ser an Sony st a fe e, ve ht other ies, range sa re is ra mo this L-plat boug an un is yet e– a copy came anoth mirrorless we’ve that the cours with ra on er platfo others wheel, of Even came table rm wi gettin new lens warn r for ol , repea th mo ting the g a bit mirro contr copy moun d using a e a firm ra body to bodie predic unt. It’s at the ll that the an s with provid me table iss stand nt showed t gave a sm – flattis EVFs, older just to g of the ca th Arca Sw t adap op un h tin wi me ing , iShoo align The sp tics, and vid tors for moun equipped and mo nt. Try Below end with arm me ec eo od ific e functi ati salign without stand over a trip L-plat tripod offer ons. of mi plenty ons have t. ads, l eBay of a gree as vide he d e be efu ll of de sp moun an siz us od pro en times; reads n d ich d as we us trip heet put the gone Amazo lates, wh cost an ay, met threa iss fit. Swiss vario for jus an Sw Arca ee-w g to the t pickin d you’d be m in a nd rsal L-p Arca rtrait runnin geared thr en we fou mera. mirro unive forgiv g a ful or po rless any ca en ble l-fram cape ss. Th body locka hone e lands ting on works for succe perb bit of at ran stly? little of moun ich dom, They with – a su dies, e LP-64 e wh rapid Hex and ’re all So if lution design. Th got on d Sony bo good you’r ling is d the so key in alrea We’ve e em . d Leve not do ra pus an rk an of dy be po es ym wo se , dded Tri ba CNC latest and wond t Dials our Ol . What it do the came Rig. Screw ering in Nikon tmen techn of d d ds Small Inch ur ne jus lle kin ca wh olo 3/8 Ad hte nto ha all 3 ler ere the gy is ve so the co with s it’s tig still – ay sel methi Base abilit China an eB lock to e, so unles ng tha or if you ca s can ies from lat n d from t y len U5H8 op arrive the Z6 of those mi matches ction basep ly, a heav 1.35 the rro ysh could by a fra uch, firm for £2 Sunn tripod leap very mera be see rless rivals zip po week of fai the ca ny inferior th its n as der a – e work. th tha ing st. Wi in un new rotate Ma precis but n, say a greater amaz ew mirro ing po gree. same, d , ad ad is sory for rless includ like Nik of a de ll do the k-soli acces ing he system opting a ised scr roc at ell od a wi ons; ch gre s nt ls . Nikon this lev ree red an you ge head u have don’t wa low, a an whee u ing yo . Th se, be t mode ge the rec s feel king to yo Ba , lue um loc ra va ad th – intere ass ing me ls like ipe an ra on Levell and he ters wi ted came the ca ak link. the 1 d sting : the adjus , but what to be tripod ection of un we Below not… system you ex a mo stand final nn copy well, allow pect find the co be the t, the F-prefi not od or after gh to At las xe ad to e of years any trip aligned. centr Wh d SLRs. the he s easy enou of D or inese dead ion s en the It wa precis e of Ch nd for the ed the testin Z6 arr the len L-plat g, r show rfectly on t bra r with then, my ived here mirro erea a good red iShoo harde pe us r lly le for to ex so did pecta ee a litt to the sen big enough l, too know tions The. bo n’t engin and A7R, actly ita where ng, dy It’s A7 ed ex axis! to sit erythi is reassu mat dig n Nik Sony match cable . m for ringly wi ev onod DSLR t one . The like a aces mediu you can’t with in fee to ge A7RII familia l – ma old trip II and d interf the Well, e Z-fmo gn for r contr the A7 mp an xt to re im Warax ols an esium, ough ring cla ard fit ne I arrived po d and the o big en reassu tethe kw RII d to bertantl t, als an aw en the A7 prove ranceF of y, the tac un t, re as mo ma crack ld as tile we Th all the gri le-fin m for So fit at s end. ishick ite mediu them.ba ng Qu plate’ ed pa p and would e and us er siz rio ith ldi ck nt dint ste Tripo . From a my ring anm Fo , the and ne is a differe nu lderart iculat tethe Alumi d pa se ndd Ho lay ed scr e. The Fityle rec the ba d the cable te Stanis (fuou t isme een uctiv ll na se Pla ogHe obstr tan e an es able it ins Relea haBa ll ad shap for5 do tly more 9 matched t & ndled ov even er £3 anyo ll I/A who at a smaller t a bane Flex Til clamp A7RII most has azon) ttest’ all (no APS-C t had a Arca on Am 58 Ma first ‘Fi ordered ky, buNik eful at unt, the the ng us y/Junlooks fun free on we mo thi te al It no pla r). e 2019ts are rtic end of eithe en Came x key liar ve s at the e covers. herac head justm pecu a sit ad ac rafs t gle erf using which moun hinge t the an detentes, the int plate k the near en, the t ut loc ra op up witho vided) to came se to ends int tha mera . ow the to the po (not pro m. The ca only To all where d t away do ing no ne s could a time. at ran n aim was cu od head t desig of it at e-dow trip but no all! y end upsid many 2122 eered Á eful at e skinn engin allRig the ng us Well grip on y, the Sm nothi vided ving Finall it does 0 pro – pro 6.5 im e at £4 ep base, 19 51 L-plat d grip, a de une 20 – an y/J ce l ion Ma You’l d balan solut raft get mera’s cally stowe merac ve to se ca Ca ha ra the the gneti came one of a ma unt to the lise with to rea le y to fix vertical mo se litt hex ke the the ba how tend lip of is. It and ex The front onuse it great… n. a rotati erface looks sectio RIII in int en no the A7 locks and wh is used, the p, gri ng proof rtheri

ES SORI S E C AC ERED E N I ENG Cam

30 May/June 2019 Cameracraft

Pro 3800 printer. It’s fourteen years since I visited the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris for the launch of the Epson 4600 which followed the 3800. Used in bursts of activity, the 3800 nevertheless keeps going well. Since the Amalfi paper really doesn’t work well with conventional colour images, the profile was hardly needed. Just using Epson Colour Controls works fine for the sepia, blue-tint and line art tests which really suited the paper. It’s not the same as Amalfi paper when used by Graphistudio for albums even though it comes from the same maker. With two new papers on the market from British world leaders in the field, I also decided to test Fotospeed Legacy Gloss 315gsm and Permajet FB Pearl 300. These are updates on earlier materials, not surprising when you remember that Epson, Marrutt and others have all been revising their ranges as the European mills and converters introduce new substrates. These tests follow.

AMATRUDA AMALFI paper – a single weight, warm parchment coloured, handmade paper with a laid texture and the hand-torn effect of mould edges. This paper is not sold through photo dealers and doesn’t seem to appear in craft shops either. It’s made in the Italian town (which can be seen in the cyanotype-effect print, central of the samples from my printing here). It seems best printed using the Singleweight Matt setting for Epson, as the paper is under 0.1mm thickness (on this setting, it transports and prints well). It works best for engravings and line art, sepia or antique effects.

Trevo r & Fa ye Yer bury

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William has now moved home to Thailand, so his immediate plans include “getting our house in order over here” and updating the studio after the process of selling up in England – “the container with our belongings has only just arrived and I’ve got things in boxes that I haven’t even opened yet”. In addition, he has exhibitions in June and July, and more work for hairstyling awards amongst many other plans. Whatever the future holds for this incredibly talented and successful photographer, it’s going to be big.

David Kilpatrick looks at inkjet media which come close to matching silver darkroom printing and historic processes. From the fragile softness of Amalfi hand-made paper to premium Permajet FB Pearl and Fotospeed’s Legacy Gloss fibre-based, your choice of paper can give your work lasting value.

A large studio space makes shooting with people, props and sets possible and gives room for expertly controlled lighting.

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The big move

CAM ERAC RAFT PORT FOLIO

Cameracraft 2019 1 PHOTOGRAPH BY WILLIAM BARRINGTON-BINNS • ISSNMay/June 2514-0167 • £8.50

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Kabuki Seasons – Winter and Spring, from a new series of work. Director and photographer: William Barrington-Binns. Creative Director: Tia Oguri . Stylist: Dandy Kimono of Uber. Set , First Assistant and Technician: Rob Youngson. Lighting: David Levy and Lee Romney of Arri Lighting. Hairstylist and co-stylist: Mamiko Sato of Kimono de Go. Makeup: Anastasija Potjomkina. Models: Filantropi Lu and Nange Magro. Assistants: John Gabriel Lopez and Mai. Collaboration with ARRI PCA and Phase One Photo, thanks to Drew Altdoerffer.

“There are still female Kabuki artists and may this continue. Though all-women troupes, or at least troupes having a female leader, are becoming more common in Japan they are still looked down upon. They will never be able to reach the same status as that of an all-male cast if the strict tradition of the onnagata is to continue. The doors of big theatre in Japan, especially on the National stage, are barred and locked to women. “In conclusion, although women are not held in the same status as they were held when Kabuki was first born, they still play an important part. From being the cause of a long tradition of the onnagata to slowly trying to ease their way back onto the stage, feminine presence never really left. The story of Kabuki must continue on, and women may just have to be the ones to pick the torches back up and carry it. They are still evolving.”

ese Chin f the find me o at so g you can ng look ti eerin ke a shoo We ta engin ort your st low co to supp e on-lin

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The 24 the Z7 -70mm ƒ4 a mu and Z6 is lens relea ch sed wi be at 24 larger ƒ2 ing joine th mm (le d .8. telesc ft) bu It is comp by op make ing barre t the doub act abov it substan l and lens le e. tia ho which Note the l at 70mm od top and theSony’s 7 ser plate inf , o LC ies three User models lac D memo DSLR ry mo k, . Ex des. 24Mp cept there’ s a ful senso l-fram r. Skip e, it’s all through the familia r Nikon menus an fayre; d ple profes thoug nty of cu sio na stomi h the sation l 1/200 seems , th fla a tad sh syn slow. curta c There in syn ’s sec c, and work ondyes – prope it do rly lens, and the . Attach the es essen kit sense ce of of gettin Nik lighte g the r pack on, but in a small age co 24-70 ntinu er, kit es – the well-m lens may be an ade, tac ƒ4 the co llapsibl k-sharp an , but it’s d sh cons e desig um n of the ares 18-55 er-level AP ; great S-C eq for a uivale frame walknt body aroun . d fullLosin g the really optic isn al fin der specifie ’t a proble m. d the – it’s Z6’s EV Nikon has fluid, F very fast an to flic d doesn well ker ’t ten also de or lag. Th d e rea lightf r scr ull thoug h using y crisp an een is d brigh the ba it a lot t, ttery does life an optio eat int d the n for o re’s no ex Where tra powe grip r. the thoug h, is wh Z6 really im NIkon presse ere it coun owne s ts rs; open ing the within mi for nutes charg box, puttin of ed ba g ttery came and tak in the ra int o the ing the studio , it wa s like


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BACK PAGE BRONZE - Dan Rushton -

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Profile for Guild of Photographers

Creative Light Magazine - Issue 34  

Creative Light Magazine brings together people interested in the craft of photography.

Creative Light Magazine - Issue 34  

Creative Light Magazine brings together people interested in the craft of photography.