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POWERED BY JETGALA

AFRICAN ADVENTURE

06 May – July 2013

FROM COAST TO COAST IN AN ANTONOV AN-2 CESSNA’S CITATION M2 PHANTOM FIGHTER ANDREW WINCH DESIGNS SKY COMBAT

THE PRIME VILLAS OF UBUD

REVERBERI YACHT DESIGN TEUFFEL GUITAR ART | FRANCK MULLER Q&A SIHH WATCH NOVELTIES | CATERHAM RACE CARS


EXECUJETINTRO

GREAT HEIGHTS "ONCE A TRIP REACHES ITS LOW POINT, THERE IS ONLY ONE WAY TO GO — UP" — TRACEY CURTIS-TAYLOR

WELCOME TO THE SUMMER ISSUE OF OUR INFLIGHT MAGAZINE. ExecuJet has been involved in yet another unique adventure in the past few months, supporting a charity flight from the coast of Siberia in Russia to Capetown, South Africa — an ocean-to-ocean adventure. Five people started a mission knowing where to go, but unsure of the exact route and unaware of the trials they would encounter along the way. They faced numerous challenges but ultimately arrived safely in South Africa, where the ExecuJet staff gave them a warm welcome. The interesting Antonov An-2 aircraft that they flew can presently be seen in our Capetown hangar. Despite delays, hassles, discomfort and days of waiting, Tracey Curtis-Taylor, one of the aircraft’s pilots, claims she would not have exchanged the experience for anything. She describes flying over the Sahara as having a dream-like quality with everything else becoming irrelevant. This reflects the pure joy and true spirit of the industry we work in. Not only was this an adventure with old world appeal, it also had a purpose — providing wings to a charity organisation that plans to use it for humanitarian relief in Southern Africa. This is a worthy cause, and I am sure that you will agree. We trust that the story will connect you to some of Africa’s beauty, and bring to life the adventure of this epic trip. Niall Olver CEO ExecuJet Aviation Group

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INTRO Great Heights

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EXECUJET LOCATIONS

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AT WORLD’S END African Adventure On A Vintage Aircraft

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SNIPPETS New & Exclusive

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WINGS

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SWIFT BEAUTY Cessna’s Citation M2

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SKY CABINS Andrew Winch Jet Interiors

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FOCUS & SKILL Hawker Pacific Expands In Asia

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FRESH VISION Visionaire Revives The Vantage Jet

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WINNING FLIGHT Gulfstream’s Eastern Perspective

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HUMAN PROPORTION Feng Shui In Business Jets

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OLD SMOKEY Phantom Fighter — The Last Ace-Maker

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GET HIGH Be A Fighter Pilot For A Day — In Vegas

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ROCKET SLED Supersonic On Land

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HIGHER PLANES The Future Of Private Aviation In China

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CAPTAIN SPEAKING The Human Factor

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A HOTEL FOR YOU 54 on Bath is an elegantly understated boutique hotel in the heart of Rosebank, Johannesburg. From the moment you enter the lobby, you sense a sophisticated yet timeless atmosphere. It combines all the elements of luxury, great attention to detail and superb dining at our Level Four Restaurant. So whether your needs are business or pleasure, 54 on Bath is a hotel for you.

54 Bath Avenue, Rosebank, 2196, Johannesburg | P.O.Box 3046, Saxonwold, 2132 Tel: +27 11 344 8500 | Email: 54onbath.reservations@tsogosun.com Follow us on Twitter @54onBath | facebook.com/54onBath

54onbath.com


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ontents 88 84

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LUXE

70 UBUD — BALI’S SANCTUM Top Villas In Ubud 76

MONUMENTAL MOVEMENTS SIHH 2013 Novelties

80 THE LIGHTNESS OF BEING Fun And Minimalist Caterham Cars 84

FIVE ELEMENTS Michela Reverberi’s Yacht Interiors

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MECHANICAL MAVERICK Q&A With Franck Muller

90 ELECTRA SLIDE Teuffel Guitar Art 92

SOLE MASTER Santoni Bespoke Shoes

94 MARQUE MAKER

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Pininfarina’s Design History 98

GROOM ROOM The Traditional Barber Returns

102 PLOTS ON A PLATE Hajime Yoneda’s Culinary Paintings 104 JETGALA INDONESIA TAKES OFF A New Jetgala Edition 106 SHADOW PAINTER Surreal Portraits In Black And White 113 AIRBORNE 116 BRIEFING Business Aviation In Brief 122 PLANE SPEAK Aviation Glossary 126 AIR SHOW DIARY 128 TAILHOOK Disc Flight

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ADVERTORIAL

CONNECTING BRANDS GLOBALLY

RECOGNISED BY THE BRITISH MEDIA AS “THE NEXT GENERATION OF MARKETING FOR LUXURY BRANDS”, UK brand The Luxury Network paves the way by connecting more than 250 high-end brands from around the globe. Launched in May 2007, and with networks currently operating very successfully under franchise in 13 countries worldwide, The Luxury Network operates by creating exclusive business relationships between many of the world’s most respected and experienced luxury marketing professionals. “We are the professional team in the middle, proactively creating, facilitating and mediating unique partnerships between highend companies,” says Jeremy Nel, CEO of Luxury Brands and co-director for The Luxury Network South Africa. As an international, private, ‘invitation only’ B2B / B2C community of premium brands and high-end service providers, The Luxury Network brings together a huge amount of knowledge, contacts and a wealth of global luxury market expertise for mutual business and client development. Luxury brands and high-end service providers joining The Luxury Network come from all areas of the top-end market, including fashion, boating, finance, motoring, wealth management, concierge, health and beauty, IT, property, travel, sports, events, jewellery and watches, entertainment, home and garden, beauty and cosmetics, aviation and insurance, and many more. Recent additions to the South African franchise of this very influential private business club include Aston Martin and Rolls-Royce, together with other established luxury

marques such as Pam Golding Real Estate, ExecuJet Private Jets, Seabourn Private Ships, LiveOutLoud, Constantia Glen, The International Wine Club, Sunseeker Yachts, Luxury Brands, Daytona Group, Crystal Cruises, Val de Vie Estate and The Grand Africa group. Numerous luxury brands join The Luxury Network every month. While many luxury brands ‘dabble’ in affinity, partnership and event marketing, sadly, most of these relationships either never get off the ground or peter out for many reasons. The Luxury Network are experts in luxury brand affinity marketing with over 20 years combined experience in this field. “It is not a simple feat to identify, develop, nurture and grow strong and successful marketing alliances and partnerships, but we believe that The Luxury Network South Africa will be a valuable partnership in organising and identifying high-end affinity marketing activities and events amongst a selection of leading international luxury brands. With this in mind, we look forward to the development and growth of The Luxury Network South Africa in connecting members with similar goals,” says Andrew Golding, CEO of the Pam Golding Property Group. Indeed, identifying high-end brand partners to successfully collaborate with is a crucial, costly and painstaking process. For this reason, luxury marques are increasingly turning to The Luxury Network — the world’s most exclusive affinity marketing group — to professionally facilitate and mediate these activities. For more information visit: www.theluxurynetworkinternational.com

Contact: Tel: 021 702 3436 Email: jeremy@theluxurynetwork.co.za

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EXECUJET LOCATIONS

CONTENT EDITOR Katrina Balmaceda & Sandy Tan ART DIRECTOR Sylvia Weimer (Spacelab Design, Sydney) DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Sylvia Weimer, Elliott Foulkes,

Sara Morawetz (Spacelab Design, Sydney) EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Charmaine Tai EDITORIAL INTERN Charmaine Tay AVIATION EDITOR Rainer Sigel ONLINE EDITOR Sandy Tan CONTRIBUTORS Dina Abdullah-Enriquez, Jim Gregory, Jeff Heselwood, Jonathan Ho, Suzi Jarrell, Brian Craig Kennedy, Carol Lee, Fiona Low, Rowena Marella-Daw, Brian Moore, Melissa Pearce, Sanjay Rampal, Jim Simon, Steve Slater, Alvin Wong

EXECUJET LOCATIONS FEATURED IN THIS EDITION ExecuJet Aviation Group Head Office Zurich ExecuJet Aviation Group PO Box 1 8058 Zurich-Airport Switzerland Tel: +41 44 804 1616 Fax: +41 44 804 1617 enquiries@execujet.eu

COMPANY PUBLISHER Rainer Sigel MANAGING DIRECTOR Michelle Tay SENIOR MANAGER, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Jaime Lim BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE Shirleen Low CIRCULATION & PRODUCTION MANAGER Caroline Rayney OFFICE MANAGER Winnie Lim MARKETING ASSISTANT Anne Goh

CONTACT 120 Lower Delta Road #13-11 Cendex Centre, Singapore 169208 T: +65 6273 0620 F: +65 6273 0632 EMAILS ADVERTISING business@oriental-publishing.com EDITORIAL content@oriental-publishing.com EVENTS events@oriental-publishing.com CIRCULATION circulation@oriental-publishing.com ADMINISTRATION office@oriental-publishing.com

WEBSITES MAGAZINE www.jetgala.com FACEBOOK www.facebook.jetgala.com (Luxury News) LINKEDIN www.linkedin.jetgala.com (Aviation News) TWITTER www.twitter.jetgala.com (Aviation News) RSS www.rss.jetgala.com (Aviation News) GROUP www.orientalmediagroup.com JETGALA is published quarterly and circulated throughout the Asia-Pacific. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily endorsed by the Publisher. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: All rights, including copyright, in the content of this publication are owned or controlled by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. You are not permitted to copy, broadcast, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change in any way the content of this publication for any other purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. TRADEMARK NOTICE: The masthead logo ‘JETGALA’ is a Registered Trademark of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. All rights are cumulatively reserved by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. Their protection will be pursued to the full extent of the law. Printed by KHL Printing Co, Singapore MICA(P) 193/06/2012 KDN PPS 1775/10/2012 (022810)

PHOTO CREDITS COVER Photography: Chris Nicholls

Model: Mella / Spot 6 Stylist: Jimmy Moorehouse / The Plutino Group Hair and Makeup: Isabelle LePage SECTION OPENER WINGS Image courtesy of Andrew Winch Designs SECTION OPENER LUXE Image courtesy of Reverberi Design SECTION OPENER AIRBORNE Image courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

www.orientalmediagroup.com

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ExecuJet Africa Johannesburg ExecuJet South Africa Pty Ltd Entrance 1 Lanseria International Airport Johannesburg, 1748 South Africa Tel: +27 11 516 2300 Fax: +27 11 659 1071 enquiries@execujet.co.za

ExecuJet Africa Cape Town ExecuJet South Africa Pty Ltd Tower Road Cape Town International Airport Cape Town, 7525 South Africa Tel: +27 21 934 5764 Fax: +27 21 934 2087 enquiries@execujet.co.za

ExecuJet Africa Lagos ExecuJet Nigeria Quits Aviation Centre Hangar 1, Along Gate 1 Murtala Muhammed International Airport Ikeja, Lagos Nigeria Tel: +234 1295 5110 enquiries@execujet.com.ng

For all our regional contacts please go to our website:

www.execujet.net


ANTONOV-2 AFRICAN ADVENTURE

The Antonov An-2 used in this epic African journey, seen here at the ExecuJet Lanseria facility

AT WORLD'S END

FROM SIBERIA TO SOUTH AFRICA IN A VINTAGE BIPLANE — ALL FOR A GREATER CAUSE BACK IN THE 20TH CENTURY, PIONEERS OF FLIGHT delighted and astonished the world by charting newer, longer routes at increasingly great heights. Not long after an aircraft with bolstered levels of speed, capacity and endurance had been developed, a daring aviator would go on to set a new record. First the English Channel, then the Atlantic and finally, the world. 9

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Advanced aircraft today can transport hundreds of people in comfort across the globe in less than a day. Curious enthusiasts are always eager to see how antiques work, and are willing to take them apart and remake models. The same can be applied to aviation. Early this year, a Russian aviation crew, with the help of a buoyant British woman and the support of The ExecuJet Aviation Group which provided >> EXECUJET

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>> on-ground support, flew an Antonov An-2 biplane from the frozen reaches of northern Europe to the tip of southern Africa. The project, dubbed ‘Ocean to Ocean’ by the aircraft donor Russian carrier UTair, saw the An-2 brave extreme temperatures and numerous logistical barriers to complete a flight that commemorated 65 years of the aircraft’s production. The repainted and refurbished plane, scheduled to complete its flight in 15 days, took off from Tyumen, Siberia, 1,800 kilometers east of Moscow. Manned by UTair pilots Sergey Bykov and Sergey Dmitrenko and aircraft engineer Alexander Achimov, the aircraft took off in early December. Just five months before, the An-2 had flown across the Arctic Ocean from Cape Kamenniy to Tyumen. Along the way in Kiev, Ukraine, the An-2 — nicknamed Little Annie — also picked up vintage aircraft pilot Tracey Curtis-Taylor, who had flown in from her native England to join the flight. Also along for the ride was former South African Air Force pilot Mark Hill who was planning to coordinate the use of the An-2 for charity and humanitarian purposes once the flight touched down in South Africa (see sidebar ‘What next for Little Annie?’).

If the crew thought that, to use the old war cliché, the flight would be ‘over by Christmas’, then the weather gods had other plans. Already delayed in Siberia by sub-zero temperatures and icy conditions, the crew then found themselves forced to spend Christmas in fog-bound Brno in the Czech Republic. It wasn’t only the weather that held them up, however. Pretty much everything closed down for the festive period, so the team had no other choice but to wait for Europe to get back to work. Flying after Christmas through Germany, Switzerland and France proved fitful, but the crew made enough progress to reach Valencia, Spain, on New Year’s Eve, ready and eager to take on the challenge of the epic African continent. While weather and public holidays were Europe’s greatest challenges, Africa presented two potentially more significant difficulties — fuel availability and petty bureaucracy, not to mention the background threat of political violence. As CurtisTaylor, who chronicled the entire flight in a colourful and entertaining blog published on the website www.an2oceans.com supported by UTair, put it: “There were two main obstacles — one was the fuel issue, the other was the refusal of Gabon to allow us into their airspace.”

“WE HAVE SEEN UNTOUCHED AFRICA. IT’S THE SORT OF THING YOU CAN IMAGINE THE LEGENDARY HENRY MORTON STANLEY HACKING THROUGH” 10

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After successfully negotiating northern Africa and Mali caused worry to friends and relatives back home with only enjoying what Curtis-Taylor describes as “the stark, barren a sketchy sense of African geography. beauty” of the Sahara Desert, they were held up for two Curtis-Taylor says they came close to aborting the mission: weeks in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. This came after two “There was the possibility of leaving the plane in the ExecuJet challenging legs of the journey from Agadez in Niger via hangar in Lagos, and then flying home and coming back to Kano (also Nigeria), when visibility was reduced to whitecontinue the mission once we’d found an alternative route via out conditions. This was caused by a low smog of desert central and eastern Africa. But then we’d have lost the whole sand swept several thousand feet up into the air, forcing the momentum of the flight.” Fortunately, intervention came at the crew to fly by instruments the whole way. That, however, highest political level. was nothing compared with the next hurdle. After two weeks of frustration and confinement in their “Gabon refused us entry for the longest time on the hotel — the crew was advised not to explore the town due grounds that it was an old airplane,” recounts Curtis-Taylor. to security reasons — the flight was later cleared to continue “But we could never really work out what was the problem at the behest of the Gabonese president. “It was an entirely — was it because it was an Antonov, or because it was a African solution,” says Curtis-Taylor. “Luckily somebody knew single-engine piston?” somebody who was close to the president.” >> While in Nigeria, costs piled up, and Curtis-Taylor describes it as “the lowest point — we simply had no way around it”. The Gabonese director of civil aviation refused them twice, exposing them to massive overstay fines worth at least USD20,000, although that figure was negotiated down from an initial USD35,000. At the same time, when news came through of the deadly attack by Islamic militants on the Amenas gas complex in Algeria, there was horror mixed with a sense of relief that they had crossed the Sahara unscathed. Meanwhile, news of the French military intervention in northern

IF THE CREW THOUGHT

THAT, TO USE THE OLD WAR CLICHÉ, THE FLIGHT WOULD BE ‘OVER BY CHRISTMAS’, THEN THE WEATHER GODS HAD OTHER PLANS

OPPOSITE PAGE The adventure began at the frozen reaches of northern Europe THIS PAGE Vintage aircraft pilot Tracey Curtis-Taylor came all the way from England to join the journey

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“THERE WE WERE WITH ALL THESE ENERGY COMPANIES SURROUNDING US, AND WE COULDN’T GET THREE BARRELS OF FUEL FOR THAT AIRPLANE” >> But as Curtis-Talyor says, “once a trip reaches its low ground every day. Curtis-Taylor explains: “Avgas [aviation point, there is only one way to go — up”. And quite literally. gas] was always going to be an issue. That was logistically the Little Annie belched out oil and smoke in protest at having most complicated thing to do, and that was what fouled us up.” been made to stand around in the torrid African heat for two Though for the most part, “it worked like clockwork”, it fell weeks, but after having her oil filter cleaned, she was ready apart in Cabinda as they got trapped. to continue. One more weather-delayed day later, and the The crew, however, was now getting used to delays and An-2 was airborne again, at last compensating the crew with hold-ups beyond their control. She says: “We’d calmed down spectacular views of the Gabonese jungle. and been through the worst. Whereas Nigeria had been “I drove through the Congo basin 30 years ago,” Curtisworrying, Cabinda was frankly quite amusing.” Two fuel Taylor recalls, “but that was an entirely different experience deliveries were aborted, the second when the driver on his to flying over this flowering jungle, just a few hundred way to Cabinda was arrested after telling a police checkpoint feet overhead. This is unmapped terrain, and they can’t that he was transporting water. “There we were with all these map it because they can’t see the ground. It’s real virgin energy companies surrounding us, and we couldn’t get three rainforest, and there’s nothing there and it goes for miles barrels of fuel for that airplane,” says Curtis-Taylor. and then disappears into the mountains.” She described the Having seen so many cargo planes parked at the airport, endless waterways and rivers winding through the jungle she picked up the phone to the mission’s agents in Angola and as “untouched Africa”, saying: “It’s the sort of thing you can demanded that a military plane drop off the necessary Avgas. imagine the legendary Henry Morton Stanley hacking through.” Curtis-Taylor admits that she may have been less than polite. More frustration awaited the crew, however, when they “Within two hours he’d called me back and said he’d had to reached the Angolan province of Cabinda and were unable call in every favour with the Angolan Air Force,” she says. “It’s to refuel, despite Cabinda’s role as an oil hub where several costing me huge,” the mission’s agent said, to which Curtishundred thousand barrels of crude oil are extracted from the Taylor retorted: “I don’t care!” Two days later, on 9 February,

WHAT NEXT FOR ‘LITTLE ANNIE’? The Antonov-2 donated by UTair is now used in southern Africa for humanitarian and charity purposes. Despite its age, it is still a robust and fully functional aircraft that can be deployed to transport goods, medicine and people. ExecuJet will update readers in a future issue on the fate of Little Annie.

THIS PAGE ‘Little Annie’ is the nickname of the An-2 used in this adventure OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP The project was dubbed from ‘Ocean to Ocean’ and took the crew from northern Europe to southern Africa UTair pilots Sergey Bykov and Sergey Dmitrenko (From left) Captain Mark Hill, Captain Sergy Bykov, Engineer Alexander Achimov, Co-Pilot Sergy Dmitrenko and CEO of ExecuJet Aviation Group, Niall Olver

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an Ilyushin II-76 — a large Russian cargo plane — dropped over the airfield and offloaded three barrels of fuel in the elephant grass beside the apron. Within hours, the crew was back in the air and headed south. “I would have put Mogas [motor gas] in the airplane at that point, which would have worked. But Captain Sergey wouldn’t go for that,” says Curts-Taylor. She admits that if the plane had run into any problems over water, “we’d have gone into the sink, so it wasn’t worth the risk. Avgas is what makes that plane as safe as houses. Though if I’d been on my own I’d have been a bit more gung-ho and just put the fuel in it!” The final stretch down through Botswana and Namibia involved only minor weather glitches and some repairs to the oil pressure gauge handled by engineer Achimov. Fuel was now coming from bowsers and bonded tanks instead of being hand-pumped from barrels. The skies were clear enough to spot elephants and giraffes from the air, and everywhere the plane landed, curious locals welcomed the crew. The An-2 ended its mission in Capetown on 21 February, two and a half months after setting out from Tyumen. For the crew, coming in to land at the South African city was one of the highlights of the whole trip. “The Russian boys loved being above the ocean,” says Curtis-Taylor, “but although the concept was about flying ‘ocean to ocean’, it’s Table Mountain that defines the end of the African continent.”

In spite of all the delays, hassles, discomfort and days of waiting around, Curtis-Taylor proclaims she would not have swapped the experience for anything. Flying over the Sahara, for example, she describes as being “up there above this landscape in this capsule, and that for a time becomes your real life. The rest of your life suddenly seems irrelevant. It’s such a vivid and immediate experience, yet at the same time there’s a dream-like quality to it.” However, she thinks Little Annie’s journey “may well be the last flight of its kind down Africa in an old pistonengine aircraft like that”. Romantic notions of retracing the flight paths of historic airplanes are all very well, but they cost a lot of time and money. When setting the original schedule of a 15-day mission, she adds: “That was the part of the flight that nobody understood at the outset — how difficult it was potentially going to be.”

Some of the images have been kindly provided to us by Cornél van Heerden, a South Africa based photojournalist. www.cornelvanheerden.com @CornelvHeerden +27 82 588 5538

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EXECUJET AUSTRALASIA BOOSTS WIDEBODY FLEET AND HITS GOLD BARS

FBO IN RIYADH DRESSED FOR BUSINESS

EV E N I N G ELEG A N C E

Freywille has created the Soirée Parisienne evening bag, featuring fine leather, 24-karat gold-plated metal highlights, and enamel detailing. Designed to glimmer like the Parisian cityscape, this minaudière comes with a chain so that it can be used as a shoulder bag, while finely crafted foldaway loops inside the bag allow the wearer to hide the chain and use it as a clutch. www.freywille.com

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Image © Schweizer Luftwaffe

ExecuJet Australasia is increasing the company’s managed widebody fleet in the region with the addition of a Challenger 604 in Sydney and a Gulfstream IV SP aircraft based in Malaysia. The company’s managed fleet now comprises three Bombardier Global Express, a Gulfstream G550, two Gulfstream IV SP and two Challenger 604 aircraft, located in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth and Wellington, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia. In addition, ExecuJet Australasia has become the first organisation in the Asia Pacific to meet the requirements for the Flight Safety Foundation Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) Gold rating and will join only two other operators worldwide to obtain this accreditation. ExecuJet has met the requirements for a Gold rating after completing three successive annual audits showing full BARS compliance and is due to receive the accreditation in May.

The newly formed ExecuJet Nasjet Team in Riyadh prepares for the grand launch of FBO services in the Kingdom this Spring. Some of the current staff took a break from training for a photo opportunity to show off their newly received uniforms.

WEF 2013 A RESOUNDING SUCCESS FOR EXECUJET EUROPE ExecuJet Aviation Group’s Fixed Base Operation at Zurich Airport, Switzerland, celebrated one of its busiest ever weeks of aircraft handling for the World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual Meeting at Davos-Klosters in late January. During the event, ExecuJet handled over 300 business aircraft movements at Zurich and Dübendorf Airports, including a high proportion of ultra-long-range business jets. As in prior years, ExecuJet met high levels of WEF customer demand by expanding its aircraft parking capacity through an exclusive agreement with Dübendorf, a military facility close to Zurich Airport.


ADVERTORIAL BESPOKE JEWELLERY

CHENSHIA BESPOKE JEWELLERY EXCEPTIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP AND THE UNIQUE BEAUTY OF DIVERSITY HEADQUARTERED IN THE MOST BEAUTIFUL PART OF CAPE TOWN, Chenshia is blessed and guarded by the Cape of Good Hope in the mother city of South Africa. Our bespoke jewellery service provides our clients with a more personalised and exclusive experience. Tradition, culture, heritage and history from the East, the West and Africa are all recognisable in any given Chenshia piece. The company is fortunate enough to be blessed with talented craftsmen and technical support in offering a selected range of superior diamonds, tanzanite, South Sea Pearls and other coloured gems.The Chenshia brand explores the concept of blending artistically and culturally creative rare pieces of jewellery for our clients to invest in and enjoy. We are spreading a jewellery culture that translates art into jewellery and vice versa. Chenshia is also well placed in the tourism industry and has been facilitating a link between China and Africa through our exclusive China Travel Services South Africa (CTSSA) that is the pioneer and leader of in-depth travel. We offer a unique travelling and cultural experience for high-profile individuals travelling alone or in a group to South Africa, as well as to China. We are unique in that we offer our customers the opportunity to customise their holiday or business trip. Everyone has different travel needs and at CTSSA, we embrace people’s differences and organise fantastic personalised bespoke travel arrangements accordingly.

WE NEVER STOP IN OUR PURSUIT FOR EXCELLENCE AND CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE A ROMANTIC, ELEGANT AND CLASSICAL CHARM

Inspired and originated purely from love in 1983, Chenshia has since created, crafted and promoted constantly and persistently the jewellery pieces like works of art in order to perpetuate love. We have recently expanded our unique concept to include the ExecuJet Lanseria International lounge, as well as a store in Rivonia Road Sandton, Johannesburg.

Contact Chenshia (Pty) Ltd 42 Hans Strijdom Avenue Foreshore, Cape Town 8001 T +27 21 418 4618 F +27 21 418 3864 W: www.chenshia.com E: info@chenshia.com

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EXECUJETSNIPPETS

RECORD YEAR OF GROWTH FOR EXECUJET ISTANBUL Bilen Air Services in Istanbul celebrates a record year of growth. A new hangar and significantly increased FBO growth have meant the team has increased by almost 50 per cent.

EXECUJET AUSTRALASIA CELEBRATES SUCCESSFUL EXPANSION INTO PERTH

FLYING

SCENT

French crystal maker Lalique has teamed up with British car company Bentley for its first luxury fragrance products for men: Bentley for Men and Bentley for Men Intense. Created by Nathalie Lorson, both fragrances are made from cedar and patchouli, while Intense is also infused with African geranium. Lalique for Bentley Crystal Edition is a flacon with a stopper shaped like Bentley’s legendary ‘Flying B’. There are 999 pieces available. www.bentleymotors.com

TOP CALIBRE The unique combination of the flying tourbillon and a skeleton case sets Roger Dubuis apart from other watchmakers. The Excalibur 42 Skeleton Tourbillon, part of the Excalibur collection, is made up of 165 components. Plates and bridges are kept to a minimum to highlight the movement display. It is available in pink- or white-gold.

ExecuJet Australasia is celebrating a successful start to 2013, following the opening of a new maintenance facility at Perth International Airport in December 2012. The facility offers full maintenance, repair and operations, technical support capabilities and charter and aircraft management services. Based in a modern hangar, the Perth base is capable of accommodating a number of mid-range and longrange aircraft. With the same worldclass service as ExecuJet’s awardwinning maintenance facilities around the world, the facility provides maintenance support for Bombardier, Gulfstream, Embraer, Hawker Beechcraft and other jet and turboprop aircraft.

www.rogerdubuis.com

EXECUJET AFRICA LAUNCHES EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN SERVICE ExecuJet Africa partnered with international risk management company MS Risk to offer emergency response plans for clients with staff based at remote locations in Africa. ExecuJet and MS Risk will work with clients’ HR and safety managers to develop evacuation plans for those companies who do not currently have one in place, or integrate services into an existing programme. The URP will also include intelligence reporting, remote site visits, ground and air service options, and logistics coordination. Chris Frost, Business Development Manager for Flight Operations at ExecuJet Africa

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G REEN BUGG Y Drive directly from the road to the green with the limited-edition golf car that is street-legal in Europe. It comes with adjustable speed switches that control top speed and acceleration parameters. Its lithium batteries allow it to run at speeds of up to 60 km/h, and reach up to 60 km in range. The batteries may be regenerated while driving. Only seven units will be made. www.garia.com

SECRET TROVE Fine-art collectors can now store their precious pieces at Beautiful Mind, a state-of-the-art, 10,000 sq-ft space in North Point, Hong Kong. Apart from advanced storage space, Beautiful Mind also offers consultation services, a professional art restoration studio and an education space with an art library. www.beautifulmind.asia

ROCK PAD Home to a recording studio with equipment previously used by John Lennon, the six-star, 16,000 sq-ft, beachside Villa Rockstar offers much more — including butler service, a cinema room, a spa pool, and a roulette, card and games table. If planning for a large gathering or a wedding, Villa Rockstar may be rented together with the equally lavish Villa Nina beside it. The villas are located at Eden Rock St Barths. www.edenrockhotel.com

ROE BOWL A special dish is best served in a precious plate — or, in the case of caviar, in the Van Perckens No. 8 Caviar Bowl, which comes with a matching spoon. It may be finished in a choice of 20-karat gold, sterling silver, or silver or gold plating combined with precious stones. At the base is a layer of mouth-blown Royal Leerdam crystal. www.vanperckens.com

MEMORY Keeper Initially designed for British army polo players in India in the 1930s, Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Reverso collection is known for being hardy, elegant and customisable through the brand’s online personalisation service. Reverso owners can have the backs of their watches engraved, gem set or enamelled to show one’s name or a sketch commemorating a special occasion. personalisation.jaeger-lecoultre.com JETGALA

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WINGS CESSNA CITATION M 2 by Jim Gregory

Cessna’s in-production Citation M2 is slated to make an Asian appearance later this year or in early 2014

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SW I F T BEAUTY A PERSONAL LIGHT JET MADE FOR LIFE IN A FASTER LANE

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THE M2’S T-TAIL, SLEEK EXTERIOR AND SMALL YET RAKISH WINGLETS RENDER A DISTINCTIVE LOOK ON THE RAMP OR WHEN FLYING 31,000 FEET AT 460 MPH (741 KM/H)

Citation M2 CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY WOULD HAVE NEVER COME TO LIFE IF FOUNDER CLYDE VERNON CESSNA (1879-1954) HAD SIMPLY GIVEN UP ON BUILDING HIS DREAM — a monoplane — after 14 failed attempts. He vowed he would make it fly without wing struts first before he would forget about a life in aviation. So, on 13 August 1927, the Cessna All Purpose finally took off from a Kansas airfield and the company was well on its way. A key design concept of this new aircraft was an enclosed cockpit. The cantilevered design has since become an unrelenting standard — seen in Cessna’s latest light and midsize business jets. Its Citation business jet range can draw on over 80 years of manufacturing experience. In response to operators’ and customers’ demands for a faster and larger transition aircraft, Cessna recently introduced its new Citation M2 very light jet, which made its maiden flight last March and is now in production. A demonstrator unit 800 is slated to roll off the assembly line this April. Senior vice president of Cessna Business Jet Brad Thress says the M2 — with increased cabin size, speed and range over other light jets — is a step up for Citation Mustang owners and first-time owners of the Citation range. 28

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Potential clients in the region will get a first glimpse later this year or in early 2014 when Cessna selects an Asian aviation venue to display the aircraft. Certification for first international deliveries is expected by late 2014. The aviation needs for customers in the region will vary, according to industry observers, and Cessna is confident the M2 will fill the demand in the light business jet segment. Thress says: “We have had good sales for the Mustang and the CJ series of aircraft throughout the region and feel the performance and value will resonate with customers.”


Those who have seen the M2 fly above Cessna’s Wichita, Kansas, facility would agree that its t-tail, sleek exterior and small yet rakish winglets render a distinctive look. It has a maximum cruise speed of 460 mph (741 km/h) and can climb up to 41,000 feet. Based on a clean sheet design that incorporates customers’ desired features, the M2 is also modeled after the Citation CJ1 (Model 525) which has ceased production. Daylight streaming in through eight large windows of the 3.35-metre long cabin enhances comfort and spaciousness. The cabin features large ergonomic executive chairs with stowable armrests. Its club seating allows occupants to converse freely in a quiet cabin environment. Thress adds: “The M2 provides another opportunity for jet owners to ‘right size’ the aircraft for the mission.” It flies comfortably from 800 to 1,300 nautical miles and can seat up to six >>

“THE CITATION M2 FITS VERY WELL WITHIN THE CITATION FAMILY AS A STEP-UP AIRCRAFT FOR ENTRY-LEVEL CESSNA MUSTANG OWNERS”

OPPOSITE PAGE The M2 has a distinct T-Tail that stands out from its other Cessna predecessors THIS PAGE, FROM TOP The M2 made its maiden flight last March Its cabin will feature LED lighting, a spacious headroom, and a new headliner and valance design

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SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

42 FT 7 IN

13 M

WINGSPAN

47 FT 3 IN

14.4 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

13 FT 11 IN

4.24 M

CABIN LENGTH

11 FT

3.35 M

CABIN WIDTH

58 IN

17.7 M

CABIN HEIGHT

57 IN

17.4 M

MAXIMUM RANGE (1) WITH IFR RESERVES

1,300 NM NBAA IFR (100 NM ALTERNATE)

2,408 KM NBAA IFR (100 NM ALTERNATE)

MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING

7

MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED

400 KTAS (741 KM/H, 460 MPH)

CERTIFIED CEILING

41,000 FT

12,497 M

TAKEOFF DISTANCE

3,250 FT

991 M

MAXIMUM TAKEOFF WEIGHT

10,700 LB

4,853 KG

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>> passengers, plus another at the aft area. Customers can personalise the interiors, which feature LED lighting, a spacious headroom, and a new headliner and valance design. The M2’s Williams International FJ44-powered twinjet, mounted high atop the rear fuselage, is reminiscent of its larger big brother, the new Citation X. The smaller sibling promises to speed through the skies with the same sophisticated attention to interior detail offered by bigger private jets. The system keeps the pilot, and if desired, a co-pilot up to speed in a high-tech intuitive flight environment. The cockpit’s instrument panel sports the latest Garmin G3000 flat panel avionics suite and its expanded liquid crystal diplays with touch screen controllers form the core of the Cessna Intrinzic™ flight deck, which enhances safety. The M2 has a baggage capacity of 1.29 sq m and a total weight capacity of 329 kg. It can operate from runways as short as 3,250 feet, making any destination hardly a world away. It is as Clyde Cessna would’ve imagined.

HIGH FRONTIER OPPOSITE PAGE The M2 uses the Garmin G3000 flat-panel avionics suite THIS PAGE, FROM TOP The M2 uses a Williams International FJ44powered twinjet, which is mounted high atop the rear fuselage The M2’s certification for first international deliveries is expected in late 2014

Cessna has also recently rolled out a new Citation Sovereign with a range of 3,000 nm, which seats up to nine passengers. It features improved cabin cooling, Garmin G5000 avionics with auto throttles and a new cabin management system. Its winglets help increase range and enable a direct climb to 45,000 feet. Other new Cessna aircraft to hit the market this year include the Grand Caravan EX turboprop, the Cessna Ttx single engine composite aircraft, as well as the new Citation X which has a maximum speed of Mach .935. JETGALA

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ANDREW WINCH DESIGNS by Dina Abdullah-Enriquez

SKY C AB I NS OPEN AND VERSATILE SPACES— FROM YACHTS TO JETS

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U

ndaunted by the restrictions of an aircraft’s tubular shape, architect and interior designer Andrew Winch sees private jets as “penthouses in the sky”. To achieve this effect, he uses high-tech materials, digital entertainment technology, and open-plan configurations that enhance the sense of space in a cabin. His jet interior designs are versatile, able to seamlessly transition from business to personal use. Edora, a design for a Boeing BBJ 737-700, includes a private study that can be converted into a children’s bedroom or a yoga room. Another room features a table that can be transformed into a fullsized double bed or a relaxed seating area. There is also an office that can double as the crew’s resting place. “Our designs are created to fit our client’s life like a glove, as well as being visually stunning,” says Winch.

His choice of materials and their combination is stylish and at times, unconventional. Elite, a design for an Airbus ACJ-318, achieves textural diversity with leather and faux ostrich skin, and contrasts crisp upholstery with high-gloss dark wood. One of Winch’s more famous and lauded designs, Ingram, delivered in 2006, uses wood to instil a sense of lightness and warm elegance in a BBJ 737: shoji screens create partitions, classic chairs come in leather and laminated wood shells, the sound-proofed ceiling is decorated in African hardwood, and porthole frames are painted in trompe-l’oeil style to create a wooden effect. This choice of material also reflects Winch’s inclination to take cues from nature, “from the smoothest pebble found on the beach to the power and curves of breaking waves”, having grown up around the southern coast of England. He also gains ideas from his other practice, that of yacht interior design. One of his recent projects stemmed from superyacht clients’ request to have helipads added to their vessels. This inspired Winch to create an interior >>

OPPOSITE PAGE Jet interior designer Andrew Winch also designs aircraft livery THIS PAGE, FROM TOP Winch’s design for the Edora allows a private study to easily convert into a children’s bedroom or yoga room Elite is a fresh and sophisticated design for a client who is an experienced jet owner Elite’s sitting room features cream, white and blue hues complemented by high-gloss rosewood and almond gold fittings

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A comfortable master suite, private cinema, open-plan dining room and private, grand entrance are some customised features that owners of long-range, large-cabin jets typically request

HIS JET INTERIOR DESIGNS ARE VERSATILE, ABLE TO SEAMLESSLY TRANSITION FROM BUSINESS TO PERSONAL USE 34

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>> concept for a helicopter that will complement the sailing lifestyle. Based on the twin-engined AgustaWestland AW189, the helicopter will come with a cabin clad in leather and teak. It will offer a TV or iPad console, as well as an interactive, glass bulkhead between the cockpit and the passenger area that will show flight information, entertainment, maps and places of interest in one’s destination. Six seats — including swivel and forward seats, plus an additional pop-up chair — will come with builtin noise-cancellation technology, so that passengers will be able to hold conversations without needing to raise their voices above the din of the engines. Winch says: “My job from the beginning is to feel the essence of the clients’ loves and dislikes then to prepare ideas which inspire them. We have to have the confidence to ask the questions that make our clients feel more relaxed and willing to open up to explain who they are and what they do.” Observation is another tool — when he first viewed aircraft charter and manager

Synergy Aviation’s KingAir 200 fleet to design their livery, he noticed that the aircraft’s deicing system had a line running along the leading-edge wings and tail-edge up to its black rubber nose. He decided to incorporate that detail into the design. The result was a plane painted in metallic silver with a strong black slipstream line starting at the nosecone, running down the fuselage, around the edge and on to the tail. Winch has been designing the interiors of superyachts and private jets for more than 25 years, and has often worked with Lufthansa Technik to create VVIP interiors for BBJs and the Dreamliner. Early on in his career, he was mentored by the renowned designer, Jon Bannenberg, considered by many to be the founder of modern yacht design. Winch shares his passion for sailing with his wife Jane, with whom he started Andrew Winch Designs in 1986, with the caveat that if the business did not succeed, they would sail around the world together. It looks like that expedition will have to wait.


WINGS HAWKER PACIFIC

FOC&US SKILL

ASIA, THE PACIFIC AND THE MIDDLE EAST ARE THE MOST EXCITING REGIONS IN BUSINESS AVIATION TODAY. JETGALA SPEAKS TO AVIATION SOLUTIONS PROVIDER HAWKER PACIFIC’S COO FOR ASIA TONY JONES ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES IN SERVICING THIS TERRITORY

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Q: Congratulations on the recent FAA approval for Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre (SHPBASC) as an overseas repair station. Was the timing of approval a surprise? No, the team at Shanghai Hawker Pacific has been working towards this important approval for some time. The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) Foreign Repair Station approval is a highly valued service offering along with our CAAC (Civil Aviation Administration of China), Hong Kong and Macau local approvals, and Bermuda and Cayman Island Foreign approvals. It is a continuation of SHPBASC pioneering efforts to mature the infrastructure in China and support the development of business aviation in the region. Q: What are three significant features of a successful FBO? My first answer would be service, service and service but that would be too simplistic. A successful FBO needs careful planning and an in-depth understanding of the local environment. Secondly, you need to have great people working in the business who understand both the operating requirements and the needs of the passenger. Lastly, service — this is where the planning and the people make a difference. Q: What are the three significant ways the facility in Shanghai will help spearhead movements in other parts of Asia? The Shanghai Hawker Pacific facility, of which we are a joint venture partner, has really established itself as the premier business aviation centre in China. In March last year we opened a new Business Aircraft Centre in Singapore, the culmination of 30 years of operations in Singapore and the on-going development of our FBO and service network throughout Asia Pacific.

LEFT

BELOW

Hawker Pacific COO Tony Jones

Hawker Pacific has opened facilities in both Shanghai and Singapore as part of its expansion plans in Asia

“WITH GREATER AWARENESS OF THE BENEFITS OF BUSINESS AIRCRAFT COMES AN INCREASE IN THE DEMAND OF DOMESTICALLY FOCUSED, MID-SIZE AND TURBOPROP BUSINESS AIRCRAFT” Q: What are the company’s other target markets, and why? Hawker Pacific is very focused on Asia, the Pacific and Middle East regions, territories that appear to have an endless supply of opportunities — some long term and some with the promise of a more immediate return. We will continue to explore opportunities and how they align with our long-term plans. If we feel we can do a good job and if it makes sense to do so, we will pursue these investments. Q: How does Hawker Pacific tailor its services to different countries? We recognise that every country in the region is very different and there is a need to understand what factors shape our customers’ requirements and their operations. There is also a strong need to understand the political, financial and regulatory influences. We also recognise that no matter what country we operate in, our customers expect the very best in terms of service, communication and trust. JETGALA

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“AS INFRASTRUCTURE AND SUPPORT GROW, OWNERS AND OPERATORS WILL EXPECT SIMILAR EXPERIENCES TO THOSE ENJOYED IN EUROPE AND THE US”

Q: What are the top three factors that clients consider when purchasing an aircraft? Aircraft acquisition, particularly for first-time buyers, is a complex task. There are many factors to be considered; however, we always work with our clients to get a really good understanding of their travel needs (current and future), so we really drill down into cabin, range and features to ensure the aircraft is ‘fit for purpose’. Naturally, price is important in the client’s mind but understanding value is critical. Lastly, aircraft support, which not only ensures safe and hassle-free operations throughout the period of ownership but also protects the resale value of the aircraft when it is time to upgrade. Q: What are clients’ top challenges in aircraft management? How does Hawker Pacific respond to these? Every aircraft management company is responsible for the seamless operation and care of the client’s aircraft. Delivering this service across the globe and around the clock to a consistent standard is very demanding. We believe the key is to develop a very strong relationship with the client and to obtain a thorough understanding of their needs. With this level of understanding comes greater insight into travel schedules, which helps to anticipate their needs and plan accordingly. 38

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Q: How do you think clients’ demands or requirements have changed, especially in places like China? There is a greater realisation of the business benefits an aircraft can bring and a better understanding of the clients’ needs, so aircraft selection is becoming better understood. As infrastructure and support grow, owners and operators will expect similar experiences to those enjoyed in Europe and the US, placing greater demands on aircraft OEMs and service providers. Q: Which aircraft in Hawker Pacific’s fleet are the most popular for sale and charter, and why? There is, and will remain, a very strong demand for longrange or large-cabin business jets capable of international operations. Growth in this segment has been phenomenal in recent years. We’ve also seen that with greater awareness of the benefits of business aircraft comes an increase in the demand of domestically focused, mid-size and turboprop business aircraft like the King Air. Q: How does Hawker Pacific plan to expand its fleet? Will Hawker Pacific be announcing any support of other aircraft manufacturers this year? Hawker Pacific has expanded our offering to include a specialist acquisition and brokerage service. We have an experienced team that focuses on assisting clients with selecting and acquiring the most suitable aircraft for their BELOW Hawker Pacific recently began offering livery design for business jets

needs, as well as providing entry into service support to smooth out the entire process. Naturally, we also offer aircraft management, hangarage and through-life support of the aircraft post-sale if required. Q: What are the top challenges Hawker Pacific is currently facing? How is the company coping with these? Two that stand out for me are one, global economic uncertainty — we continue to be prudent whilst we recognise the need to seek out opportunity. Secondly, growth is very demanding on resources, specifically capable and experienced people. We are constantly developing our staff and recruiting externally to ensure we meet these demands.

“WE REALLY DRILL DOWN INTO CABIN, RANGE AND FEATURES TO ENSURE THE AIRCRAFT IS ‘FIT FOR PURPOSE’” Q: How rapidly do you think Asia’s private aviation industry will continue to grow? In your opinion, which aspects should improve? We are seeing year-on-year traffic growth in China of 12 per cent and there are no signs of this softening. Whilst China is clearly responsible for the bulk of this growth, other countries around Asia, including Indonesia, are seeing wealth grow at an astonishing rate — and this is the fuel that powers the growth of private aviation. There has been significant improvement in areas of infrastructure and support around private aviation and this will continue to develop along with demand.

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VANTAGE VERY LIGHT JET by Sanjay Rampal

F R ESH V IS I ON

THE REVIVAL OF AN INNOVATIVE LIGHT JET CONCEPT

VisionAire Jets has revived the Vantage very light jet programme, which had stalled in 2003

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A FORMER CONTENDER IN THE VERY LIGHT BUSINESS JET CATEGORY HAS DECIDED TO ENTER THE GAME AGAIN — and it’s determined to take off this time. VisionAire Jets, based in North Carolina, is reviving the development of its Vantage, an entry-level, single-engine, very light jet. Company CEO Jim Rice, one of the founders of the original VisionAire Corporation, explains why development stalled in 2003: “We had 155 firm orders and a flying prototype. But then 9/11 changed everything. Nobody wanted to invest in aviation anymore.” Escalating costs and concerned investors forced VisionAire Corporation into bankruptcy. Eviation Jets then bought the rights to the Vantage and unsuccessfully attempted to redesign the airframe into a twin-engined light jet. This effort was ill-advised, if you ask Rice, as it “took on Cessna, an established brand dominating the lower end of the jet market”. Rice believes the cancellation of the Piper Altaire in 2011 reopened the playing field for an entry-level, single-engine jet. He recently negotiated access to all intellectual property rights for the Vantage programme and assembled a team of experts to get it back on track for certification. The revived project sticks to the Vantage’s original single-engine design, but substitutes the Pratt and Whitney power plant in the initial plan for Williams’ FJ44-3AP engine. Embedding the power plant >> JETGALA

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THE REVIVED PROJECT STICKS TO THE VANTAGE’S ORIGINAL ALL-COMPOSITE, SINGLE-ENGINE DESIGN >> within the fuselage allows the Vantage to accelerate faster while somewhat reducing the probability of foreign objects being ingested through the bifurcated twin-intake ducts. The carbon-fibre composite airframe will create a cabin seven inches wider than that of the Cessna Mustang and slightly wider than that of the Honda Jet. The forward-swept, mid-mounted wings will offer less drag with the wing spar threading through to the rear without affecting passenger comfort. The Vantage will have a cruising speed of 375kts carrying five passengers plus one pilot, achieving a total of 1,500 nautical miles with additional reserves. Maximum cruising altitude will be 41,000 feet and the jet will require a minimum of 2,500 feet of operating runway. Should the engine fail, the Vantage will be able to safely glide from an altitude of 30,000 feet for 77 miles. The flight deck will use the Garmin 3000 integrated avionics system with three touch-screen displays. Rice says that the decision to use both lighter and smaller avionics and engine systems “saved weight, extended the range and also allows us to consider baggage compartments in both the nose and the rear of the plane”. There will also be an enclosed aft lavatory and a refreshment centre, while the cabin’s oval door will enable the aircraft for medical air taxi missions. The cabin mock-up is configured as an opposing pair of club seats; however, a rear bench option offers seating for three. The mock-up uses leather upholstery but this may be customised according to clients’ preferences. The new Vantage prototype is expected to fly in 2014 with certification expected in 2016. Manufacturing will take place at a facility in Newton, North Carolina. Orders will be taken by the end of this year. “We’re holding back for now and not rushing like we did before to head off the competition that has since disappeared. We expect full funding to be in place with money released as milestones are achieved,” says Rice. He is optimistic, though, having the support of some former customers and having received enquiries from Asia. 42

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FROM TOP The Vantage will be able to carry five passengers plus the pilot and the forward-swept, mid-mounted wings will offer less drag, while embedding the engine in the fuselage will help increase acceleration speed The seven-inch-wide cabin is planned to be relatively spacious compared to other jets in the same category


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GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE

WINNING FLIGHT A

s Gulfstream Aerospace’s new G650 ultra-long-range aircraft continues to set speed records, the company is also ramping up activities in the Asia-Pacific region. Gulfstream’s president Larry Flynn speaks to Jetgala about its growing presence. Q: You have been on the forefront of business aviation for over 30 years. Apart from a renewed focus on Asia, what were the three most significant trends in private aviation over the past decade? We’ve witnessed a number of trends over the past decade, but the three most significant 44

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would have to be: the increase in safety equipment available to pilots, demonstrated by our enhanced and synthetic vision systems that increase pilots’ situational awareness. Secondly, the increasing need to travel globally. Late last year, we saw the entry-into-service of the new Gulfstream G650, the largest purpose-built business jet. It also has the longest range of 7,000 nm (12,964 km) with a top speed of Mach 0.925. It has a 2.59-m wide cabin, and can seat up to eight passengers. There is also continued growth in international markets, which has caused us to expand our service network around the world.


Q: What are Gulfstream’s three main strategies to maintain fast growing demand in Asia? And in China in particular? Our overall strategy for increasing presence in Asia can be broken down into smaller strategies. The addition of key personnel focussed solely on Asia has seen the appointment of Leda Chong, Senior Vice President, Asia Pacific for Gulfstream. Chong coordinates and facilitates activities that support existing Gulfstream customers, explores partnerships with Chinese companies and coordinates with Chinese aviation authorities in expanding our offerings in the AsiaPacific region. To enhance the strong relationship between Gulfstream and the Civil Aviation Authority of China (CAAC), we’ve added Beijing and US staff to liaise with the organisation. We established a Hong Kong-based flight department consisting of five pilots, who assist with aircraft deliveries and entry-into-service flying. We’ve also added technical operations staff in Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai, with mainly Chinese-speaking employees to support Chinese customers. Other new facilities in Asia include sales offices in Beijing and Hong Kong, and a service centre in Beijing. Gulfstream Beijing, which received certification from the Chinese government late last year, is a joint venture with Hainan Airlines Group, which reflects our growing commitment to the Asian market. Lastly, our training partner FlightSafety has certified the region’s first dedicated G450/G550 business jet simulator, located in Hong Kong. This supports Gulfstream operators in conducting regional training.

Q: To what extent does a manufacturer’s in-house interiordesign themes help win a sale? You’ve recently launched Designbook and Elite Interiors; are you planning to further expand your interiors capabilities this year? We have an incredible in-house interior design team that works side-by-side with our customers to ensure their aircraft’s interiors exceed specifications. Our interior offerings, including the Elite option for the G450 and G550, reflect what our customers want to see in their aircraft. The Elite interior incorporates elements of the Gulfstream G650 and G280 and is a direct response to customer feedback. We continuously evaluate our interior offerings to ensure we stay at the forefront with our selections.

Q: Which Gulfstream models will be top sellers in South-east Asia over the coming decade? Are they different from those selling best in China and why? We expect our large-cabin, ultra-long-range aircraft to continue to be the most popular in China and South-east Asia. These aircraft enable operators to fly non-stop to almost any destination. Our G280 is proving popular for regional travel as well.

Q: Gulfstream has created medium and large jets. Can you tell us more about your ultra-large category? We do extremely well in the three areas that we’ve chosen to focus our efforts: the mid-cabin, large-cabin and ultra-largecabin. Our ultra-large-cabin, ultra-long-range Gulfstream G650 has proven to be extremely popular with more than 200 orders to date and a backlog stretching to 2017. >>

OPPOSITE

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Gulfstream president Larry Flynn

Gulfstream’s large-cabin, ultra-longrange aircraft are the OEM’s bestsellers in China and South-east Asia

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WINGS >> Q: Can you describe to us the quintessential G650 owner — what are the three main reasons for him to choose a G650? What does he use it for primarily, what services/ technology does he require on board and how often does he fly on average? The G650 appeals to a wide variety of people, whether it’s a private individual, an entrepreneur or the management team of a corporation. There are many reasons to select this aircraft, but I’d say the major ones are: it offers the best overall performance, with the longest range at the fastest speeds, as well as safety features with standard enhanced and synthetic vision. Its cabin environment features 16 super-sized windows, in-flight access to baggage and a Cabin Essential design so that each of the cabin systems has redundant features to prevent any single point of failure. Q: A general question — what do you see as the top three factors for Gulfstream’s enduring success? Gulfstream has been in business aviation for 55 years. That single-minded focus is one of our strengths. So, too, is our commitment to provide our customers the best in product support. We’re focussed on everything that we can do to enhance customer service. We were the first to introduce a dedicated airborne product support aircraft back in 2002, and now we have two dedicated aircraft. We have developed Field and Airborne Support Teams (FAST). We also have more than USD1.4 billion in parts located strategically around the world. There are more than 3,600 people working in our product support organisation. We have a robust research and

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development program to ensure that we continue to give our customers the kinds of products and features they want in their business aircraft. Q: Gulfstream Beijing has begun operations. What other Asian countries are you planning to operate in over the next three years, in which sequence, and why? Gulfstream has the largest service network in the industry. In addition to Gulfstream Beijing, we have Jet Aviation facilities in Hong Kong and Singapore, as well as authorised service facilities in Australia, Hong Kong and Japan. As we’re the wholly owned subsidiary of a public corporation, I can’t publicly project or forecast where we’re going next. What I can tell you is that service centre decisions are based on whether the market is sufficient to warrant a dedicated Gulfstream service centre or an authorised partner. We stringently evaluate every Gulfstream-authorised service centre, investing in them in terms of parts and training. Q: Several aircraft manufacturers are experimenting with biofuel or alternative power. What research/tests have you done in this area and where do you see this go over the medium term? We recently flew our entire demonstration fleet to the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) Conference and Exhibition in Orlando on a 50/50 blend of Jet A and biofuels. This signifies Gulfstream’s commitment to achieve the business aviation industry’s goals in emissions reductions, carbon neutral growth by 2020 and a reduction


Gulfstream has an in-house interior design team and offers clients set themes for the G650 and G450, although clients may request further customisation

in total carbon emissions of 50 per cent by 2050, relative to 2005 levels. Alternative fuels could account for 40 per cent of these reductions, while the remaining improvements will come from technology and operations. We’re also focussed on improving aircraft efficiencies. For example, the Gulfstream G650 flies farther and faster than any other business jet in the world, burns less fuel for the same mission and, as a result, has a reduced carbon footprint and produces fewer emissions such as nitrous oxide. Q: What are the top three challenges your company faces within the business aviation industry? I’d say the top three challenges within business aviation are firstly, to find qualified employees to build, service and fly business jets. Secondly, to improve the regulatory environment in emerging markets for continued development of infrastructure in business aviation, as well as to overcome worldwide economic fluctuations. Q: How does the company plan to solve these? We’ve worked hard to build partnerships with educational institutions to foster interest in science, technology, engineering and math careers. We also have a robust internship and co-op program, so students can try out careers within our industry. We also work closely with our

training providers, such as FlightSafety to establish training facilities in strategic locations, so that pilots, maintenance professionals and technicians can receive necessary training anywhere in the world. We’ve met with government officials and regulatory authorities to advance business aviation within their respective areas. For example, we’ve worked closely with the CAAC to facilitate infrastructure enhancements for business aviation. We’ve also worked hard to create worldwide presence, so we’re not reliant on just one region or area for sales. We’ve been successful in selling and delivering aircraft to emerging markets, and our international fleet has more than doubled over the past five years. Q: Do you believe the ‘boomless’ supersonic business jet can become a reality within 10 or 15 years? If yes, how do you see it becoming a feasible type of private jet for your clients to use? At this point, the future of supersonic travel depends on enabling legislation to lift the ban on supersonic flight over land. And that legislation is going to depend on the industry’s ability to reduce sonic boom. We are continuing research into sonic boom mitigation in hopes of someday seeing that ban lifted. Until that happens, there really isn’t a business case for a supersonic business jet. JETGALA

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PEGASUS DESIGN by Melissa Pearce

PEGASUS DESIGN by Melissa Pearce

BUSINESS JET INTERIORS WITH A MOST PERSONAL TOUCH Founded in 2006, London-based Pegasus Design is familiar with the challenges of creating business-jet interiors — from merging its own aesthetic aspirations with a given client’s emotional expectations, to meeting often prohibitive certification criteria. But as the geography of ownership shifts towards the Pacific, new types of requirements pose new conundrums. For instance, the art of feng shui is commonly used in houses and offices, but it is quite another thing to apply its principles to aircraft, as the firm’s Asian clients increasingly ask for. “Much of feng shui corresponds to general human psychology: placement of beds and furniture in relation to doors for example, and positive energy flow in a room. Some aspects cannot be integrated in an aircraft, like the placement 48

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of the toilet in the South-West corner of a building,” says design director Peder Thaulow Eidsgaard. Still, Pegasus Design aims to create ‘chi’ in any floor plan, “whether under the guidance of feng shui or simply [for] the comfort of relaxing or moving around in a specific area”.


Pegasus Design works closely with outfitters to help clients choose the materials, colour shades and accessories they want, from upholstery and dining service to entertainment, furniture and storage

Exceeding expectations while meeting the outfitter’s schedule is a tough balancing act. “Being a designer means you have to be very creative on one side, and very professional and schedule-oriented on the other,” says Eidsgaard. He adds that the firm only accepts projects that it likes to work on in order to build a reputation and at the same time, maintain its passion. Pegasus’ visions can take two to three years to reach fruition. Eidsgaard describes its designs as being meant to be “timeless, based on a certain truthfulness to materials and human scale”. This respect for natural materials is expressed, for instance, in a preference for a level of imperfection in woods and leathers. The overall design must look and feel comfortable in relationship to the body. Eidsgaard finds inspiration in technological trends, art, photography, historical objects and buildings. Some people might be surprised that an antique or a monument could >>

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PE EGA ASUS WORKS S CL LOSE ELY WITH H THE OU UTF FITT TER SO O TH HAT A CLIE ENT T CAN N CH HOO OSE E IT TEM MS BA ASED ON N TH HEIR R WEIGH HT AND ERG GONO OMIC CS, AND NOT JUST T TH HEIR R DE ESIG GN

FROM TOP Depending on the size of the aircraft, a movie theatre can be incorporated into the cabin Pegasus also designs custom aircraft livery

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>> inspire such sleek, contemporary work, but Eidsgaard is as likely to admire the simple shape and construction of a Viking ship as the futuristic appeal of the Oslo Opera House, which appears to grow out of the water. In his own city, London’s Natural History Museum draws his attention when he is not admiring cars like the new Bentley Mulsanne. One of Pegasus’ more exciting, recent projects was a client presentation in Europe that covered approximately 50 square metres, featuring a full-scale model of part of a jet interior, as well as additional samples of sofas, seats, cushions and 160 pieces of tableware. Pegasus always works closely with the outfitter so that a client can choose items such as glasses, forks and plates based on their weight and ergonomics, and not just their design. A full VVIP service on board a jet includes a huge range of items, including napkins and tablecloths, and a proper client presentation can easily exceed 100 to 150 samples. Eidsgaard notes that Chinese jet owners seem to prefer a more personal relationship with the designer than some other nationalities do. But the process begins and ends the same way with all clients: first, meet “to understand his requirements and dreams”. Eidsgaard says: “Our involvement begins with the first sketch and only finishes when the client has taken possession of his new plane.”


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MCDONNELL DOUGLAS F-4 PHANTOM II by Steve Slater

O LD SMO KEY THE LAST AMERICAN ‘ACE-MAKER’ OF THE 20TH CENTURY PILOTS CALLED IT ‘THE FLYING ANVIL’, RHINO’, ‘DOUBLE UGLY’ AND ‘ST LOUIS SLUGGER’ — YET IT WAS ANYTHING BUT SLOW. When the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II first flew in 1958, it was the fastest and highest-flying aircraft in the world, breaking 16 world records. A decade later, in the skies above Vietnam, it became the mount of the last American fighter ‘aces’ of the 20th century (see box story). The Phantom gained such a reputation for downing MiGs that it was called the ‘World’s Leading Distributor of MiG Parts’. Of all the records the Phantom set, 15 were achieved in unmodified production aircraft. During Operation Top Flight on 6 December 1959, it achieved the highest ever climb to altitude, with a zoom climb to 98,557 ft (30,040 m) — at 100,000 ft, the pilot would have technically become an astronaut. On 25 September 1960, a production F4H-1 averaged 1,390.21 mph (2,237.33 km/h) over a 100 km closed-circuit course. This was later surpassed by Operation Skyburner on 22 December 1961, when a Phantom — this time modified with water injection to boost power output — set an absolute world record speed of 1,606.342 mph (2,585.157 km/h). The Phantom’s iconic form follows function. It is big, capable of a maximum of 28,000 kg take-off weight. Having been initially developed for the United States Navy as a carrier-based, long-range supersonic jet interceptor and fighter-bomber, it has two seats for a pilot and a radar officer or weapons system officer, often called a ‘backseater’. It has distinctive upturned outer wing sections matched by equally distinctive, all-moving tailplanes with 23 degrees of downward anhedral to improve control at high angles of attack, while still keeping the tailplane clear of the white-hot exhaust of its two General Electric J-79 engines. Each develops 17,845 lb ft (79.4 kN) of thrust with the aid of afterburners. 52

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The Phantom first entered Navy service in 1960, but proved so adaptable it was soon used by the US Marine Corps and the US Air Force. It was when America entered the conflict in Vietnam that the Phantom really made its mark, offering Mach 2 fighter performance with a bomber-size payload. Under the wings and fuselage, the F-4 carried nine external hardpoints, making it capable of delivering up to 8,480 kg (18,695 lbs) of weapons, including air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles, as well as unguided, guided and (thankfully never used in anger) nuclear bombs. Initially, the F-4 was designed without an internal cannon as late 1950s military doctrine held that turning combat ‘dogfights’ would be impossible at supersonic speeds — thus, the Phantom’s ‘Sidewinder’ and ‘Sparrow’ air-to-air missiles would be the prime method of attack. But in reality, the lack of a means for a short-range attack put crews at a disadvantage. So in 1972, the F-4E model was introduced, with leading-edge slats on the wing that greatly improved low-speed manoeuvrability, and an internally mounted, 20-mm M61 Vulcan rotary cannon that made it a formidable dogfighter. The Phantom also proved to be useful for dangerous reconnaissance missions that landed on the ground immediately after a bombing.

OPPOSITE PAGE Although the Phantom was originally designed as an interceptor for the Navy, the US Air Force adapted it into a fighter bomber and became its biggest user US Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samuel Rogers

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP An 81st Tactical Fighter Squadron F-4E Phantom II aircraft releases 18 Mark-82 500-pound bombs over the Bardenas Reales Gunnery Range US Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Nolan

A Douglas A3D-2 refuelling an F4H-1F during the Project LANA transcontinental flight in 1961 Image courtesy of the US Navy National Naval Aviation Museum

THE PHANTOM GAINED SUCH A REPUTATION FOR DOWNING MIGS THAT IT WAS CALLED THE ‘WORLD’S LEADING DISTRIBUTOR OF MIG PARTS’

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THE PHANTOM FIRST ENTERED NAVY SERVICE IN 1960, BUT PROVED SO ADAPTABLE IT WAS SOON USED BY THE US MARINE CORPS AND THE US AIR FORCE The Phantom was eventually replaced by the F-14 Tomcat, which offered better weapons, power, agility and close-range dogfighting capability. A total of 4,140 Phantoms were delivered to the American armed forces and more than 800 were sold overseas before production ended in 1981. It can claim one final distinction, though. In the 1970s it was unique in being the only type to have equipped both of America’s premier formation display teams, the USAF Thunderbirds and the Navy’s Blue Angels. In the 1980s it suppressed Iraqi air defences in operation Desert Storm and even this year, Turkish Air Force Phantoms have come under fire while patrolling the Syrian border. The type remains in service with the Iranian Air Force, too. Today, the last USAF F-4s are being operated as unmanned target ‘drones’, but several are maintained in historical colour schemes. These are being displayed as part of USAF Air Combat Command’s Heritage Flight on weekends, while serving as target aircraft during the week.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A flight of US Air Force F-4C Phantom fighter bombers refuel from a KC-135 tanker aircraft prior to making a strike against communist targets in North Vietnam. The Phantoms were fully loaded with 750-pound general-purpose bombs and air-to-air missiles US Air Force photo

The cockpit of an F-4 Phantom US Navy and Air Force pilots appreciated the Phantom for being easy to fly on the edge of its performance envelope Image courtesy of the US Navy National Naval Aviation Museum

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THE LAST ACES The term fighter ‘ace’ was coined during World War I to describe pilots or crews which had shot down five or more enemy aircraft. A number of Phantom crews became ‘aces’ during the conflict in Vietnam, the first of whom were US Navy Lieutenants Randy “Duke” Cunningham and William P. Driscoll, who shot down three MiGs on 10 May 1972, and eventually brought that number up to five. Right after the pair downed their fifth MiG, their Phantom was hit by an enemy surface-to-air missile. To avoid being captured, Cunningham and Driscoll flew their burning aircraft using only the rudder and afterburner until they could eject over water and be picked up by a US Navy helicopter. They join USAF Captains Steve Ritchie, Charles B. DeBellevue and Jeffrey Feinstein, who became the last American ace of any air war on 13 October 1972.


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GET H I GH SKY COMBAT ACE by Jim Simon

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TOP GUN FOR A DAY, IN LAS VEGAS


Holiday makers in Las Vegas can try out different flying manoeuvres, either from the pilot seat or as a passenger

TAKE A CHANCE, PARTY HARDER, DRIVE A BULLDOZER, SWIM WITH SHARKS AND FIRE AN AK-47, all in the course of one day. One normally doesn’t do these things. Unless, of course, he is in a place like no other — Las Vegas. As exciting as all this sounds, though, there is one experience that takes the thrill several notches higher. In 2008, retired United States Air Force F-16 captain Richard ‘Tex’ Coe decided he wanted other people to feel what it is like to be an aerobatic or fighter pilot. Following career appointments in Korea and Italy, Coe’s last assignment brought him to Nellis Air Force Base outside Las Vegas. He chose the city as the place to set up Sky Combat Ace for being “an extreme destination”. Based at Henderson Executive Airport, a popular privatejet airport just 10 minutes from The Strip, Sky Combat Ace offers experiences for pilots and non-pilots alike (80 per cent of its customers are non-pilots). No matter which package one chooses, the common factor is that the guest pilot really flies the aircraft. “A lot of people are incredulous that they are the flying pilot. They have trouble believing that flying is not difficult; [that it is] easy to get a hold of. After each learning manoeuvre, they get to take the controls,” says Coe. The Adrenaline Rush Experience begins with a limousine ride from the guest pilot’s hotel or home to Sky Combat Ace’s dedicated hangar. On arrival, the guest pilot suits >> JETGALA

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Friends can challenge each other in a ‘battle’, scoring points every time a combat tactic is executed in the air

>> up and picks a call sign. An Expert Combat Fighter Pilot, who will be the guest’s ‘wingman’, then conducts a 50-minute pre-flight briefing, explaining the process in language that even non-pilots find easy to understand. Finally, the guest pilot and the Expert Combat Fighter Pilot climb into a two-seat Extra 330 LC, a highperformance aircraft capable of 400 km/h and 10g. If the guest pilot came with a friend, as many do, they become foes as they get ready to battle in the air. A quick safety check ensues, then the guest pilot takes off for a full halfhour of aerial dogfighting. Opponents attempt to execute air-to-air combat tactics to score a ‘kill’ against the foe. All pilots will know when they have succeeded as their optical targeting system will announce a hit with a plume of smoke. After three air-combat engagements come 20 minutes of aerobatics. Even at this stage, the guest pilot has the controls.

20 MINUTES OF LOW-LEVEL DYNAMIC FLYING ACROSS THE DESERT MAKES THE TRUE MAGNITUDE OF THE AIRCRAFT’S SPEED MORE APPRECIABLE 58

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IF THE GUEST PILOT CAME WITH A FRIEND, THEY BECOME FOES AS THEY GET READY TO BATTLE IN THE AIR Flying manoeuvres include rolls, Cuban Eights, hammerheads, tail slides, spins and a Lomcevak (tumble)

Safety is paramount, though — the plane comes with dual controls for the Expert Combat Fighter Pilot to help out should the guest pilot inadvertently put the plane in an unusual altitude. “Most of the staff come from Nellis Air Force Base, home of the fighter pilot,” says Coe. “Nobody flies these airplanes more than we do.” He adds that Sky Combat Ace is highly regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration and has a perfect safety record with zero accidents. The flying session wraps up with a final treat — 20 minutes of low-level dynamic flying across the desert. The area near Las Vegas is ideal for this as the uninhabited desert makes it legal and safe to cruise close to the ground, where the true magnitude of the aircraft’s speed is more appreciable. Returning to base, the guest pilot gets a chance to debrief in the hangar-cum-flight museum before catching the limo back to his hotel or house. Many people swear by the registered trademark: “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas”, but this is one extreme experience that no one would want to keep a secret. Sky Combat Ace makes this easy by offering guest pilots a high-quality video shot from within the cockpit so they can relive their adventure with family and friends back home. JETGALA

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BLOODHOUND SSC by Brian Moore

R OS LCE KD E T A SUPERSONIC RACER EVOLVED FROM AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY

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OPPOSITE The Bloodhound SSC is a racing car with the framework and panels of an aircraft THIS PAGE, FROM TOP The Thrust SSC, driven by Andy Green, was the first car to break the sound barrier in 1997 Image courtesy of Richard Meridith Hardy

The Thrust SSC was powered by two afterburning Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines, as used in the British F-4 Phantom II jet fighter Image courtesy of Cmglee

“THERE ARE HUGE CHALLENGES IN PUSHING THE CAR ON TO 1,000 MPH; PRINCIPALLY, KEEPING THE CAR STABLE THROUGHOUT SUBSONIC, TRANSONIC AND SUPERSONIC SPEEDS”

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or fast travellers, the Gulfstream 650 has the looks, speed, range and luxury, but that’s up in the air where it can travel at Mach 0.9 with little difficulty. For those on wheels, there’s always the MercedesBenz S65 AMG, which will comfortably get you from 0-60 mph in well under five seconds. Or how about the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport, which reaches its top speed of 267 mph in sleek style? If these are still too slow, there is a machine under construction that eschews sumptuous comforts but will run faster than any aircraft can travel at ground level, and beyond the sound barrier — all on land. The first time a car broke the speed of sound was in 1997, when RAF fighter pilot Wing Commander Andy Green drove the Thrust SSC. Now, 15 years later, Green and Thrust SSC developer Richard

Noble are part of the team behind Bloodhound SSC, who have set their sights on a new land speed record: 1,000 mph (roughly Mach 1.3) in 45 seconds. The Bloodhound SSC (supersonic car) mixes motor sport and aircraft technology, with the front half comprising a carbon fibre monocoque like a racing car and the back half consisting of a metallic framework and panels like an aircraft. The 14-metrelong car is shaped like a pencil, weighs more than seven tonnes and is propelled by both a jet engine and a hybrid rocket motor, producing a total of more than 135,000 hp. Stopping the car is achieved by air brakes, two drag chutes, and wheel brakes. The project’s chief engineer Mark Chapman is only too aware of the hurdles facing the team. “There are huge challenges in pushing the car on to 1,000 mph; principally, keeping the car stable throughout subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds. The >> JETGALA

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“IF WE ACHIEVE 1,000 MPH, IT MAY BE THE LAST WORLD LAND SPEED RECORD EVER SET”

The Bloodhound SSC can soar up to 25,000 ft if fired like a rocket straight up into the air

SIT BACK (DON’T RELAX) While the Bloodhound SSC can certainly boast of speed, it far from offers the luxury found in other fast cars. RAF pilot Wing Commander Andy Green, who will drive the car in an attempt to reach 1,000 mph, will have to lie feet-first in the cockpit. As the car accelerates from 0-1,000 mph in 42 seconds, he will experience a force of about 2.5g, (two and a half times his body weight), causing blood to rush to his head. Deceleration will create forces of up to 3g, resulting in blood draining to his feet and a possible blackout. Green will prepare his body for such conditions by flying upside-down. He writes a monthly update on his blog, www.bloodhoundssc.com/andygreen.

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>> length of the desert is also a limitation; the longest, consistently firm track we can find is 12 miles. It’s located on the Hakskeen Pan, South Africa,” Chapman says. With a degree in aeronautical engineering, Chapman previously worked with Boeing as part of the design team on the STOVL (short take-off and vertical landing) system for the F-35 Lightning II, but says he had never imagined working on a supersonic car. He adds: “This project allows us to demonstrate new technology from many different fields: for example, additive manufacturing (3D printing) is being used extensively in the build of the car... We have employed extensive use of computational methods to mathematically work out the aerodynamics, saving time and money. If we achieve 1,000 mph, it may be the last world land speed record ever set.” That doesn’t mean few designers will ever again create a supersonic car. Chapman says the team is pioneering ‘open data’, sharing all the technical specifications and CAD drawings online in the hopes of inspiring “existing and future generations of engineers, scientists and mathematicians”. With partners ranging from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the SERCO Group and the Royal Air Force, the Bloodhound SSC has a very strong and experienced team on its side — and the world is watching.


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Miles Currington, Chief Pilot, Ramsay Aircharter Since 1978, our unrivalled range of integrated aviation services, superior safety standards and expert team of professionals means we offer the right solution for any situation. Whether your aviation needs are business, government or private, contact us today to discover how we can support you.

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ffluent individuals in China appear to continue to make luxury purchases, despite government efforts to cool the trend. The top wealth bracket, in particular, is now looking to acquire ultimate status symbols — such as a private jet, for example. It has been 16 years since Yue Zhang, the CEO, chairman and president of energy and construction company Broad Group became China’s first private aircraft owner, through his purchase of a Cessna Citation jet in 1997. A decade later, there were more than 20 private business aircraft parked across the country. Between 2009 and 2011, more than 80 private aircraft had been purchased by businesses and private individuals, according to an executive from the China Business Aviation Group. Currently, there are more than 130 private planes, due to a recent boom in the country’s private aircraft market. China’s ultra-high-net-worth (UHNW) population is expected to exceed 12,250 this year, according to wealth intelligence company, Wealth-X. This represents a nine per cent increase from last year. Chinese UHNW individuals’ combined net worth is also projected to increase by eight per cent to USD1.7 trillion. These factors have led to a surge in

spending, which is expected to hit USD7 billion this year. There are also more than 1,245 Chinese UHNWIs worth over USD250 million and the number of private aircraft owners is expected to double from 75 last year to 150 this year, Wealth-X estimates. This creates major growth opportunities for private aviation companies, such as Dassault Falcon, Cessna, Bombardier, Gulfstream and Embraer, which are expanding their presence in China. Last March, just four days after its launch, a Chinese private jet dealer Zhuhai Cirrus Aviation sold 14 aircraft, including US-made Cirrus SR20s and SR22s, which have price tags of approximately USD480,000 and USD790,000 respectively. While many have started to express preferences for luxury travel, the majority of purchases stem from business travel, a director from the China Business Aviation Group said. However, the outlook for the Chinese private aviation market is not picture perfect. Bureaucratic red tape has proven problematic for Chinese private aircraft owners. As the country’s airspace is largely controlled by the military, private aviation routes have to be approved days before the actual flight. In addition, infrastructure and landing space are limited. On the other hand, the Chinese government’s attempt to relax aviation regulations and the recent establishment of new infrastructure are gradually starting to widen access to private aviation. China has also opened up low-altitude airspace on a trial basis in north-east, central and south China. This is equivalent to nearly 32 per cent of China’s total land territory, according to an official from the state air traffic commission. Addressing the lack of infrastructure, an official from the Civil Aviation of China said airports specially designed for business aircraft will be built around major cities, such as Shanghai and Beijing. The move to speed up the development of general aviation came in 2008, after Chinese authorities issued a 15-article regulation, cutting the time required to approve private flights from days to hours. The Chinese private aviation market, though in its infant stage, presents immense opportunities for aviation companies planning to expand in the country. It has the support of recent government regulations plus heightened interest and demand for a bespoke lifestyle. And as China continues to strengthen its economy, the country’s private aviation market looks set to take off.

AIRPORTS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR BUSINESS AIRCRAFT WILL BE BUILT AROUND MAJOR CITIES, SUCH AS SHANGHAI AND BEIJING OPPOSITE PAGE Chinese ultra-high-net-worth individuals are looking to buy private jets as a way of maintaining their social status in society THIS PAGE, FROM TOP The number of private jet owners in China is expected to double to 150 this year As China’s airspace is largely controlled by the military, private aviation routes have to be approved days before the actual flight

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by Brian Craig Kennedy

CAPTAIN SPEAKING... THE HUMAN FACTOR

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THERE’S A HUMAN ELEMENT THAT AT TIMES GETS OVERLOOKED WHEN BUYING A NEW JET

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ilots are on the pointy end of the spear. Flying is our passion, our way of life. Often, we find ourselves living in foreign countries where the aviation industry is booming. Some of us even call it home for years on end, as we get attached to the culture, the local food and to living in places that we find exotic and challenging. We take pride in working for our overseas employers, and let it show in all aspects of our operations. Our interest in what we fly goes beyond strapping into the cockpit and pushing up the throttles. Pilots spend long stretches learning the latest technologies, trends, maintenance and safety practices, and international aviation law. So when it comes to acquiring a new jet, pilots and flight crews can be most useful to an owner when choosing a new aircraft type. Pitfalls abound with every such acquisition. Many get the numbers and figures right, but there is a human element that at times gets overlooked when buying a new jet. Reputable brokers remain the number one tool for any jet purchase, but your flight crew can contribute a critical piece of the puzzle, and they are not only able to provide advice when engaged at the outset of the process, but they also play on the owner’s side. From my experience, an owner or flight department that values the flight crew as an integral part of all aspects of an operation is more likely to reap long-term success. When companies and jet owners engage their pilots in discussions and decisions, our vested interest in, motivation and longevity with a flight department increases exponentially. Ask any pilot a few questions about a jet and you’ll be sure to get a heartfelt and deeply knowledgeable response. Ask him to join you at the acquisitions table and you’ll find you’ve gained a tireless advocate. Image by Cristina Matei

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The town of Ubud in Bali is a haven for well designed and spacious villas and retreats Image courtesy of Amandari

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UBUD VILLAS by Rowena Marella-Daw

UBUD-

BALI'S SANCTUM ART, SPIRITUALITY AND NATURE IN BALI’S MOST QUIETLY FAMOUS TOWN

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FAR FROM THE BIKINI-CLAD CROWDS OF KUTA, AND WITH AN EMPHASIS ON CULTURE, YOGA AND AN ORGANIC LIFESTYLE, UBUD HAS ESTABLISHED ITSELF AS BALI’S CREATIVE AND ARTISTIC CAPITAL. FOR SOME, A VISIT TO THIS TOWN IS ALMOST LIKE EMBARKING ON A PILGRIMAGE. A sense of spirituality pervades even within popular tourist spots and activities, such as museums, art galleries, handicraft boutiques, temples and traditional Balinese dance. Beyond all these is a more ancient and mystical atmosphere — rice terraces, forests, valleys, the sacred Ayung River and day-today religious rituals. All these are best observed and enjoyed when staying in a private villa that celebrates both local architecture and the landscape. We pick some of Ubud’s best.

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OPPOSITE PAGE Local building materials and Balinese architectural codes are widely used in Ubud’s top villas Image courtesy of Ken Seet

THIS PAGE, LEFT Four Seasons Resort Bali at Sayan offers a variety of suites and villas which include spacious living areas and a private pool Image courtesy of Markus Gotrz

BELOW With four different resorts around Bali, Komaneka Resorts caters to travellers with various interests and purposes

At Four Seasons Resort Bali at Sayan, 18 suites and 42 private villas are spread along 18 acres of rice terraces, valley forests and the Ayung River. The 1,000-sq-m Royal Villa, located along the river, commands a view of these various landscapes. It is entered through the rooftop, which features a lily pond and meditation area. On the upper level is a living area and bedrooms, while the ground level opens out to a sun terrace and swimming pool, as well as the main living area, open-air dining area and master bedroom.

SPOILT FOR CHOICE Komaneka Resorts comprises four properties found in some of Ubud’s most romantic settings. Each features thatched roofs, Indonesian stones and exotic woods. Komaneka at Rasa Sayang is located along Monkey Forest Road, Ubud’s main cultural and artistic artery, making it an ideal base from which to explore temples, museums, art galleries, boutiques and restaurants. Komaneka at Bisma offers a wedding chapel while Komaneka at Monkey Forest offers lush tropical gardens. Komaneka at Tanggayuda overlooks Oos River and its surrounding valley with paddy fields.

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UBUD HAS LONG BEEN RECOGNISED AS BALI’S CULTURAL AND ARTISTIC CAPITAL The word Amandari means ‘peaceful spirits’, a fitting name for this Aman property situated in the highland village of Kedewatan. An ancient path leads from the resort to a sacred spring-fed pool, where villagers have worshipped at three shrines for hundreds of years. Amandari features pebbled walkways and 30 thatchedroof suites, the biggest of which is the 1,500-sq-m Amandari Villa. Designed like a Balinese compound, the villa encompasses five pavilions — three detached bedrooms, a separate living room with glass walls, and a fully fitted kitchen — plus an outdoor dining area.

Set amid flat rice fields, The Chedi Club at Tanah Gajah spans five hectares and once belonged to Hendra Hadiprana, one of Indonesia’s most celebrated art collectors. Twenty villas showcase Balinese antiques, artefacts and paintings from Hadiprana’s collection, the finest of which are found in the Hadiprana Villa. Originally built as the artist and his wife’s master bedroom, the villa comprises two bedrooms, living and dining areas, tropical gardens and a semi-private, 10-metre-long swimming pool. The resort also boasts an amphitheatre for Kecak dance performances, a lotus pond and views of Mount Agung, Bali’s highest and most sacred mountain. 74

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FROM TOP Amandari invites guests to get in touch with nature with open-air living spaces and cosy furniture The Chedi Club at Tanah Gajah features authentic local paintings and dance performances


A SENSE OF SPIRITUALITY PERVADES EVEN WITHIN TOURIST SPOTS AND ACTIVITIES

DIRECTORY A descendant of an Ubud prince designed The Royal Pita Maha in the village of Kedewatan to represent the spirituality and splendour of ancient Balinese palaces, while seamlessly blending contemporary luxuries such as private swimming pools. Offering ample space for a wedding party, the 600-sq-m Royal House features a glass wedding chapel, swimming pool and master bedroom. The resort’s wellness and healing centre is complemented by an organic farm close to the Ayung Healing Villa, a 73-metre lagoon and a holy spring.

Four Seasons Resort Bali at Sayan Sayan, Ubud, Bali 80571 Indonesia T: +62 361 701 010 F: +62 361 977 588 Amandari Kedewatan PO Box 33 Ubud, Bali 80571 T: +94 11 203 5700 or +94 777 743 500 F: +94 11 255 5922 E: reservations@amanresorts.com The Chedi Club at Tanah Gajah Jalan Goa Gajah, Tengkulak Kaja Ubud, Gianyar Bali, Indonesia T: +62 361 975 685 F: +62 361 975 686 E: reservation@ghmhotelsbali.com The Royal Pita Maha Desa Kedewatan PO Box 198 Ubud, Bali 80571 Indonesia T: +62 361 980 022 F: +62 361 980 011

TOP Guests at The Royal Pita Maha are pampered at the wellness and revitalisation spas BOTTOM With different design themes for each villa, guests at Kayumanis Ubud Private Villas & Spa are spoilt for choice

Cinnamon trees, fragrant frangipani, and vistas of tropical forests create an intimate setting at Kayumanis Ubud Private Villas & Spa. Each of the 23 villas is designed according to a specific theme (Javanese, Balinese, Oriental, Palembang, Primitive, Ethnic or Modern), and comes with a private pool and open-air garden bath. Cabanas, an infinity pool, extensive wine menu and organically grown food enhance your stay, but a more unique experience is savouring a full-moon blessing dinner in your villa in accordance with local rituals.

Kayumanis Ubud Private Villas & Spa Sayan Village PO Box 777 Ubud, Bali 80571 Indonesia T: +62 361 972 777 F: +62 361 972 660 E: experience@kayumanis.com Komaneka Resorts (Komaneka at Rasa Sayang) Jalan Monkey Forest Ubud, Gianyar 80571 Bali, Indonesia T: +62 361 975 491 F: +62 361 971 955 E: reservation@komaneka.com

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SIHH 2013 by Alvin Wong

MONUMENTAL M O V E M E N TS A PARADE OF DARING WATCHES IN CLASSIC CASES

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TOP WATCHMAKERS CONTINUE TO PUSH THE LIMITS OF INNOVATION while expanding the use of unconventional materials, shapes or combinations. This was again seen at this year’s Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH), held from 21 to 25 January 2013 in Geneva. We feature some of this year’s most ground-breaking pieces, many of which come in sober or classic profiles.


A. LANGE & SÖHNE GRAND COMPLICATION Seven years in the making and limited to six pieces, the Grand Complication by A. Lange & Söhne is set to be the brand’s most coveted creation yet. It uses the hand-wound Calibre L190.2, which boasts a range of chiming complications (grande and petite sonnerie, plus minute repeater), as well as a split-seconds chronograph and perpetual calendar with moon-phase display. The movement comes with a 30-hour power reserve and is housed in a 50-mm, pink-gold case.

MANY OF THIS YEAR’S MOST GROUND-BREAKING PIECES COME IN SOBER OR CLASSIC PROFILES

AUDEMARS PIGUET TRADITION TOURBILLON MINUTE REPEATER CHRONOGRAPH Limited to two 10-piece editions — pink and white gold, or titanium and white gold — the Tradition Tourbillon Minute Repeater Chronograph is housed in a cushion-shaped case reminiscent of 1920s timepieces. The watch is driven by the hand-wound Calibre 2874, a 504-part movement with 48-hour power reserve that not only integrates the trio of complications, but also boasts handfinishing that can be admired from the transparent sapphire case-back.

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TOP WATCHMAKERS CONTINUE TO PUSH THE LIMITS OF I N NO V AT I O N W H I L E EXP A N D I N G THE USE OF UNCONVENTIONAL MATERIALS, SHAPES OR COMBINATIONS CARTIER ROTONDE DOUBLE MYSTERY TOURBILLON Cartier’s Rotonde Double Mystery Tourbillon takes inspiration from the brand’s legendary mystery clocks. The watch not only doubles the tourbillon’s efficiency by having the mechanism rotate on two axes to counter mechanical errors more effectively, but also heightens its aesthetic allure with its ‘mystery’ mechanism. Here, the tourbillon is mounted on a clear sapphire disc-and-rack system, which gives the impression that it is rotating freely in space.

JAEGER-LECOULTRE MASTER GRANDE TRADITION GYROTOURBILLON 3 JUBILEE Limited to 75 pieces, the Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3 Jubilee celebrates Jaeger-LeCoultre’s 180th anniversary. It is anchored by the brand’s famed gyrotourbillon (a double-axis tourbillon with a spherical balance wheel and cage), which appears here in a ‘flying’ version, as if floating in a vacuum. Three separate, off-centred sub-dials indicate the time, day-night display, and an analogue-digital hybrid chronograph display with seconds register and minutes that is shown via jumping numerals. It runs on the hand-wound Calibre 176 movement.

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PARMIGIANI TORIC QUAESTOR LABYRINTHE Greek mythology, Swiss ingenuity and Eastern ostentation merge in the Toric Quaestor Labyrinthe. This platinum watch features a whitegold dial with labyrinth pattern and a layer of Burmese jade underneath. A minute-repeater movement is integrated into the case for perfect sound reverberation, thus avoiding platinum’s dampening effect on sound. The movement features an additional silent flywheel that ensures constant power supply and eradicates unwanted mechanical humming when in operation.

PIAGET ALTIPLANO AUTOMATIC GEM-SET SKELETON Piaget continues to push the limits of ultra-slim movements with the Altiplano Automatic Gem-Set Skeleton. Building on the Calibre 1200S, the world’s thinnest skeleton movement that was launched last year, the watch reconfigures the movement’s architecture and boasts 259 brilliant-cut diamonds and 11 black sapphire cabochons. Now, with the new gem-encrusted 1200D movement measuring just 3mm in height, and a 6.10mm-thin, fully diamond-paved, white-gold case, the timepiece scores two new world records — for both the world’s thinnest automatic gem-set skeleton movement and watch. The watch comes with a black alligator strap with a diamond-set, white folding clasp.

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CATERHAM CARS by Steve Slater

THE LIGHTNESS OF BE I NG A MINIMALIST RACE CAR FOR MAXIMUM FUN ON THE OPEN ROAD

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OPPOSITE PAGE The Supersport R, the successor of Supersport, houses a 2.9l Duratec engine and produces 180 bhp THIS PAGE, FROM TOP The Superlight R300 is able to travel from 0 - 60 mph in 4.5 seconds Caterham cars, such as the Superlight R600, have no doors, roofs or windscreens

THERE ARE PROBABLY ONLY TWO COUNTRIES IN THE WORLD where the production of high-performance sports cars can be described as a ‘cottage industry’. In Italy, names like Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati emphasise high-end style. In Great Britain, while Aston Martin and Jaguar are luxury icons, smaller independent companies such as Lotus or Morgan have traditionally offered cars that match the performance, if not necessarily the comfort, of their big budget brethren. One such ‘cottage industry’ carmaker has taken this to the extreme — Caterham Cars. Minimalism is the essence of a Caterham car — anything which doesn’t add to the driving experience simply isn’t there. It eschews such things as electronic traction control, power steering and anti-lock brakes. And who needs doors, roofs or windscreens? The design is straightforward: a lightweight tubular steel ‘spaceframe’ chassis, a frontmounted engine and aluminium body panels simply bolted to the frame. Like the frog-like headlights, the wheels stand proud of the car, enclosed in old-fashioned mud-guards. If this sounds like a specification from a 1950s racer, it is. The car known today as the Caterham 7 (or simply, the Seven) was originally produced by fellow British car-maker Lotus. Engineer Colin Chapman created his seventh Lotus design in 1957, combining the performance of his earlier race cars with road-legal capability. Chapman had studied aircraft design and used this knowledge to create the lightest structure possible to make the most of the relatively lowpowered engines of the era. >>

MINIMALISM IS THE ESSENCE OF A CATERHAM CAR — ANYTHING WHICH DOESN’T ADD TO THE DRIVING EXPERIENCE SIMPLY ISN’T THERE JETGALA

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THE FIRST CATERHAM SUPER 7 TOOK TO THE ROAD IN 1973 AND THE CAR HAS SINCE REMAINED IN CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION >> The first Lotus 7 cars were agile and weighed just 352 kg, and became instant road favourites and track winners. In 1959, a car dealer, Caterham Cars, became one of Lotus’ first distributors. By the start of the 1970s, though, Lotus had become a multiple Formula One world champion, and Chapman was keen to move upmarket with new sports car models. Believing that the Seven still had a future, Caterham bought the rights to continue its manufacture. The first Caterham Super 7 took to the road in 1973 and the car has since remained in continuous production. Today’s Caterham cars range from a 125-horsepower Classic model, which remains true to the original concept, to the range-topping, 260-bhp Cosworth Duratec-powered CSR, which famously took the track lap record from supercars costing five times its price on the BBC Top Gear TV show. Caterham cars are sold as complete knock-down kits in keeping with tradition, as starter kits, or fully built. In 2011, Malaysian entrepreneur Tony Fernandes acquired Caterham, neatly sidestepping a legal battle with Lotus over the naming rights of his Formula One team by rebranding it as Caterham F1. The Formula One image has boosted global interest and today more than half of the cars are exported, with Japan, France and Germany showing a strong appetite. There are active distributors in Singapore and Taiwan, with India and China next on the list. “In his wildest dreams, I doubt Colin Chapman would have thought his lightweight sports car would last half a century, that it would still be a benchmark for performance and handling, and be sold in over 20 countries,” says Graham Macdonald, Caterham Cars’ CEO. “The Seven will always be a work in progress. Consequently, we don’t stand still. It’s not in our nature, nor that of the car.” 82

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LEFT The SP/300.R features an entirely new design from Caterham, with twin rollover protection hoops and a lightweight polyurethane body ABOVE A Caterham Roadsport fitted with a Ford Sigma engine Image courtesy of Brian Snelson

DRIVING THE SEVEN To get in a Caterham car, which has no doors but has a soft top and flexible side-screens, simply remove these and step over the side, sit down and strap in. Turn the key and the exhaust barks, somewhere behind your passenger’s left buttock. From the controls you know immediately there is no electronic or hydraulic intervention here. The pedals feel directly connected to the clutch, brake and accelerator, because they are. So is the gear lever, which literally snicks straight into the top of the box, moving no more than a few centimetres with each gear change. On the move, everything about the Seven is direct. The tiny steering wheel squirms in your hands over the bumps, yet it’s go-kart sharp — you never turn it more than 45 degrees. Because of the ultra-light weight, the springs are soft and the ride is surprisingly good. That light weight also means spectacular acceleration and pin-sharp handling. The Seven feels like a four-wheel motorbike — noisy, draughty and fun, like all sports cars should be.


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REVERBERI DESIGN by Carol Lee

ENGAGING THE SENSES WITH INTIMATE SUPERYACHT INTERIORS

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A DEEP LOVE FOR SEA AND SPACE IS EVIDENT IN THE DESIGNS OF MICHELA REVERBERI, who is well known for imbuing superyachts with a sense of intimacy. One of her most lauded projects is the 55-metre Quinta Essentia (meaning ‘Fifth Element’), which was built by Heesen Yachts and revealed in 2011. With an interior awash in natural light, featuring splashes of colour and patterns against a white background, Quinta Essentia hardly gives a hint that it was one of Reverberi’s most challenging projects, as it required her to work from the framework of another designer, Ken Freivokh. Freivokh’s original design satisfied the owners’ wishes for a futuristic and minimalist feel, but they later desired a more intimate ambience and brought Reverberi in. Building on the yacht’s name, Reverberi showcased five elements — earth, water, air, fire, and the synthesis of all four. Neutral and vivid hues create an elegant yet playful palette — in the salon, for instance, floral pillows adorn a cream sofa, while deep aubergine enhances black and white fittings. In the owners’ suite, silver cushion covers and bedspreads reflect light from outside. For the owners, the fifth element is fine Tuscan wines, represented by the yacht’s and its tender’s exterior paint scheme — oyster white and a custom metallic red inspired by the colour of Merlot from the Montemaggio estate. The owners requested a large stateroom — the largest ever seen in a Heesen yacht when it was revealed, a Jacuzzi with a waterfall, and a dining table located on the bridge deck instead of its conventional position in the salon. >>

OPPOSITE PAGE Reverberi incorporates the sensations stirred by dynamic views into her yacht interior designs THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP The Blade’s open-air wooden deck creates inviting spaces for lounging and conversation The Quinta Essentia’s salon offers a touch of intimacy with floral patterns that complement cream-coloured furniture Residential and yacht interior designer Michela Reverberi established Reverberi Design in 2000

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FROM TOP Reverberi is known for daring to use bold colours, as well as furnishings that are more typically found in houses than yachts, as seen on the Blade Reverberi balances out the large spaces of the 72-metre Stella Maris by using lightly coloured furniture and decor to create a cosy atmosphere The brief for Reverberi’s successful refit of the H2ome yacht into the Blade called for new guest areas

>> “I always look for harmony and elegance, trying to get the highest synthesis between clients’ culture and expectations and my culture and style, and trying every time to achieve a unique and original product. Great attention is given to sensations you can feel [in] the space,” says Reverberi. Each project presents a new challenge that she relishes, but she is especially delighted with her designs for Quinta Essentia and the 72-metre Stella Maris, which was built by Viareggio SuperYachts and delivered last year. Featuring natural stone and quality fabrics, Stella Maris exudes a fresh, light and refined ambience. It features 2.7-metre-high ceilings, tall glass windows, staggered internal decks and a vertical garden. Bleached teak is used in abundance throughout the vessel, complemented by more exotic materials such as galuchat and nubuck, and more vibrant colours such as green and blue marble. Reverberi established her Rome-based company Reverberi Design in 2000, and also works on residential interiors. For her, the major difference between the two spaces is that on yachts, “you have a dynamic view from the windows, [creating] more exciting experiences and sensations”. To keep her designs current and appealing to clients, she studies various creative fields. “I take inspiration from all forms of art and nature. Projecting on yachts requires transversal training and synthesis. I like to integrate materials and technologies from different sectors into my projects in order not to have limits to creativity,” she says. Looking ahead, Reverberi is kept busy with several upcoming projects, including refitting of a 38-metre yacht and developing a new concept for a 51-metre yacht. 86

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M

ECHAN I CAL AVE R ICK FRANCK MULLER

NEW TECHNICAL FEATS BY ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST KNOWN INDEPENDENT WATCHMAKERS SINCE THE FIRST EDITION OF WORLD PRESENTATION OF HAUTE HORLOGERIE (WPHH) in 1998, the event has become a much-awaited, ‘alternative’, annual gathering for watch connoisseurs and industry professionals alike. Today, the show continues to surprise, entertain and educate visitors, as well as promote the value of independent watchmaking. We speak to the man behind this influential exhibition, Franck Muller. Q: You recently introduced a few new timepieces (such as the 7-Days Power Reserve) and opened new boutiques in Asia. What can we expect from the new year in terms of new models and new markets? During the recent WPHH that was held from 20 to 25

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January in Genthod, we presented several new models for men and women in different variants, both technical and jewellery-inspired. Some of the key highlights include the world’s fastest tourbillon — the Thunderbolt Tourbillon — and the Giga Tourbillon. The brand will also continue to see the opening of new shops. Q: Can you describe briefly the creative process for the Conquistador Grand Prix collection, and how was it different from creating other collections? Inspired by the world of Formula One racing, the Conquistador Grand Prix collection was created to epitomise the cutting-edge technology, high performance and precision of motorsport. The pairing of materials


OPPOSITE PAGE The tourbillon in the Thunderbolt Tourbillon timepiece is powered by four barrels, and rotates on a ceramic ball bearing 12 times a minute

OUR RELENTLESS PURSUIT FOR CREATIVITY HAS ENABLED US TO PUSH OUR DESIGN BOUNDARIES such as ergal, rose gold and titanium with PVD-coated titanium, together with an oversized Cintrée Curvex case, lends a sporty and masculine profile to this collection. Q: What have been the top three contributing factors to your success? Our relentless pursuit of creativity has enabled us to push our design boundaries and today we offer a wide range of models. We ensure that there is harmony in the pieces we create, by balancing aesthetics with technical skill and comfort. Finally, as the Master of Complications, we have been able to create many notable technical pieces and world firsts. Q: What do you perceive as the current biggest threat to high-end mechanical watchmaking, and how does the industry need to overcome it? In my opinion, the control and supply of watch components, the availability of competent watchmakers who specialise in high-end watchmaking, and the quality of distribution channels are some challenges to the industry. What we see now is the consolidation and vertical integration of companies within the industry to tackle these issues. Q: You have said that the quintessential Franck Muller customer is a leader in his or her field. Is there a new demographic you are hoping to reach out to with your new design? When you buy a Franck Muller, you demonstrate a difference of reflection and appreciation, which is recognised by others as you being a person out of the ordinary. Q: You’ve recently collaborated with Roberto Cavalli. Are there other collaborations planned for this year? I had a lot of fun collaborating with Roberto Cavalli because of the same principles we share in the watchmaking and fashion industry. With regards to future collaborations, we are definitely open to working with other personalities, as long as we are able to appreciate and respect the same values. Q: What watch do you wear most often? What do you like about it most? I constantly rotate between my Franck Muller watches and my current favourite is the Giga Tourbillon with Black Diamonds. I love its chic vibe and the comfort of its Cintrée Curvex shape.

Franck Muller, the Master of Complications

UP CLOSE What does time mean to you? The opportunity of a lifetime What is your biggest gripe about flying/travel? It makes you disappear from one place and makes you appear in another What surprises people most about you? My simplicity even though I am known as the Master of Complications What is the best gift you’ve received? My children What is your morning routine like? I like to start my day by taking time to read the newspaper What car do you drive? It depends on where I am and where I have to go! How did you earn your first dollar? I was 12 when I sold entry tickets for a swimming pool Words to live by — what are yours? To live life in harmony

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LUXE TEUFFEL GUITARS by Sandy Tan

A GUITAR MAKER’S UNIQUE RHYTHM

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OPPOSITE PAGE The Birdfish comes in a choice of apricot, fire, sapphire, olive and charcoal hues THIS PAGE The Birdfish positions a guitar’s fundamental elements in a modular fashion. It has been recognised as one of the most important guitars of the 20th century Ulrich Teuffel founded Teuffel Guitars in 1998 and studied industrial design from 1992 to 1996

“I BELIEVE THAT THE FUTURE OF THE GUITAR STILL LIES IN ITS IMMEDIACY. As a body-contacting medium of expression of rhythm and harmony, the guitar can produce a sense of authenticity,” says guitarmaker Ulrich Teuffel. Each of his distinctive products is a specific statement, as well as a versatile instrument that allows the musician to play with sound in unconventional ways. Teuffel understands that choosing the right musical instrument is a personal decision, and carefully considers the elements of sound, touch and ease of playing it, as well as what it says about the musician and his music. Having come from a family of engineers, cabinet-makers and a painter, it was only natural that Teuffel took up design as a career. After high school, he apprenticed in metalwork and construction at Mercedes-Benz. “During that period I learned that you can’t name something ‘exact’ if it isn’t down to one hundredth of a millimetre. Today I think that the figure is actually beyond one thousandth of a millimetre,” he says. His first complete guitar was an acoustic, designed in homage to master guitar-maker Steve Klein, who is known for his unconventional, asymmetrical designs. In 1988, Teuffel founded his company and produced his first series of guitars: the Dr. Mabuse and the bass line JFK, which featured glued-in necks and was made of mahogany, flamed maple and quilted Brazilian rosewood. He created the Tesla, an industrial or noise electric guitar devoted to his belief that there is great creative potential in a guitar’s rhythm. Tesla was designed with the recognition that unwanted noise and feedback have become

BIRDFISH PRODUCES A PERCUSSIVE AND RAUNCHY SOUND, AND PRESENTS UNLIMITED TONAL POSSIBILITIES musical archetypes, much like the scratching of records or skipping of CDs. Hence contact points and press buttons, which can activate both modern and more primitive sound effects including such feedback, have been placed all over the Tesla’s body. When Teuffel revealed the guitar in 2000, his first customers included experimental guitarists Henry Kaiser and David Torn. Teuffel has since expanded the line and has also created customised versions, including an eight-string Tesla with a 30-inch scale. In 1995, Teuffel revealed what has since become his most popular series, the Birdfish. It produces a percussive and raunchy sound, and presents unlimited tonal possibilities. Elements of the guitar, such as the fretboard and pickup, appear disjointed from the rest of its body, which consists of two tonebars screwed onto central elements, the ‘bird’ and the ‘fish’. The neck is bolted onto the upper element ‘bird’ while the lower ‘fish’ contains the control box with guitar electronics. The body is made of aluminium, which transfers vibrations without filtering influence. A layer of nickel and chrome are applied and polished with a high-gloss finish. The Birdfish has won three design awards and is exhibited at several museums. It is played by musicians such as Hans Zimmer, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons and Dusty Hill, Metallica’s Kirk Hammet and Helmet’s Page Hamilton. In an interview with Guitar World, Gibbons said of the Birdfish: “I defy any other instrument, besides these odd-ball things, to get that crazy.” Teuffel has since updated the instrument, which comes in a limited edition of 500. JETGALA

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SANTONI by Fiona Low

A BESPOKE SHOEMAKER GOES THE DISTANCE AT THE OPENING OF SANTONI’S FIRST STORE IN SINGAPORE LAST JUNE, the Italian bespoke shoemaker’s CEO and head designer Giuseppe Santoni was seen dressed in an impeccably cut navy suit and crisp white shirt. All his suits are in his favourite colour, blue and “classic” is how he describes his style. The same could be said of his brand, which despite the advance of 3D printing, prefers not to alter traditional methods of making a pair of shoes. Founded in 1975 by Andrea Santoni, the company prides itself on its handmade shoes. The cap toe was the very first kind it designed. Each pair takes between 20 and 40 hours to create and consists of more than

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40 components. There are more than 100 production stages from designing to cutting the leather, stitching and shining. Each stage is carried out by a dedicated craftsman. Giuseppe says that sewing by hand delivers finer stitching and the shoes last longer. The leather is coloured by hand by applying multiple layers of dye onto the leather until the desired shade is achieved. This gives the patina more depth, revealing varied shades and tonalities in a single shoe. Paintings, the opera and beautiful jewellery are some of the things that inspire Giuseppe’s masterpieces. “Sometimes I see art that gives me a special feeling and I want to try and recreate that with the shoes I make,”


“SOMETIMES I SEE ART THAT GIVES ME A SPECIAL FEELING AND I WANT TO TRY AND RECREATE THAT WITH THE SHOES I MAKE” OPPOSITE FROM TOP Giuseppe Santoni is inspired by his personal experiences, as well as art and jewellery Santoni’s latest collection sees the use of double buckles and elegant colour palettes THIS PAGE Each pair takes between 20 and 40 hours to hand make, and consists of over 40 components A growing Asian clientele like to explore new colours and materials in a bespoke pair

he says. He sends his team pictures of intriguing objects and together they replicate the colour and feel of the item. The 44-year-old found himself so enraptured with paintings in the Hermitage Museum that he flew three of his designers to St Petersburg. Their travels have been translated into Santoni’s 2013 Spring/Summer collection, which features a new range of sneakers as well as an eclectic combination of materials, use of double buckles and elegant colour palettes. Giuseppe was 19 years old when he started working for his father. By 21, he was the company’s chief executive officer, leading the small Le Marchebased factory to make its mark in the global arena. Santoni has stores in 15 countries around the world, plus stores

in Japan and China. New products are also made to better suit the Asian fit. While European consumers are more conservative in style, Asians are more open to new colours and materials. Reptile skins such as crocodile and lizard, as well as ostrich leather are more popular here than with European clientèle. Many Asian men also like shoes without laces, hence moccasins are a must have. Santoni has been expanding its range of products over the years to include leather accessories and a women’s line. The Spring/Summer 2013 collection will also introduce bags for women. Giuseppe reveals that plans are in the works for fragrance and eyewear to debut within the next five years. JETGALA

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THE DESIGN HOUSE BEHIND SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST ICONIC CARS 94

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PININFARINA by Jeff Heselwood

THIS SPREAD Sergio, a concept car based on the Ferrari 458 Spider’s chassis, evokes Sergio Pininfarina’s best designs for Ferrari in the ‘60s and ‘70s. It will have a maximum speed of 320 km/h

LIKE MANY MAKERS OF AIRCRAFT, CARS AND WATCHES IN THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY, CAR DESIGNER PININFARINA almost became a casualty of World War II. Founded in Turin in 1928 as Società anonima Carrozzia Pinin Farina, it only had a few years to establish its reputation before the war required it to stop car production and create ambulances and search carriages instead — until its factory got bombed. Small wonder that the organisers of the post-war 1946 Paris Motor Show banned it from participating. Of course, founder Gian Battista “Pinin” Farina and his son Sergio defied the ban and drove two of their cars — an Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 S and a Lancia Aprilia cabriolet — to the show and parked these at the entrance, in full view of the 809,000 visitors and to the delight of the press. In 1951 the Museum of Modern Art included Pininfarina’s 1945 Cisitalia 202 Coupé in a presentation honouring eight automobile designs, and this publicity led to a contract with Nash Motors. But it was another deal — also signed in 1951 — that forever changed the company’s path. Preferring not to meet in each other’s headquarters, Farina and Enzo Ferrari met in the small town of Tortona — between Turin and Modena — to discuss a possible partnership. Since that time, the only road-going production Ferraris not designed by Pininfarina have been the 1973 Dino 308 GT4 (designed by Bertone) and 2013 LaFerrari (designed in-house). >>

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SO FAMOUS HAD THE CAR DESIGNER BECOME IN THE US THAT PRESIDENT DWIGHT EISENHOWER HIMSELF RECEIVED FARINA IN ONE OF HIS VISITS TO THE COUNTRY >> Farina’s son Sergio was involved in design, engineering, technology and construction for Ferrari, and at one time was Ferrari’s design chief and one of its board of directors. He also went on to become perhaps the world’s most famous car designer, with iconic creations such as the 1984 Ferrari Testarossa, the 2002 Ferrari Enzo and the 2004 Ferrari Scaglietti, as well as the Pinin concept for Ferrari’s only four-door product. Sergio took over as CEO of Pininfarina when his father died in 1966 and increased production from 524 to more than 50,000 units a year during his 40-year leadership. It was Sergio who established Pininfarina as the world’s leading styling house, as well as the engineering company to whom many motor manufacturers would turn to create the ever-popular, folding hard tops that have since appeared on numerous vehicles. The Pininfarina team has also designed successful motor cars for other brands, such as the 1986 Fiat 124 Spider, the Alfa Romeo Spider, Peugeot’s 406 Coupé, the delectable Fiat 130 Coupé and the 2003 Maserati Quattroporte. Other clients have included Cadillac, Rolls-Royce, Volvo, General Motors and Austin, a now-defunct British manufacturer. So famous had the car designer become in the US that President Dwight Eisenhower himself received the senior Farina (who later changed his last name to Pininfarina) in one of his visits to the country. Pininfarina was the first independent Italian design house to sign an agreement with the Chinese motor industry in 1996, and now counts a number of Chinese motor manufacturers among its clients, including AviChina, Changfeng and JAC, as well as Chery and Brilliance. It was the first to introduce a coupe-cabriolet with a retractable hard top for the Chinese market with the Chery M14 model. Because of these close liaisons, Pininfarina has opened a permanent office in Beijing and a product development centre in Shanghai.

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ABOVE, FROM LEFT Apart from sporting windowless scissordoors for easy access, the Sergio also does away with a roof and windscreen The Sergio’s rear bonnet cools the mid-rear engine by releasing exhaust air from the oil coolers BELOW The two-seater sports car is a good 150 kgs lighter as compared to the Spider, improving acceleration and comfort


preview, © Cyril Lagel. SAFI organisation, a subsidiary of Art de France and Reed Expositions France

Home collections 6-10 SEPT. 2013 PARIS NORD VILLEPINTE www.maison-objet.com The show for home-fashion

Trade only. Tél. + 33 (0)1 44 29 02 00 info@safisalons.fr


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Traditional barbershop Truefitt & Hill has opened its first Asian branches in Kuala Lumpur and Singapore

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TRUEFITT & HILL by Jonathan Ho

GROOM ROOM THE TRADITIONAL GENTLEMEN’S BARBERSHOP RETURNS TO ASIA

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“I GREW UP IN AN AGE WHERE MEN WHO PREENED IN THE MIRROR WERE TEASED MERCILESSLY AND SOMETIMES EVEN BEATEN. BUT NO LONGER”

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LOOKING YOUR BEST IS A STUDIED ART IN BOTH ATTENTION TO DETAIL AND ALMOST MILITARY PRECISION. No one seems to know this better than the British. It’s no coincidence that just two years after the beginning of Savile Row in 1803, William Francis Truefitt opened his first gentlemen’s barber shop at Long Acre, London, in 1805. After all, one can dress to the nines, but the grooming has to match. By 1811, Truefitt had established himself as court hair-cutter and court head-dresser, and he and his brother soon became wig makers by Royal Appointment to His Majesty King George III. Some will argue that in the two centuries that have passed since, personal care has gone from required daily regiment to hurried afterthought. Thankfully, barbers like Truefitt & Hill have remained resilient in an age of ‘bed-head’ hair and ‘fashionable’ hipster beards. Today, as fashion returns to classic elegance, they stand ready to bring men’s grooming out from feminised salons into genuine gentlemen’s clubs. Marc Nicholson, CEO of Truefitt & Hill Singapore, brought the traditional English barber to this country not as an act of cold business calculation, but rather as a result of passionate self-interest, having found the experience of


OPPOSITE PAGE Truefitt & Hill offers complimentary shoe-shining and shirt-ironing services and provides patrons with a bar area to relax and unwind

ABOVE Shaving is done with or across the grain to prevent the growth of ingrown hair

THE WET SHAVE

“I GREW UP IN AN AGE WHERE MEN WHO PREENED IN THE MIRROR WERE TEASED MERCILESSLY AND SOMETIMES EVEN BEATEN. BUT NO LONGER” getting his hair cut in an androgynous or oestrogen-filled environment wanting and at times, emasculating. Growing up in Montreal, he and two generations before him had been served by the local barbershop. When asked why he chose this speck of Asia to site Truefitt & Hill, Nicholson explained that while Chinese men might not need to shave on a daily basis, the ritual of shaving shared between father and son is not only a bonding experience, but also a rite of passage that is passed down. Chinese fathers groom their sons as successors and future high achievers, and part of this training is instilling a sense of discipline when it comes to one’s personal bearing. “I grew up in an age where men who preened in the mirror were teased mercilessly and sometimes even beaten. But thanks to shows like Mad Men and icons like Don Draper, no longer. Grooming is not only manly; it is also a necessary component to achieving greatness,” says Nicholson. The shift from the metrosexual to the alpha male is palatable and with men returning to suits and hats, it’s no longer an exercise in vanity but a projection of class and distinction. Truefitt & Hill, with its wood-panelled walls, Britishstyle furnishing by Timothy Oulton and traditional leather barbershop chairs, is that bulwark against sloppiness much like the founder brothers themselves were 200 years ago. With complimentary shoe-shining, shirt-ironing and a bar area for martinis, Truefitt & Hill is the perfect balm in a country where some men can still be seen holding their girlfriend’s handbags.

Truefitt & Hill holds a British Royal Warrant of Appointment to Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. This means that at his request, a barber will make a house call to the Royal household to provide shaving service for His Royal Highness. Here is a guide to their legendary wet shave: 1.

Open up your pores with hot water to reduce any dirt or sebum that might get trapped later.

2.

Massage pre-shave oil to soften your whiskers for a smoother shave.

3.

Lather shaving cream to face using a badger brush to lessen chances of skin irritation.

4.

Shave across the grain, never against, to reduce incidence of ingrown hair.

5.

Close your pores by rinsing with cold water. Complete with aftershave.

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LUXE HAJIME RESTAURANT by Suzi Jarrell

O A JAPANESE CHEF PRESENTS HIS WORLD VIEW THROUGH CULINARY ‘PAINTINGS’ 102

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ONLY A HANDFUL OF CHEFS AROUND THE WORLD CAN BOAST OF RECEIVING A THREEMICHELIN-STAR RATING FOR MORE THAN ONE YEAR IN A ROW. But few, if any, can claim gaining it as fast as Hajime Yoneda did, who first earned the prestigious rating only a year and five months after opening his restaurant Hajime in Osaka, Japan. The 40-year-old Yoneda does share something in common with many chefs of his status, though — he began his career in a non-culinary field. Electronic engineering, of all things. Yet, gastronomy remained his goal. After graduating and saving enough money for culinary school, he worked for a restaurant in Japan, and then moved to Paris to continue his training. While there, he took up painting and proved to be as talented at this as he is at cooking. Looking at the dishes that Yoneda now prepares in his own restaurant, influences from his past surface. His plates are like paintings, featuring ingredients with vivid colours. One dish, Chikyu, uses up to 100 vegetables, herbs and edible flowers prepared in various ways — fresh, blanched in

salted water, seared, sautéed, cooked sous-vide or puréed — and laid out attractively on a 60-centimetre, earthenware plate with the juice of littleneck clams poured at the centre. The arrangement is a representation of the planet and its cycles, and how the minerals that nourish plants are washed by the river out to the sea, where they feed shellfish such as clams. Recognising the difficulty of producing dishes of such artistic and gastronomic standards all day, Yoneda has decided to run either a dinner or lunch menu every day, not both. He also emphasises his staff’s enjoyment of the work and their contribution to the dining experience. The restaurant now has a ‘creative meeting’ every week where staff members take turns to propose novel ideas of cooking methods, service, cooking appliances or tableware.

Chef Hajime Yoneda’s experiences as an engineer and a painter influence his dishes, as seen in Sky (opposite page), a foie gras dish (this page, top) and the popular Earth or Chikyu vegetable dish (second from top)

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LUXE

JETGALA INDONESIA

JETGALA INDONESIA TAKES OFF

ON 27 MARCH, JAKARTA-BASED PUBLISHER MOBILIARI GROUP LAUNCHED JETGALA INDONESIA, THE LATEST ADDITION TO ITS STABLE OF LUXURY TITLES. The magazine, published in the Indonesian language, features a mix of local and international content and is aimed squarely at the increasing numbers of affluent Indonesians. “With the huge growth in the number of dollar millionaires in Indonesia, more and more people are craving luxury lifestyles,” said Mobiliari Group Founder and CEO, Millie Stephanie, at the launch, timed to coincide with the closing of the company’s first annual luxury conference. The event was held at The Dharmawangsa Jakarta hotel and brought together leading luxury brands, including Hawker Pacific, Ferrari and Corum, as well as more than 200 delegates, all of whom received a free subscription to the magazine. “We believe that Jetgala Indonesia reflects both the wealth and the taste of this uniquely Indonesian market,” said Millie Stephanie.

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“JETGALA INDONESIA REFLECTS BOTH THE WEALTH AND THE TASTE OF THIS UNIQUELY INDONESIAN MARKET”

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Photography by Chris Nicholls Text by Charmaine Tai

SHADOW PAINTER

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WHEN CHRIS NICHOLLS SAW A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE WHITE SANDS NATIONAL MONUMENT in New Mexico, USA, he instinctively knew it was the perfect location for a fashion photoshoot. “The national park is basically 275 square miles of uninterrupted white sand dunes. I thought that it looked so magical and otherworldly,” he says. Nicholls envisaged a black-and-white photoshoot featuring an “alien bride” with “crazy hair” on a surreal landscape. To depict a strong woman in a desolate environment, he took advantage of the changing winds, the wave-like dunes of gypsum sand, and the play of light and shadow to paint the desired effect. Apart from cold mornings and scorching afternoons, the glare from the glistening sand dunes was also a challenge. The American Air Force conducted missile tests in the area on the second day of the shoot, causing highways to close and delaying the production. But when it all came together, “the model just looked remarkable in this bizarre landscape”, says Nicholls. Born in England and raised in Canada, Nicholls has been a fashion, beauty and celebrity photographer for more than 20 years. He constantly jets between New York and Toronto. Beautiful women, interesting locations and varying qualities of light inspire his work. Nicholls hopes to create images that not only surprise viewers, but also exceed their expectations. www.chrisnichollsphotography.com

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“WE WENT INTO IT WITH A REAL VISION OF A SURREAL LANDSCAPE WITH THIS ALIEN BRIDE AND HER CRAZY HAIR”

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“THE BEAUTY OF BLACK AND WHITE IS HOW YOUR EYE IS NOT DISTRACTED BY COLOUR... SHADOWS BECOME AS MUCH A PART OF THE COMPOSITION AS THE SUBJECT ITSELF”

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AIRBORNE


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF Boeing celebrated the completion of Nanshan Jet’s first Boeing Business Jet

Organisers of this year’s Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition (ABACE), held at the

Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre at Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport from 16-18 April, announced a record of 7,714 visitors — 20 per cent more than last year. There were more than 180 exhibitors, including 40 companies based in Asia Pacific, while 34 aircraft were on static display — more than any previous ABACE. “The potential for business aviation in China and throughout Asia has broken through and is clearly visible to all... It’s clear that, once again this year, Shanghai assumed the center of the world’s business aviation stage,” said NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

has delivered a G450 to new charter operator AllPoints, based out of Chengdu, with a G550 to follow later this year. “The growth of AllPoints reflects the rapid rise of business aviation in China,” said Larry Flynn, president, Gulfstream. The manufacturer’s Asia-Pacific fleet has more than tripled in the last six years, with its large-cabin aircraft in the region having increased from 50 to 169 since 2007. It displayed its G280 and G650 business jets at the Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition (ABACE) for the first time.

pix: Gulfstream and AllPoints.jpg]

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at ABACE. Nanshan Jet’s BBJ, a modified 737-700, is the first BBJ for a Chinese customer designed with a traditional business jet interior that includes a bedroom suite with a queen-size bed and seating for 28 passengers. Of all seven BBJs scheduled to enter service this year with completed VIP interiors, three are for Asian clients. Nanshan Jet, based at Yantai Laishan International Airport, also has a Bombardier Challenger 605, Bombardier Global Express XRS, Gulfstream G450 and Gulfstream G550 in its fleet.

Beechcraft Corporation received an order from Nakanihon Air Service in Japan for a King Air B200 to be used for multi-purpose missions, such as maritime patrol, emergency medical service and passenger transportation. It also announced an order for a Beechcraft King Air C90GTx turboprop from Qingdao Jiutian International Flight Academy, one of two Civil Aviation Administration of China-certified domestic flight schools in China. Beechcraft, which had recently emerged from Chapter 11 and shed its Hawker business jet division, continues to promote its King Air turboprop line in Asia. At ABACE, it displayed the King Air B200GT, which features composite winglets and lightweight composite propellers for improved runway performance, range, speed and enhanced climb.

The FAA has approved Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Centre (SHPBASC) as a Foreign Repair Station, following extensive on-site

inspections, including evaluating the standard of English spoken by Shanghai Hawker Pacific’s local staff. The repair station certificate was issued less than a month after inspection. “There are a number of N registered aircraft based in Asia that belong to regular clients of our

facility. The MRO is well situated to provide comprehensive maintenance support for those planes, and we feel this capability is key to the continuing development of Shanghai as a hub for business aviation in Asia,” said Carey Matthews, general manager for SHPBASC. Cessna Aircraft Company is making progress towards manufacturing business jets in China through its joint venture to be formed with China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Company (CAIGA) in Shijiazhuang and

Zhuhai. “The con-struction of facilities is complete and we expect tooling and equipment to be in place in Shijiazhuang by June and in Zhuhai before the end of the year,” said William Schultz, Cessna’s senior vice president for business development, China. Formation of the joint ventures and the beginning of operations remain subject to various government approvals. Cessna and CAIGA have appointed Trey Wade, former director of the Bell Helicopter Training Academy, as general manager for the Zhuhai operation. David Howard, who was previously responsible for overseeing operations of the Cessna Skycatcher 162 programme in Shenyang, is now general manager for the Shijiazhuang joint venture. The first production unit of Cessna’s new Citation X rolled off its Wichita, Kansas manufacturing plant in April. The programme was first announced at the National Business Aircraft Association (NBAA) trade show in 2010. The Citation X offers a new maximum speed of Mach 0.935, a longer range of 3,242 nm, a maximum altitude of 51,000 feet, a lengthier cabin, and evolved winglets. More than 675 flight hours have been logged on two test aircraft in the Citation X program. Certification is expected by the end of 2013. Earlier in March, Cessna’s first-production New Citation Sovereign also rolled off the production

line in Wichita. Type certification and entry into service are expected by the third quarter of 2013. >>


BUSINESS AVIATION –– MAKING THE DIFFERENCE IN EUROPE Nearly 500 Exhibits • 60 Aircraft on Static Display • Over 12,000 Attendees

TUESDAY, MAY 21; WEDNESDAY, MAY 22; & THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 Palexpo and Geneva International Airport Geneva, Switzerland

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF Nextant Aerospace brought its 400XT business jet to China for the first time

at ABACE. “We continue to see strong interest in China and throughout Asia for our aircraft. Increased business activity throughout China means there is a greater need for efficient business travel while at the same time people are increasingly focused on value,” said Sean McGeough, president, Nextant Aerospace. Nextant has appointed Jet Aviation Singapore as its new authorised service centre in Asia.

the manufacturer successfully powered up the jet’s two Pratt & Whitney 610F engines in March. The Eclipse 550, an enhanced version of the Eclipse 500, will be able to fly at altitudes of up to 41,000 feet at a maximum cruise speed of 430 mph, while consuming 59 gallons of fuel per hour and incurring operating costs of only USD1.69 per nautical mile. Production of the aircraft was restarted in June 2012 following a lull due to bankruptcy.

features, and the Falcon 2000LXS combines the short-field performance of the 2000S and long range capabilities of the 2000LX. The Falcon 2000LXS is slated to replace the 2000LX by the end of 2013.

The Civil Aviation Administration of China has granted Part 145 maintenance approval for the Dassault Falcon 900 EASy business jet series.

Gama Aviation has added an Embraer Legacy 600 to its Middle East fleet.

The same approval was given for the 2000 EASy series and Falcon 7X jet last year. In addition, Dassault Falcon Business Services (Beijing) Co will start operations at its regional customer service headquarters in Beijing in June.

The jet will be based at Gama’s newest operating base, Al Bateen Executive Airport in Abu Dhabi. The Legacy 600 has proven popular with the charter operator’s clients as it offers two separate cabin zones for increased privacy and accommodates up to 13 passengers. The jet can fly non-stop from Abu Dhabi to destinations such as Geneva and Bangkok.

Gulfstream has appointed longtime company employee James Liang as a regional sales manager for Product Support Sales in Asia. Liang will handle

maintenance and avionics sales in the Asia-Pacific region and will be based at the Gulfstream Product Support Asia office in Hong Kong. At his former position as Gulfstream’s Hong Kongbased manager for parts and materials in Asia, Liang managed more than USD56 million in inventory at warehouses in Hong Kong, Beijing and Singapore, and oversaw parts distribution in the region.

The Federal Aviation Administration has cleared Eclipse Aerospace to complete the assembly of its Eclipse 550 aircraft, paving the way for certification testing to begin in June. This came after 118

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Embraer’s Phenom 300 has set three speed records in the lightweight

business jet class flying from the company’s headquarters in Melbourne International Airport (MLB) to El Paso International Airport, then to Daugherty Field (LGB) in Long Beach, California, with only one fuel stop. Shaving more than 20 minutes off the standing record time, record claims are made for transcontinental speed (East to West)

from Melbourne to Long Beach and speed over a recognised course for Melbourne to El Paso, Texas, and El Paso to Long Beach.

The United States Federal Aviation Administration, Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil in Brazil and European Aviation Safety Agency have qualified FlightSafety International’s Embraer Legacy 650 full flight simulator to Level D, the highest rating available. The

simulator is equipped with FlightSafety’s VITAL X visual system, and its availability and qualification allow the FlightSafety Learning Center in St. Louis, Missouri, to begin Legacy 650 >> training in the second quarter of 2013.

Dassault’s Falcon 2000S and 2000LXS business jets have earned EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency) certification with US FAA approval expected to follow soon. The 2000S has an approach speed of 107 kts, allowing challenging, steep approaches and landing on short runways. Both new jets are equipped with a full slate of standard


WHY ARE WE HERE? It is perhaps the most important question we have ever asked. And possibly the most difficult to answer. Trees as we know produce oxygen. Birds and insects pollinate the plants that feed us. We know that some animals need plants to survive. And some animals need animals. Giant whales couldn’t survive without tiny plankton. Giant trees couldn’t survive without insects. But could life on this planet survive without us?

WHAT IS OUR PURPOSE? Of all the species that share this world, we are the only one with the power to protect the entire planet. The only one with the power to protect every species on this earth. Including ourselves. Every species is here for a purpose.

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF Cessna produced its 400th CJ3 business jet, which was rolled out in late

March. Already in its ninth year of service, the single-pilot CJ3 has been hailed for its fuel efficiency, low operating costs and large payload capabilities. “Cessna customers have confidence in the first 400, and we know they’ll have the same level of confidence in the next 400,” said Don Beverlin, business leader for the CJ range. The third of four Embraer Legacy 500 aircraft prototypes have made it into the air, with the first two already well into the flight-test program. “The first and second prototypes already have logged 122 hours on 66 flights with testing proceeding as anticipated,” said Ernest Edwards, president, Embraer Executive Jets. Embraer’s four-aircraft test programme is designed to ensure all systems and features on the Legacy 500 reach maturity before entering service. The maturity campaign feeds maintenance reports to Embraer’s Aircraft Health Analysis and Diagnosis (AHEAD) system that allows fault identification and troubleshooting responses to be planned while aircraft is still in flight. First unveiled in Geneva in May, Dassault Falcon’s new FalconBroadcast airborne health monitoring service is now available on all Falcon 2000 and Falcon 900 EASy models.

FalconBroadcast enables operators to address unscheduled maintenance events while the aircraft is in flight, allowing automated real-time troubleshooting tools and satellite links to resolve issues right away on landing. Crucial data gathered by the system is instantly transmitted to Dassault. The development of this service was driven by being able to dispatch ground crew to anticipate logistics, troubleshooting and support while the aircraft is in the air.

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UTC Aerospace Systems, a unit of United Technologies Corporation, will provide electric power generation and a distribution system for the second generation of Embraer E-Jets. The company will supply the main and auxiliary electric power generators, main and secondary electric power distribution, emergency electric generation system, and batteries and converters. Pratt & Whitney will provide the auxiliary power unit as a secondary power source. UTC Aerospace Systems will also supply the main wheel, nose wheel and carbon brakes. The second-generation E-Jets programme is expected to be launched later this year, with the jets expected to enter into service by 2018. Korean Air now offers three business jets for its clients — a Boeing Business Jet, a Bombardier Global Express XRS and a Sikorsky S-76C+ helicopter.

The private jets provide a flexible travel schedule and access to more airports and better in-flight cuisine. Flexjet Connect Service allows US travellers to connect from any Korean Air flight to a private jet for non-stop travel throughout America. Korean Air’s American gateways include Anchorage, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Honolulu, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C. The company will also expand its private jet charter service to Hong Kong and plans to add nine new aircraft to its fleet. Dassault marked the 20th anniversary of the Falcon 2000 at the Abu Dhabi Air Expo, where it also presented its range of business jets, including the next-generation Falcon 2000LXS that is slated to launch in 2014. Two decades since its first flight, Dassault has delivered nearly 500 Falcon 2000 jets and clocked almost two million flying hours on its global fleet. The Falcon 2000 is the first business jet in the world to be designed with a fully digital mockup.

The single-engine, composite Cessna Ttx has successfully completed its first production flight. Flying in and around southeast Kansas, it reached a height of 17,000 feet — a little more than half its operating ceiling of 25,000 ft, and reached a speed of 213 kts — just a bit slower than its promised top speed of 235 kts. Having flown 275 flights during the development process, the aircraft has already clocked 339 hours in the air.

Magellan Jets has teamed up with the Russian Service Bureau (RSB Travel) in

response to Russian VIPs’ increasing demand for private jet charter to, from and within the US. This follows a 32 per cent increase in sales for Magellan Jets in 2012. “Many Russian jet setters are said to have concerns surrounding safety and service when looking to arrange jet service,” said Gregory Belezerian, vice president, Magellan Jets. The charter operator will have a fully staffed flightsupport office in Russia and offers in-flight catering, concierge, ground transportation and pet-friendly travel. Gulfstream’s G650 set four city-pair records in late January, flying from

Dulles International Airport outside of Washington D.C. to Doha International Airport in Qatar in just 11 hours and 40 minutes at an average speed of 603 mph (970 km/h). From there, it travelled to New Jersey’s Teterboro Airport at Mach 0.87 in 13 hours and 3 minutes. It then proceeded to Moscow’s Vnukovo International Airport, covering the 4,190-nm (7,760km) distance in 7 hours and 47 minutes. It flew from Moscow to Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport in 9 hours and 33 minutes, cruising at Mach 0.90-0.91 for the 4,774-nautical-mile (8,841 km) journey, which resulted in an average speed of 574 mph (924 km/h).


AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

PLANE SPEAK ABSOLUTE ALTITUDE Measurable height of an aircraft above the actual terrain. ABSOLUTE CEILING The maximum altitude above sea level at which an aircraft can maintain level flight under Standard Air conditions. AGL (Above Ground Level) Altitude expressed as feet above terrain or airport elevation (see MSL). AILERONS An aircraft control surface hinged to the rear, outer section of each wing for banking (‘tilting’) the aircraft. AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT Comprehensive services provided by a management company for an aircraft owner. Details vary. AIRFOIL The shape of any flying surface, but principally a wing, as seen in side-view (cross section). AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE Official notification to aircraft owners/operators of a known safety issue with a particular model of aircraft. ALTIMETER A highly sensitive barometer that shows an aircraft’s altitude above mean sea level by measuring atmospheric pressure. ANGLE OF ATTACK The angle between the airfoil’s chord line and the direction in which the aircraft is currently moving. AOG (Aircraft on Ground) Aircraft unfit to fly, in need of repair. Owner’s worst nightmare. APPROACH (DEPARTURE) CONTROL Radar-based air traffic control, usually at an airport tower, providing traffic separation up to 40 miles. APRON Hard-surfaced or paved area around a hangar. Also, ‘ramp’. ATC (Air Traffic Control) Service providing separation services to participating airborne traffic and clearances to land, take off or taxi at airports. AVIONICS The electronic control systems airplanes use for flight such as communications, autopilots, and navigation. BLOCK RATES Pre-paid hours for air charter at a contracted price. CARBON OFFSET Monetary contributions to renewable energy research and production projects to ‘offset’ carbon emissions of an airplane.

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CHARTER The ‘renting’ of an aircraft with crew for a personal, business, or cargo flight from one point to another.

FBO (Fixed Base Operator) A business operating an airport terminal for non-airline, general aviation aircraft.

CHARTER CARD Pre-paid air charter plan, either for a block of charter hours at a pre-defined fee, or a set debit balance in dollars.

FERRY FLIGHT A flight for the purpose of returning an aircraft to base or delivering an aircraft from one location to another.

CLASS I NAVIGATION Operation of aircraft under visual meteorological conditions (VFR) primarily based on ‘see and avoid’ procedures. CLASS II NAVIGATION Any en route flight operation that is not Class I, i.e. instrumentbased navigation (IFR). CLEARANCE Formal instructions from air traffic control authorising a specific action (climb or descend, entry into controlled airspace).

FLAPS Hinged surfaces on the inboard rear of wings, deployed to increase wing curvature (and thus, lift). FLIGHT PLAN Filed by radio, telephone, computer, or in person with Flight Service Stations. FLIGHT TIME Portion of the trip actually spent in the air. FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP The purchase of a ‘share’ of an aircraft.

CONTRAILS Streaks of condensed water vapour created in the air by aircraft flying at high altitudes; a.k.a. vapour trails.

FUSELAGE An aircraft’s main body structure housing the flight crew, passengers, and cargo.

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE An airspace of defined dimensions within which air traffic control service is provided.

GENERAL AVIATION Part of civil aviation comprising all facets of aviation except scheduled air carriers.

CRUISE SPEED The normal speed attained at altitude once the aircraft is no longer climbing and is en route.

GLASS COCKPIT See FIS.

CRUISING ALTITUDE A level altitude maintained by an aircraft while in flight. DEADHEAD To fly the return leg of a trip without cargo or passengers. DRAG Resisting force exerted on an aircraft in its line of flight opposite in direction to its motion. Opposite of thrust. DUTY TIME That portion of the day when a crewmember is on duty in any capacity (not just in the air), limited by regulations. EFIS (Electronic Flight Information Systems) Glass cockpit avionics that integrate all flight parameters into one optimised instrument. ELEVATOR An aircraft control surface hinged to both rear horizontal stabilisers, changing the aircraft pitch attitude nose-up or nose-down. EMPTY LEG Also known as ‘one-way availability’. Usually posted as available for travel between two airports during a certain time period. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) The Department of Transportation’s agency for aviation.

GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellitebased navigation system operated by Department of Defence. GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning System) System designed to alert pilots if their aircraft is in immediate danger of flying into the ground. GROUND SPEED Actual speed that an aircraft travels over the ground also called ‘shadow speed’. HANGAR An enclosed structure for housing aircraft. Originated with lakebased floating homes of the original German Zeppelin airships. HEAVY JETS See ‘Large-Cabin Jets’. HORSEPOWER The motive energy required to raise 550 lbs. one foot in one second, friction disregarded. HUD (Head-Up Display) A transparent display that presents data without requiring the user to look away from his or her usual viewpoint. IATA CODE International aviation code for international airports. ICAO CODE Civil aviation codes for airports.


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AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) Rules for flights into clouds and low visibility, by reference to cockpit instruments and radio navigation. ILS (Instrument Landing System) A precision instrument approach system permitting aircraft to land with low ceilings or poor visibility. JOINT OWNERSHIP Purchase or lease of an aircraft by a number of owners, often through a partnership or limited company. KNOT (Nautical Mile per Hour) Common measure of aircraft speed equalling 6,080 feet or about 1.15 miles. (For mph, multiply knots by 1.15.) KTAS True airspeed, in knots. LARGE-CABIN JETS The largest size aircraft that doesn’t require a major airport runway. Typical capacity 9-15 passengers. LAYOVER A night spent in the middle of the trip in a city other than home base for the aircraft and crew. LEG Describes one direction of travel between two points. Commonly used in referring to a planned itinerary. LIGHT JETS See ‘Small-Cabin Jets’. MACH SPEED A number representing the ratio of the speed of an airplane to the speed of sound in the surrounding air. MAYDAY An international distress signal to indicate an imminent and grave danger that requires assistance. MID-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 7-9 passengers. MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) Company licensed to provide services for the upkeep and airworthiness of airplanes. NAUTICAL MILE Defined internationally as equivalent to 1,852 metres or 1.15 statute miles. NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) A radio transmitter at a known location, used as an aviation or marine navigational aid. PAN PAN International call signal for urgency, indicating uncertainty and usually followed by the nature of the alert. PART 91 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering corporate flight departments. PART 121 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on scheduled airline operations, including the publication of a schedule.

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PLANE SPEAK

PART 135 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering charter carriers.

TARMAC A paved airport surface, especially a runway or an apron at a hangar.

PART 145 Certificate allowing an organisation to perform maintenance and alterations on US-registered aircraft.

TAXI TIME Portion of the trip spent rolling between the gate, terminal, or ramp and runway.

PATTERN The path of aircraft traffic around an airfield, at an established height and direction.

THRUST The forward force produced in reaction to the gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. Opposite of drag.

PAYLOAD Anything that an aircraft carries beyond what is required for its operation during flight.

TRAILING EDGE The rearmost edge of an airfoil.

POSITIONING Ferrying aircraft for departure from other than originating airport.

TRANSPONDER An airborne transmitter that responds to automated air traffic control interrogation with accurate position information.

RADAR System that uses electromagnetic waves to identify the range, altitude, direction, or speed of moving and fixed objects. RAMP The apron or open ‘tarmac’ in front of an FBO or terminal facility. This space is busy, used for deplaning, parking of aircraft, etc. ROLL One of three axes in flight, specifying the action around a central point. ROTATE In flight, any aircraft will rotate about its centre of gravity, a point which is the average location of the mass of the aircraft. RUDDER Aircraft control surface attached to the rear of the vertical stabiliser (fin) of the aircraft tail. Forces the plane to veer left or right. RUNWAY HEADING Magnetic direction corresponding to the centre line of the runway. SLATS Small, aerodynamic surfaces on the leading edge of the wings of fixed aircraft which allow the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack. SLIPSTREAM The flow of air driven backward by a propeller or downward by a rotor. SMALL-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 5-8 passengers. SQUAWK A four-digit number that a pilot dials into his transponder to identify his aircraft to air traffic controllers.

TURBINE Engine that uses compressed air to generate thrust to spin a metal shaft inside the motor, used in jet engines and turboprop aircraft. TURBOPROP An aircraft in which the propeller is driven by a jet-style turbine rather than a piston. VERY LIGHT JETS (VLJ) Small jet aircraft approved for single-pilot operation, maximum take-off weight of less than 10,000 lb (4,540 kg). VFR (Visual Flight Rules) A defined set of FAA regulations covering operation of aircraft flying by visual reference to the horizon. VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Range) Ground-based radio navigation aid. VORTICES Regions of high velocity that develop at the tip of a wing as it flies through the air. WIND SHEAR Large changes in either wind speed or direction at different altitudes that can cause sudden gain or loss of airspeed.

STATUTE MILE A unit of length equal to 5,280 feet.

WINGLET A small, stabilising, rudder-like addition to the tips of a wing to control or employ air movement, thereby increasing fuel economy.

SVS (Synthetic Vision System) A technology that uses 3D to provide pilots with intuitive means of understanding their flying environment.

YAW One of the three axes in flight, specifying the side-to-side movement of an aircraft on its vertical axis.

TAIL NUMBER An airplane’s registration number.

YOKE The control wheel of an aircraft, akin to an automobile steering wheel.


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AIRBORNESHOWDIARY

EBACE Geneva

MAY 2013 21-23 MAY

EBACE 2013 (EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION)

Palexpo and Geneva International Airport, Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero

31 MAY-02 JUN

AEROEXPO UK 2013

Sywell Aerodrome, UK

www.expo.aero/uk

50th INTERNATIONAL PARIS AIR SHOW 2013

Le Bourget Exhibition Centre, Paris, France

www.paris-air-show.com

LABACE 2013 (LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION)

Congonhas Airport, São Paulo, Brazil

www.abag.org.br/labace2013

10-12 SEP

CIBAS 2013 (CHINESE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION SHOW)

Flight Inspection Center of CAAC, Beijing Capital Airport, China

www.cibas-beijing.com

24-26 SEP

SAE 2013 AEROTECH CONGRESS & EXHIBITION

Palais des Congres de Montréal, Canada

www.sae.org/events/atc

JUNE 2013 17-23 JUN

AUGUST 2013 14-16 AUG

SEPTEMBER 2013

OCTOBER 2013 22-24 OCT

NBAA 2013 (NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION Las Vegas Convention Center, Nevada, ASSOCIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION) USA

www.nbaa.org

29 OCT-03 NOV

SEOUL INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE & DEFENCE EXHIBITION

Cheongju International Airport, South Korea

www.seoulairshow.com/eng

DUBAI AIRSHOW 2013

Dubai World Central, UAE

www.dubaiairshow.aero

BAHRAIN INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW 2014

Sakhir Air Base, Bahrain International Airport, Bahrain

www.bahraininternationalairshow.com

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2014

Changi Exhibition Centre, Singapore

www.singaporeairshow.com.sg

NOVEMBER 2013 17-21 NOV

JANUARY 2014 16-18 JAN

FEBRUARY 2014 11-16 FEB

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AIRBORNETAILHOOK

VOUGHT V-173 by Katrina Balmaceda

DISC FLIGHT

THE VOUGHT V-173 WAS AN EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT BY AERONAUTICAL ENGINEER CHARLES ZIMMERMAN, who in the 1930s advocated disc-shaped aircraft. Originally made of wood and canvas, the Flying Pancake had two piston engines producing a meek 80 horsepower, which drove the propellers located on the leading edge at the wing tips. With its low aspect ratio, the flat, ‘all-wing’ aircraft proved effecting in overcoming induced drag. The location of its propellers gave it a relatively small wing area, which meant better manoeuvrability and a stronger structure. In fact, the Flying Pancake remained largely undamaged when it once flipped over onto its back after a test pilot, who had planned to land at the beach, attempted to divert the aircraft at the last minute to avoid two bathers. The pilot was also unharmed. This impressed aviator Charles Lindbergh and the US Navy. After 131.8 flying hours in over 190 flights, the V-173 made its last flight on 31 March 1947, never having made it past the developmental stage. However, with its 22-degree ‘nose-high’ angle, it did prove Zimmerman’s theory of a fighter aircraft capable of near-vertical take-off and landing. It also excited locals living in the vicinity of the testing field, who reported seeing an unidentified object flying in the sky.

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The Vought V-173 on its maiden flight in 1942 Image courtesy of the US Navy


CABIN ALTITUDE: 6,000 ft/1,829 m at FL450 PASSENGERS: 12-19 SIGNATURE OVAL WINDOWS: 12

BUSINESS IS

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LEASURE

Anyone can travel, but few will travel in the unsurpassed comfort and style of the Gulfstream G450. With forward and aft lavatories to optional equipment like a Broad Band Multi-Link (BBML) high-speed data system, the G450 has cabin amenities to help you cross continents and arrive relaxed and ready for business.

To contact a Gulfstream sales representative in your area, visit GULFSTREAM.com/contacts.

GULFSTREAMG450.com


ExecuJet - Issue 06  

Inflight Magazine of the ExecuJet Aviation Group

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