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anti virus software - mark harris india, the golden triangle - Gordon McGowan MASTER CRAFTSMAN - claire elliott MASTER CRAFTSMAN - frances van der merwe master CRAFTSMAN - gavin prest perfect cut outs - glyn dewis

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Contents 8 12

Mark Harris Anti Virus Software

14 18

Gold Awards March & April 2018

28 32 46

Martin Leckie Craftsman

Jason Allison Craftsman

Claire Elliott Master Craftsman

Gordon McGowan Golden Triangle - India Gary Bree Craftsman

54 56

Iain Jack Craftsman

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Frances Van Der Merwe Master Craftsman

80 94

Gavin Prest Master Craftsman

Glyn Dewis Perfect Selections and Cut Outs

Mel Taylor Craftsman

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Front Cover “This image was taken in on a winter trip to the Cairngorms when I was looking for some iconic Scottish species. On my final day, I headed to a feeding station in an ancient pine forest, designed for crested tits and maintained by wildlife photographer Mark Bend. As is to be expected for a Scottish January, the day was dull and overcast, but the tits and other small birds were out in force. Towards the end of the day, a red squirrel appeared to help himself to some hazelnuts put out in the hope of bringing in a red. He treated me to a beautiful set of poses, mostly on a tree stump. As the evening sunlight began to break through the clouds, he started to leave; he paused for just a second on the forest floor. A ray of sunlight caught him as if in a spotlight; I was privileged and lucky to be able to capture such a magical moment.

susan dudley

That was the last I saw of both the squirrel and the light.� - Sue Dudley

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STEVE & LESLEY THIRSK The Guild of Photographers

What a couple of months we’ve had since the last edition of Creative Light! The GDPR build up was quite intense for all those in business and of course the GDPR is now live and has had a global impact. In reality the GDPR is just a more detailed extension of the Data Protection Act, and it has to be a positive thing that legally enforceable measures have now been put in place to protect all our personal information! The coming months and years should prove very interesting when we start to see how things unfold and the real impact of these new regulations – as they are currently untested. Here, at the Guild we invested many hours to support our members through this significant transition and hope that the step by step guide and template Privacy Policy proved to be of value, simplifying the process and detailing the necessary steps to become compliant. The efforts we made were because of our genuine commitment to members! This commitment can also be seen in the Guild’s new partnership with Pixsy, one of the worlds leading copyright protection services. Through Pixsy and their advanced reverse search engine technology members can protect up to 100,000 images, and have the option of sending legally enforceable take-down notices through an automated process or seeking compensation for their unauthorised use through Pixsy’s legal teams. Pixsy have only been around for 4 years or so and in that time have detected over 175 MILLION images matches, reflecting the extent of copyright theft. We are very proud of this partnership and very grateful for Pixsy’s support of Guild members and the Creative Industry. Together we can fight for the rights of photographers! There’s more about this in this edition of Creative Light please see page 75. We had even more to celebrate recently. Following a judging day, we have seen several more members achieving our highest membership levels of membership – those of Craftsman and Master Craftsman! In this magazine, you will also see some of the amazing work produced by those who achieved these levels. It’s only right that we mention the value of the Guild’s mentoring programme at this point. We are blessed with an incredible Panel of Mentors who are committed to paying it forward, passing on their years of experience and learning to those wanting to learn. The mentor’s offer guidance to those wanting to develop their personal skills and/or go for our qualifications. They are so committed that they are just as nervous as the person submitting on these days, if not more so. If you haven’t done so, do engage with our mentoring programme. Everyone needs a mentor! New ‘kit’ can be a great investment but training is an equally important investment, if not more so. There’s little point buying a Ferrari if you don’t know how to drive a car is there? Our Wedding, Business and Qualification training days sold out in April so we have rescheduled the 3 days for October. If you are interested you can find out more HERE. As an aside do keep the 14th and 15th November free in your Diary as the 2 days are a PhotoHubs special event with 10 Inspirational speakers and limited number workshops as well as presenting an opportunity to meet some of the best Trade suppliers! Enjoy the read… Steve and Lesley

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Editor Timeless Tradition

julie oswin

“Much like old collectables, wedding albums are nothing short of a family heirloom that will remain in the family for generations to follow and your children will grow up looking at pictures of your wedding, your parents’ and your grandparents’ weddings. It is the pictures that allow us to remember the time and the family members who have passed. Pictures connect one generation to another. To familiarise a child with one of his or her great-grandparents is almost impossible without photographs. Viewing and holding an album you can help the child know and understand what their family looked like; you can tell the stories behind the faces. An album is another addition to the valuable family archives of heirlooms.

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Just when the bride’s car arrived at the lychgate the clouds burst open and the rain poured down. After a mad dash to the church doorway from the car, the bride sheltered and composed herself. I saw this image unfold and captured the moment. I got soaked but it was worth it! Creative Light Magazine

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Editors Choice Laurie Campbell

Awarded Silver - March 2018

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Anti-Virus Software Mark Harris is a Qualified member of the Guild and amateur photographer focusing mainly on portraits (www.

markharrisphotography.com). His day job is as a “Distinguished Engineer” at Sophos, a British Security company based in Abingdon. He’s worked in the Antivirus industry for other 20 years having worked for McAfee before he joined Sophos. He’s spoken at many industry events, has appeared on TV and Radio as well as speaking in front of a House of Lords select committee on Cyber Security. If asked, he would obviously recommend Sophos, specifically, the premium edition of home.sophos.com which allows protection for up to 10 machines, Windows and Mac.

“WannaCry” ransomware that affected NHS hospitals last year, encrypts a wide variety of files including JPEG, TIFF and RAW

A regular question on Facebook and elsewhere is which Antivirus do people recommend. Unfortunately,

mark harris

AV can be a bit like camera brands, everyone has an opinion on what is best. The reality is, that all the established security companies, are pretty good (although none are perfect) and the choice is down to what you need and what your risk is.

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But first some terminology. Like all industries there is a lot of jargon that causes confusion, so here’s a few definitions Virus – A computer virus like a biological virus, infects programs on your computer by attaching itself and then when you run the program the virus also runs and spreads, or does whatever harm it was planning. There are very few “viruses” these days. Malware –“Malicious software” Is the term now used to describe all the different types of viruses, trojans, worms, PUAs etc. Trojans – A trojan is a computer program that says it’s one thing, but is not. They use bugs in the programs you use to get onto your computer and then run. Often, they are just hiding the background trying to steal your personal information, bank details etc. Worm – This type of malware, once on your machine, spreads to other computers over the network. Again, they use vulnerabilities (bugs) in the software you use to spread. Exploits – computer programmers make mistakes (vulnerabilities); the bad guys find these mistakes and use (Exploit) them to get malware onto your computer without you knowing. Creative Light Magazine

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Ransomware – This is a fairly recent type of malware, rather than hiding on your computer stealing information, it holds you to ransom. Once on your computer it makes all your files unreadable (encrypts them) and asks for money for you to get your files back. Unfortunately, it’s very unlikely you can get your files back even without paying or restoring them from a backup. The big news story last year was “WannaCry” that impacted hospitals was ransomware. Adware and Potentially Unwanted Applications – Officially these aren’t “malicious” just very annoying. Things like “search bars”, “helpers”, “advertising”. Using up your memory and disk space and generally getting in the way. They usually get installed along with something else, often a “free” tool. Phishing – Emails asking you to log into your bank, iTunes or a Nigerian Prince needing to urgently transfer money. All ways of getting you to provide passwords and/or bank details Choosing a security product Look for an established company. AVG, NOD32 (Eset), Bitdefender, Norton (Symantec), McAfee, Kaspersky and of course Sophos. There’s a lot of “Fake” Antivirus as well, so choose one you have heard of and go directly to their websites to make sure you are getting the real thing. Free isn’t always best, often it will constantly nag you about buying the full product. After all it’s expensive to develop security software and constantly keep it up to date, so they need to sell. What quality would expect from a photographer that did “free” all the time. The free products usually only include the basic file scanning. On the other end of the scale, Internet Security suites come with loads of “extras” that you don’t need and can eat up memory and slow your machine. It’s these that tend to give the Antivirus industry a bad reputation. Magazine reviews often focus on all the extras so take them with a pinch of salt There are only a couple of organizations that test the effectiveness of AV (AV-Test.org and AV-Comparatives.org) but honestly, the way they test doesn’t really match how people really get infected so they don’t tell you much. In general, established vendors all do a pretty good job at stopping viruses\malware but nothing is perfect. Windows Defender that now comes with Windows is “ok”, but it really depends on how you use your computer. Look for protection against exploits and ransomware Most malware comes in by email or from web browsing. Make sure your email provider includes spam protection and your security product includes web filtering. If you think you may have been infected HitManPro (part of Sophos) or MalwareBytes are good for checking your machine, but will nearly always find “something” to show value, usually “cookies” which are on the whole harmless, and are used by websites to track what you are searching for. What about Mac? There is malware for Mac, but very little. I would still recommend you use one if you aren’t very tech savvy or other people use the same computer. What about my phone? iPhones don’t need security software, in fact Apple won’t let anyone write an AV product. Android is a little more at risky, use one if you tend install a lot of apps. But again, go for an established company. Think about who uses the computer? If you share it with your children, the risk increases, they tend to be searching for a wider variety of things, increasing the risk of visiting a site that might have malware. How to keep secure If you use Windows, a security product is essential, simply because it is targeted so much. You can use Windows Defender, but I would recommend you purchase a separate security product. If you use a Mac, it’s probably not essential. However, if you are in business and store customer details then you really should. If the worse did happen, and you lost data, having to admit you didn’t have security software is going to be embarrassing to say the least, especially considering the new data protection rules. Keep your software up to date, not just the operating system, but browsers, acrobat, word processors and of course you Antivirus product! Be careful what you download, “free” often comes at a price, usually bundled with toolbars, helpers and other PUAs or worse. Never enter passwords and bank account details after clicking on links. If you are asked to update details, go to the actual web site rather than clicking on the link. Don’t reuse passwords. Make use of password generators that keep a unique password for each website. The biggest vulnerability is between the chair and the keyboard. Backup regularly! - Mark Harris Issue 25

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Jason Allison

Awarded Craftsman May 2018

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Anne Aveyard

march & april 2018

Ian Knaggs

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Mayna Halton Jason Allison

Mayna Halton

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© Moritz Rehbein

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© Michael Taterka © Tom Schönfeld

HAHNEMÜHLE PHOTO The Quality Choice For Everyday Printing

An assortment of universally usable inkjet papers that are ideal for artists and professional photographers daily printing.

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Claire Elliott

Master Craftsman - February 2018

THE NEW BEGINNINGS I feel as though every moment in my career so far, perhaps even in my life, has been leading up to the creation of this panel. Having started out my training at art college studying fine art, graphic design and photography I’m now creating an entirely different kind of art: Babies. Recording precious little bundles, capturing them in a split second, paused forever.

Entering for qualification of any level is a significantly daunting task. So thinking about creating my Master Craftsman panel was no different. I run my photography business from a converted stable block in Richmond, beautiful town in North Yorkshire. With a full calendar of both studio shoots and photography training, the stables is a lovely hustle and bustle. It is the perfect place to be creative and produce the work and style my clients have become accustomed to. Deciding to enter for the Master Craftsman qualification was a decision I had been making for a while but once I had made up my mind I was both excited and nervous at the prospect. My first decision was that of choosing the palette of the work I was going to put forward for qualification. Using texture layers, clothing and the baby skin tone itself I was able to create the soft pastel tones I was looking for. The decision to build the pastel images wasn’t an easy one. A lot of my more recent work was very moody, dark, and full of shadows. Colour is also a big part of my usual client imagery so to then start producing such a delicate pastel, almost porcelain feel to the plates was something very different for me; but something I took on and made it my own. Choosing the single images for the set was easy at first as I feel all babies are beautiful in their own way making it hard to decide which to include and which to leave out. That’s where qualification mentoring came into its own. Choosing images for a panel isn’t just about the emotion, the colour, the lighting, but its also about them fitting together to make one. One feel, one gallery, one piece of work that sits together. Posing newborn babies isn’t as easy as you’d think to look at the panel, but take my word for it, when you have a 6-day old newborn baby in the studio for a shoot with Mummy and Daddy overlooking your every move, it can be nerve-wracking. As most of the babies in my panel are asleep I had to use other ways to create impact and emotion. Curled up in beautiful, safe poses making compositional shapes on the beanbag, and exciting setups on the floor drops with delicate props was the way forward. Safety is a big part of the Newborn Photography genre. Looking after the baby’s airway and circulation is very important and must not be compromised for any pose or reason, even if its cute at the time. The images are all lit with very soft lighting modifier, I felt this complimented the theme of the panel and would also help with the tones I had chosen to present. The photographs were printed on Hahnemuhle German Etching paper; this texture was the final puzzle piece to creating the look for my qualification panel. My experiences have driven me to create this panel of images, which demonstrates how I capture my very own precious tiny human beings; their little noses, soft hair, velvet skin, small toes, but most of all, their existence, the beginnings of life”

- Claire Elliott MCrGNBP 18

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G.D.P You’re sick of hearing about it. Who isn’t. Employers and Public Liability insurance: But, just say, for a moment, that you unwi�ngly fall foul of GDPR, suffering what’s known as a ‘Privacy Incident’… where do you turn?

A must-have policy for anyone with employees or working with the public. Currently these provide some protec�on against claims raised under current Data Protec�on Act.

Your insurance could be the resource you need for prac�cal financial and expert help.

Industry expecta�ons are that these GDPR regula�ons take over in May 2018, cover is likely to be amended and very much more restricted.

This month, photography insurance specialists Infocus, look at common policies for photographers, which relate to GDPR, and data generally. Please bear in mind that all policies can vary in their terms and we advise you to check your own specific cover with your broker or agent.

Professional Indemnity insurance These policies are designed to protect Professional Service companies from client claims, so in the event of a GDPR claim, this SHOULD cover you. Under PI policies there is no cover for the loss or exposure of the private records of staff or Directors or Partners, or suppliers or prospects who are equally protected by GDPR. There is also no cover under PI policies for loss or damage to a policy holder’s own IT assets and systems, Income, or the� of funds held.

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The GDPR workshop was a runaway success

Commercial Legal Expenses

Where do we all go from here

IT system and Data clean, repair and reinstatement costs - These policies usually provide for the These o�en cover legal defence and compensa�on cost of cleaning, repairing and reinsta�ng your IT awards for claims under current Data Protec�on programme and data assets following an IT breach Act legisla�on, though usually exclude fines. causing a loss of or damage to or corrup�on of Cover maybe subject to the business being proper- systems and data. ly registered with the ICO (Informa�on CommisLoss of IT based Trade Income - These policies can sioners Office). some�mes provide for trading losses arising from These policy sec�ons will need to be updated to an interrup�on to normal IT or Web Site reflect the change of guard from the DPA to GDPR. opera�ons.

Cyber Insurance This is the biggie for GDPR, as it’s insurance for your IT systems, which usually includes storage of company and client data. Here are some of the elements cyber insurance can cover:

Work out what private personal informa�on you control or process, where it is, how it is protected, how it is used, how old it is, how accurate it is and whether any improvements to security and safe processing could be made. Work out what happens if all your safety and security measures fail and you fall vic�m to a GDPR incident.

Under Data Protec�on regula�ons its referred to IT Crime – Electronic the� of money or funds from as a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA). More broadbank accounts arising from an IT breach or mally it should form part of an IT System Risk ware (Ransomware, Virus, Trojan etc) or decep�on Assessment and be part of a Business Con�nuity via e-mail or other messaging. Plan. In our opinion appropriate insurance protec�on and access to exper�se is an absolutely essen�al component of those plans.

In summary

Personal Informa�on Loss, Damage, The� or Leak Insurance is there to help. But is no subs�tute for – If personal details are hacked, this can provide being properly prepared. the cost of monitoring personal credit records for A good Cyber policy is likely to be the safest bet a specified period (usually twelve months). as they have been designed with Cyber Risks in Regulatory Fines – Some policies appear to cover mind and that is where the heaviest GDPR risks fines, but the problem here is lack of case law as seem to exist, not the paper based documents to what a court might deem to be recoverable. and filing systems. Fines are meant to be a form of punishment, so businesses should not assume they are insurable. Issue 25

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Martin Leckie

Awarded Craftsman May 2018

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Creating beautiful websites & brands

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creating beautiful BRANDS & WEBSITES

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India

The Golden Triangle The hustle and bustle of a continent full of rich variety. From the snow-covered peaks of the Himalayas to the South with its forts, palaces, tigers, monkeys and the majestic Taj Mahal with its dramatic history. India’s diverse landscape, culture, it’s people, the tuk-tuks, mopeds, aromas, architecture, spices, and the fabulous colours.

Gordon, his wife Aileen and their friends booked their trip with Audley Travel, a company that specialises in tailor-made travel. The tour started in Delhi which dates from the 1600’s and a population of 18.98 million. The next stop was Agra and the magical Taj Mahal a mausoleum built for the Mughal ruler Shah Jahan’s wife, Mumtaz Mahal (who died in childbirth in 1631).

gordon mcgowan

Jaipur - a city of colours which charms its visitors with its merging of terrains, colours, and cultures. To Udaipur, which nestles alongside the shimmering Lake Pichola and the wooded Aravalli Hills and onto Varanasi, often described as India’s spiritual capital and is one of the most fascinating and colourful places in India. Varanasi spreads out along the banks of the River Ganges and is a place so sacred, it is said that to die there gives liberation from the endless cycle of rebirth and union with the divine.

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The final destination of the trip was the multi-cultural city of Mumbai, previously known as Bombay with a population of 18 million people. Mumbai, known as the ‘city of dreams’ and home to one of the biggest slums in India and also home to the wealthiest people. Mumbai is a hub of manufacturing, fabulous architecture and bazaars. A diverse city, a city for all. All images have been captured by Gordon on his iPhone 6S+

The ‘Marigolds’ My travelling companions, left to right, Julie Fraser, John Connor, Jo Connor, Aileen McGowan, Anita Mason and me!

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Taj Mahal “The Taj Mahal was an amazing place to see, especialy at sunset” - Gordon The Taj Mahal meaning “Crown of the Palace” is an ivory-white marble mausoleum on the south bank of the Yamuna river in the city of Agra. Commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal Emperor, Shah Jahan to house the tomb of his favourite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for being ‘the jewel of Muslim art in India and one of the universally admired masterpieces of world heritage.” The Taj Mahal is regarded by many as the best example of Mughal architecture and a symbol of India’s rich history.

Information source on the Taj Mahal - : Wikipedia

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“The Monkey Sanctuary, Jaipur. What an amazing setting, just simply an incredible place to visit and not at all what I expected, it took my breath away. Loved the experience and definitely a place to visit� 36

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The Time Keeper, Varanasi

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Mumbai Fishing Market

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River Ganges

“The morning light on the River Ganges with the sounds and smells of the early morning rituals is a something that I will remember forever. It was such a magical time to take a boat ride and experience what was happening on the banks of the river and the rituals of the burning of the bodies. The Pyres of Varanasi: Breaking the cycle of death and rebirth to liberate the soul the body must first be burned. So many experiences and that was just one of many over the two weeks we spent in this fantastic country, India.

One thing I did find unusual, and it wasn’t until we got to Mumbai that we noticed a guy light a cigarette and it suddenly dawned on us that this was the first time in two weeks that we had seen or noticed anyone smoking. I have seen poverty in India that I have never seen or experienced before but the smiles and the lovely people that we have met on our ‘Marigold’ trip has been a truly humbling experience. India is amazing, I wished I could have stayed longer. India is a country that should be on your bucket list to visit. You won’t be disappointed. My next visit to India will be to tour the South of the country. - Gordon McGowan

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Creative Light Magazine PROCESSING LAB

WINNER 2015-17

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RAF In Camera: 1970s Author: Keith Wilson Highlights Provides a unique photographic portrait of the Royal Air Force during one of the most significant and interesting decades in aviation history. This is the third volume in a major new series that seeks to explore a wide variety of aspects of the Royal Air Force’s history over the course of the 20th and 21st centuries. Includes more than 450 high-quality photographs, including many rare archive images – all supported by an informative narrative. While many look back to the 1970s with fond memories of package holidays, Space Hoppers, Saturday Night Fever and disco music, others see it as something as a hangover from the ‘swinging sixties’. For many, the 1970s is seen as the decade that taste forgot. That said, the cultural texture of British life probably changed more quickly between 1970 and 1980 than during any other post-war decade. At the beginning of the 1970s, the RAF were a force with many overseas bases supporting a worldwide capability but, by the end of the decade, was based almost exclusively in the UK and Europe – in response to the perceived Cold War threat from the Soviet Union. During the 1970s, the military emphasis changed from global strength to the protection of Europe through NATO, while still possessing limited capabilities as a reactionary, expeditionary force. It should also be noted that many of the changes were driven by economic rather than strategic influences. During the 1970s only a limited number of aircraft types were completely withdrawn from RAF. Aircraft that arrived in RAF service during the decade included the BAe 125 CC.1, Puma HC.1, Bulldog T.1, Jetstream T.1, Gazelle HT.3, Jaguar GR.1, Nimrod R.1, Hawk T.1 and Sea King HAR.3; as well as the upgraded variants of the Nimrod MR.2, the Harrier GR.3 and Buccaneer S.2B. Keith Wilson takes up from where he left off with RAF in Camera 1960s in order to take us on a journey through a particularly significant decade. All of the decade’s landmark events are referenced in this thorough, well-researched and image-packed publication. Each chapter focuses on a specific year, relaying all of the highlights that characterized it. As with the two previous releases, this new addition to the In Camera series is sure to be regarded as something of a collector’s edition and a real enthusiast’s favourite.

book review

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KEITH WILSON has been actively involved in aviation publishing for more than 30 years and is

probably best known for his striking air-to-air images in Pilot magazine. During his extensive airto-air photographic career, he has photographed almost 2,000 different aircraft; featuring a very broad range of subjects, from gliders, microlight, vintage and veteran, aerobatics and general aviation subjects right through to high altitude research aircraft, business jets, commercial jets and military fast jets. Keith is the author of RAF in Camera 1950s and its follow-up RAF in Camera 1960s, both published by Pen and Sword Aviation.

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Garry Bree

Awarded Craftsman - May 2018

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jon@camerafocussupportservices.co.uk


www,camerafocussupportservices.co.uk


congratulations John Hare QGP

Qualified Guild Photographer May 2018 50

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congratulations Colin Daniels QGP

Qualified Guild Photographer March 2018 52

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Iain Jack

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TIP SHEET #9 Perfect Selections and Cut Outs

As Photoshop continues to advance, the ability to make great selections and cut outs is certainly being made easier and far less frustrating. The introduction of the Quick Selection Tool was quite literally a game changer for many, making the ability to make accurate selections so much easier. However, despite the advancement in Photoshop’s Selection Tools, there’s still no ‘one click fix’ or rather one tool that will work on every image. Each image is different and offers up it’s own challenges so as a user of Photoshop it’s certainly a good idea to build up an understanding of as many ways to make selections as possible and so add to your Photoshop Toolbox. This way no matter what the challenge you encounter, you’ll be able to call on a tool / technique that will work so much better PLUS you’ll be able to combine techniques to achieve the result you’re after. In this tutorial I take you through one of the ways that I use the Quick Selection Tool. Now most of the time the Quick Selection Tool will do a great job however through experience I have found that sometimes you need to use it to make two separate selections and then go on to add them together.

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This can quite often be the case when making a selection of a person where the Quick Selection works great on the body area but when using it to pick up all those fine hairs on the head, this can affect what you have already done. Let’s go through the steps so you can see what I mean…

Step 1: Quick Selection Tool Choose the Quick Selection Tool (W) and click and drag to make a selection of the body area of our character including the walking stick. We can see the area we’re selecting by it having what is commonly called the Marching Ants around it. Areas like those between his arm and his body we can exclude from the selection by holding down the OPTION (PC: Alt) key and dragging within them. Don’t select the head but rather go straight across the tops of the shoulders.

Step 2: Quick Mask Mode Once you have finished using the Quick Selection Tool, press Q on the keyboard to enter Quick Mask Mode. Now I have mine set so that the red overlay indicates what has been included in the selection, however by default Photoshop will indicate the selected areas by not having them covered by the red overlay. To set Photoshop to show you how I use it, double click on the Quick Mask icon at the bottom of the tool bar, turn on Selected Areas then press OK. Now press Q on the keyboard to show the selected areas covered in the red overlay.

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Step 3: Checking the Selection Now that we’re in Quick Mask mode we can hold down the space bar and click/drag to move around the image to see if there are any areas that need to be added to the selection or indeed any areas that need to be excluded from the selection. To add an area choose a brush (B) and paint with black. To exclude an area simply paint with white. Once finished press Q to exit Quick Mask Mode.

Step 4: Save the Selection Next step is to save the selection. To do this, with the marching ants still visible, go to SELECT - SAVE SELECTION and in the dialog box type in something like BODY and click OK. Then go SELECT - DESELECT. We now need to make a selection of the head and hair and again we’ll do this using the Quick Selection Tool (W).

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Step 5: Select & Mask With a selection around the head active, click on SELECT AND MASK in the options bar at the top of the screen. With the On White (personal choice what view you use) turn on Smart Radius and then increase the Radius slider to help Photoshop to pick up any fine hairs that it missed when first using Quick Selection Tool. Don’t increase this too much otherwise it will ruin the selection. I found a radius of 6 pixels enough here. Next use the Refine Radius Tool to brush around the outer edge of the characters head to further pick up any fine hairs.

Step 6: Save the Selection Before exiting the SELECT AND MASK dialog, choose Selection from the Output drop menu at the bottom of the dialog box and then click OK. We are now back in the work area and the head/ hair is surrounded by marching ants. As before, save this selection by going to SELECT - SAVE SELECTION, name it HEAD and click OK. Then go SELECT - DESELECT.

Step 7: Combine the Selections We now need to combine the two selections. Go to the Channel Tab and drag the BODY channel over the New Channel icon to create a copy. Double click on the name of this channel copy and rename it to CUTOUT. Hold down the COMMAND (PC: CTRL) key and click on the HEAD channel thumbnail to activate the marching ants. Go to EDIT - FILL and choose WHITE from the contents menu and click OK, then SELECT - DESELECT. We have now combined the two selections.

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Step 8: Layer Mask Cut Out Click once on the thumbnail of the RGB channel to return to normal view of the image then click on the Layers Tab. Go to SELECT - LOAD SELECTION and from the Channel drop down menu choose CUTOUT. This is the channel we created from combining the two selections. Now click OK and the marching ants are around the body and head of our character showing that the two selections were combined and we now have one complete selection. With the selection / marching ants active click the LAYER MASK icon to now cut the character from the background and then simply use the MOVE TOOL (V) to click and drag the character into your background scene.

CHECK OUT MY YOUTUBE PAGE FOR 100’S OF FREE TUTORIALS

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congratulations Lisa Wildgoose QGWP

Qualified Guild of Wedding Photographers March 2018

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Frances Van Der Merwe

Awarded Master Craftsman May 2018

Many years ago I bred, showed and judged goldfish with The Goldfish Society of Great Britain. This is where I met Derek. He became my mentor, taking me under his wing, and teaching me everything he knew. Quickly, he and his lovely wife became close friends of mine, more like family. Then Derek started having what he called “funny turns”. They were more like brief blackouts, and sometimes he would fall as a consequence. It felt like it took years for them to come up with a diagnosis which we already suspected: vascular Dementia and Alzheimers. The “funny turns” were indeed mini strokes and slowly destroying his brain. Many people didn’t take his plight seriously because Derek looked so healthy and his mind seemed so alert. He could quote all the Latin names for plants. There were bad days, and that is when people that knew Derek could see the flaws. In November last year, just before my Mum visiting from South Africa, I had a desperate urgency to do his portrait. Several people thought that I should wait, but I insisted that I wanted to do it. I arrived with all my gear, which he and Ena didn’t think I would do, and quickly realised that Derek wasn’t himself. In the few weeks, I hadn’t seen him there seemed to have been a rather significant deterioration. He was a little more confused than normal, but he seemed rather amused that I wanted to take his photo.

- Derek -

I took several photos that day but there was such a sad, blank look in Derek’s eyes and I was ready to give up hope of ever capturing the glint in his eyes that I loved of the “old” Derek. Then, for a very brief moment, the “old” Derek returned, and on the last photo, I managed to capture him the way we all remembered him. A couple of weeks later Derek developed a urine infection, and they admitted him to hospital after a few complications. Within five days he had progressed to advanced Dementia, and he passed away after twelve days. I never saw him again after that photoshoot. That last photo was so important to everyone. Ena used it at his funeral, and everyone commented on the photograph and said that this is now everyone knew Derek and wanted to remember him, full of fun and mischief. This touched my heart so much that I wanted to provide more elderly people with the opportunity to have a decent portrait. I put adverts on social media in my area and also on Nextdoor. I was looking for people over 70, and everything would be free. I also wanted to get to know my subjects, so I treated them to tea and cookies, and we chatted first about their lives. Several of my subjects were sent by their children who wanted a good portrait. This project has been a very emotional journey for me. I have met the most wonderful people, all amused by me wanting to take photographs of them who are largely forgotten in society. Each one of these portraits has a story behind it, and like with Derek, I hope I have managed to capture a little spark from their souls which can be treasured by family forever. - Frances Issue 25

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congratulations Helen Rowan QGPP

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The Colours in Black and White Photography By Dietmar Temps Black and white photography continues to be very popular. This is also reflected in the field of street photography, which takes on an important role in photo communities such as Flickr or 500px. Old masters like Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson or Ansel Adams, whose works still strongly influence modern photography, are certainly also responsible for the persistent popularity of black and white photography. The fundamental idea of black and white photography is based on the reduction of the colour of an image to contrasts and graphic structures. Black and white photography is far more than just the omission of colour. On the contrary, in black and white photography the colours play an important role in the selection of the subject of the image. Additionally, the colours are also important for the image composition of a black and white image as well as in the subsequent post processing.

Selection of the subject The conversion of the colours into the black and white abstraction begins with the selection of the subject. There are many subjects that work very well in colour, but often lose the attraction after the conversion to a black and white image. Monochrome scenes with many details, such as a green landscape with many plants and trees are a good example. The transformation of such scenes in black and white often looks like the mere removal of the colour from the picture. As opposed to this, a monochrome scenery with rather large unstructured areas, such as the silhouette of a mountain range at dawn, can achieve an exceptional effect in black and white. The same applies to portraits and faces: a portrait in black and white is only perceived as attractive if the grey tone of the face is significantly different from the grey tones of the background. It is important for the choice of the subject to interpret colours as contrasts. The subject is perceived as an abstract form with the light-dark transitions of the grey tones. Š2018 Inc. All rightsLight reserved. Datacolor and- Spyder are registered trademarks of Datacolor. 72 Datacolor : Creative Magazine Issue 25


Post processing phase

It is advisable to shoot the picture in colour and in RAW and do the conversion in black and white later in the subsequent post processing phase. Beginners will probably prefer to follow the “trial and error” principle, as opposed to experienced photographers, who might already control the black and white image when taking the shot by influencing the image composition. Setting the digital camera to “black and white” directly when shooting is more suitable for street photography. In this configuration, the corresponding shades of grey, contrasts, and shapes of the scene can be controlled in the viewfinder. However, you lose many creative possibilities of the subsequent image editing phase. This is why this approach may be better reserved for the enthusiasts.

Possibilities of conversion

The conversion of the colour image into a black and white image is usually processed in image editing programs such as Lightroom or Photoshop. Inexperienced photographers often use the function “Save as greyscale” and remove only the colour information of the image. This approach produces small image files, but the photographer has no control on the result of the black and white conversion. Sometimes people use the colour saturation slider to get a black and white image. Setting the slider all the way to the left or to -100, which means completely desaturating the colour, creates a black and white image, but the result is very sluggish because the converted shades of grey based on the colour are not displayed correctly. It is much better to follow one of the following approaches: convert the image using the black and white wizard of the image editing program, convert the image based on a custom workflow, or use a special plug-in for the conversion with a variety of controls and presets.

Usage of colour filters

The black and white wizard of the image editing program allows you to simulate colour filters, such as the familiar yellow, orange and red filter of analog black and white photography. This offers a great control of the converted grey tones based on the colours. The effect is often used for the sky; the blue tone is rendered in a very dark grey tone, and the strong contrast to the white clouds gives the picture a dramatic expression. The output is an RGB image file with identical red, green, and blue channels which display the black and white image in a neutral tone. Thanks to the RGB mode, the picture can also be toned, usually with a slight sepia, blue, or brown tone. However, experienced photographers tend to ignore the wizard and prefer to set up their own workflow for conversion. They often work with layer masks. The goal is to control the colour filters during the conversion and to use them partially if necessary. Thanks to this approach, it is possible to optimize the grey tone of the skin or even only the grey tone of the lips in a portrait.

Plug-ins for conversion

There are many very popular plug-ins for the black and white conversion. The most well-known is certainly the plug-in “Silver Efex”. With the help of these plugins, the conversion can be optimally controlled partially or in the entire image and stored as a preset. Basic out of the box presets can easily be adapted and expanded to the photographer’s own needs. The biggest advantage is that, based on the presets, it is very easy to get consistent results. In addition, these plug-ins usually offer analog black and white film emulsion simulations. These simulations for the grain effect of the classical SW film emulsion use scanned grain templates and include them into the picture. Technically speaking, the picture loses some of its resolution. But that should be accepted, as the grain effect gives the “clean look and feel” of the digital image a pleasant, organic finish. Accomplished media designer and photographer Dietmar Temps lives in Cologne, Germany and has amassed almost 20 years in the media business. His first professional position as a photographic assistant took him through whole Europe and across the pond to America. After that he studied photo and media technology at the Cologne University of Applied Science. Currently he mainly realizes photo and internet projects with the focus on travel photography, social networking and video streaming.

Dietmar Temps

Contact: Dietmar Temps // Photography and media design // Cologne, Germany dietmar.temps@gmail.com // http://dietmartemps.com

Dietmar about Coulor Management: “The calibration is surprisingly easy. The colors are after calibration better and the contrast is slightly higher. The images are simply looking better. After using the before/after function my monitor shows a slight yellow/green color cast which I hadn’t realized before. Dietmar Temps // Travel Photographer and Photo Blogger // Cologne, Germany +. Dietmar is a Datacolor Friends with Vision Member since MarchIssue 2017. 25 He is- using a Spyder5ELITE Creative Light Magazine

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congratulations Sian Lewis QGNBP

Qualified Guild of Newborn & Baby Photographers May 2018 Issue 25

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As a member of The Guild of Photographers you will receive a complimentary bi-monthly CameraCraft Magazine as part of your membership!

The first series of Cameracraft was a quarterly subscription-only magazine, covering three years of important developments in photography from 2012 to 2015 when it became part of f2 Freelance Photographer bi-monthly. A year later, from the November/December 2016 issue, Cameracraft returned as the main title for the magazine though you’ll still find the f2 logo there. Now Cameracraft is back and a new ISSN has been issued, the next edition will lose the f2. We have teamed up with The Guild of Photographers so all their members, professional and enthusiast alike, will receive Cameracraft. - David Kilpatrick

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Guild’s New Trade Partner Find & Fight Image Theft The Guild of Photographers is delighted to be teaming up with Pixsy, one of the world ‘s leading image protection businesses in the field of Copyright Protection. Pixsy find where and how your images are being used online. They recover and fight for compensation for unauthorised use. We all know how frustrating it is for Photographers to have their work stolen. Some of the benefits of Pixsy include:• Up to 100,000 images monitored; • UNLIMITED import sources; • Priority Match Scanning; • Take Down Notices; • Free & unlimited case submission; • Protected by Pixsy watermarks & badges; “Many of us at Pixsy are artists ourselves. We know what it feels like to discover your work stolen and understand the special challenges creatives face. As a “By Creatives, For Creatives” company, our mission is simple: to fight for the rights of artists” Please click on the link below for further information on Pixsy Copyright Protection Pixsy: www.pixsy.com

“Together we will fight for the rights of photographers” - Steve Thirsk Issue 25

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Tackling The Problem Of Image Theft In The Digital Age Professional photographer Paul Reiffer discusses the problem of image theft and offers his solutions.

Leading image protection service Pixsy talked to Paul about the problem of Image theft.

How much of an impact has image theft had on your professional career?

What challenges do you face as a photographer in the digital age?

Having an end product which is of a digital nature, can make it scary when you see your image “in the wild”. I noticed a few publications had used my images without permission. I started “dipping in” every now and then, using products such as TinEye to reverse search for where my images had popped up across the internet. The problem with that is I have thousands of images, some licensed, some not, and keeping a track of all of those became a task that would have taken a week out of every month to monitor. Beyond that, even though we could inform the image user or send a takedown notice, we were still missing the licensing revenue that should have initially come from its use – and I didn’t have time to work with different legal teams in different countries on hundreds of cases at any one time.

Introducing Paul Reiffer Paul Reiffer is a multi-award winning professional photographer. He has traveled to over 60 countries capturing people, landscapes and commercial images. His work has featured in exhibitions all over the world, from Times Square in New York to the Royal Albert Hall and Houses of Parliament in London, with gallery installations in Europe and Asia. Much of Paul’s photography has been commissioned and used by some of the finest brand names and companies worldwide. He is sponsored by and works with, some of the top equipment providers in the industry.

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The relative ignorance that still remains out there when it comes to image theft and copyright infringement is quite scary.

Even my own friends would often say to me “but it’s OK if I found it on Google, right?” or “Yeah, but I’m only a little business, they won’t mind, it’s good for them to get their image out there”. We now actually teach people, as part of our workshops, not only about trademark and copyright infringement but also about how to protect their work.

How did you find out about Pixsy? Initially, a friend pointed Pixsy out on social media, and I was initially unconvinced. I mean, here’s a company who will take a big chunk of any “recovery” money that they receive on your behalf when they didn’t even take the image, right? But then, as an experiment, I loaded a small sample of my work into their tool and the results were shocking. We had hundreds of cases, from the very outset, including some very


large companies and brands who had been using my work for years without any permission, license or payment. On the one hand, I thought “I could get my own team to chase this and cut out the middle-man”, but on the other, the task of chasing, negotiating, and if necessary taking the infringer to court just seemed too daunting when I was looking at the volume of cases and countries they spanned across on just that small sample. So, I gave them a try.

anecdotal successes when I check back with them. Indeed, some previous infringers have also now come to me for advice on the correct approach to licensing images in the future, so it’s not a one-way street.

Which forms of active protection would you encourage photographers to take in the fight against image theft?

What result has using Pixsy had on your problem with image theft?

To be honest, in the age we live in there is very little that can actually be done to prevent your image being stolen.

We’ve had three big results.

Watermarks can be removed easily (indeed, Adobe actually make this easier with every release of content-aware fill!)

1. We’re now being recompensed for unauthorised use of our images. We don’t apply any outrageous “damages” claims, just our standard corporate licensing rates to ensure the user pays the same as others would have done for the same usage. 2. We’ve had images removed from sites all across the world with the automated tools and chasing that Pixsy does on our behalf – ensuring our brand is maintained. 3. It’s helped to educate other photographers and image users that I speak with – I’ve recommended Pixsy to many others, who’ve had

Instead, I’d recommend to everyone that they register their work with the US Copyright Office. Even though I’m very much against that way of working (as a British photographer, I shouldn’t need to do that, as we’re lucky that copyright is granted automatically in the UK), for any US infringement it makes life so much easier should it need to go through any legal process.

Definitely invest in some form of “Reverse Image Search” technology. There are many out there – some free, some paid.

There are services other than Pixsy that offer similar solutions too, but having tried their major competitor with appalling results, I wouldn’t personally switch to anyone else. Save your files with copyright metadata, and a filename that includes not only keywords but the copyright owner. As above, it won’t stop a thief intent on stealing your work, but it can help a legitimate customer find you from your image.

Digital watermarks, while better, can still be obliterated (I’ve seen it done). Copyright Metadata can be easily removed by freely available programs.

And while I don’t like watermarks on images, sometimes a visual clue as to who to contact should someone want to purchase the photograph can often help!

Social media (and screen resolutions) are demanding higher and higher resolution photos – and so are customers – so the old trick of “low res for web” really no longer applies.

More about Pixsy Pixsy is one of the leading legal-tech services for online image protection. Founded in 2014 by Daniel Foster, Pixsy is an award-winning startup with over 25,000 visual artists in its community. Pixsy has processed over 40,000 copyright infringement cases and works with over 26 law firms across the globe. www.pixsy.com

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Gavin Prest

Master Craftsman May 2018

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“

I joined the Guild in 2013 and over the years I have been a member I have seen many great images and met many great photographers which has been truly inspirational. I now feel I have discovered who I am as a photographer. Having explored several different photographic genres my style has evolved into a recognisable one - one which is purely black and white. Since gaining a Master Craftsman qualification in 2014 I have now decided to test myself with a personal brief to try for another. I set parameters for the brief, it had to be shot using very little equipment, it had to be shot on location, it had to be easily achievable on a limited budget, it had to be very different to my normal style - it had to be colour. Using the three primary colours as the colour theme led me to buying red blue and yellow clothes from second hand and charity shops. I selected a model to work with and decided on the location and off we went. The whole series of images were captured over three days. Considering all the basics I have learnt during my photographic career I went against quite a lot of it and avoided correct posing, frame placing and rules of composition. The resulting images evolved into what you see today. I have never been completely happy with straight colour images so I felt that the processing for the images also had to add to the style. The posing of this panel has now flowed into client work, giving my family portraits a very recognisable look, shooting these client images is both rewarding and great fun. The discovery of myself as a photographer has allowed me to now focus on the art and creativity that is within me and not worry about fitting into the high street based photography that I see everyday. Creating these images, and meeting fellow photographers on a recent trip abroad, has fuelled my creative imagination and I am excited to start work on my next body of work� - Gavin Prest

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congratulations Simon Newbury QGWP

Qualified Guild Wedding Photographers May 2018 84

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congratulations Mel Petit QGP

Qualified Guild Photographer April 2018 86

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The world is my studio Profoto A1

We created the Profoto A1 with a round head that delivers light that’s both natural and beautiful both on camera and off. It’s also incredibly easy and to use, with superfast recycling and a longlasting battery, so you’ll never miss a shot. It might be the smallest light we’ve ever made, but the creative possibilities are enormous. Discover the world’s smallest studio light at profoto.com Issue 25

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SPEND MORE TIME SH HOW ZENFOLIO HELPED STREAMLINE MY BUSINESS by Ioan Said

HERE AT CELYNNEN PHOTOGRAPHY WE ARE CELEBRATING OUR 10TH ANNIVERSARY!

Over the past 10 years we have many changes to refine our busi we’ve tried different web solution trialed new camera systems, outsourced editing, brought it ba house, etc. But we had not mana to find a Web solution that work us — until Zenfolio.

This year we really wanted to streamline and expand our busin

Ioan Said is the BIPP North-West Wedding Photographer of the Year 2017, and two time North Wales Wedding Photographer of the Year. He is ranked among the TOP 100 wedding photographers in the UK on Fearless Photographers and recently served as Chairman of the North West BIPP region. See his site at: celynnenphotography.co.uk

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Like many wedding photographe we are busy with all the different we need to do — shooting, editi social media, blog writing, traini networking, selling, organising, finances, and more. These other are time consuming, and the wh reason we got into this business the first place was to take picture Plus, our little boy is now an am 2 year old, and I want to make s spend as much time with him as I can!


OOTING

made ness; ns,

ack in aged ed for

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Because of the time-consuming aspects of running a photography business, I constantly felt like I was missing out on maximising my database, missing promotions, getting through my blog posts, missing upsell opportunities…the list goes on. These are all areas where Zenfolio has really sorted things out for me. Partnerships with print companies who handle everything with suggested pricing including markups save me time. Free marketing campaigns that can ensure we make the most of our databases — many of them activated with a single click — are beneficial as well. Since switching to Zenfolio we have sold more prints in a year than we had in the previous five years combined! The blog is fully integrated, making it easy to source images and ensure Web traffic is optimised to one

website. Previously we had a separate blog, had to ensure it was kept secure, and optimise two websites… which was very stressful. Not any more. Our website is now fully responsive, and there are other smart integrations such as client apps that let our clients share their pictures on social media in a way that always promotes us. All of our photoshoots are stored within the Zenfolio system, giving us an easily accessible backup of our files, and with a few SEO tweaks, our site recently shot up in Google for most of our targeted keywords. We are delighted we made the switch to Zenfolio. It’s sorted out a lot of issues that were bugging us and has also opened up new opportunities for us to expand. We are looking forward to seeing where our new website takes us!

GET 30% OFF YOUR SITE USE CODE GUILD AT ZENFOLIO.CO.UK/GUILD Issue 25

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congratulations Lyn Braund QGNBP

Qualified Guild Newborn & Baby Photographer April 2018

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Mel Taylor

Awarded Craftsman May 2018

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congratulations Peter Morgan QGWP

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congratulations Sarah Smith QGNBP

Qualified Guild Photographer May 2018 98

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THE GUILD OF PHOTOGRAPHERS Let the Guild help you with your photographic journey like it has done for many others! The Guild is suitable for those in business, contemplating a career in photography, undertaking photography related courses, or even those who simply love using their camera.

JOIN US Professional Membership costs £126 and Regular Membership costs £96

PHOTO: HELEN ROWAN

“No other photographic body offers what the Guild does... get an incredible package of business support, training and mentoring by some of the most respected names in the industry, insurance, legal protection and the rights to use our respected membership logos”

Telephone: 01782 970323 www.photoguild.co.uk 100

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Creative Light - Issue 25  

Creative Light Magazine brings together people interested in the craft of photography.

Creative Light - Issue 25  

Creative Light Magazine brings together people interested in the craft of photography.