Page 1

POWERED BY JETGALA

SCHEUBLEIN + BAK ART GALLERY

09 February – April 2014

EMBRAER’S LINEAGE 1000E SKYACHT BY EDDIE SOTTO RIDE TO NEARSPACE AEROMOBIL SKYE SH09

FROM CAPE TOWN TO GOODWOOD

SKIING AT REVELSTOKE | SUITE MACAU LUBIN PARFUM | AMERICA’S CUP SKELETON WATCHES


EXECUJETINTRO

IMAGINE! "I AM LOOKING FOR A PICTURE OF WHAT IS IN MY OWN IMAGINATION" — MICHAEL REISCH, ARTIST

WELCOME TO 2014. THE UNDERLYING MESSAGE OF THIS ISSUE OF OUR INFLIGHT MAGAZINE IS — IMAGINE! SEE THINGS FROM ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE! A different outlook to flying is articulated in a short article that you will find in this issue. In late 2013, we at ExecuJet were part of a remarkable project in South Africa, namely, ‘From Cape Town to Goodwood’. The achievement of Lady Mary Heath — the first female pilot to fly solo in an open-cockpit biplane from Cape Town to London in 1928, making headlines worldwide — was commemorated by Tracey Curtis-Taylor, who recreated the journey in her own open-cockpit Boeing Stearman biplane from our facility in Cape Town. Tracey arrived back in the UK early this year. We as a company have supported such an adventure because projects like this are the heart and soul of aviation. They touch something in us that is beyond sight and allow us to envisage and dream about what may be possible. Our main article also deals with imagination, and with seeing the world from a different perspective. The first venture was turning an old Swiss castle into a gallery for modern art. This gallery was then filled with the work of artists who have a unique approach towards observing the world. In the same way in which Tracey Curtis-Taylor’s vision of the world changed when looking at it from flying low over Africa, so photographers Michael Reisch and Dan Holdsworth explore different perspectives of landscapes and nature. They also play with the images formed in the minds of the observers. Holdsworth says “we are thrown into doubt about what we see and challenged to look at it in a new way”. Let us keep looking at new ways to view our world, and at different perspectives on life around us. Let us imagine. I trust that you will enjoy this issue of our Inflight Magazine. Regards, Niall Olver CEO ExecuJet Aviation Group

2

EXECUJET


EXECUJET CONTENT

9

ontents 09 2

INTRO Imagine!

7

FLYING’S FIRSTS Adventure From Cape Town To Goodwood

8

EXECUJET LOCATIONS

9

BEYOND SIGHT Contemporary Art In A Historic Castle

14

SNIPPETS New & Exclusive

26

WINGS

28

PEDIGREE IN MOTION Embraer’s New Long-Range Contender

34

DESIGNS FROM MIDDLE EARTH VIP Jet Completions By Altitude Interior

38

ALPHA ACTION France’s Elite Aerobatic Team

34

40

SMOOTH ROTATOR A Helicopter For Many Purposes

42

ELEVATED ELEGANCE Dine In-Flight With Metrojet

44

THE FLYING YACHTSMAN Sea, Stars & Sky In The Skyacht One

48

HYBRID WINGS

50

NIGHT WITCHES

52

GLOBAL GIRL

56

FLOOR FASHION

Wings For Your Wheels All-Female Soviet Bombers Q&A With A Model-Turned-Pilot Bespoke Cabin Carpets From Hong Kong 60

PAST REFLECTION

62

PRINTED WINGS

64

A DIFFERENT VIEW

66

CAPTAIN SPEAKING

Revisiting History With Manolo Chrétien’s Prints

48

The First 3D-Printed Plane A Trip To Nearspace Time For New Take-Offs

4

EXECUJET


ADVERTORIAL

RED CARNATION HOTEL COLLECTION

IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

The view from The Oyster Box

The River Boma — perfect for predinner drinks at Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve & Wellness Retreat

The Tollman family owned Red Carnation Hotel Collection enchants visitors with three bespoke, five-star ‘jewels’ in distinctive areas across South Africa. Each destination has its own individual character and unique location, but shares the qualities that create richly rewarding experiences for visiting guests. Standing majestically on Umhlanga’s prestigious beachfront, close to Durban, The Oyster Box captivates with sweeping views of the Indian Ocean. The combination of colonial charm, lush tropical gardens and breathtaking seaside setting makes this hotel one of South Africa’s most beloved and cherished properties. Member of Leading Hotels of the World.

Azure Restaurant at The Twelve Apostles Hotel and Spa

Only 270 km from Cape Town, Relais & Châteaux member Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve & Wellness Retreat is located right at the heart of the Cederberg Mountains. Wide open plains, majestic rock formations and crystal-clear waterfalls set the scene for a unique wilderness experience in this South African Natural Heritage Site, where abundant wildlife roams free. The Twelve Apostles Hotel and Spa, a proud member of Leading Hotels of the World, is situated on Cape Town’s — if not the world’s — most scenic route. Nestled between the Atlantic Ocean and flanked by the majestic Table Mountain National Park and the Twelve Apostles mountain range, the lauded hotel is surrounded by nature only.

The Oyster Box

The Twelve Apostles

Bushmans Kloof

+27(0)315145000

Hotel and Spa

+27(0)214811860

info@oysterbox.co.za

+27(0)214379000

info@bushmanskloof.co.za

www.oysterbox.com

res1@12apostles.co.za

www.bushmanskloof.co.za

www.12apostleshotel.com

EXECUJET

5


EXECUJET CONTENT

ontents 82

68

90

LUXE

70 SUITE MACAU High Stakes In Asia’s Gaming City 76

INNER CHOREOGRAPHY Revealing The Mastery Behind A Watch’s Face

82

THE EVOLUTION OF POWER Porsche’s Iconic 911 GT3 And 911 Turbo S

86

WRIST CANDY Style & Elegance With Cuff Links

90 ROYAL CONNECTION Exclusive Scents By Lubin Parfum 94 A LASTING PASSION Galeries Bartoux Singapore 96

A MOST COVETED CUP The Perpetual Sailors’ Race

100 VERTICAL TERRAIN A Luxurious Launch Pad For High-Level Skiing 104 SOLITARY HEAT Sensuality On Camera By Paul Westlake 111

AIRBORNE

114 BRIEFING Business Aviation In Brief

100 6

EXECUJET

122 PLANE SPEAK Aviation Glossary 126 AIR SHOW DIARY 128 TAILHOOK Stealth Lift


TRACEY CURTIS-TAYLOR

FLYING'S FIRSTS TWO REMARKABLE WOMEN UNDERTAKE THE SAME JOURNEY — 85 YEARS APART

Image courtesy of www.ctie.monash.edu.au/hargrave/heath.html

Image © Press Association

IN 1928, MARY HEATH MADE FRONT-PAGE NEWS AROUND THE WORLD as the first ever pilot to fly a small, open-cockpit biplane from Cape Town to London. In November 2013, to commemorate Lady Heath’s flight and to celebrate women’s achievements across the African continent, pilot Tracey Curtis-Taylor embarked on a journey from Cape Town, South Africa, to London on the Spirit of Artemis — an open-cockpit Boeing Stearman biplane from the 1930s. The old plane has a top speed of 95 mph, an operating ceiling of 10,000 feet and a range of only 450 miles.

the first female pilot to be based at the historic Shuttleworth Collection at Biggleswade, Bedfordshire. In February 2013, she and other aviators set out on a 20,000-km charity flight — supported by ExecuJet — from the coast of Russia to South Africa in Little Annie, a Russian Antonov An-2 biplane.

MARY HEATH: THE INSPIRATION Largely forgotten today, Mary Heath was one of the world’s most famous women near the end of the 1920s. Having spent two years as a dispatch rider and an ambulance driver during the first World War, Heath pioneered women’s athletics in Britain and helped introduce women’s track and field to the Olympics. Switching her attention to flying, she then became the first woman in Britain to receive a commercial pilot’s licence. She was also the first woman in the world to parachute from a plane and to become an airline pilot, as well as the first person to fly solo from South Africa to the United Kingdom, in 1928. TRACEY CURTIS-TAYLOR: REPEATING HISTORY UK-born Tracey grew up in Canada and moved to New Zealand in her early 20s. Here, she began flying and earned a private licence, commercial licence and instructor rating. Returning permanently to the UK in 1997, Tracey became

AFRICA Tracey departed on 2 November from the ExecuJet facility in Cape Town to begin her journey aboard the Spirit of Artemis. Her route followed Mary Heath’s — from Cape Town to Zimbabwe, Zambia and Tanzania, then on through Kenya, Uganda, Sudan and Egypt. From there, she flew from Mersa Matrouh on the Egyptian coast across the Mediterranean to Crete and from there, up the Peloponnese Peninsula and on up the Croatian Coast, across the mountains to Hungary and on through Austria, Germany and France to England. ExecuJet Africa’s Operations Team helped with the flight clearances over Africa and was on standby in case Tracey needed further assistance. Tracey arrived safely in the UK on 31 December. She had flown the Spirit of Artemis in just under 10,000 miles from Cape Town, passing through some of the most troubled and beautiful parts of the world in over 30 legs. A feature documentary on the adventure is being produced by Nylon Films and is expected to be completed by Spring 2014. www.capetowntogoodwood.com Modern-day aviator Tracey Curtis-Taylor (right) finds inspiration from the aerial exploits of Mary Heath (left) in the 1930s

EXECUJET

7


EXECUJET LOCATIONS

CONTENT EDITOR Katrina Balmaceda AVIATION EDITOR Rainer Sigel EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE Charmaine Tai EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Charmaine Tay ART DIRECTOR | DESIGNER Sylvia Weimer (Spacelab Design, Sydney)

CONTRIBUTORS Jim Gregory Jennifer Henricus Jeff Heselwood Kee Hua Chee Christel Lee James Nicholls Jim Simon Steve Slater Alex Unruh COMPANY PUBLISHER Rainer Sigel MANAGING DIRECTOR Michelle Tay ASSISTANT MANAGER, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Gynn Lee CIRCULATION & PRODUCTION MANAGER Caroline Rayney OFFICE MANAGER Winnie Lim MARKETING ASSISTANT Anne Goh

CONTACT 120 Lower Delta Road #13-11 Cendex Centre, Singapore 169208 T: +65 6273 0620 F: +65 6273 0632 EMAILS ADVERTISING business@oriental-publishing.com EDITORIAL content@oriental-publishing.com EVENTS events@oriental-publishing.com CIRCULATION circulation@oriental-publishing.com ADMINISTRATION office@oriental-publishing.com

EXECUJET LOCATIONS FEATURED IN THIS EDITION ExecuJet Aviation Group Head Office Zurich ExecuJet Aviation Group ExecuJet Aviation Centre PO Box 1 8058 Zurich-Airport Switzerland Tel: +41 44 804 1616 Fax: +41 44 804 1617 enquiries@execujet.eu

ExecuJet Zurich FBO ExecuJet Aviation Centre Bimenzaeltenstrasse 75 8058 Zurich-Airport Switzerland Tel: +41 44 876 5656 Fax +41 44 876 5657 fbo.lszh@execujet.eu

WEBSITES MAGAZINES www.jetgala.com | www.solitairemagazine.com GROUP www.orientalmediagroup.com SINGAPORE www.oriental-publishing.com VIETNAM www.oriental-ltd.com DIGITAL EDITIONS & DOWNLOADS www.jetgala.com/digital-editions FACEBOOK www.facebook.jetgala.com (Luxury News) LINKEDIN www.linkedin.jetgala.com (Aviation News) TWITTER www.twitter.jetgala.com (Aviation News) INSTAGRAM instagram.com/jetgalamagazine# RSS www.rss.jetgala.com (Aviation News) EXECUJET JETGALA is a special edition of JETGALA and is published in cooperation with JETGALA and distributed globally, including on aircraft operated by the companies of the ExecuJet Aviation Group. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily endorsed by the Publisher. COPYRIGHT AND OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS NOTICE: All rights, including copyright and all other intellectual property rights, in, out of and to the content of this publication are owned or controlled by ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, respectively by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore, as applicable. You are not permitted to, by any means or technology including without limitation any electronic means, copy, broadcast, upload, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change in any way the content of this publication or any part thereof for any purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, respectively of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore, as applicable. TRADEMARKS NOTICE: The masthead logo ‘JETGALA’ is a Registered Trademark of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. The logo ‘EXECUJET AVIATION’ and ‘EXECUJET AVIATION GROUP’ and the words ‘ExecuJet’, ‘ExecuJet Aviation’ and ‘ExecuJet Aviation Group’, in whatever form are Registered Trademarks of ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, and/or of its subsidiaries. The rights and title to other logos and trademarks contained in this publication are the rights and title of the respective title holders. All rights to their respective Registered Trademarks are cumulatively reserved by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore, respectively by ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, as applicable. The protection of all rights will be pursued to the full extent of the law.

ICAO: LSZH IATA: ZRH SITA: ZRHEH8X VHF: 130.25 MHz Hours of operation: 0500 - 2245 Remarks: ARR & DEP slots required

ExecuJet Geneva FBO In partnership with RUAG 6, rue Robert-Adrien-Stierlin 1217 Meyrin Geneva Switzerland Tel: +41 22 710 44 34 Fax: +41 22 710 44 40 fbo.aviation@ruag.com ICAO: LSGG IATA: GVA SITA: GVATAXH VHF: 130.55 MHz Hours of operation: 0600 - 2200

Printed by KHL Printing Co, Singapore MCI (P) 156/05/2013

PHOTO CREDITS COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Paul Westlake MODEL: Chelsea Scanlan / Chadwick Models MAKEUP: Wayne Chic PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: J.P Westlake SECTION OPENER WINGS Image courtesy of SottoStudios / LA SECTION OPENER LUXE Image courtesy of Porsche Automobil Holding SE SECTION OPENER AIRBORNE Image courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

www.orientalmediagroup.com

8

EXECUJET

For all our regional contacts please go to our website:

www.execujet.com


“THERE IS AN ‘OTHERNESS’, BUT IT IS ALSO FAMILIAR” — DAN HOLDSWORTH Modern art is juxtaposed against the old walls and structure of the Castle as seen in the Shifting Realities exhibition All images courtesy of SCHEUBLEIN + BAK

SCHEUBLEIN + BAK

A CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY IN A CLASSICAL SETTING

EXECUJET

9


EXECUJET

In an extraordinary gabled, Gothic Revival mansion on the Sihlberg hill in the heart of Zurich, SCHEUBLEIN + BAK gallery has introduced emerging discoveries in the three years since it opened. Many of the artists are represented in major museums and institutional collections around the world, while the young emerging artists have high potential to become the next stars in the dynamic world of contemporary art. “In every work, there must be a visible quality of craftsmanship, whether that is in photography, painting or sculpture,” says Christina Scheublein, managing partner of the gallery. Scheublein, who hails from a long line of Munich art connoisseurs and auctioneers, holds a degree in economics from University of Innsbruck. Her strong roots in the art world brought her to New York, where she trained at Christie’s and also achieved a master’s degree in Modern and Contemporary Art. Before forming her own venture, she gained experience in galleries and auction houses in New York, Munich and Berlin. Her business partner Georg Bak has a legal and art management university background and long-term experience in art banking advisory and international gallery business.

SCHEUBLEIN + BAK wants to give the viewer a chance to experience modern art in a setting beyond the archetypal white-cube gallery, so ubiquitous today. The “Castle”, as the mansion is called, was erected in 1898 by Switzerland’s preeminent beer brewer of the day, Albert Hürlimann. But the gallery doesn’t confine its exhibitions to this permanent location. Shows at sites such as a century-old shipyard in Zurich and an early cinema in the Swiss Alps have also been curated. One major focus of SCHEUBLEIN + BAK’s programme is landscape photography. The gallery’s 2013 show, Monuments: Peter Buggenhout. Dan Holdsworth. Robert Smithson. Lawrence Weiner, featured English photographer Dan Holdsworth’s large-scale depictions of a glacier that has been building up for 33 years since the volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington. This exhibition goes hand-in-hand with a show of German photographer Michael Reisch, who photographs familiar landscapes and then subjects them to digital editing. Both artists — each in a unique way and with very different results — play with landscape and its mutability, subject to the force of nature as well as to the different ways of seeing that observers, often subconsciously, bring with them. The Monuments exhibit features art by Lawrence Weiner, Robert Smithson, Peter Buggenhout and Dan Holdsworth Christina Scheublein’s experience in various galleries and auction houses helped in her current venture

10

EXECUJET


Holdsworth’s Blackout series evokes memories of the European blackout following the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland Blackout seems to blur the distinction between ice, stone, mountain and valley Apart from showcasing his works at the SCHEUBLEIN + BAK gallery, Holdsworth’s pieces have also been featured in London and Paris

Dan Holdsworth Holdsworth’s photographs are snapped from a helicopter with a Linhoff camera designed for large-format film. He then prints them in duplicate, placing the twin photos in a diptych, with one rotated 180 degrees in the opposite direction from the other. In doing this, Holdsworth plays with a phenomenon called false topographic perception, which has flummoxed cartographers since mapping began. When mapping valleys and mountains, for example on planets, the mind is ‘tricked’ into seeing convex formations as concave and vice versa. Holdsworth plays with the way in which we locate such pictures in our mind, so that a mountain becomes a valley; a valley becomes a mountain. In his Blackout series, Holdsworth inverted positive and negative images of Icelandic volcanoes, evoking the memory of the European blackout during the volcanic eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull. Sometimes the photos appear as a moonscape, other times as an X-ray — confounding the viewer’s natural desire to label it in time or place. Although we associate the images with topography, we cannot identify them as a particular location or a specific topography — stone or ice, mountain or valley, day or night. We are thrown into doubt about what we see and challenged to look at it in a new way. “There is an ‘otherness’,” Holdsworth remarks, “but it is also familiar.” While the Mount St. Helens glacier may naturally evolve and then recede, others are being laid waste by global warming. Just hundreds of years ago, people feared the ice would take over the Alps, while now, they worry about the effect of melting glaciers on sea levels around the world, reflects Holdsworth. He wants to communicate this “planetary” evolution and explore how these changes are mirrored in how we live in our own time and space. Holdsworth’s work was inspired by his childhood hikes to the Alps with his father, a scientist. He developed an interest in the outdoors, ecology and the relationship of mapping to the history of photography. Holdsworth studied at the London College of Printing. His works are represented in the collections of the Tate Modern and the Saatchi Gallery in London, and in the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. They are also held in a number of major corporate and private collections, such as that of UBS. >>

BOTH ARTISTS INVESTIGATE THE AUTHENTICITY VIEWERS ASCRIBE TO PHOTOGRAPHS BY MANIPULATING THE PICTURES EXECUJET

11


EXECUJET

“I AM LOOKING FOR A PICTURE OF WHAT IS IN MY OWN IMAGINATION” — MICHAEL REISCH Michael Reisch’s solo exhibition at Museum Kurhaus Kleve, Germany SCHEUBLEIN + BAK showcases contemporary art in a historic castle in Zurich

Michael Reisch In a show that opened in 21 January at Sihlberg Castle, German artist Michael Reisch challenges us to see familiar landscapes in an unfamiliar way by manipulating photographs of places until they no longer represent the image we expect. He thus shows us that our perception is imbued with preconceived ideas, deeply embedded in our subconscious. Reisch deliberately takes pictures of familiar subjects — landmarks where thousands of tourists make pilgrimages, bringing with them their expectations of what they will see. In this way, the mind’s eye seeks what it anticipates. Reisch attempts to disrupt the relationship of the photograph to the object the viewer perceives in his mind. “It looks like a photograph and it should look that way, but it isn’t a photograph in the conventional sense,” says Reisch. He uses a digital computer programme to sculpt familiar landscapes into something fictitious. The summit of the Matterhorn becomes exaggeratedly geometrical or a familiar landscape is deconstructed and depicted only through light and contrast. “I redesign the nature which we see,” he 12

EXECUJET

The gallery SCHEUBLEIN + BAK can be visited by appointment: +41 43 888 55 10 or info@scheubleinbak.com Schloss Sihlberg Sihlberg 10 CH- 8002 Zürich


The gallery provides viewers a chance to experience modern art in a setting beyond the archetypal white-cube gallery

Several of SCHEUBLEIN + BAK’s artists are currently on display in ExecuJet’s Zurich FBO lounge, including Michael Reisch’s and Dan Holdsworth’s photography, Nicolai Winter’s chromed sculptures resembling vacuum-packed, space-age luxury goods, and Mexican Huichol Indians’ colourful, beaded, skull-shaped sculptures. The gallery’s current exhibition “Michael Reisch — Ausgewählte Werke” in the Sihlberg Castle runs from 22 January to 28 March.

explains. “First, I go into the wilderness. Then I dig around like you would in your garden — but I do this at the Matterhorn, the holy grail of nature lovers, and I change it into an ideal of nature, an object of design.” The enormous size of the work — 180 by 240 centimetres — draws the viewer in physically, yet they bear an unemotional, detached quality that keeps the viewer at a distance. Devoid of human civilisation, the photographs are idealistic and seemingly recognisable, yet utterly make-believe. “I am looking for a picture of what is in my own imagination,” says Reisch. “Then I make a comparison and try to place this imagined picture in the photo.” The Düsseldorf-based artist studied at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf and at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. His works can be seen in major museum collections such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the National Galleries of Scotland. He just had a well-received solo exhibition at the museum Kurhaus Kleve in autumn 2013. EXECUJET

13


EXECUJETSNIPPETS

EXECUJET MIDDLE EAST TRIUMPHS IN BOMBARDIER ASF EXCELLENCE AWARDS

EXECUJET AFRICA RECEIVES BARS AND NATA SAFETY ACCREDITATIONS

Chris Milligan (Director Authorized Service Facilities), Nick Weber (Maintenance Director ExecuJet Middle East), Stan Younger (Vice President Aircraft Service Centres)

ExecuJet Middle East celebrates its Dubai maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) facility being named Overall and International winner at the Bombardier Authorised Service Facility (ASF) Excellence Awards. ExecuJet has now won the International category three years in a row. The Bombardier ASF Excellence Awards are presented annually to Bombardier ASFs that deliver the highest quality service and best performance, and demonstrate their shared commitment to putting Bombardier customers first. The awards are based on a set of 13 criteria including quality assurance, technical compliance and customer influence, as well as management and representative input.

KEEN

MACHINE The Wazuma V8F quad bike might as well have sped off the set of a Batman film. This big, black machine by custom-vehicle maker Lazareth houses a Ferrari 3.0L V8 engine and the injection system of two sport bike engines, which is controlled by a Sybelle system. A six-speed sequential gearbox from BMW’s M3 is controlled from the handlebars. For a smooth ride, the suspension system features four made-to-measure horizontal shock absorbers. www.wazuma.fr 14

EXECUJET

ExecuJet Africa has been awarded the Flight Safety Foundation Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) accreditation and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA) Safety 1st Ground rating. ExecuJet Africa also holds safety standard accreditations from the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), the International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) and Wyvern.

EXECUJET MIDDLE EAST EXTENDS MAINTENANCE CAPABILITIES

ExecuJet Middle East is extending the company’s line maintenance capabilities in order to provide additional support during Dubai International Airport’s runway closures in 2014. ExecuJet has established a line station at Dubai Al Maktoum International Airport, which has been approved by the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) to conduct scheduled maintenance packages on Bombardier, Embraer and Hawker aircraft currently supported by the Dubai International Airport MRO. The line station is also expected to receive European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) approval by mid-December.


TO BREAK THE RULES, YOU MUST FIRST MASTER THEM. AN EVOLUTION OF THE RULE BREAKING AUDEMARS PIGUET ROYAL OAK LUXURY SPORTS WATCH, THE ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE POSSESSES A DRAMATIC AND PURPOSEFUL AESTHETIC THAT TURNS FUNCTIONAL ELEMENTS INTO ICONIC DESIGN FEATURES. AT 44 MILLIMETRES DIAMETER, THE OFFSHORE COMMANDS A UNIQUE PRESENCE, AND IS RESOLUTELY GEARED TOWARDS POWER AND PERFORMANCE. UNIQUELY, THOSE SURFACES MOST EXPOSED TO TRAUMA ARE EXECUTED IN HIGHLY INNOVATIVE MATERIALS. HERE THE SIGNATURE OCTAGONAL BEZEL AND PUSHPIECES ARE FORMED IN HIGH - DENSITY CERAMIC – SCRATCHPROOF AND SEVEN TIMES HARDER THAN STEEL.

ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE

IN PINK GOLD AND CERAMIC. CHRONOGRAPH.

SINGAPORE AUDEMARS PIGUET BOUTIQUE 541 ORCHARD ROAD LIAT TOWERS #01-03 TEL (65) 6836 4918 AUDEMARSPIGUET.COM


EXECUJETSNIPPETS

NEW LOOK AT EXECUJET HAITE’S MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN TIANJIN, CHINA ExecuJet recently moved into the new maintenance facility located on the west side of Tianjin Binhai International Airport. The facility includes 2,700 sq m of hangar space, three floors of offices, back shops and storage, and 6,600 sq m of dedicated apron space. Representing Bombardier and Embraer, ExecuJet is poised for an influx of customers when the doors are officially opened as relationship building continues.

ON YOUR MARK EXECUJET CONTINUES TO EXPAND IN THE MIDDLE EAST Porsche enters the compact Sports Utility Vehicles class with the Macan, which features the highperformance seven-speed Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission, an all-wheel drive system, and the Porsche Active Suspension Management chassiscontrol system. Macan — Indonesian for tiger — comes in three versions: Macan S, Macan S Diesel and Macan Turbo. www.porsche.com

ExecuJet Middle East is celebrating another year of successful expansion in the region. The company’s new fixed-based operation (FBO) in Riyadh runs in partnership with NasJet, the private aviation arm of Saudi Arabia’s National Air Service. It is performing well and has handled a range of jets, including Airbus aircraft, since operations began.

LEAN WHEELS Ducati has built its lightest ever machine — the new 1199 Superleggera, which features a magnesium monocoque frame, forged Marchesini magnesium wheels, a carbon-fibre body and titanium parts to achieve a weight of 155 kgs (341.7 lbs). The superbike boasts a Superquadro engine with special two-ring pistons that greatly reduce mass and friction. A top power of 149 kW (200 hp) can be achieved at 11,500 rpm. www.ducati.com

16

EXECUJET


CITATION SOVEREIGN +

FROM GREAT AUTHORITY COMES GREAT POWER With a powerful 3,000nm range, an all-new interior, and the most advanced avionics suite in the world — Garmin® G5000TM — the Citation Sovereign+ has the versatility to move your business forward. The world’s leaders rely on Cessna: This is aviation authority.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SOVEREIGN + AT CESSNA.COM


LOUNGE

CAMERA ROLLING FALCON HERITAGE The 1960s saw the birth of Dassault Aviation’s Mystère-Falcon 20, the iconic name which continues until today to set benchmarks for business jets. Timepiece creator Bell & Ross dedicates its Vintage collection’s Sport Heritage line to the Falcon’s half-decade milestone. The BR 126 Falcon watch, for instance, sports an outline of the aircraft on its 41-mm dial and is marked with a ‘50 years of Passion and Innovation Dassault-Falcon’ logo on its caseback.

Russian company Konstantin Chaykin presents the Cinema Watch, which uses an in-house KCM 01-0 calibre that powers both the watch and a zoopraxiscope — a device that displays motion pictures, made by photographer Eadweard Muybridge in 1879. Modelled to look like a manual single-lens reflex camera, Cinema Watch comes with an aperture window at six o’clock that airs a mini film remake of Muybridge’s first stop-motion pictures, which featured a galloping stallion. It comes in time with the arrival of 2014, the year of the horse. www.konstantin-chaykin.com

www.bellross.com

MEASURED & MADE While staying true to time-proven artisanal techniques, The Left Shoe Company likes to use new-school technologies, too — like 3D-scanning, which helps ensure a perfect fit. Clients can choose from a range of materials like suede and crocodile skin, and include inscriptions inside their shoes. Each one-of-a-kind pair is handcrafted in Europe and takes six weeks to be completed and shipped to its owner. www.leftshoecompany.com

TIME FOR EVOLUTION The prestigious Aiguille d’Or award at the 13th Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève went to Girard-Perregaux’s Constant Escapement L.M., considered a revolutionary timepiece. Its movement features a new escapement architecture and design that allows constant force — a puzzle that watchmakers had been trying to solve for centuries. The prototype was first revealed in 2008 and took five years of research and development to evolve into the final product. www.girard-perregaux.com

VIRTUAL VISION Developed specially for the new Playstation 3 Gran Turismo 6 game, the Mercedes-Benz AMG Vision Gran Turismo sports a low body with sensual contours. Beneath its long bonnet lies a V8 bi-turbo engine capable of generating 430 kW (585 hp) at 5,500 rpm. The vehicle also features double wishbone suspension on both front and rear axles. Made with an aluminium spaceframe body and carbon-fibre components, it tips the scales at only 1,385 kgs. www.mercedes-benz.com 18

JETGALA


THIS IS AVIATION AUTHORITY

STANDING BEHIND YOUR JET Highest dispatch rate.*

Best customer experience.*

Largest company-owned global service center network. Unsurpassed service speed. Best spare-parts availability.

*JetNet IQ 2013

FIND US ONLINE AT CESSNA.COM/CITATION-SERVICE


LOUNGE

CONSTANT PERFORMER

LEAR CCUT

Bartolomeo “Meo” Costantini, two-time winner of the Targa Florio endurance race, was a close friend of Ettore Bugatti, founder of the eponymous car brand. Costantini has now been immortalised in the third model of the brand’s Les Légendes de Bugatti six-part edition with the Meo Costantini, which — like all cars in the series — is based on the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse. With an eight-litre W16 engine, the car can sprint from 0 to 100 km in 2.6 seconds. Only three units are available. www.bugatti.com

The year of the horse brings new inspiration to Lalique, a brand that prides itself in its animal sculptures. Its new Equestrian collection includes a horse’s head sculpted out of black crystal. Another standout piece, the Equus vase is sculpted by seven glassmakers and portrays wild horses carved out of clear crystal. It weighs 13.8 kg and stands at a height of 38 centimetres. Only 999 pieces will be produced. www.lalique.com

SECOND MATTERS Greubel Forsey’s Tourbillon 24 Secondes mechanism features a tourbillon cage that is angled at 25 degrees and completes a revolution every 24 seconds, which minimises gravitational effects on the oscillator. It is used in the Tourbillon 24 Secondes Contemporain titanium timepiece, which is hand finished with a straightgrained and mirror-polished bevel. It comes in a redgold or white-gold round case, and has a power reserve of 72 hours. www.greubelforsey.com

P

AST FORWARD

Wondering how the first pedal-powered mode of transport — the velocipede — would be capable of when equipped with modern technology, product-design firm Ding3000 and chemical company BASF created the Concept 1865. While the brake, axle and motors of this electrically powered ‘e-velocipede’ are made of metal, other components are constructed from modern BASF plastics. www.ding3000.com | www.basf.com

FIBRE FIXTURE John & Table upgrades your run-of-the-mill table by replacing the typical wood and nails with black carbon fibre, leather and patented Alcantara. The RACE table is stable and lightweight due to its carbon-fibre exterior and a high-tech foam interior. It comes with a highgloss tabletop plus an optional Hadi Teherani Silverchair in either sterling silver or 24k gold. www.johnandtable.com 20

JETGALA


24-hour Hotline: +65 9030 1111 state-of-the-art medical equipment your preferred doctor

your family

your preferred hospital

\RXUĂ H[LELOLW\\RXUFRQYHQLHQFH

customised medical evacuation to complete your bespoke lifestyle

For enquiries, please contact us at: %MAILOPS %-!ASIACOMs/FFICE s&AX s7EBSITEWWW%-!ASIACOM !DDRESSExpress Medical Assistance %-!   -OUNT%LIZABETH-EDICAL#ENTRE -OUNT%LIZABETH 3INGAPORE


AT ULTRA LOUNGE SINGAPORE 12 FEB 14

Our exclusive aviation themed party begins with a strictly ‘by-invitation-only’ VVIP Reception from 8.00 – 11.00 pm at Pangaea Ultra Lounge at Singapore’s Marina Bay Sands Casino.

Venue:

Pangaea Singapore B2-05 Crystal Pavilion South Marina Bay Sands www.pangaea.sg

Theme:

“Fly By Night” — Retro Aviation

After 11.00 pm, the club opens its aviationthemed doors to a wider audience for a night of trademark Pangaea-style partying and dancing till the sun rises.

Date:

Wednesday, 12 February 2014 (second day of the 2014 Singapore Air Show)

Time:

8-11pm Jetgala VVIP Reception RSVP fly@jetgala.com by 3 February 2014

All of us at Jetgala and Solitaire magazines are extremely excited to welcome our friends and supporters from around the world of private aviation, fine watches and high jewellery, along with the highest levels of luxury as our guests. Don’t miss this one-of-a-kind experience.

11pm to sunrise Table Bookings RSVP vania@pangaea.sg or call +65 8611 7013


WINGS


WINGS PILATUS PC-241000E EMBRAER LINEAGE by Jim Gregory

PEDIGREE IN MOTION A MUCH IMPROVED LONG-RANGE CONTENDER FROM BRAZIL TAKES FLIGHT

28

JETGALA


Cessna’s in-production The Lineage 1000E is an upgrade of Embraer’s Lineage 1000 and will be unveiled at the Singapore Air Show this year

JETGALA

29


WINGS

AT THE SINGAPORE AIR SHOW TWO YEARS AGO, Embraer drew the crowd to action star Jackie Chan’s Legacy 650, which was painted with a dragon motif. This time around, the Brazilian manufacturer will display its new flagship business jet — the ultra-large, intercontinental Lineage 1000E. A measurable improvement over the Embraer Lineage 1000, the 1000E was launched at the 2013 National Business Aviation Association convention and is being branded as a “home away from home”. But with its five distinct cabin zones that offer room for up to 19 passengers, the 1000E will be many things to many people. One example is shown by a designer who created interiors resembling a gentleman’s club or a yacht cabin, rather than an aircraft cabin (see page 36). Embraer also made available an interior theme specifically for the Asian market, as well as other versions for Europe and North America. After all, the jet is made with the top echelons of VVIP fliers in mind. From the polished chrome of the external handrails leading up the jet’s forward stairs to the cabin’s stylish sideledges and storage nooks, elegance is found in the details.

30

JETGALA

The Lineage 1000E has new seats, electric doors, automatic tables, and a refreshed cabinetry design. At the company’s design centre in Florida, jet owners will find a wide range of interior options, including 700 choices of fabric, 400 choices of leather, 60 choices of carpet and 35 choices of veneers. A wet galley with a baker’s oven and state-of-the-art appliances makes it possible to prepare three-course meals onboard, to be served at a spacious dining room that accommodates six people. There is also an office with highspeed Internet connectivity. Jet owners may choose to have a private bedroom complete with a queen-sized bed and fully fitted wardrobe, as well as a walk-in shower. Enhanced sound-proofing, a cabin pressurisation system, and three independently controlled temperature zones further reduce passenger fatigue. And you’ll never worry about storing your luggage, as the Lineage 1000E comes with a 9.1-squaremetre walk-in baggage compartment. Such creature comforts become not just a luxury but a necessity when it comes to long-range travel. The Lineage 1000E can reach a range of 4,600 nm with eight passengers onboard, compared to its predecessor’s 4,400-nm range. >>


Embraer offers hundreds of fabric, leather, carpet and veneer options

OPPOSITE PAGE Apart from Europeanthemed interiors, Embraer will also design themes specially for the Asian market

FROM THE POLISHED CHROME OF THE EXTERNAL HANDRAILS TO THE CABIN’S STYLISH SIDE LEDGES AND STORAGE NOOKS, ELEGANCE IS FOUND IN THE DETAILS

JETGALA

31


WINGS

>> It is capable of flights from London to Mumbai, Dubai to Jakarta, and Beijing to Riyadh; its steep approach capacity allows it to operate from key airports such as London, Teterboro and Aspen. The fully digital Honeywell Ovation Select entertainment and cabin management system may be controlled with seat buttons or wirelessly with an iPad. Multiple media devices and video inputs, such as BluRay players, iPod docks and HDMI or USB ports, may be connected to a fully integrated media centre that delivers high-definition displays and surround sound. The flexible and configurable furniture, with adjustable shelves and PC power outlets, also makes for easy installation of game consoles.

Cockpit of the Future The Lineage 1000E offers the optional Autoland, which conducts approach, touch down, and a five-second rollout when the autopilot is engaged. The system was field-proven during five years of operation in the Embraer E190 commercial jet fleet, upon which the Lineage 1000E is based. Autoland offers mitigation of non-stabilised approaches, and provides response to gusts in turbulent conditions, minimising the occurrence of hard landings and, ultimately, reducing pilot workload. The optional Embraer Enhanced Vision System is also offered as an option on the Lineage 1000E.

IT IS CAPABLE OF FLIGHTS FROM LONDON TO MUMBAI, DUBAI TO JAKARTA, AND BEIJING TO RIYADH 32

JETGALA


Lineage 1000E SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

118 FT 11 IN

36.24 M

WINGSPAN

94 FT 3 IN

28.72 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

34 FT 8 IN

10.57 M

CABIN LENGTH

84 FT 4 IN

25.70 M

CABIN WIDTH

8 FT 9 IN

2.67 M

CABIN HEIGHT

6 FT 7 IN

2.00 M

MAXIMUM RANGE (BASED ON

4,600 NM

8,519 KM

8 PASSENGERS, M 0.78, 3 CREW AND NBAA IFR RESERVES WITH 200 NM ALTERNATE AIRPORT)

MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING

UP TO 19 (EXCLUDING CREW)

MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED

874 KM/H

MAXIMUM OPERATING ALTITUDE

41,000 FT

12,497 M

TAKE-OFF FIELD LENGTH

6,076 FT

1,852 M

MAXIMUM TAKEOFF WEIGHT

120,152 LB

54,500 KG

With five distinct cabin zones, the aircraft can be customised to fit up to 19 passengers

OPPOSITE PAGE The queen-sized bed, wet galley and fully fitted wardrobe enables the Lineage 1000E to feel like home

JETGALA

33


WINGS

ALTITUDE AEROSPACE INTERIORS by Jennifer Henricus

MIDDLE EARTH WINNING VIP JET COMPLETIONS IN A COMPETITIVE INDUSTRY

34

JETGALA


“SOME CUSTOMERS PLACE MORE IMPORTANCE ON BESPOKE FURNITURE AND COMFORT LEVELS WHILE OTHERS ARE STRONGLY FOCUSSED ON WEIGHT REDUCTION”

Altitude offers a complete package that goes from product design to installation, and to certification OPPOSITE Preferring to start from a ‘blank canvas’, the firm works exclusively on Boeing business jets

IN THE RAREFIED BUSINESS OF PRIVATE JET FIT-OUT, aircraft completion centres vie for the opportunity to work on jets in ‘green’ condition: aircraft sans all interior furnishing and exterior paint; a blank canvas. No wonder the team at Altitude Aerospace Interiors has been pleased lately — it will soon complete its first ‘green’ fit-out and has started on its second at its Christchurch completion centre. And they’re no small jets, either — the firm works exclusively on Boeing business jets with approval from the aircraft manufacturer. It has worked on Boeing 737 models for more than 40 years, and is one of the suppliers endorsed by Boeing to supply customised products for the 787. Altitude’s clients range from heads of government to businessmen around the world, while the number of customers from Asia and Europe has also been growing. Requests for fit-outs are as varied as the clients themselves, but the overriding desire is for a luxurious and efficient way to travel for pleasure or for business. “Some customers place more importance on bespoke furniture and comfort levels while others are strongly focussed on weight reduction to ensure they can enjoy long-sector flights,” says Matthew Woollaston, head of Altitude’s VIP Business completions department. >> JETGALA

35


WINGS

The company only does one completion at a time, ensuring that their resources are not diluted Each interior reflects the client’s visualisation and use of the jet

>> BBJ clients don’t seek to make a statement with their aircraft — they are usually very discreet about their jets and prefer anonymity while travelling. However, Altitude’s clients have a definite wish-list that forms the basis of the design. “It’s a very collaborative process — the design team works closely with the client to come up with a total concept that meets their requirements. Once this has been agreed upon, designers and engineers work with various suppliers to create the final specifications for the aircraft interior,” says Woollaston. Altitude conducts all engineering in-house. Over the years, the firm has developed a personalised but structured process that keeps things simple for the client. It incorporates the client’s visualisation of the interior — including custom colour palettes, materials, trims and finishes — as well as the proposed use of the aircraft. “The goal is to cater for every desire and whim and ensure that the entire aircraft interior is in line with the client’s vision,” explains Woollaston. He adds: “We have had our share of quirky requests and at times it can be very challenging to turn these out-of-norm concepts into real solutions for a certified aircraft. On occasion, we have had to modify the original idea to meet with aircraft regulatory restrictions; but most often, with [an] in-depth understanding of the client’s lifestyle and travel requirements, we come up with a creative solution.” Altitude strictly works on one completion project at a time, ensuring there is no dilution of resources and enabling the 270-strong team to focus on innovation and meticulous attention to detail. The company is an independent entity owned by Air New Zealand.

36

JETGALA


WINGS

PATROUILLE DE FRANCE

ALPHA ACTION by Jeff Heselwood

FRANCE’S ELITE AEROBATIC TEAM TAKES FLIGHT FOR D-DAY 38

JETGALA


La PAF performs overhead and leaves a trail of red, blue and white smog Image by Etienne de Malglaive © EADS

The team performs as many as 27 manoeuvres during each show Image by by Łukasz Golowanow

Image by by Łukasz Golowanow

OPPOSITE PAGE Patrouille de France celebrated its 60th anniversary in May 2013 with grand demonstrations at the Paris Air Show Image by Katsuhiko Tokunaga

LA PAF WILL BE FLYING OVER NORMANDY THIS YEAR AS THE REGION CELEBRATES THE 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF D-DAY THE 6TH OF JUNE, 1944, IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT DAYS OF WORLD WAR II. With inclement weather, the German soldiers occupying France had settled in for a quiet week by the sea at Normandy, believing no invasion would be possible that day. The ensuing surprise attack by the Western Allied forces — involving huge numbers of ships from the sea and aircraft roaring overhead — would be forever remembered around the world as D-Day. Once the war was over, one of the French pilots with a background in aerial demonstrations was asked to lead a newly formed aerobatic troop by the French Air Force. It became so popular that other armed forces divisions began forming their own groups, too. In 1952, Squadron Leader Delachenal formed a team of four F-84 aircraft, and the following year, at an air show in Algeria, the squad impressed a commentator so much that he called them ‘Patrouille de France’, or ‘Patrol France’. It is fitting, then, that Patrouille de France — colloquially known as ‘La PAF’ — will be flying over Normandy this year as the region celebrates the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the freedom it brought to France and the rest of occupied Europe. It has chosen to

perform above the pontoons of the artificial harbour at Port-en-Bessin, a fishing village where a small, heroic troop overcame the defenders of the Atlantic Wall. This year, Patrouille de France is headed by Major JeanMichel Herpin, while Captain Jean-Noël Guy acts as operations manager. La PAF uses the Alpha Jet, produced by DassaultBreguet in France and Dornier in Germany. An advanced trainer aircraft, the Alpha Jet has mainly been phased out as a combat aircraft among the world’s air forces, but it is an ideal aerobatic machine that responds to a light touch from its pilot. The plane, which had its first test flight in 1973, has proved to be extremely manoeuvrable and has rapidly become a recognised training aircraft worldwide. The beauty of the Alpha Jet as far as Patrouille de France is concerned is that it needs just 700 metres of runway to become airborne and will fly at up to Mach 0.86. Flying eight jets, the pilots perform as many as 27 intricate manoeuvres during a show, resembling images such as arrows, diamonds and hearts. The team is also known to tow a smog belt from their aircraft to form the Tricolor — the red, blue and white of the French flag, their own ode to liberty. JETGALA

39


WINGS

MARENCO SKYE SH09 by Jeff Heselwood

The SKYe SH09 is designed to be versatile enough to serve varying needs

SMOOTH ROTATOR A HELICOPTER TO SERVE BUSINESS, LEISURE AND ADVENTURE

40

JETGALA


SOME HELICOPTERS ARE BEST FOR sightseeing over African safaris or skiing on the Alps, while others are built for surveying rough mountains or embarking on rescue missions. Once in a while, a helicopter succeeds in becoming flexible enough to skilfully serve these varying needs. Such is the goal of the SKYe SH09. “This aircraft... is to be considered as a ‘vertical take-off platform’ which will have the ability to perform numerous missions,” says Martin Stucki, CEO of Marenco Swisshelicopter Ltd, which is designing and producing the SH09. With a flat floor and high ceiling, the cabin can be configured to have up to seven passenger seats for touristic flights, or be fitted with equipment for geological or rescue operations. Tools and supplies may be brought in through a large rear cargo compartment and large door openings. One glance at the SH09 reveals a striking feature: a glass cockpit floor, which offers both crew and passengers a wide view of the terrain below. Not only is this useful for sightseeing, it also enhances safety by enabling the crew to “monitor the external loads or the surrounding environment at all times and in all types of operations”, according to Stucki. And once the aircraft powers up, you discover another pleasant factor — the SH09 is not as loud as other similar choppers, and this extremely low noise level is manifested both outside the helicopter and within the cabin. This is a result of a combination of a fully composite fuselage, an advanced bearing-free rotor system with five blades, and an electronically governed engine. With a cruise speed of 270 km/h (145 knots), the SH09 is expected become one of the fastest single-engined light helicopters in its class. It will attract operators who wish to avail themselves of high altitude performance, greater payload capacity, an augmented sling-load capability and faster cruise speed. Maximum take-off weight is 2,650 kg, while maximum range is around 800 km. All this power comes from a Honeywell HTS-900-2 unit. It’s easy to see why Marenco’s machine created quite a stir when it was launched at Heli-Expo in Orlando, Florida, in 2011. While the company focusses on North America and the whole of Europe, it also targets Brazil and China. “Since our Chinese clients indicated they wanted this aircraft, Marenco Swisshelicopter has made great progress in entering China and we are currently progressing in our strategy to establish the infrastructure to serve the Chinese market,” says Martin Senes, the company’s commercial director. Marenco unveiled a prototype of the SKYe SH09 in December last year at Mollis Airport in Switzerland. It is expected to fly early this year. The company has signed about 47 letters of intent, with deliveries expected to start in 2015. Production capacity will enable Marenco to deliver 80 units per year. The SKYe SH09’s flat glass cockpit floor allows one to better survey the terrain The single-engined helicopter is steady enough to be used for both sightseeing purposes and geological and rescue operations

SINGLE CHOICE Supported by a large financial group, Marenco Swisshelicopter Ltd was founded in 2007 for the purpose of developing, building and commercialising a new concept of light-turbine helicopter. It aimed to produce a 2.5-tonne, single-engined helicopter that would be modern and sumptuous, with state-of-the-art avionics and electronics. Why the company wanted to go for this market can be explained by the fact that almost half the global market for these civilian helicopters are for single-engined aircraft; commercial helicopters in places like Hong Kong and Singapore are invariably twin-engined for certification purposes. Yet, the SH09 fully complies with international certification standards.

JETGALA

41


WINGS

METROJET LUXURY JOURNEYS by Christel Lee

ELEVATED ELEGANCE THE ‘EXTRA MILE’ ON EXCLUSIVE CHARTERED FLIGHTS As the number of business jet charter operators in Asia continues to grow, industry players strive to set themselves apart from the rest. Hong Kong-based Metrojet is doing just that with Luxury Journeys, which aims to transform a few hours of flight into a lifestyle experience. The first stage of this new campaign offers in-flight gourmet food pairing and a fresh change of the cabin crew’s attire. The new dining experience pairs The Glenlivet 18-year-old Single Malt Scotch Whisky with a three-course Italian meal: an entrée of Scottish smoked salmon with orange salad, a main course of Mezzi Paccheri pasta in red prawn sauce, and a dessert of Torta apples, saffron and raisin, and

42

JETGALA


Madagascar vanilla sauce. The menu — which is offered as a seasonal supplement to Metrojet’s dedicated in-flight cuisine — was created by executive chef Francesco Greco of Messina IL Ristorante, which is under the K.O. Dining Group. Akihiko Nosaka, director of beverage in the group, says: “The perfect balance will entice an even more delicate taste of Italian cuisine with the smoky aroma and elegance of The Glenlivet.” The second highlight of Luxury Journeys celebrates Hong Kong designer Dorian Ho, who has created new cabin-crew wardrobe comprising a coat, dress and suit in classic shades of black, cream and beige. Ho’s latest collection for Metrojet fuses East and West with beauty and functionality, featuring traditional Chinese buttons and belts. Ho notes: “This project was a pleasant challenge for me. There were so many things to consider when designing the outfits. Each piece has been tailor-made with bespoke elements, but they must also perform a function and the ladies need to feel confident and comfortable in their uniforms whilst working around an aircraft.” Metrojet is in talks with potential partners in other industries to further enhance passengers’ journeys. So whether you’re chasing a contract or embarking on a personal mission, you’ll have a travel story to tell even before you reach your destination.

RIGHT Dorian Ho revamped Metrojet’s crew uniform, infusing East with West while ensuring the comfort of the crew OPPOSITE PAGE Scottish smoked salmon entrée with Sicilian orange salad, served with a bread bowl and 18-year-old whisky

THE FIRST STAGE OF THIS NEW CAMPAIGN OFFERS IN-FLIGHT GOURMET FOOD PAIRING AND A FRESH CHANGE OF THE CABIN CREW’S ATTIRE

JETGALA

43


WINGS SKYACHT ONE by Jim Simon

A CLASSIC YACHT IN THE SKY

44

JETGALA


The Skyacht One’s livery sports a hand painted, mahogany-hued ‘hull’ The Grand Room features a planetary clock in a marquetry mural A throttle-inspired faucet with lapis and coral controls and a Compass Rose over a walnut and gold sink in the master bathroom OPPOSITE PAGE The captain’s quarters are fitted with a 14th-century-inspired silk carpet and simulated skylights

hat if a yacht could fly? That was the question that experiential designer Eddie Sotto asked himself for his first jet interior project. The founder of California-based SottoStudios formerly spent years as one of the famed Walt Disney Corporation ‘imagineers’, who were fond of saying: “It’s often fun to do the impossible. Why don’t we try?” Disney’s amusement parks aim at providing guests with a “wow experience” through their use of storytelling and an intense focus on details, and Sotto decided to create such an experience on a private jet. “Experiential design works when all of the details come together in a sensory way to provoke a feeling,” explains Sotto, adding that flying on private aircraft is an immersive experience. As he searched for inspiration for a jet interior design, he came across the story of millionaire George Whittell Jr., who in 1939 had a powerboat designed to mimic the look of his Douglas DC-2 aircraft. Sotto decided to do the opposite — to design a jet’s cabin after that of a yacht. Like luxury cars, watches and handbags, luxury yachts are crafted by hand, have a legacy, and tell a story — and thus reward their owners emotionally. >>

JETGALA

45


WINGS

46

JETGALA


>> As Sotto’s vision for a ‘flying yacht’ took shape, he reached out to Embraer Executive Jets, which suggested that Sotto work side by side with its engineers on the new Lineage 1000E flagship aircraft. The collaborative effort was aptly named Skyacht OneTM, and looked to a legacy of navigation — something that yachts and aircraft share. The storytelling begins at the runway. “The ‘wow’ starts outside with a plane that appears, even on close inspection, to be [made of] mahogany, like the hull of a ship,” explains Sotto. “Imagine that wood-planked stabiliser at the airport — no mistaking Skyacht One. So we hint at the story, but reveal it a bit at a time.” He adds that the “second wow” is experienced upon boarding Skyacht One, when guests are greeted by a marquetry mural of planetary clocks and a galley designed in the British Campaign style. For Skyacht One’s story to be believable, it has to withstand close inspection, which means there are no accidental details. References to historical navigational devices are seen throughout the aircraft — even on tableware. Windows look like yacht portholes, and shagreen skin lines tabletops. “[There are] analog controls that look like they came out of a fine watch, or inlaid ship’s planks that make up the bulkheads. Rich mahogany at a distance, intricate joinery close up. High tech meets high touch,” says Sotto. The theme continues to the aircraft’s most private corners, such as the master suite’s malachite shower and bath. But Sotto assures that “even with all of this detail, none of it overwhelms you or begs for your attention” — in fact, it feels comfortable and lived in. Opportunities for personalisation include the woodpanelled seat-backs and the seat-belts, which have removable inlaid marquetry medallions for the jet owner’s crest, logo or initials. The hues of metals and jewelled controls may be adjusted, and leather patterns on the galley and bedroom furniture may be customised. Each compartment in the floor plan may be configured to suit the owner better. Sotto says: “Like a monogrammed cuff, it’s discreet, but made for you.”

“E EXPERIE ENTIA AL DES SIG GN WORKS S WHEN ALL OF THE E DETA AIL LS CO OME TO OGET THER IN NA ENSO ORY WAY TO PROVOK KE A FEE ELIN NG” SE OPPOSITE The Skyacht OneTM features British Campaign furniture and is inspired by the art of navigation, something both yachts and aircraft share

Matte-finished teak and mahogany line the master bathroom and are complemented by malachite

Sotto’s concept was inspired by years of experience being one of Disney’s ‘imagineers’

JETGALA

47


WINGS AEROMOBIL by Charmaine Tai

WI N GS ONE MORE STEP FORWARD TOWARDS THE FLYING CAR

48

JETGALA


IN 1940, HENRY FORD WENT ON RECORD with these words: “Mark my word: a combination airplane and motorcar is coming.” Many have since come and gone trying to fulfil his prediction. One recent effort was unveiled at the SAE 2013 AeroTech Congress & Exhibition — the AeroMobil 2.5. The two-seater prototype, designed by Slovakian engineer Štefan Klein, had previously completed a successful — albeit slightly unstable — take off and landing on a runway. Klein has been researching and designing his “flying car” for more than 20 years now. The first version, AeroMobil 1.0, was conceptualised in 1990 as a single-person aircraft. A second prototype, AeroMobil 2.0, came five years later and sported a more compact design. Klein later teamed up with Juraj Vaculík to create the AeroMobil company in 2010, with the former acting as head designer and the latter as CEO. The AeroMobil 2.5’s successful completion of its wings stress, road and flight tests has paved the way for the AeroMobil 3.0, which is expected to be completed this year. The car-cum-aircraft uses a Rotax 912 water-cooled engine, which is linked to both the rear-mounted propeller and the front wheels, and produces 100 hp. On land, the flying car will reach a speed of 160 km/h; after taking off at 130 km/h, it will be able to fly faster than 200 km/h.

The collapsible wings which can be tucked on top of the car when not in use will extend to 27 feet during flight mode OPPOSITE The AeroMobil 2.5 prototype completed successful take off and landing

Despite its large frame, the AeroMobil 3.0 will weigh only 450 kg, thanks to its steel framework and carbon coating. This lightness also translates into more efficient fuel consumption, with the flying car requiring only 7.5 litres of petrol for every 100 km on land, and 15 litres per hour in the air. Unlike the bulky AeroMobil 1.0, the fourth-generation AeroMobil will fit in a normal car park lot, with its width spanning 19.7 feet. Collapsible wings, which are neatly tucked in at the top of the car when not in use, will extend to 27 feet during flight mode. The aviation and automobile markets have yet to see a successfully produced, civilian flying car, and regulations and infrastructure will have to be modified to accommodate this hybrid vehicle, too. One advantage of the AeroMobil is that it will be able to use existing structures — for instance, it is designed to take off directly from garages, and will use regular gas stations for refuelling. It’s certainly good news for those who believe in Henry Ford’s words... or for those who simply wish to escape traffic.

SINGLE CHOICE AeroMobil 3.0 is not the only winged car being prepared for take off in the next few years. In 2006, US-based company Terrafugia began developing the Transition (above), a white-and-blue two-seater ‘roadable aircraft’ with wings that could be bent and folded vertically. In 2004, Dutch company PAL-V Europe NV came up with a twoseater flying car concept based on a gyrocopter design.

ON LAND, THE AEROMOBIL WILL REACH A SPEED OF 160 KM/H; AFTER TAKING OFF AT 130 KM/H, IT WILL BE ABLE TO FLY FASTER THAN 200 KM/H

JETGALA

49


WINGS

SOVIET NIGHT WITCHES

NIGHT by Steve Slater

FEMALE FIGHTERS, SLUGGISH AIRCRAFT AND LEGENDARY WAR TRIUMPHS DURING RUSSIA’S DARKEST HOUR and against all odds, a unique group of women helped repulse the threat of invasion during World War II. At their head was Marina Raskova, who had been well known in the country as a record-breaking flyer before the war, the way Amelia Earhart and Amy Johnson were famed in their homelands. In 1941, Raskova proposed the creation of three Air Force Regiments with all-female pilots, navigators, mechanics, gunners and staff personnel. Over a thousand volunteers were recruited. The three regiments were given specific tasks. The 586th Fighter Aviation Regiment operated nimble, single-seat Yakovlev Yak-1 fighters. Much to the chagrin of the male units, the 587th Bomber Aviation Regiment flew the best Soviet ground-attack aircraft at the time — the twin-engined Petlyakov Pe-2 dive bombers. But the 588th Night Bomber Regiment had to make do with aircraft that looked (and flew) as if they had come from the previous world war — the wood-and-fabric Polikarpov Po-2. 50

JETGALA


A two-seat, open-cockpit biplane, the Po-2 had a five-cylinder radial engine that produced just 100 horsepower and a staccato bark that could be heard from miles away. This was a major issue for its crews, as with a top speed of less than 130 km/h, the venerable biplane could be heard long before it appeared. It carried no armour plating, radios and parachutes — meaning protection was scant, navigation was tricky, and escape was impossible once the aircraft was hit. But despite its weaknesses, the Po-2 — along with its crews — gained a fearsome reputation. Since it had been designed in 1928 as a trainer and an agricultural aircraft, it could operate from short, unprepared fields, and could also carry equipment under its wings — such as a range of 50-kg and 100-kg bombs, which the regiment used to support the Army. The 588th Regiment flew in the dead of night, climbing to around 2,000 metres. Then, throttling their aircraft’s engines back to idle to minimise noise, they would glide towards their targets. The Po-2’s bracing wires would emit a whistling sound as they passed overhead, which reminded the German soldiers of a witch’s broomstick and earned the crew the nickname: ‘Night Witches’. Flying the Po-2 was extremely arduous. For four years, as the Russians repulsed their invaders, as many as 40 twowoman crews flew up to 18 short sorties each night, braving searchlights and gunfire around their targets, as well as night-fighters and sub-zero temperatures that could be felt intensely in the open cockpit. They flew in groups of three, with the first two aircraft acting as decoys to attract searchlights while the third sneaked in to drop its bomb. They would then switch roles until all three had unleashed their weapons. No less a hazard was the task of landing back on short, rough fields with the aid of a single, briefly illuminated spotlight on the ground. Until its dissolution in October 1945, the regiment remained totally female. Collectively they are said to have flown about 30,000 sorties and dropped 23,000 tons of bombs. Twenty-three Night Witches were awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union, the country’s highest honour. Just before her death in July 2013 at the age of 91, one of the last survivors among the Night Witches, Nadezhda Popova, graphically described conditions on the 852 missions she flew. “Almost every time, we had to sail through a wall of enemy fire,” Popova told author David Stahel in an interview for his book, Operation Typhoon: Hitler’s March on Moscow, October 1941. She has also been quoted as saying: “I sometimes stare into the blackness and close my eyes. I can still imagine myself as a young girl, up there in my little bomber, and I ask myself: Nadia, how did you do it?” But even in such tough conditions, there was room for romance. Once, after being shot down, Popova found herself among retreating troops and civilians, including a wounded fighter pilot, Semyon Kharlamov. The two stayed in contact and at the end of the war, met in Berlin and scribbled their names on the wall of the Reichstag. They married and today, their son Aleksandr upholds family legacy as a General in the Belarussian Air Force.

OPPOSITE PAGE Navigator Rufina S. Gasheva and pilot Natalya F. Meklin made 1828 sorties during the war. A Po-2 aircraft lies in the background Image courtesy of www.waralbum.ru

THIS PAGE Pilots of the 586th Fighter Wing Defence included Galina Burdin, Tamara Ustinova Memorial, Varleria Ivanovna Homjakova and Valentine Lisitsina Image courtesy of www.waralbum.ru

Nadezdha Popova was one of the first Night Witches and received many awards for her efforts, including Hero of the Soviet Union Image courtesy of Albert Axell

Popova survived the war and returned to her hometown of what is Ukraine now, eventually marrying another soldier Image courtesy of The Week UK

THE PO-2’S WHISTLING SOUND REMINDED THE GERMAN SOLDIERS OF A WITCH’S BROOMSTICK AND EARNED THE CREW THE NICKNAME: ‘NIGHT WITCHES’ JETGALA

51


WINGS NADIA MARCINKO

G LO BAL G IR L 52

JETGALA


With more than 100,000 followers on her Global Girl Facebook page, Nadia Marcinko must be doing something right. And it’s not just because she’s blonde and beautiful. The marketing-savvy former model is a corporate pilot, flight instructor, model ambassador, motivational speaker and self-described “entrepreneur at heart”. We learn a little about Global Girl as she switched from one runway to another. Q: What sparked your interest in aviation/flying? I worked as a fashion model flying around the globe but there was a problem — I was a nervous flyer. I had no intention of becoming a pilot at the time, but I decided to take a flying lesson in hopes of getting over my fear. I became so fascinated by flying and the sense of freedom that comes with being at the controls that I quickly decided to make a career switch — from one runway to another.

Marcinko used to model for high fashion houses, fashion magazines and music videos before making a career switch to the aviation industry (Opposite page & this page, top left) Image by Tereza Janakova Photography, Hair & Make Up by Kodo Nishimura

UP CLOSE Who is your aviation hero? Amelia Earhart Describe your morning routine. I usually have a quick breakfast, read my emails and I am out the door in 45 minutes. What is your pet peeve about flying? Getting to the airport. I’m waiting for someone to build a good flying car. Name your dream destination. Space What is the most nerve-wracking part of a flight? Flying an approach to minimums What watch do you wear? On the ground, I wear a Panerai Luminor and in the air, a Breitling Emergency. What’s your dream aircraft? F 15 — I’d love to land it on a carrier one day. What did you want to be when you were young? I come from a family of architects so that was my plan too before I stumbled upon aviation. Words to live by — what are yours? “What’s stopping you?”

ONLY SIX PER CENT OF LICENCED PILOTS ARE WOMEN AND IT CAN BE A LITTLE INTIMIDATING TRYING TO ENTER THE PROFESSION Q: How did you land your first job as a corporate pilot? It was a classic example of when preparation meets opportunity. I spent many evenings staring at a wall covered in cockpit posters, getting familiar with the layouts and practicing emergency procedures, instead of going out with friends. I had worked hard during my training and was fortunate enough to know the right people in the industry. I got an opportunity to fly a Gulfstream IIB for a few years and now fly an Embraer Phenom 300. I was also able to find a few jobs for other pilots I met throughout the years. Networking plays a big role in corporate aviation and I enjoy meeting people and connecting them. It’s no secret — people like to work with friends. Q: What are the top similarities and differences between modelling and flying? Discipline, dedication and confidence are necessary to succeed in both fields, but there are a few differences. In modelling, the customer is expected and encouraged to form an opinion based on first impressions. They take one look at you and either love what you are selling, or not. You present other people’s work and may get a standing ovation for simply walking down a runway. >> JETGALA

53


WINGS

Apart from flying an Embraer Phenom 300, Marcinko is also a flight instructor

>> The world of aviation is exactly the opposite. If you don’t look the part, the tendency to form an opinion based on looks quickly becomes a disadvantage and you have to work a little harder to alter those assumptions. You are responsible for people’s lives and you better do it right. If there is a problem in flight, it’s only up to you to take care of it, preferably without the passengers ever noticing. Nobody is going to applaud you for an uneventful flight, yet the sense of accomplishment is more than enough. And the biggest difference between modelling and flying? The runways are much longer. Q: Which part of a flight is your favourite? I especially love the moment after climbing into a dark grey layer of clouds, starting to see the sun glistening through and then breaking out on top only to find a clear azure sky with a puffy blanket below. Nature is amazing… Q: What has been your most memorable flight thus far? My first solo flight was an unforgettable, exhilarating experience. I remember being a little nervous and checking the weather three times during the time it took me to taxi from the ramp to the runway. The first time there was a system malfunction and I was responsible for getting the plane safely on the ground was a different kind of a memorable flight. And I have to say my recent aerobatic lesson in an Albatros L-39 is very high on that list as well. I’m still waiting for an opportunity to fly to space. Then, we may have a clear winner… Q: What challenges do you encounter being a female pilot in a male-dominated profession, and how do you deal with them? Getting into aviation was the best decision I ever made, but it was not without a few obstacles along the way. Only six per cent of licenced pilots are women and it can be a little intimidating trying to enter the profession. Being a woman in a male-dominated field takes a bit of confidence. I believe the sense of being the odd one out actually worked in my advantage — it made me study a bit more, work a little 54

JETGALA

harder and appreciate each accomplishment more than I did in my previous career. When you enter any field as a minority, in order to be successful, you need to know your stuff and make sure you are heard. Q: You are known for promoting aviation careers to young women. How do you encourage them? I think it’s important to lead by example, so when I hear people talk about the lack of young women interested in STEM fields or the upcoming pilot shortage, I feel compelled to do something. I started an aviation page on Facebook for other women to hear my story and say to themselves: “This looks like a lot of fun and if that girl could do it, so can I.” Many women have since sent me messages describing their decisions to get into aviation after seeing the page. It’s truly heartwarming. Q: Please share with us a success story in your mission to promote flying as a career for women. One young girl said she loved to fly but her boyfriend told her she couldn’t do it. We had a little talk and she is now going to school to become a commercial pilot. Q: You launched your own business, Aviloop. Tell us about the experience. I decided to create a ‘daily deal’ website focused solely on aviation, aiming to make flight training more accessible. The company has since morphed into a more of a personalised aviation concierge service, but the original ‘daily deal’ portion of the site is still active. I enjoy creating businesses from the ground up. You need to have a certain tolerance for risk and be willing to accept uncertainty during the inevitable ups and downs. I have no problem riding the roller coaster so I am now excited to be working on a unique aviation business venture with a mission of doing good by flying private. I am still working out the kinks but I can tell you all about it in a few months.


Experience a distinct ability to create a very distinctive interior. AERIA Luxury Interiors, the completions division of ST Aerospace San Antonio, specializes in VIP completion and refurbishment for Boeing and Airbus airframes. The AERIA team has renowned expertise in completions, engineering, and all related support activities. Our management team collectively has nearly 150 years of experience and has performed successful completions on more than 50 aircraft. For the ultimate expression of airborne style, elegance, and functionality, call on AERIA Luxury Interiors. The Luxury of Experience. Visit us at Booth/Chalet: G01/L01 during the Singapore Airshow 2014, Feb. 11 to 16! 9800 John Saunders Road, San Antonio, Texas 78216, U.S.A., Call us at +1 210 293 6925

AERIA Luxury Interiors is the completions division of ST Aerospace San Antonio, L.P., which is an afďŹ liate of ST Aerospace.

www.aeriainteriors.com


WINGS

FLOOR FASHION

TAI PING CARPETS by Jennifer Henricus

CUSTOMISED CARPETS TO COMPLETE THE TOTAL CABIN LOOK 56

JETGALA


A black-and-white interior shot of a Tai Ping-furnished Volo G1 aircraft OPPOSITE PAGE Conde from the Chinoiseries collection

ARTISAN HOUSE Tai Ping Carpets International Ltd recently launched a new direction with five brands within the company, differentiated by their techniques, colour palettes and applications. Its artisan brands — Tai Ping, Edward Fields and La Manufacture Cogolin — focus on hand-made, customised carpets for private residences, luxury boutiques, yachts and jets. Latest collections include Eclipse by Tai Ping, inspired by light and motion; Beacon by Edward Fields, reminiscent of Native American crafts; and Bayadères by La Manufacture Cogolin, which emphasises vibrant colour and geometric twists.

WHENEVER A NEW jet interior design is conceptualised or accomplished, the attention is rarely on the floor. One lauds the space-saving layout and the brilliant gadgetry docks, or the ultramodern galley and that one feature that has never before been seen on aircraft. Yet, it is the subtle touch — the wall colour, the soft light, the carpeted floor — that sets the tone, making a design theme not just cohesive, but comfortable. One company head-quartered in Hong Kong helps designers accomplish just that. Tai Ping Carpets International Ltd custom-designs this all-important floor feature of an aircraft. Founded more than 50 years ago with the goal of preserving China’s rug-making tradition, the company has now grown into a global entity with design centres and showrooms in fashionable cities such as New York and Paris. The company began creating aviation carpets about 15 years ago, and these now count among its rapidly growing sectors, says Mersine Patts, Tai Ping’s managing director of global aviation. Demand comes from around the world, most especially from Asia and the Middle East. The business-jet segment has particularly seen strong growth in recent years, with more designers and clients paying closer attention to their cabin carpets. Patts says that of all types of carpets, those created for jets

are by far the most interesting because the space is very unique. They differ from the company’s other products because they are governed by strict standards, including technical and fibre restrictions. Achieving the right scale and design solution is thus paramount. Every Tai Ping design is worked out with the company’s team of aviation-specific designers. The design process is entirely client-centred. “Understanding how a client will use and enjoy the aircraft and then incorporating the technical requirements for the aircraft is the key challenge,” says Patts. Another task is managing weight requirements, particularly for wide-bodied jets that tend to be decorated more sumptuously than narrow-bodied ones, and thus require very dense, luxurious carpets. After the carpet has been created, Tai Ping’s designers work closely with installation teams at aircraft completion centres. There is no minimum order, so even owners of the smallest aeroplanes can get the look they want. While most aircraft cabin carpets are made of wool, silk is used occasionally. In a recent collaboration with Jetsolution, Tai Ping created a carpet for a Global 5000 that came with the owner’s company logo, which was woven with 75 per cent New Zealand fine wool and 25 per cent delicate silk. >> JETGALA

57


WINGS

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Tai Ping collaborated with Hong Kong-based service provider, Metrojet, to work on the carpets of their aircraft Carpets are meant to complete the overall tone in the aircraft, as seen in a neutraltoned Gulfstream jet La Valliere I from the Chinoiseries collection

>> Recently, Tai Ping opened a new colour dye house that applies German, Swiss and Italian technologies and uses advanced computer systems to control all stages of the dyeing process. This has resulted in better-quality yarns, more precise colour, and shorter supply times. But for a company pursuing a sustainable ethos, the biggest benefit is the recycling of all the water used in the new process, so that it now uses about 25 per cent of the energy and water required in conventional dyeing. This focus on environmental responsibility is another area where Tai Ping resonates well with the aviation industry — proving once again that even the most traditional products deserve a space on some of the world’s most advanced machines.

58

JETGALA


WINGS

MANOLO CHRÉTIEN by Charmaine Tai

Lightning from the JusteCiel collection Manolo Chrétien with an aircraft, photographed by Stephane Guilbaud Sabre includes the production number of the aircraft on its fuselage

AVIATION HISTORY SEEN THROUGH THE EYES OF AN ARTIST

60

JETGALA


Vintage Concorde on an aerospatial aluminium template A Groupe Air France Concorde in the hangar translated onto brushed aluminium All images courtesy of Red Sea Gallery

Born in a French Air Force base, photographic artist Manolo Chrétien grew up surrounded by the sight of shiny aluminium, the feel of a hot tarmac and the smell of kerosene. This background influences his unique artistic technique, which involves superimposing photographic prints on aluminium sheets recycled from vintage aircraft parts and engineer templates. As a result, his subjects — crashing waves, aviation history, and reflections of bustling cities — are as essential to the total image as the details of the metal canvases. Chrétien calls them “aluminations”. Aircraft are the stars of his Juste-Ciel and NouveauxNez collections — one artwork creates the illusion of an Exocet missile mirrored on an aircraft’s body. Screws and rivets line a photograph of a Lockheed Constellation’s

windows, with rust acting as a tell-tale sign of the machine’s state. Sabre, showing a reflection of clear skies and a runway, even mimics production numbers on a fuselage. Since his debut with a series of boat-themed photographs in 1998, Chrétien has exhibited in galleries across France, Germany, China and the United Kingdom. His most recent exhibition at the Redsea gallery in Singapore in November showcased more than 25 pieces from his various collections. It also included three images of the supersonic Concorde, each printed on aluminium sheets that were used in the original design templates for the manufacturing of the aircraft in the 1950s. Each sheet holds essential information about the Concorde — original drawings still faintly visible through Chrétien’s prints.

He superimposes photographic prints on aluminium sheets recycled from vintage aircraft parts and engineer templates JETGALA

61


WINGS 3D-PRINTED AIRCRAFT by Jim Simon

PRI NTED WI N GS FROM IDEA TO FLIGHT IN DAYS

62

JETGALA


COULD SOMETHING AS COMPLEX AND POWERFUL AS AN AIRCRAFT COME STRAIGHT OUT OF A PRINTER? Visionaries in the fields of aviation and education seem to think so. Three-dimensional printing has provided quantum leaps to various industries — from dentistry to jewellery, from cars to food — thanks to its expediency, low cost and, most of all, design flexibility. Also called ‘laser sintering’, 3D printing generates fully functional parts directly from computer-aided designs. It eliminates the expensive and time-consuming tooling process that heavy manufacturing has relied upon for generations. It is no surprise that the technology has already attracted investment from such aviation giants as Rolls-Royce and GE Electric, who even foresee the potential to design and build jet engines using 3D manufacturing. To prove this point, a small group of visionary engineers at the University of Southampton has built an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) through this process. The SULSA (Southampton University Laser Sintered Aircraft) can fly nearly 45 km on a single charge, thanks to its electric-powered engine, light weight, and two-metre wingspan. More intriguing is that the plane, once ‘printed’, can be assembled in mere minutes without using any bolts, screws or nuts, as the parts are made to perfectly fit together. SULSA was entirely printed on an EOS nylon laser sintering machine, which built the aircraft layer by layer. The design can be stretched or resized. Professor Jim Scanlan, from

This UAV experiment uses an elliptical wing form, which is traditionally difficult to manufacture but was easily produced through 3D printing

“LASER SINTERING REMOVES THE MANUFACTURING CONSTRAINT ASSOCIATED WITH SHAPE COMPLEXITY” the University’s Computational Engineering and Design Research group, says the process allows engineers to revisit historical techniques and ideas that were previously deemed unfeasible. One such idea is a geodetic airframe, used on the Vickers Wellington bomber in the early 1900s. Scanlan explains: “This form of structure is very stiff and lightweight, but very complex. If it was manufactured conventionally, it would require a large number of individually tailored parts that would have to be bonded or fastened at great expense.” Professor Andy Keane, part of the same group, notes that SULSA uses an elliptical wing form, similar to that seen on the Spitfire. “The Spitfire wing was recognised as an extremely efficient design, but it was notoriously difficult and expensive to manufacture. Again, laser sintering removes the manufacturing constraint associated with shape complexity, and in the SULSA aircraft there is no cost penalty in using an elliptical shape,” he says. Both Scanlan and Keane lead the SULSA project. While SULSA focusses on UAV applications, the technology promises potential benefits for the private jet market. It’s not only about savings for both manufacturers and consumers; it’s about more personal service and groundbreaking design. Imagine building spare parts on demand by accessing designs housed in a central database via the Internet, and ‘printing’ them out. Or customising aircraft like never before to meet a customer’s functional and personal requirements — even from the conceptualisation stage, a far stretch though it may be. There are, after all, some unconventional designs today just waiting to leap off the drawing board. JETGALA

63


WINGS WORLD VIEW EXPERIENCE by Charmaine Tay

FLOATING TO SPACE FOR A SHIFT IN PERSPECTIVE

dfkjaklfjfdjakslfj

64

JETGALA

ASTRONAUTS WHO HAVE LOOKED AT EARTH FROM OUTER SPACE are struck as much by its fragility as by its beauty. This view has tended to produce a shift in perspective called the ‘overview effect’, which stems from realising that all life on Earth is interconnected and interdependent, and that the only thing protecting us from the rest of the universe is — in the words of astronaut and spacewalker Ron Garan — “a paper-thin layer” of atmosphere. Astonauts have attempted to share this perspective with the rest of us through photographs, but a team of pioneers hopes to offer something even better. World View Experience aims to bring passengers — or voyagers, as the company calls them — to the usually out-of-reach space. “Seeing the Earth hanging in the ink-black void of space will help people realise our connection to our home planet and to the universe around us,” says company CEO Jane Poynter.


To achieve this, it is developing a vehicle together with Paragon Space Development Corporation, the entity responsible for the NASA Constellation spacesuit and the Mars One concept. Up to six voyagers and two crewmen will fit inside a capsule attached to a large helium balloon, which is inflated by ground crew until it expands. It then gently ascends as it loses density, and reaches an altitude of 30 kilometres (100,000 feet) in roughly two hours. It is at this height where the coveted view of Earth is revealed through the cabin’s view-ports — the curvature of a white, blue and green planet contrasted with the darkness of an infinite cosmos. Scientists at the International Space Station have been known to spend hours ‘Earth gazing’ — but if you can pull yourself away from the windows, you can help yourself to the contents of an on-board refreshment bar, or send photos back home via in-flight internet. After hovering in the stratosphere for about two hours, the capsule begins to descend when the pilot vents helium from the balloon. It is finally detached from the vehicle and released at 15 kilometres (50,000 feet), to be recovered by the ground crew later on. With the aid of a ParaWing, the

capsule glides on towards a designated landing site. Nearing land, skids are deployed and the ParaWing is flared to achieve a gentle touchdown. The entire voyage lasts from five to six hours — enough, says the company, for scientists to gather data, create videos, or even teach classes. The gentle journey gives voyagers time to observe phenomena at various atmospheric levels. It also eliminates the need for spacesuits, specially protected equipment, and extensive training. Most importantly, it may “open up a whole new realm for exercising human curiosity, scientific research and education”, says Poynter, and introduce a new era in which every man can be a true explorer.

IF YOU CAN PULL YOURSELF AWAY FROM THE WINDOWS, YOU CAN HELP YOURSELF TO THE CONTENTS OF AN ON-BOARD REFRESHMENT BAR

The capsule descends when the pilot vents helium from the balloon, before detaching it from the vehicle

OPPOSITE The World View Experience brings voyagers to ‘near space’, where they can view Earth’s curvature

SAFE IN THE STRATOSPHERE

Booking is scheduled to open in 2016, but meanwhile, view an animation of the flight here

As the exact altitude where ‘outer space’ begins has been much debated, World View Experience says its capsule will travel to “nearspace”. Nevertheless, the Federal Aviation Administration has agreed to certify the capsule as a commercial space tourism vehicle, meaning it has been built to operate in outer space. The vehicle will be operated by travel and transport design consultancy Priestmangoode. Safety precautions include a ParaWing that is deployed and ready to use at all times during the flight, and the capacity for the vehicle to be operated by ground crew if necessary.

JETGALA

65


WINGS

by Alex Unruh

CAPTAIN SPEAKING... TIME FOR NEW TAKE-OFFS

66

JETGALA


R

eflect. Recalibrate. Anticipate. This is how I prime my mind for new challenges and chances each time we enter a new year. I look back at 2013 and see the busiest year I’ve ever had in nearly a decade of flying for a certain aircraft manufacturer. The company rolled out four new aircraft — three of which I fly, in addition to the other four I’ve been taking to the skies. As with any new product, market interest sparked a need to conduct demonstrations for potential buyers. This, along with some regulatory restraints on the operation of new aircraft globally, made 2013 equally taxing and rewarding. Many of us try to recalibrate our lives at the start of a new year — resolving, for instance, to exercise and eat healthy. Professionally, we appraise ourselves and apply lessons learned to our work. Most trainee pilots would have heard this famous, albeit anonymous, quote: “A good pilot is always learning.” I learned a valuable lesson in 2013 when I demonstrated an aircraft in Luanda, Angola. Long story short, the ordeal of obtaining flight permits in this developing country was unlike any place I’ve been to — and as a pilot, I’ve been to many. We anticipate the future even though we don’t know for certain what we can expect. This year, I look forward to showing off more new aircraft to current customers as well as potential clients — one of the best perks of my job. I also expect a dynamic year for the aviation industry, be it in matters of regulatory changes, new aircraft models, technology, service, or mergers and acquisitions. So whether you are a pilot or a passenger, I wish you a happy and prosperous 2014, and trust that your landings shall equal take-offs.

WE ANTICIPATE THE FUTURE EVEN THOUGH WE DON’T KNOW FOR CERTAIN WHAT WE CAN EXPECT JETGALA

67


LUXE


LUXE PRESIDENTIAL SUITES by Charmaine Tay

SUITE

MACAU HIGH STAKES AND HIGH LIVING IN ASIA’S GAMING CITY

70

JETGALA


Macau is made up of the Macau Peninsula and the Taipa and Coloane islands, which are connected by the Cotai Strip Image courtesy of Mandarin Oriental Macau

JETGALA

71


LUXE

UNIQUELY POSITIONED BETWEEN MAINLAND CHINA AND HONG KONG, THE HISTORIC ENCLAVE OF MACAU ALLOWS FEW VISITORS TO LEAVE WITHOUT HAVING SPENT SOME CASH ON LADY LUCK. On the main island of this former Portuguese colony, one can expect to snack on delectable Portuguese favourites, shop along iconic stone-paved streets, and visit the famous Ruins of St. Paul’s — all on Senado Square, a UNESCO World Heritage site. On the other side of town lies Cotai, home to Cotai Strip which, like the Las Vegas Strip, hosts major hotels with casinos. So collect your winnings and ride the elevators up to some of the best suites in this culturally rich city. THIS PAGE The Mandarin Oriental Macau is located on the Nape waterfront The Altira Macau is finished in contemporary decor, and offers floor-to-ceiling windows in every guest room

72

JETGALA


Derived from the Latin word altus (‘high’), Altira Macau commits to the highest standards of hospitality and service. The 38-storey complex guarantees a floor-to-ceiling window in every guest room — a feature that is twice as enjoyable in the hotel’s four villas, each of which boasts two adjacent walls with a panoramic view of the Macau Peninsula. The 256-square-metre space includes a bedroom, a fully equipped kitchenette and lounge, and a steam room. After working out at the villa’s gym while listening to music from a state-of-the-art sound system, guests can draw a bath in the circular stone tub, or achieve zen in the Japanesestyle shower.

SNACK ON DELECTABLE PORTUGUESE FAVOURITES, SHOP ALONG ICONIC STONE-PAVED STREETS, AND VISIT THE FAMOUS RUINS OF ST. PAUL’S

Floral motifs and purple hues infuse a sense of royalty into Grand Lisboa’s Presidential Suite

Never missing from a tourist shot because of its position in Macau’s skyline, the 261-metre-high Grand Lisboa is designed to mimic Macau’s Lotus symbol. Its Presidential Suite is as grand as its façade, boasting an area of 341 square metres. Guests at the suite can enjoy a Turkish steam bath or immerse themselves in theatre with a 40-inch Bang & Olufsen television. Certain suites include a sauna and a private sky garden. One may also find French cuisine at Robuchon au Dôme and contemporary Cantonese food at The 8 Restaurant — both Michelinstarred establishments. >>

JETGALA

73


LUXE Mandarin Oriental Macau’s marbled bathroom offers an undisturbed view of the former Portuguese colony The suite boasts a contemporary take on traditional Asian design Each villa at MGM Macau can be configured to include an additional bedroom The hotel’s European inspiration is reflected in its villas

Mandarin Oriental Macau serves as a convenient and exclusive meeting and conference venue. The two-bedroom Presidential Suite on the 23rd floor occupies 337 square metres and is furnished with Asian-style artefacts and patterned carpets. The two-bedroom, two-bathroom suite also offers two sitting rooms with study and entertainment areas, as well as a private bar and dining room. A 270-degree view takes in the Macau Bay, Macau Tower and Nam Van Lake. Hypoallergenic pillows and butler service are available on request.

COTAI STRIP, LIKE THE LAS VEGAS STRIP, HOSTS MAJOR HOTELS WITH CASINOS

MGM Macau’s distinct feature is its grand atrium, the European-styled Grande Praça, housed under a ceiling of glass. The hotel’s dedication to detail is carried over to its 15 villas, which range in size from 220 to 380 square metres. Guests access the villa through an exclusive lobby and dedicated elevators, and may choose either a one-bedroom or two-bedroom configuration. VIP visitors enjoy customised service – once, a highprofile guest who liked to work out in the morning was offered a treadmill in his room. The opulently decorated villas face the South China Sea.

74

JETGALA


The Florence Suite in the Venetian Macao sports warm hues and comfortable lighting Floor-to-ceiling windows in Wynn Macau’s Encore Grand Salon Suite capture the Nam Van Lake view, as well as Macau’s skyline Image by Barbara Kraft

DIRECTORY Boasting one of the world’s largest casinos, the Italian-styled Venetian Macao splashes out on entertainment, dining and shopping options. The largest single-structure hotel building in Asia, it replicates Venice’s iconic canals and architecture indoors. Among its 3,000 suites, the Florence Suite is the largest, occupying 290 square metres. Furnished with a blend of Eastern and Western design, the suite includes two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a living room, a dining area, and a media room. The in-room jacuzzi offers extra relaxation, while a butler helps keep guests’ minds at ease. Limousine service is available on request.

Altira Macau Avenida de Kwong Tung Taipa, Macau T: +853 2886 8888 F: +853 8867 6688 E: enquiries@altiramacau.com www.altiramacau.com Grand Lisboa Avenida de Lisboa, Macau T: +853 2828 3838 F: +853 2888 2828 E: reservation@grandlisboa.com www.grandlisboa.com Mandarin Oriental Macau Avenida Dr. Sun Yat Sen NAPE, Macau T: +853 8805 8888 E: momac-reservations@mohg.com www.mandarinoriental.com/macau MGM Macau Avenida Dr. Sun Yat Sen NAPE, Macau T: +853 8802 8888 F: +853 8802 3333 E: hotelenquiry@mgmmacau.com www.mgmmacau.com

Wynn Macau offers two towers with meeting and conference facilities, a shopping arcade, a Moon Jellyfish aquarium, and a spa that provides, among others, Deluxe Caviar Therapy. Tucked in the Encore tower is the 2,000-square-metre Encore Grand Salon Suite, with a bedroom, massage room and living room decorated in a red, white and gold motif. Wall-to-wall, floor-to-ceiling windows grant guests a generous view of Nam Van Lake and the city’s skyline. Expect fine Egyptian linen, a 65-inch flat screen television, and a spacious bathroom.

The Venetian Macao-Resort-Hotel Estrada da Baía de N. Senhora da Esperança, s/n, Taipa, Macao T: +853 2882 8888 E: inquiries@venetian.com www.venetianmacao.com

Wynn Macau offers two towers w

arcade, a Moon Jellyfish aquarium, Wynn Macau Therapy. Tucked in the Enco Rua CidadeCaviar de Sintra Grand Salon Suite, with a bedroom NAPE, Macau a red, white and gold motif. Wall-to T: +853 2888 9966 F: +853 2832 9966 view of Nam Van Lake an generous E: inquiries@wynnmacau.com a 65-inch flat screen television, and www.wynnmacau.com

JETGALA

75


LUXE

SKELETON WATCHES by Katrina Balmaceda

REVEALING THE MASTERY BEHIND THE FACE MANY ENDEAVOUR TO MASTER THE CRAFT OF MAKING EXQUISITE WATCHES AND RARE MOVEMENTS. Only a selected few succeed, and fewer still have perfected the art of piercing dials, paring them down to their bare minimum in order to open up a world of mechanical marvels to wearers and collectors. Such an endeavour takes countless hours of filing and bevelling, and requires an eye for aesthetic balance, too — after all, if you reveal the inner workings of a watch, they must be fascinating and pleasing. The best watchmakers do this even when the movements are hidden — so when they decide to skeletonise dials and movements, they in fact go the extra mile to draw out the beauty of the components. Here are some of the finest examples.

76

JETGALA


PIG OYA

ED

The inner workings of a Royal Oak — a model that has evolved while maintaining a signature style throughout 42 years — are seen in this model, which was created in 2012 to mark the series’ fourth decade. The Audemars Piguet Openworked Extra-Thin Royal Oak uses the extra-thin, self-winding Manufacture Calibre 5122, which matches the 3.05 mm thickness of the very first Royal Oak movement. The 249part Calibre 5122 was subjected to galvanic treatment, bringing out an anthracite hue that complements the watch’s slate-grey dial. With so much revealed beneath the dial, the date display is discreet without sacrificing readability — the sapphire date disc’s black numerals can be seen clearly against the grey background of the metallised sapphire date window. The watch comes in a 39-mm-diameter platinum case with 50-metre water resistance. It runs on a minimum power-reserve of 40 hours, and comes in a limited edition of 40 pieces.

VI

JO

For the Villeret Squelette 8 Jours, Blancpain chose the aesthetic signature of Villeret, its most classic collection, as the canvas for an entirely open-worked movement — the hand-wound Manufacture Calibre 1333SQ. Arched shapes distinguish the 157-part movement, implying extra complexity born from the process of crafting various interior angles. A scrolling motif on the bridges and mainplate helps draw the eye to these shapes, especially the rounded curves of the barrels, case and bridges. The 4.20-mm-thick movement is housed in a 38-mm-diameter case, which comes in options of white gold, diamond-studded 18k white gold, and diamond-studded 18k red gold. The watch offers eight days of power reserve and is water resistant up to 30 metres.

JETGALA

77


luxe

BREGUET CLASSIQUE 5335 GRAND COMPLICATION TOURBILLON MESSIDOR While it appears to be the simplest of all dial shapes, a round dial is among the hardest to perfect. This marriage of complexity and eye-friendly construction is mirrored in Breguet’s Classique 5335 Grand Complication Tourbillon Messidor, which boasts an open-worked, entirely hand engraved movement with a tourbillon in a spacious carriage. The watch is named after the day AbrahamLouis Breguet patented the tourbillon regulator — 26 June, 1801, known in the French Revolutionary calendar as 7 Messidor Year IX. Running on the hand-wound mechanical Calibre 558 SQ2, the watch displays running seconds on the tourbillon carriage at six o’clock. It offers 50 hours of power reserve and comes in a 40-mm-diameter, 18k rose-gold case — alternatively offered in platinum — with 30-metre water resistance.

If you reveal the inner workings of a watch, they must be fascinating and pleasing

78

jetGALA


ANK

ELE

Cartier challenged custom in 1917 with its first Tank watch, which came in a rectangular dial — unusual at the time. A similarly avant-garde appeal marks the Tank MC Skeleton Watch, which was launched last year and unapologetically contrasts taut lines with organic curves within a guillochÊ dial. The 3.97-mm-thin, 138-part Calibre 9611 MC movement is seen through a rectangular face that appears almost square, and is housed in a palladium case. The MC model, which is touted as the most masculine Tank edition ever, offers 72 hours of power reserve and water resistance of up to 30 metres.

PE

.5

/1

The Patek Philippe Ref. 5180/1 boasts a finely detailed and decorated skeletonised movement within a minimalist case. While the inner choreography of a timepiece is stunning in itself, the 2.53-mm thin, 159-part Caliber 240 SQU goes further, featuring rhodiumed components engraved with arabesques and finished by hand. A Calatrava cross adorns the circular opening that exposes the mainspring barrel, while a 22k-gold mini-rotor integrated into the plate also features arabesques on both sides. To further highlight the self-winding mechanical movement, Patek Philippe used a 39-mm-diameter, 18k white-gold case with a casing ring that has been pierced to leave only 12 hour markers. Beneath this, one sees the indigo-hued periphery of the sapphire-crystal back, serving as a frame of sorts that contrasts with the movement’s silver, gold and ruby tones. The watch offers 48 hours of power reserve and water resistance of up to 30 metres. Due to the amount of work required to create the watch, only a few pieces are produced each year.

JETGALA

79


LUXE

RJ-Romaine Jerome has named its first ever skeleton timepiece after NASA’s first space station, Skylab. Inspired by the solar system, the watch features a complex five-layered skeleton designed to make the components appear as if they are floating in space. A single barrel is seen at 12 o’clock, a balance wheel at six o’clock, and the brand’s monogram at three o’clock on one of the inferior levels. The illusion of zero gravity is further enhanced by the timepiece’s lightness — achieved by hollowing the lugs — and fewer visible screws compared to regular movements. The dial comes in a choice of anthracite or black PVD-coated steel, while the case is available in anthracite, black PVD-coated steel, and rose gold. Topping off the galactic concept, the bezel contains material from the Apollo 11 mission.

80

JETGALA


REBELLION 540 MAGNUM TOURBILLON Inspired by the world of racing, Rebellion pierced the dial of its 540 Magnum Tourbillon timepiece to reveal the original REB T-14 movement, which is made of magnesium, aluminium, titanium and carbon fibre. The first part of its name comes from its large 17.2-mm-diameter tourbillon, which has a circumference of 54 mm or ‘540 tenths of a millimetre’. This is housed in a ceramicised-magnesium cage and located at four o’clock, while a retrograde seconds lever is found to its left, at six o’clock. The movement’s 14-day power reserve is generated by twin mainspring barrels — one is engraved with the words ‘Passion’, ‘Speed’ and ‘Rebel’, the other with ‘Extreme’, ‘Victory’ and ‘Glory’. A bright red arrowhead at nine o’clock indicates estimated power reserve, while a roller at seven o’clock gives a more precise reading. The watch features an almost-square carbon-fibre case and comes in a limited edition of 10.

JETGALA

81


LUXE

THE EVOLUTION OF POWER

PORSCHE 911 GT3 & 911 TURBO S by Jeff Heselwood

AN ICONIC CAR GETS SMOOTHER AND SPORTIER

A completely new development, the fifth generation of the 911 GT3 is touted as the sportiest 911 ever

82

JETGALA


THE NEW 911 GT3 IS DESCRIBED AS “THE SPORTIEST 911 TO DATE” The 911 GT3’s lightweight body is constructed out of aluminium and steel, while its wings, doors, boot and bonnet lids are made of aluminium

ertain things improve with age. Great wine comes to mind. Some art or iconic properties. And then there is the Porsche 911 series, which began in 1963 and has continued to evolve over the decades in terms of power, technology and smoothness. Originally designated as 901, the sports model was renamed after an outburst by the French at Peugeot claimed the rights to the central zero figure. The first 911 had a twolitre, air-cooled, flat-six engine that produced 130 bhp. Although inevitably, engines have since increased in size and are now water-cooled for greater efficiency and noise reduction, the original concept remains: a rearmounted, horizontally opposed power plant that drives the rear wheels — or all four wheels when necessary, such as with the Carrera 4 and 911 Turbo S. Now Porsche has made its next move. To celebrate its 50th anniversary last year, the company has launched what it describes as “the sportiest 911 to date” — a new 911 GT3, with a body of high-tensile steel and aluminium, complemented by similarly tough yet lightweight interiors. The coupé boasts a 3.8-litre boxer engine, which produces 475 bhp (350 kW) at 8,250 rpm and is mated to a seven-speed PDK dualclutch transmission. Despite following Porsche’s basic configuration, the engine is unique to the 911 GT3, with titanium con-rods and forged pistons — components that permit a maximum operating speed of 9,000 rpm. >>

JETGALA

83


LUXE

84

JETGALA


>> As a result, the 911 GT3 reaches the benchmark 0-100 km/h in just 3.5 seconds, and attains a maximum speed of 315 km/h. All this potential velocity is reined in by carbon-ceramic discs fitted all around the car. With such power to tame, the new sports model allows the rear wheels to steer in the same or opposite direction of the front wheels, depending on speed — thus enhancing stability and precision in navigating turns. It also comes with a constantly variable differential lock and an electronic stability control system. A rear track wider than that of a standard 911 improves road-holding and aerodynamic balance.

It is in wet- or off-road conditions that the new 911 TURBO S excels Porsche 911 Turbo S Ten years after the original 911 was launched, Porsche introduced the 911 Turbo, which was reincarnated last year with the new 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S. Featuring a 560-bhp flat-six engine and a sevenspeed PDK transmission, the 911 Turbo S sprints from 0-100 km/h at 3.1 seconds, marginally quicker than the 911 GT3. But it is in wet- or off-road conditions that the 911 Turbo S excels, with its electronically controlled all-wheel drive system apportioning power to the wheels with the most traction. Except under bursts of harsh acceleration, power is directed to the rear wheels in normal driving conditions, giving this Porsche a more conventional feel. Despite this performance, Porsche says that fuel economy has improved by up to 16 per cent.

OPPOSITE PAGE Porsche’s 911 Turbo S owns the widest body of all 911 cars, and is at least 28 mm wider than the Carrera 4 The new 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S come with completely redesigned interiors and builds on the 911 Carrera family

The 911 Turbo S comes with a Burmester system, a radar-controlled cruise control system, a camera-based road sign recognition and speed limit recognition BOX STORY Timo Bernhard, one of the drivers representing Porsche at the World Endurance Championship and 24 Hours of Le Mans this year, made a special guest appearance at the launch of the fifthgeneration 911 GT3 in Singapore

EASTERN ATTRACTION Fifty years on, the 911 and its derivatives still attract a great number of enthusiastic owners beyond Europe and the US, with China, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore being buoyant markets for Porsche. Deliveries in 2013 saw an increase of 20% from the previous year, bringing the number to 61,534 of cars delivered in the Asia Pacific, Africa and Middle East region. The new 911 GT3, 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S will be available in the Asia Pacific region this year.

JETGALA

85


LUXE

Red-gold and white-gold bullet cufflinks with round diamonds, SCHREINER FINE JEWELLERY

CUFF LINKS by Kee Hua Chee

CANDY

LINKING STYLE AND CLASS

86

JETGALA


LUXE

FROM LEFT Marine Royale cufflinks in 18k pink gold with Marine fluting and knurled bezel, BREGUET; Ashoka-cut diamond cufflinks totalling 4 carats in 18k white gold, WILLIAM GOLDBERG; Calatrava Cross cufflinks in rose gold, PATEK PHILIPPE

T H O U G H S E E N O N LY F L E E T I N G LY AS O N E ’S S JAC K E T S L I D E S U P A N D D OW N W I T H EVERY MOVEMENT, CUFF LINKS HINT AT PERSONAL STYLE UNLESS YOU LIKE WEARING FLAPPY, FLOPPY, PYRAMIDAL SLEEVES, long-sleeved shirts need to be fastened at the wrist. Mere men make do with buttons sewn onto the shirt cuffs, which are fastened in seconds and hardly ever get lost. Yet, gentlemen use cuff links — which, though seen only fleetingly as one’s jacket slides up and down with every movement, hint at exquisite taste and personal style. DANDIES’ DILEMMAS The precursor to the modern shirt was the 16th-century linen shirt that featured fancy, ruffled sleeves with openings at the wrist, which were tied by ribbons or thick strings called cuff threads. Tying these strings — and even loosening them if you haplessly tied a dead knot — took a bit of practice and dexterous fingerwork. Then again, men who owned these types of shirts usually had butlers and servants to perform such tasks. Cuff threads remained popular until the 19th century, when the simple button-and-hole made dressing by oneself a breeze. CUFF LINKS TODAY Cuff links as we know them had their genesis during the reign of King Louis XIV at Versailles, when shirt sleeves were folded and fastened together with identical pairs of coloured glassbuttons linked by a short chain. Folding one’s sleeves allowed the wearer to dine comfortably without inadvertently soaking his frilly garments in soup or gravy. It also freed the fingers to swiftly grab a sword without any fabric getting in the way.

88

JETGALA

SLEEVE STYLE Shirt-sleeves with two button-holes but no buttons may have a single, straightforward cuff, or two folded cuffs. They are held in place with cufflinks that either overlap or press against each other. Like clothes, the varieties of cuff links are near endless, including ones made of solid gold engraved with the owner’s initials, coat of arms or signetring insignia. While most cuff-link pairs are identical, a Mr John Brown might engrave one end of a cuff link with ‘J’ or ‘John’, and the other with ‘B’ or ‘Brown’. Because they are worn more discreetly than other accessories, cuff links are more personal than ties and tie pins, and thus tend to be adorned meaningfully. They may feature the wearer’s birth stone, favourite lucky gem, or images associated with hobbies like golf or flying. Pearls and ivory cuff links remain popular, while metal links in the shape of silk knots are seen as hip. For the ultimate statement, today’s titans may opt for William Goldberg cuff links with patented Ashoka diamonds, exuding classic elegance. On the other hand, European jeweller Schreiner’s current cuff link designs appeal to the James Bond in every man — shaped like Makarov and Kalashnikov bullets, and studded with white diamonds, black diamonds or sapphires. Lovers of tradition may wear cuff links patterned after their favourite watchmakers’ signature styles, such as Breguet’s Marine heritage series and Patek Philippe’s Calatrava Cross emblem.


LUXE

ROYAL

LUBIN PERFUME by Kee Hua Chee

CREATING EXCLUSIVE SCENTS AMID WARS, REVOLUTIONS AND MODERNISATION

Present day Galaad, Black Jade and Eau Neuve perfume bottles

90

JETGALA


FROM LEFT The original perfume bottle and ad for Nuit de Longchamp An old bottle label for Bouquet Greuze (below) Lubin opened his first shop in 1978

IN N 179 98, LUBIN N OP PENE ED A OP NAMED D AU U BO OUQU UET SHO DE RO OSES AS S A DISC CREE ET TRIBU UTE E TO THE BEH HEADED MARIE ANTOIINET TTE MEASURED BY THE TEST OF TIME, Lubin perfume has undisputed appeal. Plenty of today’s big names in fragrance are relative novices compared to this French brand, created in 1798. But if the name is not widely known, it is because the House of Lubin suffered hard times in the 1950s and was only revived in recent decades. This exclusivity is also inherent in its character — after all, few fashionable designer perfumes seen around duty-free stores can, like Lubin, claim royalty as their customers. The royal connection lies at the company’s roots, when Pierre-Francois Lubin, born in 1774, became a perfumer’s apprentice at the age of 10. He started out in Grasse, the legendary centre of France’s fragrance industry, immortalised in the movie Perfume. Six years later, he moved to Paris to train under Jean-Louis Fargeon, Queen Marie Antoinette’s official perfumer who, even during Her Majesty’s imprisonment, continued to send her supplies. Every day, the queen wore a citrus scent, although her favourite was that of roses — a delicate fragrance that was difficult to capture, and which Fargeon did with great skill. In 1798, toward the end of the French Revolution, Lubin opened a shop named Au Bouquet de Roses as a discreet tribute to the unfortunate queen, who had by then been beheaded. After the revolution, Lubin supplied perfumes, scented balls, fragranced masks, rice-powder balls and perfumed ribbons to Les Merveilleuses or The Marvellous — socially exalted, extravagant women who frequented the Thermidorian drawing rooms of Napoleonic France. Since bathing was rare — the French during this era believed water would wash away their life essences — men, too,

sprinkled perfume on their necks and clothes to mask body odours. Many dandies were the so-called Incredibles — members of a subculture that mixed fashion with propaganda. And, of course, perfume. Lubin charmed the French Imperial Court with his creations. Fans included Empress Josephine and Napoleon’s sister Pauline Bonaparte, who later became Princess Borghese and lent her name to one of his scents. Marie Antoinette’s daughter, Marie Thérèse of France, embraced him after her return from exile in 1815 and appointed him Supplier to the Duke of Angoulême, as she was then Duchess of Angoulême. In 1821, Lubin became official supplier to King George IV of England, followed by Tsar Alexander I of Russia in 1823. Within a few years, many of the crowned heads of Europe were wafting in mists of Lubin’s perfumes. Moving with the times, the savvy entrepreneur changed his shop name from Au Bouquet de Roses to Aux Armes de France (The Royal Coat of Arms). During the reign of Maria Amalia, the last Queen of France post-revolution, Lubin finally became the official perfumer of the French Royal Court. Lubin then sent a representative to spread word about his fragrances to the New World that was America in 1830 — with great success. International expansion was further fuelled by Felix Prot, Lubin’s apprentice and spiritual heir, who took over the firm in 1884. Prot built Europe’s first modern perfume factory in Cannes, using steam machines to extract essential oils. His son later ran Lubin for 50 years and opened France’s biggest perfume factory in Courbevoie, a Parisian suburb. >> JETGALA

91


LUXE Black Jade used to be called Secret Garden and was made in honour of Marie Antoinette Lubin’s shopfront on 1022 bis Rue Royale in 1955 Felix Prot opened Europe’s first modern perfume factory in Cannes where steam machines were used to extract essential oils

L BIN H RMED HE RE I P RI L OURT WIT HIS

H RE TION

>> Lubin enjoyed decades of success in the USA until the 1929 Great Depression struck, causing the closure of its New York subsidiary. In 1937, the company introduced Nuit de Longchamp, which evoked the fragrance of a white flower that blooms at night — an apt symbolism, as it was this scent’s popularity among the international elite that kept Lubin afloat during this troubled period. With a new generation of Prots running the company after World War II, Lubin received a much-needed youthful boost, reflected in one of its most famous fragrances at the time — Gin Fizz, released in 1955 in honour of Grace Kelly. But despite the scent’s commercial success, the company’s fortunes continued to decline in the ’70s, and by the 1980s, it had stopped making haute parfum. The family-owned business was sold and resold several times and was on the brink of bankruptcy by 1998. It was then that perfumer Gilles Thévenin resurrected Lubin, along with two descendants of Felix Prot. With the help of former Lubin perfumers, the company revived scents such as Nuit de Longchamp and Gin Fizz, both sold today in modernised bottles. Another exulted scent in its past was Jardin Secret, the mysterious perfume created by Fargeon for Marie Antoinette, who carried it everywhere inside a small flask made of black jade. Lubin continued selling it as Secret Garden till the 1930s; these days, it goes by the more enigmatic name, Black Jade. Today, Lubin is once again an independent, private maker of haute parfum. Its bottles have reappeared on the shelves of prestigious department stores, and are distributed in 20 countries, mostly in Western Europe. Its wares and antique documents are exhibited at Grasse’s world-famous International Perfume Museum. But although it is expanding its wings, it remains one of the trade’s best-kept secrets, with a boutique in Paris known only to connoisseurs in search of scents that have stood the test of time. 92

JETGALA


LUXE GALERIES BARTOUX by Charmaine Tai

Doggy John by French artist Julien Marinetti A masterpiece by American artist Andy Warhol OPPOSITE Masaya combines conventional painting with modern printing techniques to create his art François d’Izarny’s tribute to Spanish painter Joan Miró

EMBARKING ON A QUEST TO BRING ICONIC ARTISTS CLOSER TO THEIR AUDIENCE

94

JETGALA


“I AM A MAN OF ART; ART MAKES ME HAPPY,” says Robert Bartoux, who likens art to the sense of smell “as it evokes emotions and feelings — something closely linked with our heart and love”. Aiming to make art accessible to the public and to promote cultural values, Bartoux pioneered exhibitions in airports, malls and other public spaces in the 1980s. He and his wife formed the Galeries Bartoux group and set up shop in Honfleur, France, in 1993. The group rapidly expanded throughout France over the years and has since opened an international branch in New York and, most recently, Singapore. After searching for the ideal location for more than two years, Galeries Bartoux Singapore found its home at ION Orchard mall in 2012. Pop art by Andy Warhol occupies one side of the gallery, while glaring cityscapes of Hong Kong and New York line an adjacent wall. Each piece invites closer inspection, and by the end of the gallery tour, viewers would have gone through a series of scenes akin to a fantasy movie. This is the fruit of careful, deliberate positioning that creates visual harmony and balance between each sculpture and painting. Art pieces are rotated at least twice a month to allow visitors and collectors a fresh view on a regular basis. Refusing to be “an antique dealer of the art market”, the group focusses on acquiring works by artists who have significantly contributed to the 20th-century movements of surrealism, cubism and pop art. The gallery includes pieces that use traditional techniques like oil on canvas, as well as those that use new mediums. “We select our artists primarily [based on the traits of] high quality, innovation and creativity,” says Bartoux. “My art represents the spirit of the moment. I also want personality — that’s why I select our artists.” Bartoux says buyers must feel ease and enjoyment when selecting and buying artwork. “Buying an artwork should

be primarily guided by your emotions. There must be an invitation to dream and travel... What matters is that you like it. Each piece of artwork has its own style and characteristic, and each one of us [has our] own interpretation while viewing it,” he explains. Apart from sourcing pieces for a customer, the gallery may also present it at a client’s place to help with the decision-making process.

ASIAN APPEAL Galeries Bartoux Singapore celebrated its first anniversary in October 2013. Seeing a surge of art collectors in Asia Pacific, the Galeries Bartoux group plans to open a branch in Hong Kong next year. The group also curates works by Asian artists — especially Chinese artists, who are becoming increasingly popular in Europe and around the world.

JETGALA

95


LUXE AMERICA’S CUP by James Nicholls

THE PERPETUAL RACE FOR ONE OF THE WORLD’S OLDEST SPORTING TROPHIES

96

JETGALA


The match between Team Oracle USA and Team New Zealand proved to be one of the most thrilling regattas in the Cup’s history Image © ACEA / Photo Abner Kingman

IN 1851, JOHN COX STEVENS — who had founded the New York Yacht Club (NYYC) just seven years before — decided the group could use a bit of glory and money by winning a match overseas. He set his sights on a regatta held annually by the Royal Yacht Squadron around England’s Isle of Wight. Stevens formed a six-person group that hired famous yacht designer George Steers to create a competitive vessel, resulting in a 101-ft (30.78-m) schooner named America. This was at a time when the American Civil War was still 10 years into the future and Wild Bill Hickok was only 14 years old. On 22 August that year, having sailed for the Isle of Wight, America joined the 53-nautical-mile (98-km) race and beat its 15 rivals under the gaze of Queen Victoria. The trophy, which had until then been known as the R.Y.S. £100 Cup, was then renamed America’s Cup. It was given to the NYYC for stewardship with the condition that it be made perpetually available for competition among different nations. Today, it is considered to be the oldest international sporting trophy that is still being fought for. It took 132 years and more than 20 challenges for the Auld Mug — sailors’ affectionate nickname for the trophy — to finally change hands. By 1970, interest in the Cup — in the glory of ousting the undefeated champion — had become so intense that several yacht clubs from various countries vied to be Challengers, necessitating a qualifying regatta. This was first held in 1970 and has been known as the Louis Vuitton Cup since 1983, the year NYYC’s reign was finally shattered by Royal Perth Yacht Club’s Australia II. Only two other nations have since won the America’s Cup. After the USA won it back from Australia in 1987, it lost to New Zealand in 1995. This century, Switzerland took over the mantle in 2007 before relinquishing the Cup back to the US in 2010, this time to San Francisco-based Golden Gate Yacht Club. >>

1

I

ABOVE The names of winning teams are engraved onto the trophy Image © ACEA / Photo Abner Kingman

OPPOSITE PAGE The rules of the recent race for the Cup required catamarans with such speed that they were virtually flying above the water Image © ACEA / Photo Abner Kingman

JETGALA

97


LUXE SWIFT STYLE The 34th Edition of the America’s Cup held in San Francisco Bay in September 2013 featured some of the fastest sailing boats ever built. Critics have questioned their safety, though, after a few accidents in the lead-up to the regatta. Will they be used again in the 35th edition or will there be a return to more traditional designs? AC72 (AMERICA’S CUP 72 CLASS RULE) PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS

Hull Length Maximum Beam Mast Height Maximum Draft Displacement Wing Area Jib Area Gennaker Area Crew

The 34th Challenge Last year, Artemis of Sweden, Luna Rossa of Italy and Emirates Team New Zealand placed their bid to challenge the Cup. New Zealand beat Italy in the best of 13 races in the Louis Vuitton Cup, earning the right to meet the Defender, Oracle Team USA. What a series of races it proved to be on San Francisco Bay, where throngs of spectators lined the waterfront. Lasting from 7 to 21 September, it was the longest ever match in the Cup’s history, and one of its closest regattas. According to the protocol set by the Defender and the Challenger, the sailboats used were catamarans powered by towering wing sails held up by 40-metre masts. They achieved top speeds in excess of twice the actual speed of the wind in which they sailed, with Emirates Team NZ peaking once at 47.57 knots in 21.8 knots of wind — virtually flying above the water. New Zealand held what many thought to be an impregnable 8-1 lead with it seeming only a matter of when, not if, they would notch the one more victory needed to put the Cup back in Kiwi hands. But after having made a succession of changes and improvements — notably bringing on-board Sir Ben Ainslie, oft described as Britain’s greatest sailor alongside Captain Cook, Lord Nelson and Sir Francis Drake — the Americans began a comeback as remarkable as any ever seen in the world of sports. Try as they might — and perhaps they tried too hard — the New Zealanders could not stop the inexorable tide of US victories, and against all probability, the Americans turned the deficit into a 9-8 win.

THE CATAMARANS ACHIE EVED TOP SPEEDS IN EXCESS S OF TWIC CE THE ACTUAL SPEED OF THE WIN ND CH THEY SAILE ED IN WHIC 98

JETGALA

22 m (72.2 ft) 14 m (45.9 ft) 40 m (131.2 ft) 4.40 m (14.4 ft) 5900 kg (13007.2 pd) 260 sq m (2798.6 sq ft) 80 sq m (861.1 sq ft) 320 sq m (3444.5 sq ft) 11

The final leg of the race saw the Americans closely battling Emirates Team New Zealand to the very end to win the America’s Cup (top) Image © Guilain Grenier / Oracle Team USA (bottom) Image © ACEA / Photo Gilles Martin-Raget

The Americans’ euphoria was as palpable as the draining effects of defeat on the New Zealanders’ faces and in their voices. Sailing is a sport revered in NZ and it seemed the country was almost in mourning to have the Cup of victory dashed from its collective lips. It is too early to tell what the future holds for New Zealand sailing. Already, though, work is apace for the 35th America’s Cup with the protocol to be agreed between the Defender Oracle Team USA and the Challenger of Record, Australia’s Hamilton Island Yacht Club, for the location, timing and style of boat. The next challenge is expected to take place in three or four years’ time. Whatever the protocol, make sure that you do not miss the action at sea — or even take the next opportunity to challenge the most coveted Cup in the world of sailing.


@SDKHDQ YTOOHMFDQ BG

Plate Tableware or part of a watch movement? Discover the world of Fine Watchmaking at www.hautehorlogerie.org

Plate | The plate which bears the various movement parts and in particular the bridges. The dial is usually affixed to the bottom side of the plate. The plate is pierced with holes for the screws and recesses for the jewels in which the pivots of the movement wheels will run.

THE FOUNDATION’S PARTNERS | A. LANGE & SÖHNE | AUDEMARS PIGUET | BAUME & MERCIER | BOVET 1822 | CARTIER | CHANEL | CHOPARD | CHRISTOPHE CLARET CORUM | DE BETHUNE | GIRARD-PERREGAUX | GREUBEL FORSEY | HARRY WINSTON | HERMÈS | IWC | JAEGER-LECOULTRE | LOUIS VUITTON | MONTBLANC | PANERAI PARMIGIANI FLEURIER | PIAGET | RALPH LAUREN WATCH & JEWELRY | RICHARD MILLE | ROGER DUBUIS | TAG HEUER | VACHERON CONSTANTIN | VAN CLEEF & ARPELS


LUXE

VERTICAL TERRAIN A LUXURIOUS LAUNCH PAD FOR HIGH-LEVEL SKIING

100

JETGALA


Guests at the lodge may choose to ski on a variety of terrain like the famous old-growth forest, alpine powder bowls or glaciers Each of the eight staterooms showcases a unique design, many of which, takes in the view of the Columbia River and Mount Begbie Despite freezing temperatures, guests can be adequately warmed up in the outdoor hot tub while admiring the scenery OPPOSITE PAGE Revelstoke receives some of the driest and lightest snow, sometimes up to 30 cm overnight

BIGHORN REVELSTOKE by Charmaine Tay

FOUNDED AS A TRANSPORTATION AND MINING-SUPPLY HUB IN THE 1880s, THE CITY OF REVELSTOKE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, picked up skiing from Norwegian immigrants around 1892. Featuring some of the world’s best powder snow and 5,620 feet of unspoilt downhill adventure, it was the location for some of the earliest heli-skiing escapades of the 1960s, and now hosts prestigious competitions like the Freeride World Tour. This, along with its isolated location between two imposing mountain ranges, makes the city an ideal setting for the Bighorn estate. Michael Kirkland, who founded Bighorn together with his brother Christopher, says its concept combines “the top-end luxury of a European chalet with the size, amenity and location of a Canadian heli lodge”. Located at the base of Revelstoke Mountain Resort, Bighorn features a great timber structure on 15,000 square feet of land. Inside, a triple-height living room welcomes guests with a fireplace and with views of Columbia River and Mount Begbie. The property offers eight individually designed staterooms and a range of recreational facilities, including a gym and sauna, outdoor hot tub, indoor pool and private cinema. One may arrange yoga sessions and spa treatments, or drop by the leisure room for a drink and a pool game. Guests may dine formally on a four-course meal, gather round the kitchen grill for teppanyaki, or ask the chef to whip up special dishes. >> JETGALA

101


LUXE After a long day of skiing, guests can help themselves to the bar or a game of pool; or warm themselves by the fireplace or in the hot tub

>> Owing to Revelstoke’s distance from the coast, the snow in the vicinity is drier and lighter than that found in many other ski areas. It falls consistently from September to April, sometimes getting as deep as 30 cm overnight. From Bighorn’s own helipad, skiers can ride to the top of the Selkirk and Monashee mountain ranges, where they can find fresh powder on varied terrain, from high alpine glaciers to gladed forests. The landscape at this altitude suits snowcat skiers and tree skiers, too. Guests may choose from a variety of skiing packages or create their own itinerary, including activities like snowshoeing, snow tubing, snowmobiling, dog sledding, and even picnicking. They may also ski back to the lodge via a backcountry trail. With all this, it’s clear why Bighorn beat other contenders — including The Vale Niseko, Japan, and Chalet Zermatt Peak, Switzerland — at the 2013 World Ski Awards to win the World’s Best Ski Chalet.

102

JETGALA


BRILLIAN CE MEE TS

MARCH 27 – APRIL 3, 2014


Photography by Paul Westlake Text by Charmaine Tai

SOLITARY HEAT

104

JETGALA


White Stockton dunes in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, paint a timeless setting for photographer Paul Westlake, who feels that the best shoots involve a well thought-out story — especially one with a “quietly sexy” woman. In this tale, a model looks perfectly at ease amid the tranquil dunes. A distant and longing gaze seems to suggest otherwise, though, providing a compelling storyline to Westlake’s visual narrative. This penchant for mystery is partly what led Westlake to photography. “Somewhere in the late 1960s, I was snooping around the forbidden territory of my uncle’s cupboard where I found a war-time Leica in a leather case,” he recalls. “That camera was perfection in engineering and I just wanted it so bad. A few days later, after watching [Michelangelo] Antonioni’s Blow Up at the cinema, I immediately decided that photography was a world I wanted to be part of.” That world has since included photo shoots for top international magazines with some of the most famous faces in beauty and fashion. It comes with its complications, too — he recalls having to drastically improvise after a well-known singer-songwriter arrived four hours late for a beach shoot, well after the tide had receded and the sunlight had begun to fade. When not on shoot, Westlake collaborates with fashion editor Nathalie Agussol to work on Pan and the Dream, an e-zine celebrating fashion, beauty and art. www.paulwestlake.com | www.panandthedream.tumblr.com

JETGALA

105


“YOU HAVE YOUR TECHNIQUE, YOUR MASTERY OF THE CRAFT, BUT THEN IT IS WHAT YOU CAN CONCEIVE IN THE MOMENT”

106

JETGALA


“ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN BECAUSE THERE IS THE ELEMENT OF THE UNKNOWN AND TO ME, THAT’S THE WHOLE POINT”

JETGALA

107


108

JETGALA


“I STILL FIND THE PROCESS OF MAKING PHOTOGRAPHS INCREASINGLY MYSTERIOUS AND COMPELLING”

Model: Chelsea Scanlan / Chadwick Models Make up: Wayne Chic Photographer’s assistant: J.P Westlake

JETGALA

109


SUBSCRIBE TO JETGALA TODAY GET ASIA-PACIFIC’S PREMIER PRIVATE JET MAGAZINE DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR DESK

R’S E E A R 1000 B M E AGE DDIE SIOT E CHT BYNEIGHT JWET N I L SKYA OVIET ETRO AGE

It is simple enough, log on to www.jetgala.com/subscribe.php and fill out a brief and confidential request form.

P W E N 911 E H T T3 &REVELS G N TC 911 BIGHLOERTONEWSABA

19 y– ruar Feb

@

SGD 50 SGD 60 SGD 70 SGD 150

n E @@

0 5,00 0 IDR8 QAR4 00 00 00,000 INR5 S3 0 PESO VND1 D8 HK D20 D40 NZ 0 AE B100 RM MYR20 HT25 0 D1 D3 00 BA BN 5 00 KWTWD3 D1 AU W10,0 SGD8 KR R40 SA

Subscription rates are:

14 il 20 Apr

SKE ALER G

Zn  Et

Once received, we will email you a simple subscription form with several payment options.

SINGAPORE MALAYSIA/THAILAND BRUNEI/INDONESIA VIETNAM/PHILIPPINES

LA

AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND

SGD 150

REST OF THE WORLD

SGD 190

1

CO

GA

BO FIRST E CE IVERY THE CUSTOM L FOR SCIEN 013 S 2 G A N WI NBA

18

ES &3 H C T WA ERS 201 KE O WON| DSMYTHSONUIBSEMSPOINETS

Zn Et En @ @@

ary 2014 – Janu ber 2013 Novem 000 IDR85, 40 500 QAR 0 80 INR OS300 0 HKD 20 PES VND100,00 NZD 40 RMB10 BND10 D3 MYR20 T250 AED AUD15 000 KW D300 BAH KRW10, SGD8 TW 40 SAR

For further enquiries, bulk orders, etc, please contact us at: T: +65 6273 0620 F: +65 6273 0632 E: circulation@oriental-publishing.com

d

nd

LT’S U A S S DA LCON 5X350 A ER NEMWBARFDIER VCEHRALGLUELNFGSTDREESAIGMN

Please note: Annual subscription rates are inclusive of shipping charges. Please allow 4 to 6 weeks for processing.

We

ET

0J

SGD 130 SGD 150

19

Pa

e.i

ak

stl

ul

R VE

00

HONGKONG CHINA/TAIWAN/KOREA

M INT A V

S

| LO SUITE RCH NDMA GER SAFES | SAIGON I H A ANY STOCKIN T HOME ION A AVIAT

PM 8:33 /13 4/11

I


AIRBORNE


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF Pacific Flight Services, Pacific Flight

Fly Comlux, an executive charter service subsidiary of Comlux The Aviation Group, reintroduced its only wide-body aircraft, a 767BBJ, back into the market after a mandatory maintenance check. Significant upgrades were made to the cabin, including brand new carpeting, re-upholstered light beige leather seats, a new humidification system, highspeed WiFi and an enhanced in-flight entertainment system. The aircraft can carry up to 63 passengers in three separate cabin zones for VIPs, executives and an entourage — a configuration that suits high-level government officials and royal families, says Andrea Zanetto, CEO Fly Comlux.

Hong Kong-based aircraft services provider Metrojet has introduced a Gulfstream G650 aircraft to its fleet — the first of the model to be registered in Hong Kong. Late last year, it also received approval from the US Federal Aviation Administration to maintain the new aircraft. Metrojet has also recently opened a 25,000 squarefoot storage facility that is one of the largest Airport Freight Forwarding Centres in Hong Kong. Gulfstream Aerospace’s service centre in London Luton Airport, United Kingdom, has received approval from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) to perform comprehensive

Services, a subsidiary of ST Aerospace, offers executive charter that is available and operational round the clock. This is made possible by a team of experienced pilots and partnership with vendors and service providers around the world, who help arrange landing and takeoff permits, concierge services, customised meals and other finer points of travel. Reaching over 200 destinations on either a Gulfstream G550, G150 or Learjet 60, the service provider has an in-house flight dispatch and point-topoint flight monitoring. Besides business and leisure flights, the company also offers air ambulance services using a Learjet 45, Learjet 35 and Learjet 35A, with the assistance of a pre-flight medical consultation team and an onboard medical team. The medevac service counts more than 15 years of experience. Following more than a year of flighttesting, Embraer’s ‘mid-light’ Legacy 450 completed its first flight on 28 December, after fly-by-wire issues had been ironed out. Embraer test pilots Eduardo Camelier and Eugênio Cará, supported by flight test engineer Carlos Kobayashi, flew the aircraft for one hour and 35 minutes. With a revised completion schedule, the Legacy 450 programme is now on target, and will continue with a year of flight tests and certification campaigns. Textron, a conglomerate that includes Bell Helicopter and Cessna Aircraft, is acquiring Beechcraft Corporation for USD1.4 billion in cash and USD1.1

billion in new debt. Scott Donnelly, Textron’s chairman and CEO, says the acquisition will be “an extremely good fit in terms of product” as Beechcraft’s King Air turboprop will boost the conglomerate’s service business. Beechcraft, which emerged from bankruptcy protection in February 2013, is bound under the agreement to pay Textron a USD48 million termination fee should it find and choose a higher bidder. The FAA has issued the first Type Inspection Authorization certificate for the HondaJet — a key milestone in the light jet’s certification programme, which is now ready to enter its final stage of certification flight tests with FAA pilot participation. Aircraft type certification is expected in the first quarter of 2015, with deliveries soon after. Honda Aircraft Company’s customer service facility has also been certified as a Part 145 repair station. US President Barack Obama signed the Small Aircraft Revitalization Act of 2013 on 3 December last year, approving legislation that reduces certification costs for new general aviation aircraft weighing less than 12,500 lbs, as well as for their avionics and equipment. It also increases safety by reducing certification costs for modifications. The bill requires the FAA to implement its recommendations by 31 December 2015. “Reforming the way the FAA certifies aircraft can help more pilots fly more safely while lowering their costs,” says Mark Baker, president of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. >>

maintenance services on the super mid-size G280 aircraft. This is in

addition to the approval to work on the G650, which was granted in 2013. The Luton facility is both EASA and FAA-approved, and can accommodate up to 12 aircraft.

114

JETGALA

At the end of 2013, Bombardier Aerospace received a firm order for


6,1*$3

RE ±)(%‡OPEN FOR 25($,56+2:‡

ASIA’S BIGGEST FOR AVIATION’S FINEST

The world of aviation will once again take centre stage at Asia’s largest aerospace and defence event, where we will be welcoming the heads of the commercial aviation community, international government delegations, key political and military leaders, among many others! Attend Singapore Airshow 2014 to forge partnerships and do business in this thriving Asia Pacific region!

GISTRATION NOW!

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2014 HIGHLIGHTS 2014 Feature Country: U.S.A. Aviation Training Zone Singapore Airshow Aviation Leadership Summit 2014 Asia Pacific Security Conference 2014 A*STAR Aerospace Technology Leadership Forum 2014 Singapore Aerospace Technology and Engineering Conference (SATEC 2014)

REGISTER NOW FOR SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2014! www.singaporeairshow.com/registration

Business Forums

SCAN TO BE OUR GUEST

Singapore Airshow

Linkedin group

Singapore Airshow

@SGAirshow

Organised by:

Feature Country:

Official Media Partner:

Supporting Publications:

Held in:


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF 10 Challenger 350 business jets worth USD259 million at list price. A week earlier, it also received a firm order for five Challenger 300 jets and five Challenger 605 jets valued at

approximately USD280 million. Hawker Pacific sold its first Bell 407GX helicopter to a private

Australian customer. The aircraft is equipped with a Rolls-Royce 250-C47B turbine FADEC engine and can cruise at 133 knots. It is slated for delivery in early 2014, and will be based in Sydney for corporate and VIP operations. The helicopter will be customised and maintained by Hawker Pacific. Gulfstream Aerospace Corp.

celebrated the first anniversary of its Gulfstream Beijing service centre in December at Beijing Capital International Airport. As the only business-jet manufacturer to offer factory service in China, Gulfstream Beijing has served more than 120 aircraft since November 2012. The facility also provides airframe maintenance and avionics installation and repairs on G550, G450 and G200 aircraft registered in China. Switzerland-based AC Aviation Charter has opened a new office in Vienna, Austria. The new office will work closely with the existing office in

Zurich, and will be led by Bernhard Wipfler. The company plans to expand its current fleet of 10, which includes a Citation XLS, a Bombardier Challenger 605, and three Dassault Falcon 900s. The company also offers brokerage service for clients. ExecuJet Middle East in Riyadh continues to expand after celebrating

another successful year in the region. The FBO facilities include a crew room, ramp, operations and administration offices, and are housed in the existing private aviation terminal. In addition, it has signed a contract with Bilen Air Service to extend their FBO partnership in Istanbul, Turkey. Both companies offered services at Istanbul Atatürk Airport in 2011 before extending the partnership to include aircraft handling at Sabiha Gokchen Airport in 2012. Meridian Air Charter, based in

Teterboro Airport, has announced the addition of two business jets, a Hawker 900XP and a refurbished Cessna Citation VII, both of which seat up to eight passengers. These two aircraft will join Meridian’s current fleet of 14, which includes a Falcon 2000 and a Citation XLS.

Jet Aviation signed a fixed-based operation service agreement with VistaJet , and will provide handling

services to the latter’s fleet of private jets through its network of FBOs in Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia. Jet Aviation will also manage and operate VistaJet’s fleet of Bombardier Global business jets, which will be based in the US from this year onwards. L’VOYAGE, a member of Sino Private Aviation Limited, has added a newly

delivered, China-registered Bombardier Challenger 605 to its fleet. The Shenzhen-based aircraft will serve L’VOYAGE clients in Mainland China, and will be able to access destinations such as Lijiang, Jiuzhaigou, and Zhangjiajie. The company was launched in mid-2013 to provide charter solutions to the region’s elite. Arab Wings has signed a purchase agreement with Embraer Executive Jets for a Lineage 1000. The aircraft

will be managed on behalf of an undisclosed customer, and will be available for third-party charter. It joins a Legacy 500 and Legacy 650 on Arab Wing’s aircraft operating certificate, operating out of its Jordan base. Delivery is scheduled in the first semester of this year. Colin Steven, Vice President EMEA, Embraer Executive Jets, says the Middle East is the largest market for the ultra-large Lineage 1000. Airports of Thailand Public Co. Ltd. is drawing plans for a new private jet terminal to support Bangkok’s growing

business aviation sector. The proposed facility, which will be located at the old Don Mueang airport, will have a passenger terminal, six hangars, an aircraft maintenance centre and an apron for eight business jets. Construction is expected to commence this year for operations to begin in late 2015, when the current five-year concession granted to Mjets to run the existing private jet terminal expires. >>

116

JETGALA


APRIL 15, 16, 17, 2014

BUSINESS AVIATION ON FULL DISPLAY IN SHANGHAI — MAKE PLANS TO BE THERE

WWW.ABACE.AERO


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF approach procedures like WAASLPV and RNP. The Falcon Elite II also replaces existing Cathode Ray Tube MDUs with more reliable LCD displays. Combined with a new cursor control device, this upgrade will support electronic moving maps, electronic charts, XM weather charts and other new deck features. The upgrade was developed in conjunction with Honeywell, and can be installed by any Dassault-owned service centre.

Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

Dassault Aviation’s Falcon 5X performed its first simulated flight in

November last year on the Falcon Simulation Bench at the company’s design office in St Cloud, France. The flight verified the aircraft’s behaviour in various flight configurations — including takeoff, cruise and landing — under conditions equivalent to those of an actual flight, and performed an initial run-through of the flight envelope. The 5X will be the first business jet to be fitted with flaperons — active deflectioncontrol surfaces that act as both flaps and ailerons, as well as airbrakes. First actual flight is expected in the first quarter of 2015. Bombardier’s Learjet 75 received full type certification from the FAA in

November. The aircraft has an improved Honeywell engine, offering improved takeoff field length performance over its predecessor. This system contributes to weight savings, while the new canted winglets improve aerodynamic efficiency. 118

JETGALA

celebrated the first anniversary of the first customer delivery of the Gulfstream G280 last November. To date, approximately 20 G280s have entered service. The G280 was first announced in 2008, and was rolled out a year later. Its first flight in December 2009 lasted three and a half hours and saw the aircraft flying to 32,000 feet. A total of three G280 aircraft participated in the flight-test programme, completing over 790 test flights. Dassault Aviation introduced a new avionics upgrade package for Falcon 900C and 900X operators. The Falcon Elite II package will enhance the capability of the aircraft with functionalities that allow operators to comply with air traffic management mandates such as the ADS-B Out. It will also reduce crew workload and enable the use of new

A corporate jet terminal will be added to New Zealand’s Queenstown Airport to cater to high-end visitors. Queenstown Airport Corporation announced a lease agreement to build FBO facilities on land adjacent to the main airport terminal. Auckland’s Air Center One and Wellington’s Capital Jet Services have signed on to build the new terminal, which is scheduled to open in March.

Dassault Aviation is delivering the first Falcon 7X equipped with Falcon Sphere, a paperless flight software suite

designed for use with the CMA 1100 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) provided by CMC. The package consists of a Dassault-designed touch-based user interface and a full set of Falcon-tailored EFB applications, including the new Falcon Manuals application. Falcon Manuals allows the crew to access cross-referenced flight documentation customised to each aircraft configuration for quick, easy browsing. The EFB suite will include Dassault’s in-house performance calculation apps such as Falcon PErf and the Electronic Performance Manual. The suite will be proposed as a retrofit on the Falcon EASy aircraft starting this year. >>


201 014

BUSINESS AVIATION: Making a Difference in Europe. 500 Exhibits 60 Aircraft 12,000 Attendees

www.ebace.aero


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF Qatar Executive, the corporate-jet

division of Qatar Airways, added a Bombardier Global 5000 Vision to its fleet. This delivery brings its fleet of wholly owned, all-Bombardier aircraft to a total of seven. The new Global 5000 Vision comes in a twocabin configuration with a separate galley. The forward cabin can accommodate up to eight passengers and features a four-place conference table, while the rear cabin is fitted with two single seats, a private lavatory, and a three-person divan that can be transformed into a double bed.

Cessna Aircraft Company donated a restored 1953 L-19/O-1 Bird Dog aircraft to the Armed Forces Foundation at the latter’s 43rd annual Barrett-Jackson car auction sale. The donated unit is a fully functional instrument flight rules (IFR) aircraft equipped with Garmin 430Wide Area Augmentation System. It saw service throughout the 1950s and ’60s with roles such as artillery spotting, medevac operations, search and rescue, communications and training. The Bird Dog was manufactured in 1950, and had a successful operation during the Korean campaign. Usage of air-taxi services and businessjet charter services by executives and professional sports teams increased last year compared to 2012. To keep up with the trend, aviation solutions provider Flightrans has been employing differentiation strategies and focussing on the VVIP class. The company signed a contract for exclusive operation rights in Asia with China’s Hanhwa Business Jet Airlines, and will participate in business jet charter services in the Asian charter markets. 120

JETGALA

Royal Jet launched a new FBO facility in the Seychelles in association with Air Seychelles.

Air Seychelles has also taken over the commercial and operational management of the VIP lounge located at the Seychelles International Airport. The lounge and FBO will be named Air Seychelles VIP. Embraer will expand its current facilities in Melbourne, Florida with a new aircraft assembly line for the Legacy 500 and 450. Delivery for the Legacy 450 is scheduled for 2015, with action star Jackie Chan as its launch customer. Meanwhile, the first Legacy 500 will be delivered in 2016. Both jets include a head-up display with enhanced vision by Rockwell Collins and fly-by-wire controls. Embraer’s current Melbourne campus includes an assembly plant and paint facility for Phenom 100 and 300 business jets, as well as Embraer’s customer centre for executive aircraft. The company is also constructing an Engineering and Technology Center, currently housed in a temporary facility at the Melbourne airport, as part of the new campus. Cessna Aircraft Company delivered its first Citation Mustang to IRM Ltd, a travel company in India with a

Embraer Executive Jets’ Legacy 600 and 650 received type certificates for operation in Taiwan, enabling customers to register and operate the two aircraft in the country. Both have three separate cabin zones and WiFi technology. To date, more than 200 aircraft from the Legacy family have been sold globally. Following the certification, Embraer Executive Jets revealed that it already has a customer for the Legacy 600 in Taiwan.

facility in Ahmedabad, where the aircraft will be based to be used for executive and corporate travel, as well as charter operations. The Mustang is equipped with the Garmin G1000 avionics suite and weather avoidance radar. A terrain-avoidance warning system, traffic information system, dual altitude heading reference system and dual air data computers are included. Since the Mustang’s first flight in 2005, more than 400 have been manufactured and have entered service.


WHY ARE WE HERE? It is perhaps the most important question we have ever asked. And possibly the most difficult to answer. Trees as we know produce oxygen. Birds and insects pollinate the plants that feed us. We know that some animals need plants to survive. And some animals need animals. Giant whales couldn’t survive without tiny plankton. Giant trees couldn’t survive without insects. But could life on this planet survive without us?

WHAT IS OUR PURPOSE? Of all the species that share this world, we are the only one with the power to protect the entire planet. The only one with the power to protect every species on this earth. Including ourselves. Every species is here for a purpose.

Image courtesy NASA

And each of us has a part to play. Let’s do ours. WWW.ONEEARTH.ORG


AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

PLANE SPEAK ABSOLUTE ALTITUDE Measurable height of an aircraft above the actual terrain. ABSOLUTE CEILING The maximum altitude above sea level at which an aircraft can maintain level flight under Standard Air conditions. AGL (Above Ground Level) Altitude expressed as feet above terrain or airport elevation (see MSL). AILERONS An aircraft control surface hinged to the rear, outer section of each wing for banking (‘tilting’) the aircraft. AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT Comprehensive services provided by a management company for an aircraft owner. Details vary. AIRFOIL The shape of any flying surface, but principally a wing, as seen in side-view (cross section). AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE Official notification to aircraft owners/operators of a known safety issue with a particular model of aircraft. ALTIMETER A highly sensitive barometer that shows an aircraft’s altitude above mean sea level by measuring atmospheric pressure. ANGLE OF ATTACK The angle between the airfoil’s chord line and the direction in which the aircraft is currently moving. AOG (Aircraft on Ground) Aircraft unfit to fly, in need of repair. Owner’s worst nightmare. APPROACH (DEPARTURE) CONTROL Radar-based air traffic control, usually at an airport tower, providing traffic separation up to 40 miles. APRON Hard-surfaced or paved area around a hangar. Also, ‘ramp’. ATC (Air Traffic Control) Service providing separation services to participating airborne traffic and clearances to land, take off or taxi at airports. AVIONICS The electronic control systems airplanes use for flight such as communications, autopilots, and navigation. BLOCK RATES Pre-paid hours for air charter at a contracted price. CARBON OFFSET Monetary contributions to renewable energy research and production projects to ‘offset’ carbon emissions of an airplane.

122

JETGALA

CHARTER The ‘renting’ of an aircraft with crew for a personal, business, or cargo flight from one point to another.

FBO (Fixed Base Operator) A business operating an airport terminal for non-airline, general aviation aircraft.

CHARTER CARD Pre-paid air charter plan, either for a block of charter hours at a pre-defined fee, or a set debit balance in dollars.

FERRY FLIGHT A flight for the purpose of returning an aircraft to base or delivering an aircraft from one location to another.

CLASS I NAVIGATION Operation of aircraft under visual meteorological conditions (VFR) primarily based on ‘see and avoid’ procedures. CLASS II NAVIGATION Any en route flight operation that is not Class I, i.e. instrumentbased navigation (IFR). CLEARANCE Formal instructions from air traffic control authorising a specific action (climb or descend, entry into controlled airspace).

FLAPS Hinged surfaces on the inboard rear of wings, deployed to increase wing curvature (and thus, lift). FLIGHT PLAN Filed by radio, telephone, computer, or in person with Flight Service Stations. FLIGHT TIME Portion of the trip actually spent in the air. FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP The purchase of a ‘share’ of an aircraft.

CONTRAILS Streaks of condensed water vapour created in the air by aircraft flying at high altitudes; a.k.a. vapour trails.

FUSELAGE An aircraft’s main body structure housing the flight crew, passengers, and cargo.

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE An airspace of defined dimensions within which air traffic control service is provided.

GENERAL AVIATION Part of civil aviation comprising all facets of aviation except scheduled air carriers.

CRUISE SPEED The normal speed attained at altitude once the aircraft is no longer climbing and is en route.

GLASS COCKPIT See EFIS.

CRUISING ALTITUDE A level altitude maintained by an aircraft while in flight. DEADHEAD To fly the return leg of a trip without cargo or passengers. DRAG Resisting force exerted on an aircraft in its line of flight opposite in direction to its motion. Opposite of thrust. DUTY TIME That portion of the day when a crewmember is on duty in any capacity (not just in the air), limited by regulations. EFIS (Electronic Flight Information Systems) Glass cockpit avionics that integrate all flight parameters into one optimised instrument. ELEVATOR An aircraft control surface hinged to both rear horizontal stabilisers, changing the aircraft pitch attitude nose-up or nose-down. EMPTY LEG Also known as ‘one-way availability’. Usually posted as available for travel between two airports during a certain time period. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) The Department of Transportation’s agency for aviation.

GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellitebased navigation system operated by Department of Defence. GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning System) A system designed to alert pilots if their aircraft is in immediate danger of flying into the ground. GROUND SPEED Actual speed that an aircraft travels over the ground also called ‘shadow speed’. HANGAR An enclosed structure for housing aircraft. Originated with lakebased floating homes of the original German Zeppelin airships. HEAVY JETS See ‘Large-Cabin Jets’. HORSEPOWER The motive energy required to raise 550 lbs. one foot in one second, friction disregarded. HUD (Head-Up Display) A transparent display that presents data without requiring the user to look away from his or her usual viewpoint. IATA CODE International aviation code for international airports. ICAO CODE Civil aviation codes for airports.


[ locate ]

Finally, one clear source to fuel all your aviation business needs. Aviation Business Index (ABI) is a worldwide portal for aviation sales information. Easily find: • jets, turboprops, piston aircraft and helicopters for sale worldwide • market reports and lists • aircraft owners/operators, dealers/brokers and FBOs • aircraft financiers and insurance providers • aviation industry news and events Go to aviationbusinessindex.com to find accurate, real-time, updated information on aircraft for sale worldwide.

The World Leader in Aviation Market Intelligence | 800.553.8638 | +1.315.797.4420 | jetnet.com VISIT THE JETNET EXHIBIT AT THE NBAA SCHEDULERS & DISPATCHERS CONFERENCE JANUARY 14-17 IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, BOOTH #554.


AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

PLANE SPEAK IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) Rules for flights into clouds and low visibility, by reference to cockpit instruments and radio navigation. ILS (Instrument Landing System) A precision instrument approach system permitting aircraft to land with low ceilings or poor visibility. JOINT OWNERSHIP Purchase or lease of an aircraft by a number of owners, often through a partnership or limited company. KNOT (Nautical Mile per Hour) Common measure of aircraft speed equalling 6,080 feet or about 1.15 miles. (For mph, multiply knots by 1.15.) KTAS True airspeed, in knots. LARGE-CABIN JETS The largest size aircraft that doesn’t require a major airport runway. Typical capacity 9-15 passengers. LAYOVER A night spent in the middle of the trip in a city other than home base for the aircraft and crew. LEG Describes one direction of travel between two points. Commonly used in referring to a planned itinerary. LIGHT JETS See ‘Small-Cabin Jets’. MACH SPEED A number representing the ratio of the speed of an airplane to the speed of sound in the surrounding air. MAYDAY An international distress signal to indicate an imminent and grave danger that requires assistance. MID-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 7-9 passengers. MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) Company licensed to provide services for the upkeep and airworthiness of airplanes. NAUTICAL MILE Defined internationally as equivalent to 1,852 metres or 1.15 statute miles. NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) A radio transmitter at a known location, used as an aviation or marine navigational aid. PAN PAN International call signal for urgency, indicating uncertainty and usually followed by the nature of the alert. PART 91 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering corporate flight departments. PART 121 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on scheduled airline operations, including the publication of a schedule.

124

JETGALA

PART 135 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering charter carriers.

TARMAC A paved airport surface, especially a runway or an apron at a hangar.

PART 145 Certificate allowing an organisation to perform maintenance and alterations on US-registered aircraft.

TAXI TIME Portion of the trip spent rolling between the gate, terminal, or ramp and runway.

PATTERN The path of aircraft traffic around an airfield, at an established height and direction.

THRUST The forward force produced in reaction to the gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. Opposite of drag.

PAYLOAD Anything that an aircraft carries beyond what is required for its operation during flight.

TRAILING EDGE The rearmost edge of an airfoil.

POSITIONING Ferrying aircraft for departure from other than originating airport.

TRANSPONDER An airborne transmitter that responds to automated air traffic control interrogation with accurate position information.

RADAR System that uses electromagnetic waves to identify the range, altitude, direction, or speed of moving and fixed objects. RAMP The apron or open ‘tarmac’ in front of an FBO or terminal facility. This space is busy, used for deplaning, parking of aircraft, etc. ROLL One of three axes in flight, specifying the action around a central point. ROTATE In flight, any aircraft will rotate about its centre of gravity, a point which is the average location of the mass of the aircraft. RUDDER Aircraft control surface attached to the rear of the vertical stabiliser (fin) of the aircraft tail. Forces the plane to veer left or right. RUNWAY HEADING Magnetic direction corresponding to the centre line of the runway. SLATS Small, aerodynamic surfaces on the leading edge of the wings of fixed aircraft which allow the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack. SLIPSTREAM The flow of air driven backward by a propeller or downward by a rotor. SMALL-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 5-8 passengers. SQUAWK A four-digit number that a pilot dials into his transponder to identify his aircraft to air traffic controllers.

TURBINE Engine that uses compressed air to generate thrust to spin a metal shaft inside the motor, used in jet engines and turboprop aircraft. TURBOPROP An aircraft in which the propeller is driven by a jet-style turbine rather than a piston. VERY LIGHT JETS (VLJ) Small jet aircraft approved for single-pilot operation, maximum take-off weight of less than 10,000 lb (4,540 kg). VFR (Visual Flight Rules) A defined set of FAA regulations covering operation of aircraft flying by visual reference to the horizon. VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Range) Ground-based radio navigation aid. VORTICES Regions of high velocity that develop at the tip of a wing as it flies through the air. WIND SHEAR Large changes in either wind speed or direction at different altitudes that can cause sudden gain or loss of airspeed.

STATUTE MILE A unit of length equal to 5,280 feet.

WINGLET A small, stabilising, rudder-like addition to the tips of a wing to control or employ air movement, thereby increasing fuel economy.

SVS (Synthetic Vision System) A technology that uses 3D to provide pilots with intuitive means of understanding their flying environment.

YAW One of the three axes in flight, specifying the side-to-side movement of an aircraft on its vertical axis.

TAIL NUMBER An airplane’s registration number.

YOKE The control wheel of an aircraft, akin to an automobile steering wheel.


Free advertisement.

FATE DOESN’T ASK. IT COULD ALSO BE ME. OR YOU. David Coulthard. 13-time Formula 1 Grand Prix Winner and Wings For Life Ambassador.

SPINAL CORD INJURY MUST BECOME CURABLE. In funding the best research projects worldwide focusing on the cure of spinal cord injury, the Wings for Life Spinal Cord Research Foundation ensures top-level medical and scientific progress. We assure that hundred percent of all donations are invested in spinal cord research.

Your contribution makes a difference. Donate online at www.wingsforlife.com


AIRBORNESHOWDIARY

EBACE Geneva FEBRUARY 2014 11-16 FEB

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2014

Changi Exhibition Centre, Singapore

www.singaporeairshow.com.sg

25-27 FEB

ABU DHABI AIR EXPO

Al Bateen Executive Airport, Abu Dhabi, UAE

www.adairexpo.com

INDIA AVIATION 2014

Begumpet Airport, Hyderabad, India

www.india-aviation.in

ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION (ABACE 2014)

Hongqiao International Airport, Shanghai, China

www.abace.aero

20-22 MAY

2014 EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION (EBACE)

Palexpo and Geneva International Airport, Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero/2014

30 MAY-1 JUN

AEROEXPO UK 2014

Sywell Aerodrome, UK

www.aeroexpo.co.uk

EUROPE AVIATION EXPO

Hradec Králové, Czech Republic

www.aviationexpoeu.com

12-14 AUG

LABACE 2014 (LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION)

Congonhas Airport, São Paulo, Brazil

www.abag.org.br/labace2014

14-17 AUG

AIRBOURNE: EASTBOURNE INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW

BN21 4JJ Eastbourne, East Sussex, UK

www.visiteastbourne.com/airbourne

30-31 AUG

SHOREHAM AIRSHOW

Shoreham (Brighton) Airport, West Sussex, UK

www.shorehamairshow.co.uk

NBAA 2014 BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION

Orange County Convention Center and Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, Florida, USA

www.nbaa.org/events/bace

CHINA INTERNATIONAL AVIATION & AEROSPACE EXHIBITION

China International Aviation Exhibition Center, Zhuhai, China

www.airshow.com.cn/en

MIDDLE EAST BUSINESS AVIATION

Dubai World Central, UAE

www.meba.aero

AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW AND AEROSPACE & DEFENCE EXPOSITION

Avalon Airport, Geelong, Victoria, Australia

www.airshow.com.au

MARCH 2014 12-16 MAR APRIL 2014

15-17 APR

MAY 2014

JUNE 2014 19-21 JUN AUGUST 2014

OCTOBER 2014 21-23 OCT

NOVEMBER 2014 11-16 NOV

DECEMBER 2014 8-10 DEC

FEBRUARY 2015 24 FEB-1 MAR

126

JETGALA


AIRBORNETAILHOOK

VOLOCOPTER by Charmaine Tai

STEALTH LIFT VIEWED FROM THE AIR, THE VOLOCOPTER MAY LOOK LIKE PART OF A WINDMILL STRUCTURE. When the world first saw it on YouTube in 2011, it more closely resembled a clothesline. But late last year, this unusual vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft finally took to the skies, lifted up into the air by 18 connected rotors forming a circle. Unlike helicopters, the Volocopter eschews complex mechanisms, including mechanical pitch control. As a VTOL, it is meant for places with little or no runway space — such as the rooftop of your building, or the empty space behind your house. It’s as easy to operate as an automobile, with only a joystick for manoeuvring. And should you suddenly let go of the controls, the aircraft will not come crashing down, but will hover in the air. Designed by E-volo, the Volocopter is powered entirely by electricity, and emits low noise and no vibration. At present, it can fly for 20 minutes, but its inventors are working to extend the time to at least an hour — enough, perhaps, for a trip from home to the office, and back.

128

JETGALA


JOAILLERIE

C’est La Vie 1 E R M P E  ˆ  4 E V M W  ˆ  , S R K  / S R K

[ [ [  N I [ I P Q I V  G S Q


Profile for ExecuJet Aviation Group

ExecuJet - Issue 09  

Inflight Magazine of the ExecuJet Aviation Group

ExecuJet - Issue 09  

Inflight Magazine of the ExecuJet Aviation Group

Advertisement