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JULY 2012

“WEIRD”

ART & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE *FROM RETRO TO METRO*

US & CANADA: UK EUROPE: AUSTRALIA: JAPAN

10 $ 6.5 ₤ 8 EUR 9 $ 790 ¥

*FEATURING

Android Jones and art that will move you soul / Ryohei Hase’s paiting to express the darkness of mind / Xhxix’s surreal states of mental.

IN FOCUS

Christopher Nolan’s filmography Walk off the earth the one guitar band

GRAPHIC

10 Unique packaging designs Good design and bad design The Brandversation

EXPLORE

Infographic about BASE jumping Cannibalism life today


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ABOUT US OKO /oukayou/ is a quarterly print and online magazine about creativity in unlikely places, from the favelas of Rio to the alleys of Delhi. These are environments where resources may be scarce, but where ingenuity is used incessantly for survival, enterprise, and a self-expression. We believe in an industrial future fueled by networks of makers, from roadside engineers to co-working creatives. We are documenting a movement of hackers, sharers, and entrepreneurs innovating under resource constraints. OKO is about people, the things they make, and the context they make them in.

Staff

Steve Daniels EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Santos Henerejos EDITORIAL DESIGNER

Myles Estey SENIOR EDITOR AND PHOTO EDITOR

Melanie Chow FUNDRAISING

Jina Moore FEATURES EDITOR Justin Levinson ONLINE EDITOR Cary Mandel PUBLISHER

Zach Caldwell VIDEO EDITOR Jil Crary-Ross COMMUNITY MANAGER Alex Goldis COMMUNITY MANAGER

Publisher

OKO is published by Analogue Digital, an organization dedicated to researching, communicating, and supporting grassroots innovation in resource-constrained areas around the world.

Contact

For general and contributor inquiries, contact us or send an email to editor@OKO. com advertising inquiries, visit OKO.com/ads.


CREATIVES TEAM ART

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ESTINCE VOI Estince Voi immerses himself in graphics and illustrations everyday. He is an expert at creating unique pattern and share his skills on www.estincevoi.com

JALIE SAN Jalie San sucessfully creates horror and fantasy digital art. She demonstrates her skills of manipulating at OKO covers. Check her out at www.jailesan.com

YUURIN CHAN Yuurin Chan specialises in branding and typography. The OKO graphic designer guides you through the creation of words and images. www.yuurin.net


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ART

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GRAPHIC Good design & Bad design BY CLARE MCNALLY Design of values through communication BY PHILIP COTLER

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10 UNIQUE PACKAGING DESIGNS BY Y.ZAPPATERRA

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BRANVERSATION BY STEFAN ASAFTI

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Annual Structures BY MILANO KNIGHT

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New thinking. New possibilities. BY MILANO KNIGHT

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ART

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Android Jones BY JESSY BOHAMLEN

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Ryohei Hase BY ANDERSEN J

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Xhxix BY ABDUZEEDO

FEATURING

RYOHEI

HASE BY ANDERSEN J “My theme of paintings is to express the darknes of mind which is sad and glomy but at this time, its beautiful and strong.”

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BRAND VERSA

TION BY STEFAN ASAFTI “This is a project about brands - the great brands of the modern world - which have build quite a history for themselves as the years went by.”

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WEIRD CONTENT

BY Y. ZAPPATERRA “The packaging design must have that uniquenes, that it could certainly grab the eyebals of the customer.”

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EXHIBITION: Imaji Nasi BY NATHAN NIKON

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CONCEPT

CHARACTERS

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PREDATOR BY STAN WINSTON

PREDATOR

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THE TERMINATOR BY BASEM WASEF

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND BY MICHAEL KUTSCHE

BY STAN WINSTON “The Predator was originaly designed with a long neck, a dog-like head and a single eye.”

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SKETCH

10 DESIGNS UNIQUE PACKAGING

BY

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MICHAEL KUTSCHO “Alice in Wonderland’ character designer is a Cinderella story As of April 2012, it is the elev-


LIFESTYLE

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EXPLORE

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10 Most Common Sport Injuries BY ALEX MANA

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Some facts about Base Jumping BY MIRANDA GIRA

FEATURING

on the roof P110 Up BY ALEX MCLEAN for practicing P114 Reasons cannibalism BY DAVID J.REIBSTEIN LIFE P116 CANNIBALISM BY JOSH CLARK the last cannibal P118 Visit tribe today BY JOHN GARNAUT

P126 P130

ENJOY

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Walk Of The Earth BY MATT GOLDBERG

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Director: Christopher Nolan BY ABDUZEEDO

Of Monsters And Men BY SARAH A.MEYER

CANNI BALISM EXPLORE BY JOSH CLARK Cannibalism was a part of life and death for cultures around the world. How cannibal works?

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OF

MONSTERS AND MEN

BY SARAH A.MEYER A six piece India folk/ Indie pop band from Iceland and the 2010 winner of MÚSÍK TILRAUNIR, an annual battle of band competition. IN ICELAND.

P130


WEIRD CONTENT

WALK OF THE EARTH BY MATT GOLDBERG Unique and heartwarming approach to song writing, filming and constant, open interaction with everyone their music touches.

P134

CHRIS

TOPHER NOLAN

INFO

GRAPHIC BY ALEX MANA AND ESTINCE VOI Information of sport by Alex Mana is described through images and graphs by the illustrator Estince Voi.

P106

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Christopher Nolan’s Preferred Actors BY ABDUZEEDO

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Christopher Nolan’s filmography BY ABDUZEEDO

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Awards & Future Projects BY ABDUZEEDO

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Where the wild things are BY SPIKE JONZE


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GRAPHIC Good design & Bad design

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Design of values through communication

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10 Unique packaging designs

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Brandversation

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Annual Structures

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New thinking. New possibilities

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DESIGN IS NOT JUST

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE

DESIGN

IS HOW IT

WORKS ART

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THE TERM COMMUNICATION DESIGN IS OFTEN USED WITH VISUAL COMMUNICATION, CREATING NEW MEDIA CHANNELS TO ENSURE THE MESSAGE REACHES THE AUDIENCE.

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ommunication design is a mixed discipline between design and informationdevelopment which is concerned with how media intermission such as printed, crafted, electronic media or presentations communicate with people. A communication design approach is not only concerned with developing the message aside from the aesthetics in media, but also with creating new media channels to ensure the message reaches the target audience.Communication design seeks to attract, inspire,

create desires and motivate the people to respond to messages, with a view to making a favorable impact to the bottom line of the commissioning body, which can be either to build a brand, move sales, or for humanitarian purposes. Its process involves strategic business thinking, utilizing market research, creativity, and problem-solving. The term communication design is often used with visual communication, but has an alternate broader meaning that includes auditory, vocal, touch and smell.


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here is nothing inherent in our profession that forces us to support worthy causes, to promote good things, to avoid visual pollution. There might be such a responsibility in us as people. With prominent figures like Peter Saville recently talking about the crisis of the unnecessary and lamenting about the fact that our contemporary culture is monthly, there might now finally be room for content, for questions about what we do and for whom we are doing it. The incredible impact the First Things First manifesto had on my profession would certainly point in that direction. The first sentence on page 1 of Victor Papanek’s “Design for the Real World” reads: “There are professions more harmful than industrial design, but only very few of them. And possibly only one profession is phonier: Advertising design. In persuading people to buy things they don’t need, with money they don’t have, in order to impress others that don’t care, it is probably the phoniest field in existence definitely until today.”

HINKINGMADE

THERE ARE PROFESSIONS MORE HARMFUL THAN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN, BUT ONLY VERY FEW OF THEM. AND POSSIBLY ONLY ONE PROFESSION IS PHONIER: ADVERTISING DESIGN.

designIS

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GOOD DESIGN “

JUDGING THE QUALITY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN IS ALWAYS PRETTY SUBJECTIVE. PEOPLE HAVE DIFFERING OPINIONS OVER WHAT THEY LIKE AND WHY THEY LIKE IT.

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hy must a car body have these curving lines? Such questions plagued me while I was busily transitioning from a Danish mechanical engineer to an American transportation designer. While this was not a particularly easy transition, it greatly expanded my outlook concerning design. Sensual curves can be controlled to evoke emotions and meaning,

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fueling creativity and enriching life beyond mundane functionality. Designers fabricate design philosophies that express beliefs and then visualize these beliefs into objects to which people can relate and experience. When enough people identify with and vote by means of purchasing power on a design philosophy, a design trend is created and a strong trend becomes the prevailing taste.


BAD

DESIGN WHAT SEPARATES GOOD DESIGN FROM BAD? CLARE MCNALLY

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any people speak of good quality as if it were made up of good workmanship and good materials alone: but without good design it is impossible to make the most of these qualities. Good design, indeed, is an essential part of a standard of quality. Without it, the manufacturer cannot give the best service, through his products, to the consumer - to the community of which he is himself a part and from which he derives his livelihood.

BAD DESIGN

GOOD DESIGN

Bad design is like noise.t can be frustrating, dull, or annoying. It may be as bad as ugly, or unremarkable and therefore not worthy of someone’s attention. To your audience, bad design is an obstacle instead of an enabler. At best, bad design does not help your cause; at worst, it hinders your cause by creating an obstacle for the audience to climb over. Why create obstacles to getting your audiences’ attention?

Good design makes it easy for your audience to hear you, to “get it”, to tell others, and take action. Good design helps your audience understand your message — which helps you achieve your goals. Good design creates delight, ease, joy, and efficiency. Good design attracts positive attention.

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DESIGN OF VALUES THROUGH COMMUNICATION PHILIP KOTLER

COMMUNICATIONS DESIGNERS TRANSLATE IDEAS AND INFORMATION THROUGH A VARIETY OF GRAPHIC MEDIA.

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ocial marketing uses products or activities to advance social behaviors or causes: the Trojan Man character positions condoms as acceptable purchases for women, to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease; an Australian traffic safety campaign instilled the ethical values of driving responsibly on many television viewers. Social marketing integrates planning, communication, marketing skills, and approaches to social change to maximize users’ responses. Communication, often about how a product is used, is the means for changing behavior.

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Social marketing programs are structured around the needs of particular segments of a particular audience. A “target population” is defined by unifying characteristics, including age, social class, and income; psychological profiles, such as values and beliefs; and behavioral characteristics, such as buying and decision–making habits. However, group characteristics begin at the level of the individual, first through beliefs, then attitudes and values. A belief is a conscious or unconscious proposition inferred from what a person says or does. An attitude is an organization of beliefs around an object or situation, and a value is a type of belief centrally located in a

Poster by Aleksandra Niepsuj


TOP

POSTERS OF THE

MONTH JULY 2012

BERJO Czech Republic

personal system of behavior. Kotler recognizes that individuals have selective attention, in that they do not notice everything; selective distortion, in that they hear only what they want to hear; and selective recall, in that they can only retain a small part of a message in memory. When communication takes place, the currentimage held by the individual is replaced by the desired image of the communicated message. Kotler’s communications model shows change taking place on three levels: cognitive, affective and finally, behavioral. Kotler’s communications model suggests that the experience evoked

by socially marketed products is often both satisfying and rich. New products are designed and marketed to exceed user expectations and change beliefs. Users are immersed in a process whereby a carefully designed product changes their current behavior to a new and better one. Products like birth control pills and nicotine patches change beliefs and values centered around a way of life. Something more happens after a product “does its job” — values are affected through gradual change. The product may even take on a symbolic meaning. For example, a plastic recycling bin becomes a symbol of the attempt to save the earth’s resources.

ALEKSANDRA NIEPSUJ Poland

ANDREI OGRADĂ Romania

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UNIQUE

10 Which product attracts you the most in case you have two products of same specifications but different packaging designs. Obviously the one with attractive and unique packaging designs.

Packaging and product design has often attracted us with its amazing art, illustrations and graphic designs.

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PACKAGING DESIGNS Y.ZAPPATERRA

THE PACKAGING DESIGN MUST HAVE THAT UNIQUENESS, THAT IT COULD CERTAINLY GRAB THE EYEBALLS OF THE CUSTOMER.

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ackaging design is a blend of science, art and technology of covering any product in such way that it becomes easy to store, distribute, promote and sell them in their niche market. In fact, packaging itself possesses a very broad sense, which involves the entire process of designing, assessment and creation of packages. There was a time, when packaging designs were merely created with the aim of protecting and distributing the product. At present, beside protection and distribution aspects, packaging design is created with a focused mind set which aims at brand awareness as well as brand promotion. The packaging design must have that uniqueness, that it could certainly grab the eyeballs of the customer. Furthermore, it should be provided with all the required information regarding the product. This ‘packaging design’ is not a very simple task; you can correlate it as

web designing activity, because here also, you need to create a design for the product packaging and that too with eye catching looks and easy usability. So, it requires a creative set of mind who understands customer’s need and requirement. A beautifully designed packaging is the best thing to attract the attention of your potential customers, and this is the main reason why many designers opt to create such a remarkable packaging designs that would not only provide information to the customers but would also interact with them emotionally and provoke feelings.

EFFECTIVE PACKAGING DESIGN BREAKS AWAY FROM THE STANDARD RULES AND CONVENTIONS THAT WE ARE ACCUSTOMED TO, GIVING THE PRODUCT A UNIQUE EDGE TO STAND OUT FROM THE REST.

When choosing one product over another, the design of the packaging probably influences your decision far more than you realize. Effective packaging design breaks away from the standard rules and conventions that we are accustomed to, giving the product a unique edge to stand out from the rest.

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SOCKS PACKING

HANGING TEA

WOOLY HEADS


AUDIOVOX EARBUDEEZ

04

THE PACKAGING SHOULD APPEAL TO YOUR TARGET MARKET. IT’S ALSO VITAL TO ENSURE THAT YOU’RE CONVEYING THE NECESSARY INFORMATION ABOUT THE CONTENTS AND QUALITY OF THE PRODUCT, WHILE TRIGGERING THE DESIRED EMOTION IN YOUR CUSTOMER.

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PORKINSON BANGER

BEST SELLING

ART BOOKS JULY 2012

GRAPHIC DESIGN: NOW IN PRODUCTION US $40.00 CAN $40.00 / TRADE ISBN 9780935640984 / In stock

LEWIS HINE US $65.00 CAN $65.00 / TRADE ISBN 9781935202769 / In stock

DESIGN WITH THE OTHER 90%: CITIES

US $29.95 CAN $29.95 / TRADE ISBN 9780910503839 / In stock

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06 07 BOMBAY SAPPHIRE

ORWELL

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PISTACHIO

THE PACKAGING SHPACKAGING DESIGN HAS THE PRIMARY GOAL TO ATTRACT CUSTOMERS’ ATTENTION. FOR THIS PURPOSE, PACKAGE DESIGNS CAN NOT SIMPLY INFORM THE CUSTOMERS, BUT ALSO PROVOKE FEELINGS AND COMMUNICATE EMOTIONS. AN EFFECTIVE PACKAGING LOOKS ATTRACTIVE, IMPRESSES WITH ITS CREATIVITY AND IS JUST NICE TO HAVE ON THE SHELF.


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BEST SELLING

ART BOOKS JULY 2012

STATE OF CRAFT

BOXSAL

US $19.95 CAN $19.95 / TRADE ISBN 9780956205346 / In stock

SCAN WOOD

DRAWING THROUGH THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

10

US $50.00 CAN $50.00 / TRADE ISBN 9780870707827 / In stock

DESIGN WITH THE OTHER 90%: CITIES

US $29.95 CAN $29.95 / TRADE ISBN 9780910503839 / In stock

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THE GREATEST

BRAND

VERSATIONS WE ALL HAVE SOMETHING IN COMMON Stefan Asafti

THIS IS A PROJECT ABOUT BRANDS - THE GREAT BRANDS OF THE MODERN WORLD WHICH HAVE BUILD QUITE A HISTORY FOR THEMSELVES AS THE YEARS WENT BY.

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here have always existed disputes among the competing parties, divergent opinions, while the fans of each brand were convinced that theirs was the best product. Last, but not least, the rivals have even conducted ad campaigns against the competing brands. This project mostly approaches the visual “conversations” between the company logos and the ways that they influence each other, hence the name of the project, Brandversations. It is a parallel between the modern and the old, some of the slogans dating back to the 40s and 50s. I have switched the slogans of the brands amongst themselves, the goal of this being to give them further meaning and to create a sort of a confusion. It is surprising how logos can influence other logos. The truth is that each pair of rivals has something in common, that something which has helped them to build one identity upon the other, this way becoming the biggest brands. Completing this project has taken a lot of time and patience on my part. Each little bit of the final image has been moved and resized manually in order to maintain a correct and balanced composition and layout of the elements.

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INTRO

DUCTION

B COKE VS PEPSI

randversations is a collaboration between the principals of three firms with deep global brand expertise, and experience guiding some of the largest brands and companies in the world. It offers a best-in-class commitment and resources to all things Brand: research, positioning, design, development, training, marketing, communications and customer experience. Brandversations is designed to stimulate new ways of thinking and engaging audiences in authentic brand experiences, inside and outside an organization, that build long-term relationships and loyalty.

WINDOWS VS APPLE

Building a strong brand has offered the promise of transforming the way organizations encourage customer loyalty, gain sustainable competitive advantage, and generate superior financial results. Clearly some organizations have reaped those benefits by championing the discipline of corporate brand management.

PHOTOSHOP CS6 Create powerful images with the professional standard

UPGRADE FROM US $199 CANON VS NIKON

Upgrade now. Individual CS upgrades only on Adobe.com.

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BRAND FOR A COMPANY

IS LIKE A

REPU

TATION FOR A PERSON

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Annual PATTERN MATTER:

TRUCTURES “

PATTERN MATTERS IS A GRAPHIC DESIGN-BASED PROJECT INQUIRING ON POSSIBLE WAYS TO AUGMENT THE ROLE OF PATTERN BY LOOKING INTO THE DESIGN PROCESS AND TACTILE EXPLORATION THROUGH PATTERN MAKING. Milano Knight

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AUGMENTING THE ROLE OF PATTERN IN GRAPHIC DESIGN THROUGH TACTILE EXPLORATION It demonstrates the way of how this design element of pattern can be adopted differently on various platforms in graphic design. The main objective of this project is to inspire designers to look at pattern in every possible angles. Pattern Matters also aims to demonstrate that pattern is a crucial form of design element in graphic design which eventually evident that pattern is not merely a decorating tool.

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NEW THINKING. NEW POSSIBILITIES IS BOTH THE STARTING AND ENDING POINT. WE DECIDED TO INTERPRET THE CONCEPT TO THE DEEPEST, STARTING BY BREAKING THE ONE AND ONLY RULE: DO NOT MODIFY THE PAY-OFF VISUAL. Hyundai Creative Lab is a creative lab, dedicated to italian and international designers and creatives, aimed to promote the Culture Of The Project, supporting young designers ideas in creative and widespread design world, with peculiar attention to automotive issues and sustainable mobility. Hyundai, on the occasion of Milano Design Week, announced a prize-on-call to produce a poster whose theme to be interpreted is “New Thinking, New Possibilities“. We are the winners”

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ur “New Thinking” dealt with walking the untreaded path. The unexpected hides new possibilities to be discovered, and we followed that direction just by changing point of view. That’s why we decided to look at the sentence not only as a sequence of words, but as a typographic object too, whose appearance could be manipulated without loosing its meaning. There’s one and only point of view from which the poster reads the correct sentence, while slightly shifting aside the trick

Milano Knight is unveiled: the typography lays upon the multifaceted paper object underneath, being split to spread over faces that build the heart/engine up. Technlogy, technique, machine – Love, Passion, Man. Forever elements of a unique universe, the first being generated from the other’s creativity. Many issues are telling ourselves about the need that tech development get closer to human needs and his environment. They are more and more the pivot of every new project, that’s why a small human thrones over the symbol of his own huge creative power.

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SKYPE ICONS ON EXHIBITION

Siim Teller

“Skype” and “art” are not words we’ve seen together before, I think. But there’s an exhibition in Tallinn, Estonia right now where among other things Skype icons are on display. This exhibition called “Personality” itself is organized by

Estonian Graphic Designers Union and its aim is to show off latest local graphic design. It’s not very large venue but certainly appealing for anyone interested in the topic. There are number of cool fonts on display, some of them really clever, actual advertisements and more art-oriented pieces of work. I asked Priidu Zilmer, who is the author of Skype icons to give a little background to the whole thing.

RIO CARNIVAL DATES

Michelle Cavalcante

When the official Carnival dates are? Well, it is a long history. We will abbreviate it, though. This party has its origins in ancient Greece and Rome celebrations. Later, it was incorporated into the Catholic liturgical calendar and allowed until the Ash Wednesday.

WHAT’S NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CS6?

Siim Teller

Adobe® Photoshop® CS6 software delivers even more imaging magic, new creative options, and the Adobe Mercury Graphics Engine for blazingly fast performance. Retouch with new Content-Aware features, and create superior designs as well as movies using new and reimagined tools and workflows. Enhance your creativity and boost your productivity with the new Adobe Mercury Graphics Engine, Content-Aware tools, and more. GRAPHIC

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MARC NEWSON’S LOCKHEED LOUNGE

Siim Teller

Presenting his first solo show in the United States, Marc Newson’s exhibition opens this thursday in New York blurring the line between design practitioner and artist. Sometimes I start with the material,

sometimes the idea. In this case the materials were the inspiration. I began by identifying materials that I had always been interested in but had never used. Often the context of materials strikes me more than the materials themselves. Marc Newson Newson’s Lockheed Lounge (1985) made history last year as the highest price ever paid at auction for the work of a living designer.


BOOKWORMS GO GREEN

Siim Teller

Got some books piling up in the corner just collecting dust? Turn them into flower pots! The honbachi, or book pot, was designed by graphic design agency Tokyo Pistol. I love how the moisture corrodes the pages and the book takes on a life of its own! The Live Book is a small planter wearing sheep’s clothing – that is to say a book. It’s a great way to jazz up that old book shelf and lets face it. Most of us rarely read our collection of books more than once. If anything, it becomes a display piece and so why not add a little green to it. The removable vase has a simple drainage system and actually opens up into a real book.

Read more at www.oko.com/articles Feedback to editor@oko.com

TURN A BOOK INTO A SEAT

Siim Teller

From the idea that objects should adapt to people, and not the other way around, is born “take a seat”. This folder stool uses the existing

storage space that everyone dispose. It hides in your interior by taking the form of a regular book on a shelf. When you open this book, the pages unfold and create an extra seat to share with your guests. Made from solid oak boards and steel hinges, “Take a seat” provides a steady and comfortable casual stool.

HONGKONG INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR

Siim Teller

Founded in 2007 by Asian Art Fairs Ltd, ART HK grew rapidly last five editions under the directorship of Magnus Renfrew to become one of the world’s leading art fairs. In 2008, ART HK welcomed over 100 galleries with nearly 20,000 visitors. In its fifth and final edition in 2012, the Fair welcomed 266 galleries from 38 different countries and visitor attendance reached over 67,000. ART HK has remained the only art fair in the world to showcase a 50/50 balance between Eastern and Western. GRAPHIC

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UPCOMING

EXHI

BITION JULY 2012

“Chelsea Brown” Solo Exhibition Opens July 14th, 2012

“In Their Words” Mods Rockers & Margate Opens September 9th, 2012

“This Boy’s Own Story” Roger Brown Opens October 12th, 2012

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ART Android Jones

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Ryohei Hase

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Xhxix

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Exhibition: Imaji Nasi

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ART THAT WILL

BURN YOUR

SOUL


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Jones Android

&

ART THAT WILL MOVE YOUR SOUL

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THIS IS A EXCERPT FORM THE NIGHT RAINBOW SERIES, CREATED LIVE AT LIGHTING IN A BOTTLE, ITS A HOMAGE TO THE DO LAB FAMILY, ONE OF THE MOST INSPIRING CREATIVE COLLECTIVES I KNOW. Jessy Bohamien


AS AN ARTIST, I DON’T TAKE CREDIT FOR THE ART THAT COMES THROUGH, NOT THAT IT’S BEYOND WHAT ONE HUMAN CAN DO BUT BECAUSE FOR ME IT’S A DISTILLATION AND AN ABSTRACTION OF REALITY THAT HAPPENS WHEN THE ARTIST ALLOWS IT TO HAPPEN. DID YOU RECEIVE ANY FORMAL INSTRUCTION?

It isn’t everday when you see something that you are absoolutely sure will give every human being a whiplashing double-take, a soulshaking rush that makes your stomach bounce right back into your heart. Android Jones does that for us. His art makes you see a world that is impossible to explain with words, for if they say a picture is worth a thousand words, Android Jones’ art is worth 10 million. This art gets deep in your fractal and resurrects shapes throughout every cranny. It gives one hope for something so much greater than all things that are great. It makes you take a deep breath, and truly reevaluate your definition of art. More than anything, it truly, truly Unravels Your Mind. You will be inspired.

Android: When I was in preschool I made a particular painting of a caterpillar and the teacher thought there was something really special about it so she told my parents….. who then enrolled me in an art class at the age of six or seven. I did take some private lessons as well after that, with a woman named Rita Irangan, and I’ve always had the opportunity to be around and be inspired by so many other artists.

YOU BEGAN YOUR ARTISTIC CAREER AS A CONCEPT ARTIST IN THE FILM AND VIDEO GAME INDUSTRY, WORKING WITH THE LIKES OF INDUSTRIAL LIGHT AND MAGIC AND NINTENDO, BEFORE FOUNDING MASSIVE BLACK. HOW HAS THAT EXPERIENCE INFLUENCED YOUR EVOLUTION AS AN ARTIST? Android: I really consider that I began my career as a professional artist (meaning being an artist who makes money with art) on Pearl

Street, here in Boulder. I was taking academic portraiture and fine art classes with a teacher named Elvie Davis, and part of our practice was to create head studies from life. I would go out to the Pearl Street Mall and draw. I started off drawing the homeless people and the runaway kids in the summer, because they were always there and had a lot of time on their hands. We had great conversations. After I felt proficient enough with that, I started drawing for tourists and people at night. That was the first time I realized I could actually support myself fully with the skills of being an artist. It was a pretty significant realization for me. I continued to do portraiture for several years, and that was how I supported myself through art school at the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, FL. Ringling is a computer animation school, and a pretty expensive school, so I took out loans to attend. Once I graduated, however, I came to understand the debt that I had accrued; I wasn’t really focusing on it during school, and afterward it hit me all at once. It became very clear to me that in order to buy my freedom back—because we live on a planet where you have to pay to.

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Dragon, 2010 >>

GROWING UP SURROUNDED BY THE NATURAL ISOLATION OF MY FAMILY’S FARM IN LYONS, I SOUGHT REFUGE IN DRAWING. ART WAS ALWAYS A COMPANION TO MYSELF. IT FOSTERED AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE I COULD BE CREATIVE AND EXPLORE MY OWN IMAGINATION. ON A FARM YOU OFTEN HAVE TO ENTERTAIN YOURSELF.

liveI needed to find a way to support myself, that would also alleviate the debt as soon as soon possible. When I graduated, in 2000, a lot of the opportunities for making money were in the film and games industry. It was something that I naturally felt an affinity for. My first internship was at ILM, and then I went on to be a lead concept artist at Nintendo for five years. After that, I started Massive Black with a group of friends of mine. I was a concept artist and worked in the industry just as long as I could stomach it. While there was something unquestionably exciting about creating worlds that millions of people would then be interacting with, I simply didn’t feel comfortable supporting what video games as a definition stood for any more. HAVE YOU BEEN INFLUENCED BY ANY CLASSICAL ARTISTS?

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Android: I grew up surrounding myself with and looking at classical artists. I’ve always really liked the alla prima painters. My teacher, Elvie Davis, was taught by one of the apprentices of John Singer Sargent. Sargent was a big influence, as well as [Diego] Velázquez. I remember growing up my parents got me an M.C. Escher book, and that really blew my mind. I was a huge fan of art history and I always had ready access to art and the ability to study art. I was fascinated by the old masters…..how they used art and how their art evolved with different tools, or reading about what their art meant for them. I read an article where your work was described as ‘Esoteric Surrealism’. COULD YOU ELABORATE ON THIS CONCEPT FOR OUR READERS? Android: Well, I wouldn’t define it as such myself, but there are elements of that idea that fit within my work.


<< Eyes, 2010

<< Prayer, 2010

<< The Twin, 2010

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The King, 2011 >>

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<< God of Sea, 2011

I take influences from dreams and the dream realm, and these nighttime visions are a rich source of inspiration for me. I am drawn toward spiritualism – however, the word ‘esoteric’ is often pinned to new age philosophies that are not every time something I would want to identify with. To express the inexpressible or that which we feel but cannot know is how I choose to communicate with the world via the container of art. AS A VISUAL CREATOR, YOU UTILIZE A PLENTITUDE OF VARIOUS MEDIUMS. WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORED FORMS OF CREATIVE MANIFESTATION? Android: In the past decade or so, I’ve invested a lot of my energy into the medium of electricity and making art with electricity: electric art. There are new creative tools coming out at an exponential rate….. tools that have evolved to meet the needs and desires of our own consciousness.

<< Hope, 2011

<< Liberty, 2011

It is interesting to zoom out and place myself in a cultural context of where I am as an artist in the greater scheme of things, of how I fit into the several thousand year-old conversation of art history. The artists that I have admired the most have always had one thing in common – their art wasn’t just about themselves, but also about pushing the whole art movement forward and that way pushing humanity forward. Many of them had utilized or even invented tools that were considered advanced or unusual in their age. The paintbrush was a piece of technology at one point, and papyrus and paper. Now we live in an age with some of the most incredible breakthroughs. What digital does for me—with Wacom, and Photoshop and the various programs—is it unleashes the bandwidth of my ability to create and it’s gotten to the point now where it cycles back. At first

THE PAINTBRUSH WAS A PIECE OF TECHNOLOGY AT ONE POINT, AND PAPYRUS AND PAPER. NOW WE LIVE IN AN AGE WITH SOME OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE BREAKTHROUGHS. it was truly mind boggling just having these tools where you had control over thousands of colors and shapes and textures. I could paint with photographs and all these ways of being creative that I wasn’t even aware of when I was growing up. So you have these new epochs that keep opening and opening, and what’s really exciting about it for me now, is that many of these tools have become second nature.

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Outside,ART 2009 >>

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<< ART Inside, 2009

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BOUND >>

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Ryohei “

Hase ANDERSEN J

MY THEME OF PAINTINGS IS TO EXPRESS THE DARKNESS OF MIND WHICH IS SAD AND GLOOMY BUT AT THIS TIME, ITS BEAUTIFUL AND STRONG.

Im a freelance illustrator and an artist based in Tokyo, Japan I illustrate for CDs, web, Magazines, games, movies, and fashion photographs. I also create my own paintings on spare time. My theme of paintings is to express the darkness of mind which is sad and gloomy but at this time, its beautiful and strong. I went to an Art university and learned basic art skills. in order to become a professional illustrator. I worked part-time while I was attending school and gained experience in design and illustration. After I graduated from the University. I got a job with Bandai Namco Games in order to learn CG and how to work as a team. I worked for the company four years and learned a lot. In 2008, I left the company and successfully achieved my ambition of becoming a freelance illustrator.

“COULD YOU TELL US A

LITTLE ABOUT YOUR ART BACKGROUND AND HOW YOU CAME TO BE AN ILLUSTRATOR?”

Ryohei: I was very bad at art during high school and achieved only embarrassing grades in the subject. However, in my third grade I became engrossed in drawing, but was unsure of what influenced me at the time. Now it’s perhaps the face of Kotaro, my small Japanese dog. Whilst studying art at university I eventually developed some technical ability which was important in order to work professionally, and also help my overall enthusiasm. I now work for a computer games company in Tokyo, but I try to create as much of my own work as I can.

“YOUR WORK IS OBVIUSLY VERY CHARACTER DRIVEN, BUT HOW DID YOU COME TO

DEVELOPE THE INTEREST IN CROSS POLINATING HUMANS AND ANIMALS ?” Ryohei: I didn’t intend to draw any specific subject or character. I just always look for the best way to express my theme. Human-animal character was one of my choices at that time.

“DO YOU EVER SEE YOUR

CHARACTERS AS BEING PART OF A STORY THAT RELATES THEM TO ONE ANOTHER AND IF NOT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SOMEHOW TIE THEM TOGETHER IN A GRAPHIC NOVEL FOR EXAMPLE?” Ryohei: At this point nothing relates to each other as I am still in the middle of a phase looking for ways to express things with my art. However, I really would like to create a story tying my characters togethersomeday.

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Imprison, 2011 >>

“WHAT DO THE ANIMALS IN YOUR WORK REPRESENT?”

Ryohei: Either people, I love, people I am scared of or gremlins and fantasies from the very dark corners of my mind

“WHEN YOU MENTION THE

DARK CORNERS OF YOUR MIND IT IS SOMEWHAT SUGGESTIVE OF DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES. DO YOUR SLEEPING HOURS EVER HAVE A BEARING ON YOUR WORK AT ALL?”

Ryohei: Yes. Sometimes dreams and nightmares inspire my work. I really enjoy looking back at dreams especially when I had really fantastic ones as they could come from feelings deep in my mind. As you know, remembering dreams is not very easy after waking up, but it is very interesting as it is like a finding treasure filled with ideas.

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“YOUR WORK APPEARS

TO SHARE SOME CHARACTERISTICS WITH THAT OF THE 15TH CENTURY DUTCH PAINTER HIERONYMUS BOSCH. IS THAT A FAIR COMMENT?” Ryohei: I love Bosch, but I am not sure that he is a direct influence. H.R.Giger is somebody who I feel has been a stronger influence, but even more so I think my student friends and colleagues have and continue to influence me.

“THERE SEEMS TO BE A

STRONG THEME IN MUCH OF YOUR WORK CONCERNING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMANS AND NATURE. DO YOU SEE THIS AS BEING SOMETHING CLOSE TO THE JAPANESE HEART?” Ryohei: As my heart is Japanese, it is difficult for me to know how much

of my work is influenced by this. Surely it must be a factor, but then again I promise that not all Japanese hearts are full of these images!

“HAVE YOU EVER WORKED ON ANY COMPUTER GAMES AND IF NOT WOULD YOU LIKE THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO SO – SAY AS A CONCEPT ARTIST. I’M THINKING OF SOMETHING LIKE SILENT HILL? “ Ryohei: Yes. I‘ve worked on several computer games. I do character modelling and background design. However, I haven’t yet had the chance to represent my own design

“IN WHAT WAY DO YOUR

FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES INFLUENCE YOU?” Ryohei: Yes. I get influenced by people I know personally more than old masters. For example, works of old great artists’ are really wonderful,


SOMETIMES DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES INSPIRE MY WORK. I REALLY ENJOY LOOKING BACK AT DREAMS ESPECIALLY WHEN I HAD REALLY FANTASTIC ONES AS THEY COULD COME FROM FEELINGS DEEP IN MY MIND. but I get a feeling of nothing more than just wonder. On the other hand, works by living people of the same generation and same environment as me do give me a lot of inspiration and prompt questions such as “How do they come up with this idea”, and “How could I improve on this work if I were him?” Just like thinking about how to arrange colour, shape, and composition in my work. Also, especially when somebody of my age group creates something really wonderful, it fuels the spark of my imagination.

“IF YOU HAD THE CHANCE TO WORK ON A COMPUTER GAME WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHAT TYPE OF ROLE WOULD YOU IDEALLY LIKE?” Ryohei: I would like to work as a concept artist creating monsters’ or on package illustrations.

“THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME TO TALK TO US” << The Rabbit, 2012 ART

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The Hole, 2008 >>

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<< Immortal, 2008 ART

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Xhxix ABDUZEEDO

XHXIX IS A JAPANESE ARTIST WHO WORKS DIGITALLY. THE INCREDIBLE DETAILING IN HIS DIGITAL WORKS ARE EXTREMELY IMPRESSIVE!

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<< Meal, 2010


<< Meal, 2010

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

HE IS A TOKYOBASED ARTIST WHOSE DIGITAL PAINTINGS DEPICT MOSTLY GAUNT YOUNG MEN IN SURREAL STATES OF MENTAL ANGUISH OR PHYSICAL INJURY. HIS SUBJECTS ARE INSPIRED BY NICHE MODELS, SUCH AS JACOB MORTON, WHOSE PICTURES HE GATHERS OFF THE INTERNET.

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ew but some of his paintings feature mythical elements, such as Island, featuring a young man surrounded by fish that appear swim on thin air. A play on the popular phrase, it could be interpreted as a projection of ego, or the sad disillusionment of youth. He prefers to leave his work open to interpretation. Beautifully dark and amazingly dimensional.

True, 2012 >>

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Digital illustration work is pouring out into the Tumblr pages of the artist known as Xhxix. Xhxix is inspired by his contemporaries in hyper-realistic art, such as Yanni Floros and Audrey Kawasaki, as well as a vast range of fashion and amateur photography. In a time where getting exposure and a name on the market it’s almost a obligation for any artist, some still rather stay mysterious. Some people may hate this posture, as some may hate Banksy for being anonymous. But the truth is that only when the artist is out of focus, we can truly appreciate his art. And for that I must say I highly appreciate the digital art of Xhxix, despite the fact I don’t know quite nothing about him and the reason why he do it.

Stars, 2012 >>

Balloon, 2012 >>

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His work is a little grotesque but it has a soft dreamy quality to it that cushions its harsh entry. The Japanese artist’s pieces feed on abstract gore and strives on trailer parkesque banality.

Microphone, 2012 >>


No name, 2012 >>

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<< Change, 2011

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<< Change, 2011

No name, 2011 >>

<< Hurt, 2011

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Exhibition by Roby Dwi Antono

THE THEME “IMAGINATION” HAS APPEARED OUT OF ROBY’S CONVERSATION WITH A FRIEND ABOUT THEIR CHILDHOOD DREAMS. Nathan Nikon This weekend in the area of ​​ Tirana House - Boutique & Artspace, New York will be held a solo exhibition of 21-year-old illustrator’s name, Roby Dwi Antono, titled Imagination. The exhibition, which he calls the concept of story telling will Had a lot of work to bring diverse beauty of the concept of imagination as a child (approximately 15 works will be shown that the majority of which are made of pencils scratching on paper) which are believed to be the beginning of our goals in the future.

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oby has made some researches with his friends as the subjects to find out their childhood dreams. He randomly did the research with friends of the same, younger and much older age. He sort and chose dreams that were considered interesting and imaginative enough. Then he put them all into his artworks, combining them with his own imaginations and ideas. So, here they are 15 new artworks being exhibited now, along with other 5 old artworks as references for comparison. He uses mechanical pencils because with them he can make small objects in detail. His reason of using pencil than other instruments is that for him with pencil it is easier to communicate his ideas. With

pencil he also enjoys every stroke and sketch. An attractive subject on drawing medium can be created with different intensity of thickness made with pencil strokes. His skill of using acrylic paint can also be seen in one of the works being exhibited, namely the work titled “Pilu Lalu”. About the rabbit, here is Kinci. It is the character all this time Roby uses in his works. He said that Kinci the rabbit symbolizes the sensitivity to beauty, coziness and mystery like art itself. Although sometimes it looks dumb, it is indeed a cute animal. It hates violence, criticism, untidiness and filthiness. He admitted that it is like him. The rabbits in his works are actually himself, his alter ego. For him, he wants everyone to know him from these rabbits.

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ACCORDING TO HIM, WE CANNOT LIMIT WHATEVER WE WILL DO IN THE FUTURE, WE ARE NEVER AFRAID TO HAVE DREAMS. WITHIN AN IMAGINATION SURELY LIES A STRONG AMBITION TO MAKE IT COME TRUE. ART

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CONCEPT Predator: Creation and Character Sketches

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The Terminator: James Cameronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concept Art

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Alice In Wonderland: Character Design & Concept Art By Michael Kutsche

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predator &

Concept creation

CREATED BY BROTHERS JIM AND JOHN THOMAS, THE PREDATORS ARE DEPICTED AS LARGE, SAPIENT AND SENTIENT HUMANOID CREATURES WHO POSSESS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY, SUCH AS ACTIVE CAMOUFLAGE AND ENERGY WEAPONS, AND ARE CAPABLE OF INTERSTELLAR TRAVEL.

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PREDATORS

CHARACTERS SKETCH Stan Winston

THE PREDATOR WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED WITH A LONG NECK, A DOG-LIKE HEAD AND A SINGLE EYE. THIS DESIGN WAS ABANDONED WHEN IT BECAME APPARENT THAT THE JUNGLE LOCATIONS WOULD MAKE SHOOTING THE COMPLEX DESIGN TOO DIFFICULT.

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he Predator design is credited to special effects artist Stan Winston. While flying to Japan with Aliens director James Cameron, Winston, who had been hired to design the Predator, was doing concept art on the flight. Cameron saw what he was drawing and said, “I always wanted to see something with mandibles”. Winston then included them in his designs. Stan Winston’s studio created all of the physical effects for Predator and Predator 2, creating the body suit for actor Kevin Peter Hall and the mechanical facial effects. They were hired after attempts to create a convincing monster (including Jean-Claude Van Damme wearing a much different body suit) had failed. Arnold Schwarzenegger recommended Winston after his experience working on The Terminator. The Predator was originally designed with a long neck, a dog-like head and a single eye. This design was abandoned when it became apparent that the jungle locations

would make shooting the complex design too difficult. Originally, the studio contracted the makeup effects for the alien from Richard Edlund’ s Boss Film Creature Shop. However, problems filming the alien in Mexico resulted in the makeup effects responsibilities being given to Stan Winston. According to former Boss Films make-up supervisor Steve Johnson, the makeup failed because of an impractical design by McTiernan that included 12-inch length extensions that gave the Predator a backward bent satyr -leg. The design did not work in the jungle locations. After six weeks of shooting in the jungles of Palenque, Mexico, the production had to shut down so that Winston could make a new Predator. This took eight months and then filming resumed for five weeks, ending in February 1987. In Predators (which deliberately distances itself from the prior Aliens vs Predator movies), it is revealed that there are two warring Predator tribes, with one group using quadrupedal hunting beasts and elaborate traps to hunt.

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redators capture and drop a group of elite killers from different locations from Earth onto a forested planet used as a game preserve. After numerous skirmishes resulting in the deaths of two Predators and all but two of the captured humans, the last Predator manages to kill another member of its kind from a rival tribe, but is defeated in combat by the human survivors.

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redators are physically distinguished from humans by their greater height, arthropod -like mandibles and long, hair-like appendages on their heads that are set into their skulls. Their bodies are resilient to damage, capable of recovering from multiple gunshot wounds and radiation doses which would be fatal to humans. They are much stronger than humans, having been portrayed as being easily capable of outmatching a conditioned adult human male and shattering solid concrete with their bare hands. They are also skilled climbers, and will readily move through trees or across rooftops in pursuit of prey. Though capable of surviving exposure in Antarctic temperatures for an extended period of time, it is implied that

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THEIR BODIES ARE RESILIENT TO DAMAGE, CAPABLE OF RECOVERING FROM MULTIPLE GUNSHOT WOUNDS AND RADIATION DOSES WHICH WOULD BE FATAL TO HUMANS. Predators have a preference for hot equatorial climates. Their blood is luminescent phosphor green in color. Their vision operates mainly in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum; they can easily detect heat differentials in their surroundings but are unable to easily distinguish among objects of the same relative temperature. A Predator’s hunting helmet increases its ability to see in a variety of spectrums, ranging from the low infrared to the high ultraviolet, and also filters the ambient heat from the area, allowing them to see things with greater clarity and detail. While they are capable of breathing Earth’s atmosphere, the creature in Predator 2 is seen using a breathing mask after losing his helmet. Their dietary habits are also mentioned in Predator 2, where it is revealed that the creature regularly visits a slaughterhouse every two days to feed on the stored meat there.


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the

Terminator Awesome James Cameron’s Concept Art

JAMES CAMERON’S ENDOSKELETON IS WITHOUT DOUBT ONE OF THE MOST ICONIC DESIGNS IN SCIENCE-FICTION HISTORY. Basem Wasef

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&

TERMINATOR motorcycle Basem Wasef

CONCEPT ART IS WHERE IT ALL BEGINS. IT’S ALWAYS COOL TO SEE WHAT INITIAL IDEAS LOOKED LIKE VERSUS WHAT THE FINAL PRODUCT IS.

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he images are the concept of the Moto-Terminator, which shows a Terminator bot riding a motorcycle, the Ducati Hypermotard. The images are the concept of the Moto-Terminator, which shows a Terminator bot riding a motorcycle, the Ducati Hypermotard. Including red lights eyes, dangerous weapons and the awesome and amazing Terminator motobody... A few days ago, Flylyf posted some concept art I had never seen before of the Moto-Terminator from McG’s Terminator Salvation. Apparently production designer Martin Laing’s original idea involved a T-800 style endoskeleton robot with motorcycle features. The concept evolved into more of a drone alien-looking bike modeled off of the Ducati Hypermotard 1100. After the jump I’ve included concept art which is

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closer to the final design actually seen in the movie. Concept art is where it all begins. It’s always cool to see what initial ideas looked like versus what the final product is. Titan Books has released a book called “The Art of Terminator Salvation ,” today (April 28th). Titan Books had recently released The Watchmen concept art book, and that one is really insightful. So you can stroll into a book store and get a glimpse of the process of movie making, or order it here. The images below are some digital concepts of the “Moto-Terminator.” Two of these, use the iconography of the already existing Terminator design. It’s basically a Terminator bot riding a motorcycle, which is terrifying and all, but I think the third concept that features just the bike is the


strongest. You don’t want to over do it with the skulls and skeletons. Plus, a smart motorcycle that’s out to kill you of it’s own accord is totally scarier and more interesting. That James Cameron is a very clever man. As if writing and making “ The Terminator ” wasn’t enough, It turns out that he’s a talented as fuck artist too! As can be seen here in his concept paintings for “The Terminator”. Lance Henriksen was originally considered for the role of The Terminator. Writer/director

James Cameron even made early sketches showing The Terminator looking like Henriksen. The original concept was for the character to be able to blend into a crowd. Cameron approached Arnold Schwarzenegger and wanted him to play the role of Kyle Reese, but after their meeting, Schwarzenegger and Cameron both wanted Schwarzenegger to play the title role, so Henriksen was cast in the role of Det. Vukovich. Curiously, Henriksen later got to play the part of a humanoid cyborg when he played Bishop in Aliens (1986).

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TERMINATOR characters

CHARACTERISTICS

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machine learning, and the system can interpret arbitrary non-formalized tasks. The other notable science fiction component is that of a power source which can last 120 years. A trait persistent throughout the series is the faint red (or blue in the case of the TX Terminatrix) glow of the “eyes” when online, which dim to nothing when a Terminator shuts down. In all four movies, the lack of the glow has been used to show when one is out of action. The trait is so characteristic that light-up eyes are often found on Terminator merchandise, with some even replicating the dimming/reillumination effect that occurs during shut down or start up.

CONSTRUCTION

n the fictional Terminator universe, the Terminator is a formidable robotic assassin and soldier, designed by the military supercomputer Skynet for infiltration and combat duty, towards the ultimate goal of exterminating the human resistance. It can speak naturally, copy the voices of others, read human handwriting, and even genuinely sweat, smell, and bleed. To detect the Terminators, who are otherwise indistinguishable from humans, the human resistance uses dogs to alert humans to their presence. The most notable science fiction characteristics are that of an expert system featuring strong AI functionality combined with

IN THE FICTIONAL TERMINATOR UNIVERSE, THE TERMINATOR IS A FORMIDABLE ROBOTIC ASSASSIN AND SOLDIER, DESIGNED BY THE MILITARY SUPERCOMPUTER SKYNET FOR INFILTRATION AND COMBAT DUTY, TOWARDS THE ULTIMATE GOAL OF EXTERMINATING THE HUMAN RESISTANCE. CONCEPT

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description from Kyle Reese from the film “ The Terminator “ states that: The Terminator is an infiltration unit, part man-part machine. Underneath it’s a hyperalloy combat chassis, microprocessor controlled, fully armored, very tough. But outside it’s living human tissue. Flesh, skin, hair, body, blood, grown for the cyborgs. As seen in the movies, a Terminator can withstand standard 20th century firearms , crash through walls intact,

Basem Wasef

THE TERMINATOR IS AN INFILTRATION UNIT, PART MAN-PART MACHINE. UNDERNEATH IT’S A HYPERALLOY COMBAT CHASSIS, MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLED, FULLY ARMORED, VERY TOUGH.


and survive explosions to some degree. Repeated shotgun blasts have enough force to knock it down and temporarily disable it, while heavy amounts of automatic fire are able to compromise the organic disguise layer. In the second film, the Terminator says he can run for 120 years on his existing power cell. In the finale to Terminator 2 , his power source is damaged, and he is able to find an alternate source, described on the DVD commentary as heat sinks , harnessing the thermal energy from the hot surroundings. In the third film, the Terminatorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an 850 series rather than the 800 series depicted in the first two filmsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;operates on two hydrogen fuel cells and discards one of them early due to damage. It explodes shortly thereafter with enough force to produce a small mushroom cloud .

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IN THE FICTIONAL TERMINATOR UNIVERSE, THE TERMINATOR IS A FORMIDABLE ROBOTIC ASSASSIN AND SOLDIER, DESIGNED BY THE MILITARY SUPERCOMPUTER SKYNET.

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CPU

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he Terminator CPU is an artificial neural network with the ability to learn. It was also briefly referred to as a roomtemperature superconductor. In Terminator 2, The Terminator states that “the more contact has with humans, the more learns.” In the original film, he learns how to swear from the punks he encounters in the beginning of the film. In the Special Edition, he says that Skynet “presets the switch to ‘ read-only ‘ when Terminators are sent out alone”, to prevent them from “thinking too much”. Sarah and John activate his learning ability, after which he becomes more curious and begins trying to understand and imitate human behavior. This leads to his use of the catchphrase “Hasta la vista, baby.” He ultimately “learn the value

of human life” as mused by Sarah in the closing narration. The Terminator apologized - something he had never done previously - when John was frantically trying to convince him not to be sacrificed. His last words were “I know now why you cry, but it is something I can never do.”

ORGANIC COVERING

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he flesh-covering that is used on the majority of Terminator models has similar qualities to real human muscle and skin, as well as the ability to sweat, simulate breathing, and produce realistic body odor. Although Terminator flesh does contain blood, it only displays minimal bleeding when damaged and has never been shown to experience any kind of profuse bleeding even from massive lacerations, dozens of gunshot wounds, or even complete

removal. In the absence of a circulatory system, the flesh uses a system of “nanobots” which maintain the skin. It is unknown what biological processes take place to sustain the flesh covering, since Terminators do not require the consumption of food . Under 2007-era analysis, this blood is shown to be similar to human blood, using a synthetic oxygen carrier rather than human red blood cells , as Terminator endoskeletons contain no bone marrow. Terminator flesh heals by itself, and at a much faster rate than normal human tissue and has never been shown to bruise or discolor from trauma, even after several days. However, a Terminator’s flesh covering can die if it sustains adequately massive damage, at which point it takes on a waxy, corpse-like pallor and begins to really decompose.

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Side Face Concept by James Cameron ART >>

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Alice in Alice ♥

IN WONDERLAND♥ ♠ Wonderland Character Design Character Design& &Concept ConceptArt Art ByBy Michael Kutsche Michael Kutsche

““

YOU READY A TRIP DOWN RABBIT HOLE? AREARE YOU READY FORFOR A TRIP DOWN THETHE RABBIT HOLE? TIMTIM BURTON, JOHNNY DEPP AND DISNEY ARE ADDING A STRANGE BURTON, JOHNNY DEPP AND DISNEY ARE ADDING A STRANGE CHAPTER TO THE LEWIS CARROLL CLASSIC WITH THEIR NEWNEW CHAPTER TO THE LEWIS CARROLL CLASSIC WITH THEIR “ALICE IN WONDERLAND,” A FILM THAT PRESENTS A YOUNG “ALICE IN WONDERLAND,” A FILM THAT PRESENTS A YOUNG WOMAN WHO FINDS HERSELF IN THE WORLD OF THE WOMAN WHO FINDS HERSELF IN THE WORLD OF THE MADMAD HATTER, CHESHIRE QUEEN. HATTER, THETHE CHESHIRE CATCAT ANDAND THETHE REDRED QUEEN.

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND’ CHARACTER DESIGNER IS A CINDERELLA STORY AS OF APRIL 2012, IT IS THE ELEVENTH HIGHEST-GROSSING FILM OF ALL TIME.

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lice in Wonderland is a 2010 American computeranimated/live action fantasy adventure film directed by Tim Burton, written by Linda Woolverton, and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The film stars Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter, Anne Hathaway, Crispin Glover, Michael Sheen, Matt Lucas and Stephen Fry. The film is inspired by Lewis Carroll’s 1865 fantasy novel “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and its 1871 sequel “Through the LookingGlass, and What Alice Found There”. Wasikowska plays the now nineteenyear-old Alice who, 13 years after her previous visit, returns for the first time as a young woman. She is told that

she is the only one who can slay the Jabberwocky, a dragon-like creature controlled by the Red Queen who terrorizes Underland’s inhabitants. The film premiered in London at the Odeon Leicester Square on February 25, 2010, and was released in Australia on March 4, 2010, and the United States and the United Kingdom on March 5, 2010, through IMAX 3D and Disney Digital 3D, as well as in traditional theaters. Despite its short theatrical release window and mixed reviews, the film grossed over $1.02 billion worldwide. At the 83rd Academy Awards, Alice in Wonderland won for Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design. As of April 2012, it is the eleventh highest-grossing film of all time.


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About

Michael Kutsche “ ORIGINALLY FROM GERMANY, KUTSCHE IS A SELFTAUGHT ARTIST WHO CREDITS THE INTERNET WITH ESTABLISHING HIS CAREER. HIS UNIQUE APPROACH OF IMAGINATIVE CHARACTER CREATION HAS LED HIM TO BECOME A CHARACTER DESIGNER ON TIM BURTON’S “ALICE IN WONDERLAND” IN 2008, “JOHN CARTER OF MARS”, “THOR”

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ichael Kutsche is an award-winning German artist based in Los Angeles, California. He is a self taught artist who works both in traditional and digital media. His work is best described as an astoundingly lifelike depiction of parallel realities populated by odd characters reminiscent of movies, comics but also Flemish Renaissance Painting. His unique approach of imaginative character creation has led him to become a character designer on Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland” in 2008, “John Carter of Mars”, directed by Andrew Stanton and “Thor”, directed by Kenneth Branagh. Parallel to his career in the film industry he still keeps track of his own projects,

including personal paintings for future exhibitions, book projects etc. Michael was born in Berlin in 1977 and spent his childhood in Marburg, a town north of Frankfurt. He was drawing since he was four years old. In kindergarten, when all other kids were playing, he was sitting somewhere in the corner and drawing. He wasn’t very social at early age, he preferred paper and pencil as his best friends. Originally from Germany, Kutsche is a self-taught artist who credits the internet with establishing his career. Though he works in traditional media like oil and watercolor for his personal and gallery art, his professional work is primarily digital paintings, and it was from a portfolio on CGSociety, a

community site devoted to digital art, that he first gained the notice of Sony Pictures Imageworks, a connection that led to his work on Alice. Kutsche often works with his digital tools in a way that gives a feeling of painterly traditional brushwork. Though his original CGSociety portfolio does not seem to be active, there is a two page interview with him on the site, as well as a walk through of the creation of one of his pieces, The Boxer (Check out his blog) His website has a gallery of work from 2008 and 2009, and he has recently started a blog. His work is included in the new book, Disney: Alice in Wonderland: A Visual Companion as you can see above.

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EXPLORE 10 Most Common sport Injuries

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Some facts about Base Jumping

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Up on the roof

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Reasons for practicing cannibalism 114 Cannibalism Life

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Visit the last cannibal tribe today

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10 SPORT INJURES MOST

COMMON

ACCORDING TO THE U.S. CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION, POPULAR SPORTING ACTIVITIES FOR NEARLY ALL AGES RACK UP AN IMPRESSIVE OF TREATED INJURIES AND HOSPITALIZATIONS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. WE EXAMINE NATIONAL INJURY ESTIMATES FROM A CPSC SURVEY OF MORE THAN 90 HOSPITALS TO FIND OUT WHICH SPORTS ARE THE MOST DANGEROUS. NO.

NO.

NO.

NO.

NO.

Alex Mana

55%

5 most common injures

Runner’s knee

18%

Others

20%

Shouder’s injuries

7%

Tennis ebow

NO.

NO.

NO.

NO.

202,051

130,627 103,274

NO.

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 528,584 489,676

541,746

BICYCLING

BASKETBALL

FOOTBALL

3,117,744 EXPLORE

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382,970 282,008 230,666 226,142

EXERCISE BASEBALL WITH OR &SOFT BALL WITHOUT EQUIPMENT

MOPEDS & MINIBIKES

TOTAL INJURIES TREATED EVERY YEAR

SOCCER

SWIMMING

SKATE BOADING

SKIING


10 most frequent injuries

SWIMMER SHOULDER

Head: 274,455 Ankle: 258,348 MUSCLE STRAINS

BROKEN LEGS & ARMS

Finger: 198,413 Face/Cheek: 190,167 Head: 175,505

CUT, GRAZES &ABRASIONS

Shoulder: 144,896 Wrist: 126,607 Lower trunks: 98,565 Lower arm: 88,266 Lower leg: 88,234

ACL & MCL INJURES

HAMSTRING STRAINS

TORN LIGAMENTS

ANKLE SPRAINS

TOP 8 INJURES

BY SPORT

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he makers of KT Tape have recently provided us with a really cool and interesting infographic that depicts the most dangerous sports and exercises in the United States. I bet you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t guess which is the most dangerous one of all. All information is based on data gathered from CPSC.gov, The Daily Beast, and Livestrong.org to name just a few. What conclusion did they draw after compiling all of the numbers? That extreme sports have higher fatality rates, but popular sports such as football and basketball have higher injury rates. That means that you are more likely to be injured, rather than killed, while playing basketball and that there is a low risk for injury in extreme sports. Unfortunately, with extreme sports, when something does happen, the data shows that a fatality is more likely than an injury.

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SOME FACTS ABOUT

BASE

JUMPING 6% 10%

BUILDING

MANY JUMPERS WILL ONLY HAVE ONE PARACHUTE AS THE TIME CONSTRAINT MAKES IT DIFFICULT FOR A RESERVE PARACHUTE TO BE HELPFUL. WITH VERY LOW ALTITUDES A JUMPER MAY ONLY HAVE 10 SECOND BEFORE LANDING. Miranda Gira :(

5% OTHERS

71.5% CLIFF

BRIGDE

12% ANTENNA

PLACES TO

JUMP

1/60 DYING

CHANCES OF

CAUSES OF

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30% Strike (body)

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8%

5%

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Electro cution

Drowning

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ASE stands for Building, Antenna, Span, and Earth. BASE jumpers leap from any and all of these four fixed objects with parachutes designed specifically for rapid deployment. Known around the world as the most extreme of extreme sports, BASE jumpers look forward to Bridge Day ® every year.

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he New River Gorge Bridge saw its first BASE jumpers in 1979, just 2 years after the bridge was completed and opened to the public. As more and more people entered the sport, the tradition of coming to West Virginia for Bridge Day has grownmore than 800 jumps were made last year. The vast majority of people (more than 80,000 expected!) come to Bridge Day to watch. All of the jumpers are registered, and can make as many jumps as they are able to within a six hour window.

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he bridge is open for pedestrian traffic from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with BASE jumpers leaving the bridge from the jump deck the entire time. The designated Landing Zone for jumpers is the parking area at the Fayette tation river access on the south side of the gorge. pectators can take in the action from a number of spots within the gorge. In addition to walking out on the bridge, jumpers can be viewed from hiking trails along the rim, the Fayette Station river access, and the National Park observation deck at the New River Gorge Bridge visitor.

WEEEEEE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

BASE JUMPING IS MORE DANGEROUS AND REQUIRES MORE SKILL THAN SKYDIVING BECAUSE FASTER MENTAL DECISIONS ARE NEEDED DUE TO THE TIME CONSTRAINT. SKYDIVERS HAVE MORE TIME TO STABILIZE THEIR POSITION WHEREAS BASE JUMPERS MAY TUMBLE IF THEY CANNOT GAIN STABILITY SHORTLY AFTER THE JUMP. Base jumping is parachuting from a fixed object (base). B.A.S.E. jumping is a coined acronym which stands for Buildings, Antennae, Spans, and Earth. If you’ve jumped at least once from each of these categories, you can apply for a BASE number. Base #1 was awarded in 1981 after Phil Smith completed the final category by jumping from a Houston, TX skyscraper. Currently over 1,400 BASE numbers have been issued. Base jumping became popular in the 80’s and surged in interest along with extreme sports in the 90’s. Originally jumpers would use skydiving parachutes but specialized equipment has been designed specifically for base jumpers. The parachutes feature specialized harnesses, chute containers, and extra-large pilot chutes. A static line can be used for very quick parachute deployment which makes jumping at lower altitudes possible.

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IN UP ON THE ROOF, THE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHER ALEX MCLEAN DOCUMENTS THE VIEW OF MANHATTAN FROM ABOVE.

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UP

ROOF ON THE

NEW YORK’S MOST HIDDEN SPACES Alex Maclean

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McLean was struck by the evolving roofscape while on assignment to photograph Brooklyn Bridge Park in 2010. “While flying over West Chelsea, I became aware of multiuse roof spaces that seemed to be everywhere. It was obvious that a recent shift in culture and in financial resources had led to the construction of these new outdoor spaces; it was as if the spirit of the High Line had spread.” The most

striking element in these photos is the amount of greenery--lush landscapes that compensate for the lack of trees below. But perhaps the most striking feature is the vast swaths of white. Once uniformly covered in black asphalt, today’s buildings sport bright white caps to reflect the heat of the sun, allowing the interior to stay relatively cool. It is said white roofs, far from being a silver bullet for global warming, might actually increase temperatures.

So apart from sparking jealousy of those who get to enjoy upstairs gardens while the rest of us jockey for space on the sidewalk below, McLean’s pictures hint at a future solution to the problem of overcrowding cities. As more people migrate to urban areas, all of those vacant rooftops will be optimized with green roofs that will cut energy consumption, produce clean air, and provide oases of calm away from the bustling streets.

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TO THE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHER ALEX MCLEAN, THIS UNEXPLORED TERRITORY IS THE CITY’S FIFTH FAÇADE, AND IT’S THE SUBJECT OF HIS NEW PICTURE BOOK, UP ON THE ROOF.

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ew York is known for its skyline jam-packed with skyscrapers straining toward the clouds. But it’s a sight rarely seen from above, looking down on the penthouses terraces, rooftop gardens, bars, basketball courts, and pools and spaces. To the aerial photographer Alex McLean, this unexplored territory is the city’s fifth façade, and it’s the subject of his new picture book, Up on the Roof (Princeton Architectural Press, $50), which serves as a visual document of how city dwellers have begun to cultivate their once-desolate roof and spaces. In a context In which the reuse, recycling and review are essential bases, is a patchwork of unpaired objects, integrated in the green

uniform of the lawn surrounded by ever-present white wooden fence. Young volunteers were encouraged to take charge of managing the care of greenery and gardens, mind the calendar of upcoming events is already dense, between acoustic concerts, markets, workshops, and film evenings gardening, the creation of common spaces. “We basically see this project as an opportunity to inspire homeowners,” said Tiffany Ledesma Groll, the project’s coordinator. “A lot of the green roofs that are really fabulous and gorgeous are on high-rises” - invisible to most. “We thought it would be fun to bring it down to eye level.” It might not stop more than a few buckets full of rain from entering the city’s aged storm-water system.


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REASONS

for PRACTICING

CANNIBALISM David J. Reibstein

WHILE THE EXPRESSION “CANNIBALISM” HAS ORIGINS IN THE ACT OF HUMANS EATING OTHER HUMANS, IT HAS EXTENDED INTO ZOOLOGY TO MEAN THE ACT OF ANY ANIMAL CONSUMING MEMBERS OF ITS OWN TYPE OR KIND, INCLUDING THE CONSUMPTION OF MATES.

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here are fundamentally two kinds of cannibalistic social behavior: endocannibalism (eating humans from the same community) and exocannibalism (eating humans from other communities).The theme of cannibalism has been featured in religion, mythology, fairy stories and in works of art. CANNIBALISM AS AN EVOLUTIONARY STRATEGY OF PREDATOR CONTROL Joseph Jordania recently suggested that removing the dead bodies

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through ritual cannibalism might have had a function of predator control in hominids and early humans, aiming to eliminate predators’ and scavengers’ access to hominid (and human) bodies. HOMICIDAL CANNIBALISM AND NECRO-CANNIBALISM A separate ethical distinction can be made between killing a human for food (homicidal cannibalism) and eating the flesh of a person who was already dead (necro-cannibalism). In 1988 performance artist Rick Gibson became the first person in

British history to legally perform an act of cannibalism by eating a canapé of donated human tonsils in Walthamstow High Street, London. CANNIBALISM BY PERFORMANCE OF ARTIST A year later he publicly ate a slice of legally purchased human testicle in Lewisham High Street, London, England. When he tried to eat another slice of human testicle in Vancouver, Canada in 1989, he was stopped by the police. However, the charge was dropped and he finally ate a testicle hors d’œuvre.


A cannibal feast on Tanna, Vanuatu, c. 1885-9

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CAN NIBALISM CANNIBALISM WAS A PART OF LIFE AND DEATH FOR CULTURES AROUND THE WORLD. HOW CANNIBALS WORK?

LIFE Josh Clark

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01/

Cannibalism is as old as civilization, and likely older. The Kemites (Egyptians) believed that Osiris, their god of agriculture, gifted them with crops to prevent them from cannibalism. Greek mythology contains myriad tales of cannibalism, beginning with Chronos, the father of all gods. The Hebrews wandering the African desert resort to cannibalism in the Old Testament.

02/

Cannibalism is ancient, and yet -- as Meiwes, Dahmer, Fish and others remind us -- it’s modern as well. It could be latent in every one of us: Recent events show that when the chips are down, even the most civilized humans will resort to cannibalism to survive. Yet, we recoil from the thought of others consuming human flesh and refrain from exploring the possibility of our own ability to cannibalize others.

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Cannibalism was a part of life and death for cultures around the world. Those that gave it up as a practice did so unwillingly. And if history is any indicator, an end to cannibalism has not come. As Ted Turner predicted, in the face of climate change, those left to survive will resort to cannibalism. Turner isn’t an authority on the subject of anthropophagy (the clinical term for cannibalism), but he may not be far off. People have shown that we will eat one another in times of strife.

CANNIBALISM, ANTHROPOPHAGY, IS THE INGESTION OF HUMAN FLESH BY HUMANS. THE IDEA OF PEOPLE EATING PARTS OF OTHER PEOPLE IS SOMETHING THAT HAS OCCURRED WHEREVER AND WHENEVER HUMANS HAVE FORMED SOCIETIES.

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VISITING

LAST CANNIBAL TRIBE THE

TODAY

John Garnaut

THE KOROWAI HAVE BEEN REPORTED TO PRACTICE RITUAL CA NNIBALISM UP TO THE PRESENT DAY.

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here are now many wellknown topics unmistakably linked to Papua – “the island of curly people”: tree people Korowai, Kombai, and the Yali mountain tribe. There is the Wano tribe, which is famous for manufacturing stone axes. It lives in the Jalime area, which lies in the basin of the Mamberamo River. We can’t omit the legendary Dani tribe, and the famous Asmat tribe of cruel cannibals.The Baliem

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Valley was discovered in 1938, when Richard Archbold spotted it from an airplane. Not earlier than 1954 did the first missionary Lloyd van Stone parachute into the area. In 1961, in an expedition lead by Rokefeller Jr., the son of a New York state governor, disappeared into the mangroves of this area. He and the members of his expedition were never found. The last cases of cannibalism were only recently recorded. In 1968 two missionaries

(Australian Stan Dole and American Phil Masters) were chopped and eaten. During Christmas 1974, four Dutch families were killed and eaten by aborigines in the Jayawijaya Mountains. The last known case was a killing of a priest and his twelve companions. It happened because they tried to ban the aborigines from hunting for skulls and they burnt their fetishes. This tragic event happened in 1976 almost in the end of the twentieth century.


Papua New Guinea Snake men and Hulis by Eric Lafforgue.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;

THE MAJORITY OF THE KOROWAI CLANS LIVE IN TREE HOUSES ON THEIR ISOLATED TERRITORY. THEY ARE SKILLED HUNTER-GATHERERS WHOSE MEN TRACK PREY INCLUDING CASSOWARY AND WILD BOAR.

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igh above the forest floor, deep in the swampy lowland jungles of Papua, tree houses greet the eyes of explorers trekking into what remains one of the last remote corners of the globe. The tree houses tower overhead at heights of over 80 feet above the ground, appearing to teeter but held firm by Sago palm tree fibres. These constructions are the homes of the Kombai and the neighbouring Korowai, tribal people numbering in the thousands who decorate their bodies with bones and may still count cannibalism among their customs. The tree houses stand in clearings cut out of the forest by the tribespeople, who fell trees using only the most rudimentary of stone axes. These dwellings offer an escape from the heat and biting insects below the jungle canopy, and are thought to have originated as a safeguard against flooding during heavy rains while also providing protection in periods of conflict. Enemy headhunting tribes like the Asmat from the south used to maraud through these regions and the trees may have been the only refuge for the Korowai and the Kombai. The Korowai and the Kombai are distinct ethnic groups, each with their own language, but they do manage to interact and also share similar cultural practices. They are skilled hunter-gatherers whose men track prey including cassowary and wild boar. They still trade in objects like bone jewellery and knives, and may have only been introduced to metal and our idea of clothing in the 1970s, when the first missionaries arrived. Utensils such as bamboo shards are used to slice meat, shells to hold water, and heated stones in place of cooking vessels. For the Kombai, it is apparently a form of tribal punishment, with only men identified as witches killed and eaten by the community in retribution for the souls devoured by the accused.

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annibalism is also common to the histories of both the Kombai and the Korowai. For the Kombai, it is apparently a form of tribal punishment, with only men identified as witches killed and eaten by the community in retribution for the souls devoured by the accused. Cannibalism is steeped in similarly supernatural belief for the Korowai and may also have been practiced as part of their criminal justice system. It seems these tree dwellers do not believe in natural death, but death caused by sorcery, also definitely believed to be a cause of inter-clan warfare. Pigs too figure largely in the rituals and belief systems of the Kombai and the Korowai. Domesticated, these animals are a kind of sacred currency in Kombai culture, used in dispute-settlements between families, and also sacrificed in complex ceremonies when their blood is let into the river as an offering to one of the gods. Pigs

play a role in the religious life of the Korowai, too, which is filled with all kinds of spirits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; above all the revered spirits of their ancestors to which the beasts are sacrificed in times of trouble. A more festive custom enjoyed by both the Korowai and the Kombai is the eating of the Sago grub, the succulent larva of the Capricorn beetle, which is a delicacy the tribes harvest from rotting trees. Very occasionally the Kombai host parties to which guests from other tribes are invited and fed Sago grubs, while even more seldom still the Korowai will host a Sago grub festival to encourage fertility and prosperity. Such rituals seem to anchor the deeply spiritual lives of these people, who see spirits in the forest where outsiders would see none. Revealingly, for Kombai clans, strangers are themselves referred to as ghosts, and yet such ghosts are becoming an ever more

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

CANNIBALISM IS STEEPED IN SIMILARLY SUPERNATURAL BELIEF FOR THE KOROWAI AND MAY ALSO HAVE BEEN PRACTICED AS PART OF THEIR CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. concrete reality as filming crews and adventure tourists make their presence felt in their territory. The traditions of these once undisturbed tribes have been affected by contact with the outside world, with some Korowai even now paid to offer tours. It will be a sad day when the bird beaks worn by Kombai men, or the leaves the Korowai tie around their inverted penises, are discarded in favour of Western methods of concealing oneself.

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ONE’S DESTINATION IS NEVER A PLACE BUT A NEW WAY OF SEEING THINGS.

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Walk Of The Earth

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Director: Christopher Nolan Preferred Actors Filmography Awards & Future Projects

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Where the wild things are

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MUSIC IS WHAT

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MONSTERS AND MEN SARAH A.MEYER

OF MONSTERS AND MEN IS A SIX PIECE INDIE FOLK/INDIE POP BAND FROM ICELAND AND THE 2010 WINNERS OF MÚSÍKTILRAUNIR, AN ANNUAL BATTLE OF THE BANDS COMPETITION IN ICELAND.

PRE-ORDER

NEW MUSIC NOW AVAILABLE ON ITUNES

LINKIN’ PARK - LIVING THINGS

11.99$

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UNCAGED - ZAC BROWN BAD

11.99$


The band members are cosinger/guitarist Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir, co-singer/guitarist Ragnar “Raggi” Þórhallsson, guitarist Brynjar Leifsson, drummer Arnar Rósenkranz Hilmarsson, piano/accordion player Árni Guðjónsson, and bassist Kristján Páll Kristjánsson.

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pringing from various solo projects, the band’s origins began in 2009 when Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir decided to add to her solo project, Songbird. Of Monsters and Men entered 2010’s Músíktilraunir as a quartet with members Nanna

OVEREXPOSED - MAROON 5

12.99$

(vocals, guitar), Raggi (vocals, guitar, melodica, glockenspiel), Brynjar (guitar, melodica), and Arnar (drums, percussion, melodica, glockenspiel, vocals). Following Músiktilraunir, the quartet added two more members, Árni (accordion/keys) and Kristján (bass) and continued to tour venues

in Iceland and work on new songs. They were invited to perform at the 2010 Iceland Airwaves festival, and it is there where the Seattle based radio station KEXP recorded the band performing “Little Talks” from a Living Room Session.

TAPES - FOALS

THE OL’ RAZZLE DAZZLE - MISSY HIGGINS

9.99$

9.99$

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Screenshot from the Music Video

THE

TRACK TOP 10 SONGS OF 2012

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SOMEBODY THAT I USED TO KNOW - GOTYE One of the reasons for the songâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s huge success is its crossover appeal. It was the first ever tune to top all three of the Hot 100, Dance/Club Play Songs and Alternative Songs.

CALL ME MAYBE - CARLY RAE JEPSEN This returned to the top of the Billboard Canadian Hot 100 after a video featuring Jepsen singing the song with Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez and Ashley Tisdale was uploaded to YouTube on February 18, 2012.


OF MONSTERS ANDLITTLE MENTALKS from HEAD LIKE AN ANIMAL out 4/3 through Universal Republic

The Icelandic sextet set the stage with a bold anthem, full of bright horns and carried by the male-female interplay between Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir and Ragnar “Raggi” Þórhallsson.

PAYPHONE - MAROON 5 FT. WIZ Khalifa This dance-floor filler is the lead single by the American Pop-Rock band Maroon 5, from their fourth studio album, titled Overexposed.The song,was debuted on The Voice on April 16, 2012 and released for download afterwards.

WE ARE YOUNG - FUN. FT. JANELLE MONÁE

STARSHIPS - NICKI MINAJ

The song was the first ever to log seven weeks of 300,000 or more in digital sales. The only previous title to rack over four weeks of sales of 300,000-plus was Eminem’s “Love The Way You Lie,” consecutively in July/August 2010.

This bouncy Dance-Pop track is the lead single from New York rapper Nicki Minaj’s second studio album, Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded. The song was released on February 14, 2012 after premiering on Ryan Seacrest’s show.

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UNIQUE AND HEARTWARMING APPROACH TO SONGWRITING, FILMING AND CONSTANT, OPEN INTERACTION WITH EVERYONE THEIR MUSIC TOUCHES.

alk of the earth Matt Goldberg

THE

TRACK TOP 10 SONGS OF 2012

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WHAT MAKES YOU BEAUTIFUL - ONE DIRECTION

WILD ONES - FLO RIDA FT. SIA

When this debuted at #28 on the American Hot 100 chart it became the highest bow for a UK act’s debut U.S. singles chart entry since The Verve’s “Bittersweet Symphony” arrived at #13 almost 14 years previously.

Sia has also collaborated and performed with Christina Aguilera and David Guetta amongst others. Both the songstress (“Titanium”) and Flo Rida (“Where Them Girls At”) appeared on Guetta’s Nothing But The Beat album.


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alk Off The Earth is an unconventional, multitalented five-piece musical phenomena that is currently taking the world by storm.

the world through their unique and heartwarming approach to songwriting, filming and constant, open interaction with everyone their music touches.

The massive fan response quickly drew attention to their collection of innovative songs and videos spanning their last 5 years and generated an unprecedented flood of media interest. New fans from around the world immediately fell in love with the band’s organic, independent, sincere and honest original songwriting, cover interpretations and beautifully filmed videos. For the past 5 years, the band has built a massive following of dedicated fans from around

The chemistry between the members of Walk Off The Earth is undeniable. Marshall, Sarah and Gianni’s individual vocal stylings mesh seamlessly with Taylor’s haunting harmonies and keys all the while soaring over epic melodic arrangements held together by Joel Cassady’s driving and prolific percussion work. Their independent spirit, work ethic and creativity has catapulted Walk Off The Earth into new and uncharted waters with only better things on the horizon.

BASED IN BURLINGTON, ONTARIO (JUST OUTSIDE OF TORONTO), THEIR BRILLIANT 5-PEOPLEPLAYING-ONE-GUITAR INTERPRETATION OF GOTYE’S “SOMEBODY THAT I USED TO KNOW” RECENTLY EXPLODED ON YOUTUBE GARNERING WELL OVER 35 MILLION VIEWS IN UNDER 2 WEEKS.

I WON’T GIVE UP - JASON MRAZ

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN - RIHANNA

GLAD YOU CAME - THE WANTED

This largely acoustic ballad is a poignant ode to a long-lasting relationship, which Mraz says he won’t give up on her whatever happens. The song was released on January 3, 2012 now avaiable on Itunes.

The song debuted on the US and UK singles charts at #s 65 and 61 respectively upon the release of Talk That Talk, on the strength of digital downloads alone.

The track shifted 188,000 downloads throughout the following week resulting in it jumping from #23 to #5 on Hot 100. This meant that The Wanted became the first UK Boyband to achieve a top 5 hit in the States.

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ADELE SPECIAL CONCERT COMING IN JULY

Ben Ratliff

“I had three or four pairs of Spanx on that night,” she said. “I loved it. I actually had another dress made for the Grammys, and ended up, well, passed out in it. It had a corset, so I thought ‘I can’t wear that!’” The singer also says she had to take a couple of pairs off to actually perform that night. The performances featured in the upcoming special were originally released last year as part of the live 2-disc DVD, Adele Live at The Royal Albert Hall.

FOSTER THE PEOPLE AT RUMSEY PLAYFIELD

Michael Andin

Mr. Foster, a former jingle composer, evades being pinned down to a style. “I’m in the cross-fire dodging bullets from your expectancies,” he sang in “Call It What You Want.” Foster the People riffles through various

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idioms — light 1970s pop-funk, blippy synth-pop, rock marches over brisk double-time drumbeats, disco handclaps, indie-rock guitars — but makes sure each segment holds an insistent little tune. Mr. Foster was a peppy frontman: sprinting around the stage, knocking on drums, jabbing at keyboards, raising his arms to bask in applause.When he pushes up into falsetto, it loses about half its volume.

RIHANNA’S ‘TALK THAT TALK’ SYNTH

Jon Caramania

Distinctionlessness has become something of a calling card and a weapon for Rihanna, the most consistent pop star of the last five years. Last month she became the fastest solo artist in history to have had 20 Top 10 singles on the Billboard Hot 100, slower only than the Beatles. And she has pumped out these hits with little regard for style or mood — breezy dance tracks rub up against poignant, gothically ruptured rock-soul ballads. “Talk That Talk” is the blithest Rihanna album, which is saying a lot. Her voice is, for the most part, certifiably blank, which is to say it belongs everywhere around you.


THE X FACTOR IS REGAINING ITS X FACTOR

Steven Wilson

BRUNO MARS ON STAGE IN HAMMERSMITH

Gareth Grundy

This might be down to Mars being a songwriter for hire, someone whose work prizes ability over

CANADIAN RADIO MUSIC AWARDS

Fede Robson

Host: Jay “Mad Dog” Michaels Each year, CMW lets the world know what’s coming next musically, via the CRMAs. A highly-anticipated showcase of “buzz” bands, playing for a matinee audience of influential industry ears, the CRMAs have, over the years, amassed an astonishingly high batting average for predicting the emergence of big name acts. A

personality. Doo-Wops & Hooligans is unusually eclectic for a mainstream record, hopping from light reggae to Coldplay-lite and, in the case of recent hit “The Lazy Song”, even outright novelty. Pretty much any track could be covered by a variety of top 40 artists.

rookie-of-the-year award driven by radio-play, it is the most youthful and energized luncheon Music Week has to offer. Broadcasting legend and a veteran of CHUM Radio for 45 years, Bob Laine, will be posthumously inducted into the Canadian Broadcast Industry Hall of Fame during the awards luncheon. Laine’s memory and career will be honoured with the Allan Waters Broadcast Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of his outstanding success in broadcasting.

I was a bit apprehensive of attending this show as I have been to almost every X Factor tour and whilst previous years had been excellent, last year’s was terrible and seemed very cheaply produced. However, I needn’t have worried as this year’s show was a return to form and a vast improvement on last year. All I feel was missing were some of the “bad auditionees” (who are always really funny) and more interaction between the finalists. I would also like to see a compere brought back in. Otherwise I might have scored higher. Each act was very entertaining, even the ones I didn’t particularly like during the television series. I particularly enjoyed Marcus Collins who, as well as some other contestants, ran through the crowd, meaning us people up the back still got to see him up close. Kitty also gave excellent performances. Johnny was interesting but a real hoot!

Read more at www.oko.com/articles Feedback to editor@oko.com

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CHRISTOPHER NOLAN’S PREFERRED ACTORS “

BECAUSE NOLAN MOVIES TEND TO BE ABOUT HIGHLY ABSTRACT IDEAS, THE MOST COMPELLING CHARACTERS ARE THOSE AS OBSESSED WITH ABSTRACTIONS AS NOLAN

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he web is celebrating the tiny announcement from Sir Michael Caine that “Batman 3″ starts shooting next April. More interesting is that the announcement came from Caine, who is now poised to have acted in five consecutive Christopher Nolan movies, more or less making him the Bill Murray to Nolan’s Wes Anderson. This is not an insignificant pairing from either party’s POV. Caine’s done plenty of fine work, but he’s also notoriously pragmatic and available to the highest bidder. He’s worked with some great directors (John Huston, Woody Allen, Brian De Palma), and he’s also made “Miss Congeniality” and “On Deadly Ground.” Presumably Nolan’s films have a high enough budget at this point to accommodate whatever Sir Michael’s price might be, but it’s still his longest collaboration. Because Nolan movies tend to be about highly abstract ideas, the most compelling characters are those as obsessed with abstractions as Nolan: the dueling magicians in “The Prestige” are, his two most compelling leads. Batman/Bruce

Wayne lives in abstractions, as does the Joker. (One reason Aaron Eckhart isn’t as compelling a villain is because he doesn’t really stand for anything after he turns from Dent to Two-Face; he goes from a dude with an ideal to just a guy out for revenge.) So what does Nolan see in Caine, Christian Bale (who, beyond playing Batman, also starred in “The Prestige”) and Cillian Murphy (who comes along for the ride in “Inception”)? Those are pretty much the only actors he’s used consistently. Christian Bale is able to use his frame to convey tense belief in what he’s talking about; Michael Caine, by contrast, is a man who can lower the belligerence level in any room he enters without even appearing to do anything. I think Nolan’s smart enough to know that his movies are always on the verge of collapsing into overly-brooding seriousness if he doesn’t have some characters whose job is to stay collected and unmoved in the frenzy. Bale brings the tension; Caine defuses it. Other actors come and go as the spirit moves Nolan’s abstractions. And that’s how masterpieces are made…

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CHRISTOPHER NOLAN’S FILMOGRAPHY “

AS SOON AS TELEVISION BECAME THE ONLY SECONDARY WAY IN WHICH FILMS WERE WATCHED, FILMS HAD TO ADHERE TO A PRETTY LINEAR SYSTEM, WHEREBY YOU CAN DRIFT OFF FOR TEN MINUTES AND GO AND ANSWER THE PHONE AND NOT REALLY LOSE YOUR PLACE.

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Memento (2000)

As a result of the film’s success, Newmarket Films optioned the script for Nolan’s next film, Memento. Memento is a critically acclaimed cult film, and was nominated for both a Golden Globe and an Academy Award (Oscar) for best screenplay. The movie is based on the short story Memento Mori, written by Christopher’s brother, Jonathan Nolan. It follows widower Leonard Shelby (played by Guy Pearce) who suffers a head injury and is unable to form new memories. In keeping with this inability to know what has just happened before, the film’s narrative structure runs in reverse (with an interlude between each pair of major “flashback” sequences). At the Sundance Film Festival in 1999, Nolan met Wally Pfister, after being impressed by his work on The Hi-Line (1999). They shot about a quarter of Memento in black and white, and elsewhere used colors, light and darkness to emphasize the noir nature of the story.


Prestige (2006)

The Prestige, released on October 20, 2006, is an adaptation of the Christopher Priest novel about two rival magicians in the 19th century. It reunites Nolan with Batman Begins stars Christian Bale and Michael Caine, with Hugh Jackman playing the other lead role. The movie had a mostly positive response from critics and made over $109 million worldwide. The film was co-written with his brother, Jonathan Nolan and co-produced with his wife, Emma Thomas. The film revolves around the intense professional rivalry between two stage illusionists, their desire to develop better tricks than the other draws them into a battle of skill and technology, dominated by obsession, secrecy and duality. Like the novel before it, the film has aspects of meta-fiction and makes use of flash-back to tell parts of the story. Its title refers to the final part of a stage performance, where the performer attempts to return a

vanished object before the eyes of the audience.

Dark Knight (2006)

Born in London in 1970, Christopher Nolan began making films at the age of seven using his father’s super 8mm camera and an assortment of male-action figures. He graduated to making films involving real people, and his super 8mm surreal short ‘tarantella’ was shown on PBS’ ‘image union’ in 1989. Chris studied English Literature at University College London while starting to make 16mm films at the college film society. His short film ‘larceny’ was shown at the Cambridge Film Festival in 1996, and his other 16mm shorts include a three- minute surreal film called ‘doodlebug’.

Inception (2010)

After the success of The Dark Knight, Warner Bros. contracted Nolan to a seven-figure deal to direct Inception. Nolan wrote and directed the film which was described as

I’M NOT REALLY ABLE TO DISCUSS IT AT THE MOMENT, BUT IT’S SOMETHING I’M DEFINITELY INTERESTED IN “a contemporary sci-fi actioner set within the architecture of the mind”. Filming began in summer 2009, and Inception was released on July 16, 2010 to largely positive reviews and became a box office hit. Writing in Senses of Cinema, Ian Allen Paul placed Inception within a trend in modern American film which treats themes of simulation and “meta-reality”. Exploration of the subjectivity of experience, and questioning the reality of the material world had been explored in the preceding decade in The Matrix (1999), eXistenZ (1999), in Paprika and Charlie Kaufman’s Baudrillardinspired Synecdoche, New York (2008), and have existed long before in Western philosophy.

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AWARDS FUTURE PROJECTS Mr. Hughes

Originally scheduled for production in 2004, Nolan’s film about Howard Hughes was delayed due to the release of Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator (2004); Nolan feels that making it ten years after The Aviator would be more suitable as people would have forgotten about Scorsese’s rendition. He described how the film will focus on Hughes’s later life which was not covered in depth in Scorsese’s film, “We’ll meet the Howard Hughes who spent much of 1948 sitting naked in a bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel with only a pink dinner napkin covering his genitals as he screened movies from his studio, RKO Pictures, and ran up an $11 million tab; the Hughes who — obsessed with food safety — once bought every franchise restaurant chain in his home state of Texas, and who was similarly so concerned about air quality that he installed an aircraft filtration system in his 1954 Chrysler New Yorker, taking up its entire trunk. The Howard Hughes who had his hair cut and nails trimmed only once a year, and who was seemingly as addicted to Baskin Robbins Banana Ripple ice cream as he was to regular codeine injections; the Hughes who at the end of his life considered only Mormons trustworthy enough to be let into his inner circle.” The script would be based on Citizen Hughes: The

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THE BEST THING I EVER WROTE...IT’S GOING TO BE A VERY, VERY UNUSUAL SCRIPT AND A VERY UNUSUAL MOVIE. Power, the Money and the Madness, a biography of the industrialist by Michael Drosnin.

The Keys To The Street

Gemma Arterton showed interest in starring in The Keys to the Street, based on a Ruth Rendell novel that was adapted by Nolan. Christopher Nolan had adapted the book into a screenplay which he originally planned to direct for Fox Searchlight, but moved on to make Batman Begins at Warner Bros instead. The film has since been deemed dead until interest recently re-appeared for it. It is unknown whether Nolan will direct the script though he has said that he probably would not given similarities between it and his previous films. The project is currently “in development” and not planned for his production.

James Bond

Christopher Nolan expressed much interest in making a James Bond film while saying his Howard Hughes biopic is currently dead. Nolan is a longtime fan of the character.

Christopher Nolan main awards: •

• • • • • • • • • •

2001 Sundance Film Festival: Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award Winner 2011 Golden Globe: Best Director - Motion Picture Nominee 2011 Golden Globe: Best Screenplay - Motion Picture - Nominee 2010 BAFTA Awards: Best Film - Nominee 2010 BAFTA Awards: Best Director - Nominee 2010 BAFTA Awards: Best Original Screenplay Nominee 2011 César Awards: Best Foreign Film - Nominee 2010 Oscar: Best Motion Picture of the Year Nominee 2010 Oscar: Best Writing (Original Screenplay) Nominee 2002 Golden Globe: Best Screenplay - Motion Picture - Nominee 2001 Oscar: Best Writing (Original Screenplay) Nominee


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MEMORABLE QUOTES “

AND MAX, THE KING OF ALL WILD THINGS, WAS LONELY AND WANTED TO BE WHERE SOMEONE LOVED HIM BEST OF ALL.

THEN FROM FAR AWAY ACROSS THE WORLD HE SMELLED GOOD THINGS TO EAT, SO HE GAVE UP BEING KING OF THE WILD THINGS.

OH, PLEASE DON’T GO— WE’LL EAT YOU UP—WE LOVE YOU SO!

I HAVE NOTHING NOW BUT PRAISE FOR MY LIFE. I’M NOT UNHAPPY. I CRY A LOT BECAUSE I MISS PEOPLE. THEY DIE AND I CAN’T STOP THEM. THEY LEAVE ME AND I LOVE THEM MORE...WHAT I DREAD IS THE ISOLATION. ... THERE ARE SO MANY BEAUTIFUL THINGS IN THE WORLD WHICH I WILL HAVE TO LEAVE WHEN I DIE, BUT I’M READY, I’M READY, I’M READY.

AND NOW,” CRIED MAX, “LET THE WILD RUMPUS START! ENJOY

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OKO Mag issue 01  

See us on Behance http://www.behance.net/gallery/OKO-Magazine-Issue-01/4379699 OKO Magazine Issue 01 July 2012 This Magazine is a Junior des...

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