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POWERED BY JETGALA

05 February – April 2013

BUSINESS WINGS — AIR & SPACE MUSEUM

SOLAR FLIGHT | FLYING UNDER BRIDGES MS-760 JET PIONEER | BOEING BBJ MAX COBALT CO50 VALKYRIE

CHUCS DIVE & MOUNTAIN SHOP

CHICARA NAGATA BIKE ART | MIURA GOLF CLUBS SALVADOR DALI PERFUME | GENEVA SUITES UGUR SAHIN’S ROLLS-ROYCE DESIGN


EXECUJETINTRO

WELCOME TO OUR INFLIGHT MAGAZINE’S FIRST ISSUE OF 2013 We are in our second year now, and are proud to report that we are growing our support-base. So, I trust that you will enjoy this current issue with two stories that are somewhat symbolic of our business. The stories are also filled with pioneering spirit, and a certain amount of eccentricity. Charles Finch, described as “adventure capitalist” has just opened a store in Mayfair, London. It is an unusual store selling mountain gear and bikinis. Charles is inspired by his family history: his grandfather conducted a record climb at Mount Everest, and his father was an Oscar-winning actor in Hollywood. The combination of quality and elegance, of material and purpose, has led him to create “fashion for the sophisticated traveller with a sense of humour”. Our second featured story is about the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. The museum itself is worth writing about but, in this case, we have concentrated on its current exhibition on business aviation. The curator Dorothy Cochrane was kind enough to lead us through the halls and explain that one of the main purposes of the exhibition is to counter the general public’s view that business aviation is only about luxury — a message we are trying to emphasise as well. But the exhibition goes deeper. Dorothy explained how mankind’s fascination with flight raises multiple philosophical and spiritual questions. One compelling aspect is mankind’s continual striving to stretch limits. Whether you stretch your limits on the mountain or in the air, whether you discuss the best material for climbing gear or a new aircraft, a new business model or a sales strategy — the process is a creative and often visionary one, and always an adventure. We hope that you will continue to follow ExecuJet’s adventurous journey and wish you all the best as you travel around the world with us. Niall Olver CEO ExecuJet Aviation Group

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INTRODUCTION NEW HEIGHTS

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EXECUJET LOCATIONS

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FLYING WITH HISTORY An Exclusive Exhibition Of Business Aviation

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STYLE, ADVENTURE AND THE GENTLEMAN Fashion By Charles Finch

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NEWS SNIPPETS New & Exclusive

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WINGS

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FLAWLESS FLIGHT Embraer’s New Legacy 500 Takes Off

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CLASS ASCENT Jet Interiors By Greenpoint Technologies

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HIGH AMBITION Cobalt’s New Piston Aircraft

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LIGHTEN UP Solar Flight Powers Up

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FULL SCALE Boeing’s New BBJ Max

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TAPESTRY OF GRACE Unique Private Jet Carpets

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CLOSE CALL Daredevil Flights Below Bridges

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MATTER OF TASTE Introducing A Bespoke Concierge

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VENTURE EASY Helicopters Made For Entrepreneurs

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NATURAL HIGH Sky High Adventure

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PINT-SIZED PIONEER The World’s First Ever Very Light Jet

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MOON TRUCK Vacations In Outer Space


DNA. It Matters. Examine each and every aspect of a Falcon and you’ll find genius at work. But what makes a Falcon a Falcon is in its genes. Lightweight strength and maneuverability, battle-tested in Mirage and Rafale jet fighters. Unrivalled credentials for engineering excellence and technological innovation. And generation after generation of business aircraft that consistently prove best in class for performance and efficiency. And for pure genius.

Find out why. Scan the code. Or visit falconjet.com/dna


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ON THE UP The Question Of European Aviation

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CAPTAIN SPEAKING Wings Of Kindness

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LUXE

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SUITE GENEVA The City’s Storied Suites

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MOMENTOUS MODELS Unconventional Timepieces

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RETURN OF THE PHANTOM A Most Unique Rolls-Royce

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PLEASURE OF PASSAGE Royal Huisman Yachts

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SAMURAI SWING Golf Clubs For Champions

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RAPID REVOLUTION Another Franck Muller Milestone

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ART ON WHEELS Unique Bikes By Chicara Nagata

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SCULPTURED SCENT Salvador Dali Perfume

100 ROYAL MYSTIQUE Taj Lake Palace, Udaipur 104 FREE FOCUS Jamie Nelson’s Dramatic Perspectives 113

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BRIEFING Business Aviation In Brief

120 FOOD FOR FLIGHT Experiments In Biofuel 122 PLANE SPEAK Aviation Glossary 126 AIR SHOW DIARY 128 TAILHOOK First Felix 6

EXECUJET


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EXECUJET LOCATIONS

CONTENT LEAD EDITOR Sandy Tan ART DIRECTOR Sylvia Weimer (Spacelab Design, Sydney) DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Sylvia Weimer, Elliott Foulkes,

Sara Morawetz (Spacelab Design, Sydney) EDITOR Katrina Balmaceda EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Charmaine Tai AVIATION EDITOR Rainer Sigel ONLINE EDITOR Sandy Tan CONTRIBUTORS Jim Gregory, Jeff Heselwood, Carol Lee, Brian Moore, Roger Norum, Paul Prendergast, Sanjay Rampal, Elga D. Reyes, Jim Simon, Steve Slater, Alex Unruh, Alvin Wong COMPANY PUBLISHER Rainer Sigel

EXECUJET LOCATIONS FEATURED IN THIS EDITION ExecuJet Aviation Group Head Office Zurich EAG ExecuJet Aviation Centre PO Box 1 8058 Zurich-Airport Switzerland Tel: +41 44 804 1616 Fax: +41 44 804 1617 enquiries@execujet.eu

MANAGING DIRECTOR Michelle Tay SENIOR MANAGER, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Jaime Lim BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVES Shirleen Low, Kelly Li CIRCULATION & PRODUCTION MANAGER Caroline Rayney OFFICE MANAGER Winnie Lim MARKETING ASSISTANT Anne Goh

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PHOTO CREDITS COVER Photography: Jamie Nelson SECTION OPENER WINGS Image courtesy of Bailey Robinson SECTION OPENER LUXE Image courtesy of Ugur Sahin Design SECTION OPENER AIRBORNE Image courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

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For all our regional contacts please go to our website:

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NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM

BUSINESS AVIATION GOES BACK IN TIME

THANKS TO ITS ASTONISHING SELECTION OF MUSEUMS, United States of America’s capital city, Washington DC is often described as ‘home of the nation’s treasures’ with the Smithsonian housing the ‘Nation’s Attic’. The various Smithsonian buildings are home to a captivating array of treasures, documents and artefacts that reflect the history and culture of both the country itself, and the world beyond. Yet, even if you stripped the city of its galleries and exhibition spaces and leave nothing but the National Air and Space Museum, DC would still be worth visiting. The museum is often the first port of call for visitors to the city, while area residents return again and again, regardless of their aviation knowledge or expertise. Mankind’s fascination with flight and our continual striving to stretch the limits of space exploration not only sate the curiosity of pilots and engineers, but interest and inspire the casual visitor, too. >>

The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, opened in 2003, showcases the world’s largest collections of aviation and space artefacts All images are courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution

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EXECUJET >> Should you leave the magnificent National Air and Space Museum wanting more, the area offers a further treat. Just 25 miles from central DC, close to Dulles International Airport, lies a companion facility that houses dozens of flying machines that do not fit in the downtown facility. The gargantuan, purpose-built hangar, the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, opened in 2003 to showcase aircraft that would otherwise be held in storage, and is like a giant toy shop for the aviation enthusiast. Civil and military aircraft, of all sizes and from all eras, pack the hall’s ceiling and floor space. Almost hidden below an overhanging, decommissioned Concorde lies something of a rarity — a modest but allencompassing exhibition of business flights. It started when the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) agreed to support the museum in the mid-1990s by funding an exhibit that would showcase the history of the business jet. According to the museum’s curator for general aviation Dorothy Cochrane, one of the main purposes of the exhibition was to counter the general public’s view that business aviation was only about high-end luxury jets. The museum wanted to educate people on the use of corporate-owned aircraft, and how this relates to a company’s bottom line as well as the economy.

THIS PAGE The Beechcraft D18S is a lowwing, twin-engine aircraft

OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP The Piper PA-23 Apache was first produced in 1954

The Concorde was donated to the museum in 1989 by Air France

The classic Beechcraft Bonanza, first introduced in 1947, is still built today by Raytheon Aircraft

With support from NBAA, the museum worked on the exhibit and in 1998, it opened Business Wings in the downtown museum, and remained on view for two years. Its centerpiece was a loaned Cessna Citation, which was returned after the exhibit closed, and a Beechcraft King Air, loaned from Raytheon, which was later donated and is now on display as part of the permanent business aviation exhibit at the Udvar-Hazy Center. The extra space at the Udvar-Hazy Center allows the museum to display more aircraft, especially historical business aircraft. The exhibit features an NBAA-sponsored, four-minute film that focusses on various users, and explains why business aircraft are beneficial to their companies. For example, one firm uses its own plane to ship crucial repair parts to customers that can’t afford to wait for next-day shipping.

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Other benefits include the chance to use the time and space in an aircraft to work and hold small-scale staff meetings — a mundane reality for those flying in private jets, and a far cry from the extravagant luxury trips the general public probably pictures. Cochrane observes that this is nothing new, pointing to the exhibit’s picture of an Iowa washing machine salesman H.L. Ogg who, in the 1930s, refitted a Travel Air S-6000-B, so that he could fly his company’s laundering machines to demonstrate to potential customers. But just how popular was the exhibit with the general public? The exhibition was a huge success, says Cochrane, precisely because people are intrigued by the lifestyle of a perceived elite. “People like sexy business jets,” she says. “Everyone wishes they could fly in one. And people learned there’s an actual value in it. We wanted to show the utility and the economics of business aviation, to illustrate that you can save time and money going from point to point.” The exhibition is not just fascinating because of the actual aircraft, Cochrane explains, but because each individual plane comes with its own story, which is not something that can necessarily be said of most commercial aircraft. For example, the Beechcraft Model 18, which first flew in 1937 and was produced for 32 years, was used as a mail plane, a utility plane and a passenger plane. It was during the post-war economic boom that business aviation really began to expand, when numerous war jets were adapted for business use, while designers had the time and opportunity to work on new models. In 1947, the Beechcraft Bonanza business aircraft was launched — a four-place, gleaming all-metal single engine plane that is still in production by Raytheon. The Udvar-Hazy Center displays the Waikiki Beech, the fourth Bonanza ever produced and also the aircraft that set a light-plane, non-stop record from Hawaii to New Jersey in March 1949.

Further models include a Piper PA-23 Apache (first produced in 1954), the revolutionary slim-line Learjet 23 launched in 1963 (the museum boasts a test version of the second Learjet built), and the remarkable Fulton Airphibian. Cochrane says: “While a technical success as a flying car, the Airphibian designed by Robert Fulton Jr. in 1950 did not become a marketable design, due to the inherent compromises of air and car technologies and financial difficulties.” This proves that no matter how much romance is evoked in the tales of aviation, when it comes to business, the only thing that ultimately counts is the airandspace.si.edu bottom line.

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CHARLES FINCH AND CHUCS DIVE & MOUNTAIN SHOP

FASHION FOR THE FUN AND SOPHISTICATED TRAVELLER

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HE OUTSIDER’S STEREOTYPICAL VIEW OF GREAT BRITAIN and its people is rooted in the past. It’s comforting to think of the British in terms of their reassuringly ceremonial royal family, protected by Royal Guardsmen in bearskin hats. They play gentle games like cricket and bowl on manicured green lawns while drinking tea, and even films like James Bond often portray the British as perfect gentlemen. The magnificent opening ceremony to the 2012 London Olympic Games showed a more varied version of Britain. Sometimes, it requires a little more imagination to make something out of history, while at the same time looking forward with a view to forging something positive and new. Britain may not boast the commercial vitality that once made it one of the world’s leading economies, but there’s one area where it still excels: eccentricity. On that note, we introduce you to a man often described as a “serial entrepreneur”, Charles Finch.

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OPPOSITE PAGE George Finch, who created the puffa jacket, was seen here during his Mount Everest climb in 1922

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP Charles Finch describes his businesses as an adventure

Chucs’ Deacon Top swimwear features print moulded cups with detachable bow straps

Chucs Dive & Mountain Shop opened in 2011 in Mayfair, London

Down jackets are sold at Chucs, representing George Finch’s love for mountaineering

Finch came to our attention when he recently opened an unusual new shop in London’s Mayfair district, Chucs Dive & Mountain Shop. Here you can buy light clothes for the beach, or heavy jackets made for mountaineering. On the surface, it seems like an odd combination. But there’s a logical answer: the shop is a reflection of a fascinating family history — Finch’s grandfather was a mountaineer, while his film-star father loved the Caribbean sand and sea. “Chucs is all about sand, sea and mountain,” explains Finch. “Sand and sea means the beach, as well as safari. The idea of the beach really comes from my own childhood in the West Indies, and an adolescence spent in the south of France and California.” Finch’s father, the Oscar-winning actor Peter Finch, owned a plantation in Jamaica called Bamboo. The shop’s swim- and beachwear “come from the time and the elegance of 1950-60s Caribbean life”. The safari wear “comes from my fishing and trekking passion and some of the great shirts worn by my father in his film career,” says Finch. Finch’s grandfather, meanwhile, was George Ingle Finch, a chemist and mountaineer who fought in World War I, and who was a member of the second British expedition to attempt scaling Mount Everest in 1922. Although this expedition didn’t make it to the summit (Everest would not be conquered until 1953), George Finch’s pioneering use of supplemental oxygen allowed the team to set an altitude record, and his innovations opened the way for future record-setting climbs — almost

all climbers assailing Everest in modern times have used supplemental oxygen. His grandfather “also invented the down coat”, Finch points out. “He wore one on Everest in 1922 for his record-breaking climb.” The original downfilled, or ‘puffa jacket’, is also on sale at Chucs. Anyone who looks at the wider picture of Finch’s business activities would perhaps be less surprised at the dichotomy of Chucs. His consultancy, Finch & Partners, covers many fields, and it’s hard to pin down exactly what the business represents. This is no accident, Finch explains. “I purposefully never defined the company too much,” he says. “Today we are in the fashion and luxury business, movies, television, brand marketing, publishing and digital publishing. All of these creative businesses are an adventure.” ‘Adventure’ is a key word here — “Adventure Capitalist” was the headline to a column Finch wrote for GQ magazine a few years ago, in which he described himself as “someone who loves to build ideas into businesses”. Are there any figures Finch admires in British business? He describes Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou, the founder of budget airline easyJet as “pretty cool, though I don’t use it if I can”. Finch’s brand of clothing, though, is aimed at what he calls “a sophisticated traveller, and for someone who has a sense of humour”. “We are looking for quality and for elegance,” he stresses. In a world of bland, multi-national chain names and inferior, generic brands, a small shop in Mayfair stands as testimony to a fascinating personal past, and represents an entrepreneurial individualism largely lost to British retail.

Chucs Dive And Mountain Shop, 31 Dover St, London W1S 4ND, United Kingdom www.chucsdiveshop.com

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EXECUJETSNIPPETS

AQUATIC RUNWAY

Discover Chanel’s athletic side in its Sport collection. Alongside surfboards, racquets and bicycles, plus rugby, basket and tennis balls, the collection presents an inflatable raft with room for up to three people — perfect for escaping the crowd on a sunny day. www.chanel.com

ExecuJet Africa has teamed up with Acher Aviation, leaders in offshore helicopter operations, to offer a range of services including helicopter management and charter, as well as specialised support to the oil, gas, mining and resource exploration sectors.

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DOR OT H Y ’S ARBON WAY ARRIER

Founded in 2003, UK-based Calder specialises in making laptop, violin and guitar cases. Each laptop case is lined with calfskin leather and hand-painted silk velvet, completed with custom-made screws and zip fasteners. With its outer carbon fibre shell cushioned with high-density foam, the case is able to withstand 100 kg crush pressure. www.calderoriginals.com

Let your feet take you where you want to go. Artist and designer Dominic Wilcox has created a pair of shoes with built-in GPS. The wearer can input his desired destination on a mapping software and to the shoes via a USB cable. A click of the heels activates the GPS device embedded within. LED lights on the left toe cap guide the wearer and a progress bar on the right monitors remaining distance. www.dominicwilcox.com

EXECUJET HAITE AVIATION SERVICES CHINA CELEBRATES MAINTENANCE APPROVALS

(L-R) Guan Dongyuan, President of Embraer China Graeme Duckworth, MD ExecuJet Asia

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ExecuJet Haite Aviation Services China Co. Ltd. celebrates its recognition as a Line Maintenance Facility within Bombardier’s Authorised Service Facility (ASF) network, and its approval as an Embraer Authorised Service Centre for Asia. The agreement was signed at the National Business Aviation Association Convention (NBAA) in Orlando, Florida last October.


CHALLENGE EVERYTHING The Challenger family of aircraft pushes boundaries to achieve the seemingly impossible. From comfort to efficiency, performance to value, Challenger aircraft have been continuously refined to be everything a business jet should be.

A CHALLENGER. ALWAYS.

Bombardier and Challenger are trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries. Š2012 Bombardier Inc. All rights reserved.

businessaircraft.bombardier.com


EXECUJETSNIPPETS

BINDING LEATHER

Beauchamp focuses on flexibility and uniqueness and offers individuals the choice of buying a limited edition or one-of-akind piece. Belts are made of leather in various cuts and textures, and come in a range of colours and thickness. Clients may commission bespoke belts and bags by choosing a design from the current collection and customising the colour and texture. www.beauchampsoflondon.com ExecuJet Africa responds to a rising demand for business aviation in Nigeria with the opening of a new base in Lagos. The latest addition to ExecuJet’s global FBO network is located at Murtala Muhammed International Airport. Measuring over 3,000 sq m, the facility has direct access to the main runway and taxiway. From this base, ExecuJet Africa offers a range of services, including maintenance, FBO, charter and aircraft management services, state-of-theart ground support equipment, a VIP lounge and 24-hour support capabilities.

ExecuJet Middle East expands its FBO services at Dubai International Airport to cope with increasing demand. The Dubai ExecuJet FBO now includes the terminal building, previously managed by Executive Flight Service (EFS) — offering additional lounge space, expanded customs and immigration services, e-gate services and duty-free shopping. ExecuJet manages all ground handling for aircraft, using the company’s Dubai FBO facilities.

SATIN METAL Who knew cufflinks could be complicated until watchmaker Richard Mille created them out of 38 components each? They use an automatic mechanism that flips open the titanium bars with a press of the push-pieces and closes them with a press of the top plate. Made from grade 5 titanium topped with satin-brushed surfaces, the cufflinks come with a two-year warranty. www.richardmille.com

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(L-R) Éric Martel, President Bombardier Customer Services, Nick Weber, Maintenance Director ExecuJet Middle East, Graeme Duckworth, Maintenance Director ExecuJet Aviation Group, Stan Younger, VP Aircraft Service Centres Bombardier Aerospace, Chris Milligan, Director, Authorized Service Facilities, Bombardier Customer Services

ExecuJet Middle East celebrates after the company’s Dubai MRO won the Bombardier Authorised Service Facility (ASF) Excellence Award in the International category for the second consecutive year. The Bombardier ASF Excellence Awards are presented annually to Bombardier ASFs, based on a set of 13 criteria including quality assurance, technical compliance and customer influence, as well as management and representative input.


LOUNGE

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PROMISE Specialising in bespoke engagement rings, earrings and pendants for both men and women, Stephen Einhorn has gained recognition by being regularly commissioned to design collections for brands, including Paul Smith and Dunhill, and films such as Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows. He creates bespoke pieces and uses metals, pearls, diamonds, precious stones and rare materials such as 2,000-year-old oak wood. www.stepheneinhorn.co.uk

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BULLETBEAUTY Rogue DZNcombines engineering and creativity, aviation and fashion. The B2-SPARROW is a pendant that can be worn on a chain. Using a 5-axis machined from billet block and finished with calculated tool-paths, its adjustable wings hinge from the main chassis. Each piece is made from Mil-Spec G5 aerospace-grade titanium, and is numbered. www.roguedzn.com

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Louis Vuitton brings back the enchantment ent of traditional letter writing with its latest collection ction of writing instruments. With textured paper products and crystal inkwells, the set includes ludes fountain pens encased in alligator leather and a cartridge resistant to air pressure on a plane. ne. A back-lit ink bar shows off the twelve ink colours lours created exclusively for this collection. ction. www.louisvuitton.eu ton.eu

RGANIC AUDIO Shape Audio produces Organic Harmony, an omnidirectional stereo loudspeaker with built-in amplifiers. The speakers are available in bronze, Argentium Sterling silver and 18-carat gold. Only one Organic Harmony in gold, weighing 215 kg, will be produced. Complete with USB and Ethernet connection and room correction technology, the speakers come with a lifetime warranty. www.shapeaudio.com

LIGHT SAIL

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DeAntonio’s Yachts redesigns the concept of a luxury yacht with the D23, which features a teak deck and two carbon bow mooring fairleads, with a concealed 115-hp outboard motor. With adjustable seats and cushions, the yacht can accommodate up to six passengers. Optional accessories include a retractable table, swimming ladder and a water tank for shower, as well as a cabron-fibre hard top with windows. www.deantonioyachts.com


AIMING

HIGHER with 50 years knowhow and now in Asia.

Fifty years ago, a new way of handling business aircraft transactions took off ... the Jetcraft way. Seeing every customer as unique. Working harder on every deal. Building a global network with local expertise. Today, we’re one of the world’s top aircraft brokers. We are now in Asia to serve your aircraft sales, acquisitions, trading and brokerage service needs. Now in Asia and aiming higher for you. www.jetcraft.com I asia@jetcraft.com I (QTXLU\


WINGS


WINGS

EMBRAER LEGACY 500 by Sanjay Rampal

FLAWLESS FLIGHT

EMBRAER’S NEW SUPER MID-SIZE BUSINESS JET TAKES OFF 26

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“ONE OF THE KEY ASPECTS IS MATURITY,” says Ricardo Maltez, project manager of the Embraer Legacy 500, which took five years to develop until its maiden flight last November. Emotions were at a peak at Embraer’s headquarters in São José dos Campos, Brazil, when the world’s first ever fly-bywire super mid-size business aircraft took off. It was a complex road until then. Parker Aerospace, supplier of the Legacy 500’s fly-by-wire technology control system, did not have a critical software approval in place — which delayed its first flight test by over a year. Fly-by-wire technology streamlines flight control by translating pilots’ input into digital information. In the end, BAE Systems, suppliers of fly-by-wire systems for Embraer’s ERJ 170/190 regional airliners, jumped into the breach. President of Embraer Executive Jets, Ernest Edwards, credits the team and its efforts, in addition to the manufacturer’s extensive experience in developing its Phenom 100 and 300 light jets. During the one hour and 45 minute test flight, pilots Mozart Louzada and Eduardo Camelier, along with engineers Gustavo Paixão and Alexandre Figueiredo, evaluated the Legacy 500’s handling and performance, and assessed aircraft systems and landing gear retraction. “The flight was successful, precisely according to plan,” says Louzada. >>

The Legacy 500 promises smooth and fast flights of up to Mach 0.82

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WINGS >> The transcontinental jet features an airframe that sits between the Phenom jets and Embraer’s larger Legacy 600 and 650 models. It clinches a high-speed cruise of Mach 0.82, thanks to its two Honeywell HTF 7500E Turbofan engines: each generating 6,540 lb of maximum thrust. The aircraft has a projected maximum cruising altitude of 45,000 ft (13,716 m) and a maximum range of 3,000 nmi (5,556 km) — which renders flights between countries in Asia, Europe and America a breeze. The Legacy 500 is based on a clean-sheet design, with extensive input from both clients and operators. To fine tune every detail, modern and simplified interior designs developed by BMW Designworks USA were tested by Embraer, using two cabin mock-ups. Distinctive features include

The Legacy 500’s flyby-wire technology consists of an Angle of Attack (AOA) Limiter that provides stall protection

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a full stand-up cabin with flat floors, and a wet galley — a first in its class. The spacious 26 ft 10 in (8.17 m) long and 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) wide pressurised cabin seats up to 12 passengers plus two crew members. All cabin seats with earthy- and jewel-toned upholstery can recline and swivel; four of which have fully berthable positions. A pressurised and heated 40 ft³ (1.13 m³) internal luggage compartment is ideal for storing golf clubs and other valuables. >>


FROM TOP A selection of cabin interior finishes, ranging from cool blues to earth tones, is available Work and dining surfaces in the cabin can be restored when not in use

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WINGS

SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

67 FT 4 IN

20.52 M

WINGSPAN

66 FT 5 IN

20.25 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

22 FT 1 IN

6.74 M

CABIN LENGTH

26 FT 10 IN

8.17 M

CABIN WIDTH

6 FT 10 IN

2.08 M

CABIN HEIGHT

6 FT

1.82 M

MAXIMUM RANGE (1) WITH IFR RESERVES

3,000 NMI NBAA IFR (200 NM ALTERNATE)

5,556 KM NBAA IFR (200 NM ALTERNATE)

MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING

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MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED 45,000 FT

13,716 M

TAKEOFF DISTANCE

4,600 FT

1,402 M

MAXIMUM TAKEOFF WEIGHT

N/A

N/A

The Legacy 500 made a successful first maiden flight last November at Embraer’s headquarters in São José dos Campos, Brazil

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0.82 MACH

CERTIFIED CEILING

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>> Passengers can access Honeywell’s Ovation Select™ Cabin Connection Suite, which provides high definition media input, connectivity to consumer electronics, as well as high-speed satellite communications via Inmarsat or ground-based Aircell solutions for rapid voice and data connectivity. The Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion® avionics system improves situational awareness and offers paperless cockpit capabilities, and autothrottles reduce fuel flow and pilot workload.


FROM TOP The Legacy 500’s cockpit with advanced flight displays is designed specifically for pilots who will fly the aircraft The aircraft also features reduced noise and emissions

THE MAKING OF A LEGACY

“This is the aircraft that will move us from industry player to industry leader,” says Edwards. UK-based charter company FlairJet, which operates the Phenom 100 and 300 models, will add the Legacy 500 to its fleet. FlairJet CEO David Fletcher says the company is taken with the 500’s fly-by-wire technology and Embraer’s signature cutting-edge and stylish interiors. With a first delivery of the Legacy 500 slated for 2014 and the smaller Legacy 450 a year after, Embraer — which has aimed to be a major player in the business aircraft segment since its entry in 2000 — is well on its way.

To earn type certification by the end of 2013, the Legacy 500 needs to complete a total of 2,000 hours of flight tests. The fourth prototype, a finished article, will undergo further improvements and multiple take-offs and landings before the Legacy 500’s first entry into service. Embraer Executive Jets COO Tulio Pelligrini says: “Maturity plays a very important role in the game, so we learned from the entry into service of the Phenoms.” Embraer’s team spent hours aboard the Legacy 500 mock-ups and flew 300 to 400 guests. Though it will be two years or more before the 500 enters service, Embraer is making sure that it arrives first.

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WINGS GREENPOINT TECHNOLOGIES by Katrina Balmaceda

ELEVATION AND THE QUALITY OF SLEEP ABOARD BUSINESS JETS

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Apart from the Aeroloft sleeping berths, Greenpoint Technologies also designs custom cabin interiors featuring master suites, VIP cabinetry and well equipped conference rooms

AMONG ALL AIRCRAFT interior designers, those who work on private jets have the most opportunity to experiment with new cabin ideas and personalisation features. The largest private jets give the most room to stretch not just one’s legs, but also one’s imagination. Airbus once presented a concept jet with a partly transparent fuselage that lets passengers gaze on the stars and vast night sky. It is also a small wonder that the Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) cabin is the slate that many designers use to show what they can do, with concepts ranging from flying gardens and garages to opulent palaces. It is also on the BBJ

that Greenpoint Technologies, a Kirkland, Washington-based aircraft completions and modifications firm, shows its talent. Greenpoint Technologies created the increasingly popular Aeroloft installation specifically for the BBJ 747-8’s interior. “The Aeroloft provides a VIP sanctuary for individual passengers to escape the noise and activity of the main deck for rest during travel,” says Scott Goodey, Greenpoint president and CEO. Initially called the 747-8 Overhead Space Utilisation unit and scheduled for first deliveries in the last quarter of 2011, it was renamed Aeroloft in 2009 and was first installed on an aircraft last August. It has since been installed on three more business jets, with orders for two more. The modular Aeroloft provides an aircraft with a sleeping area above the main deck in the aft section. An installed staircase leads from the main deck to the loft, where sleeping berths may be concealed from the hallway by a curtain. Beside each bed is an area for placing magazines, a water bottle >> JETGALA

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FROM TOP Aerolift takes guests from the ground to the aircraft’s main deck Greenpoint Technologies specialises in interior design for BBJs. This concept interior includes a theatre room

DREAM EAST >> or a mobile phone if the passenger wishes. There are eight suites in all, plus a lounge with a changing room and wardrobe. Interiors are customisable. The Aeroloft is said to add 393 sq ft to the 4,786-sq ft cabin space, bringing the total space up to nearly 5,200 sq ft. Greenpoint’s Aerolift concept, also unveiled in 2009, comprises of a lift that leads directly from the ground to the aircraft’s main deck. The design includes an automated door on the fuselage, a lift carriage with internal doors and a cabin enclosure. Like the Aeroloft, it was designed specifically for the wide-body 747-8. The Aerolift can replace the use of ground stairs to get in and out of the aircraft — an advantage especially in remote areas or for those seeking more privacy when boarding their jets. It is also useful for passengers with ailments or physical disabilities. Each Aerolift is 2.24 m high, 1.04 m wide and 1.63 m deep — enough to hold four passengers or one wheelchair-bound passenger and an attendant. Established in 1988, Greenpoint Technologies specialises in Boeing aircraft completions and has installed VIP and head-of-state interiors on 19 BBJs. It also manufactures VIP cabinetry and custom machine parts. Greenpoint was named Aerospace Company of the Year by Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance, a non-profit organisation, in 2010, and boasts a high record of on-time and early deliveries.

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Like many business aviation companies, Greenpoint Technologies is looking East. It signed a memorandum of understanding with Aircraft Maintenance and Engineering Co, Beijing (Ameco Beijing) in June 2012 to collaborate on commercial- and business-jet completion work in China and the Asia-Pacific. The partnership’s services will encompass engineering, certification and installation of narrow and widebody VIP aircraft modifications.


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COBALT CO50 VALKYRIE by Sanjay Rampal

AMBITION 36

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AMID SOME OF THE ROUGHEST YEARS in business aviation, one company has been slowly building what it hopes will be the “best plane possible” — at least in the small aircraft arena. “We sought input from pilots on what they ideally wanted from a plane,” says David Loury, CEO of Cobalt Aircraft Industries. The answers they got ranged from good visibility to a retractable undercarriage, and of course, good design. The result is the Co50 Valkyrie, an all-composite, pusher prop aircraft that’s now being built in Canada (the company was founded in France). First unveiled at the EAA AirVenture at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 2010, the Co50 began flight tests in July last year with high-speed taxi and nose-lift trials conducted at Bagotville Canadian Air Force Base. Certification is expected in 2014. Mindful of challenges ahead, Loury says: “Development is slow and some technical modifications are necessary. Also, the Canadian winters can be unforgiving.” The ambition is high. Not only is Cobalt competing with piston-aircraft makers Cessna, Cirrus and Diamond, it also aims to raise the bar in speed, safety and pilotfriendliness. The Co50 will have twin rear vertical stabiliser fins and a front canard that fully controls the pitch of the aircraft. The canard replaces traditional tail-mounted elevators for climbing and descending. With 350 horsepower, the Co50 will clinch a top speed of 220 kts (407 km/h) and can reach a maximum height of 25,000 feet (7,620 metres). It can carry up to five passengers (four adults and one children). The Co50’s IFR (instrument flight rules) systems will make flying in inclement weather a breeze. Four independent electrical power sources and a backup battery will increase safety and redundancy, while a Kevlar-reinforced cabin roll cage and a dissipation of impact energies will increase the chances of surviving a crash. Panoramic vistas from the wrap-around cockpit also ensure pleasant VFR (visual flight rules) flying. The beating heart of the Valkyrie is the Esterline CMC Electronics’ SmartDeck avionics suite. “It complements the airframe with lower pilot workload because the complexity is shielded by the avionics, making the plane very simple to fly,” Loury says. The SmartDeck’s redundant system offers synthetic vision for enhanced situational awareness and a terrain awareness warning system. Two 12-inch displays are provided, with the second screen serving to monitor the aircraft system health, engine performance and GPS positioning. The central console offers a digital autopilot facility plus communications, flight planning

and navigation aids. The piston engine will be fully digitally controlled for pilots to easily optimise performance in cases of extreme temperatures and short runways. Loury says the company has received more than 900 quantified sales leads plus military interest. But in need of further expertise and investment, the 10-strong team has a long road to go to realise its small but powerful dream.

OPPOSITE PAGE The pusher prop aircraft is expecting certification in 2014 THIS PAGE, FROM TOP A front canard generates lift and drag The SmartDeck, with digital autopilot features, is user-friendly and ultra-intuitive

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SOLAR FLIGHT by Jim Simon

LIGHTEN UP SOLAR-POWERED AIRCRAFT ADVANCE TO NEW HEIGHTS

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t current state of aircraft technology, Boeing’s new 787 Dreamliner uses 20 per cent less fuel than comparable aircraft. The quest for energy-saving flight is on, a challenge taken up by an increasing number of inventors and technology pioneers. Who knows — there may come a time when aircraft no longer need fossil fuel to lift off, but could — at least partially — make use of energy derived from sunlight. One of these pioneers is Slovenia-based Solar Flight, founded by Eric Raymond in 1986, which aims to develop manned, solar-powered aircraft. Not as experimental prototypes, but as practical, reusable flying machines. Its first aircraft — the single-seater Sunseeker I — took flight in 1989 and a year later, it flew across the United States in a 21-stop tour, climbing up to 16,000 feet (4,877 metres) and staying a total of 121 hours in the air. Photovoltaic cells embedded in the aircraft’s wings capture and convert sunlight into energy, recharging batteries that power the motor and electronics. Early pioneers of solar-powered flight include the late Paul MacCready, whose solarpowered Solar Challenger with a maximum speed of 40 mph (64 km/h) flew from Paris to London across the English Channel in five hours and 23 minutes — rising up to 14,300 feet (4,359 metres). The late professor Günther Rochelt’s Solair I, with 2,499 wing-mounted solar cells, flew in Unterwössen, Germany for five hours and 41 minutes in 1983. Raymond is inspired by the speed and efficiency of Rochelt’s pedal-powered Musculair II that broke speed records in 1984 when it reached 22 mph (35 km/h). In 2002, Raymond introduced the Sunseeker II, sporting substantial improvements. While the first used thin and light film solar cells, its power fell short. “The airplane still flew well, but it was really flying on battery power and updrafts, with solar power recharging the batteries,” says Raymond. “For Sunseeker II, we used proper silicon solar cells that make at least 1,500 watts, which is more than enough for level flight.” >>

OPPOSITE PAGE The Sunseeker II features a teetering propeller that reduces vibration THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT The Sunseeker II uses silicon solar cells that pack at least 1,500 watts The Sunseeker I first took flight in 1989

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CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP The Sunseeker II ‘s weight matches that of a motorcycle While crossing the Alps in the Sunseeker II in 2009, Raymond flew level at 10,000 feet on solar power alone The new two-seater Sunseeker Duo will run at a higher voltage of 300v

>> Raymond intends to develop solar-powered aircraft for practical use, not for museum exhibits or solely for the record books. Raymond flies the Sunseeker II from grass runways, often without help and maintenance. It measures 23 ft (7 m) long, has a 17-ft (5-m) wingspan and weighs 292 pounds (132 kg), equivalent to an average motorcycle. It has an 8-hp engine and flies up to 40 mph (64 km/h) under solar power alone — and twice as fast with support from its four lithium polymer batteries. The improvements paid off when Raymond flew the Sunseeker II over the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps for about three hours from Zurich in 2009. It was the first solarpowered aircraft to do so. “I had to climb against the wind to Zermatt, where the Matterhorn was in the clear,” he says, “I carefully went around to the upwind side, where I found smooth slope lift.” 40

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That same year, Raymond flew the aircraft across eight countries in Europe with multiple stops. He would rely on the batteries to reach 10,000 feet (3,048 metres), and then fly level on solar power alone. The aircraft has been flown more than 60 times, up to an hour or more each since its debut. When flying in higher altitudes, piston engines lose power and require turbo chargers or superchargers. The company’s solar cells produce more power and almost double when flying at 3,000 metres. But like fuel-powered aircraft, it needs to overcome challenges in speed, endurance, reliability and cost. Solar Flight’s response is the Sunseeker Duo, a two-seater solar-powered aircraft, rolled out last year but has yet to take flight. The Duo will run at a higher voltage of 300v, and lithium polymer cells making up its batteries will sit on the wings, near the plane’s centre of gravity instead of scattered around the airframe. When cruising at 6,000 metres, 5kW from its solar panels can drive the propeller and recharge batteries without aid from its electric motor. Solar Flight has also developed blueprints for a four-seater aircraft that will appeal to flight schools and pilots. The company also cites China as a potential market. It might be some time before the company secures investors for the Sunseeker Duo but like moths to a flame, it will be irresistible to finally fly in one.


IN 2009, RAYMOND FLEW THE SUNSEEKER II ACROSS EIGHT COUNTRIES IN EUROPE WITH MULTIPLE STOPS

The Sunseeker and Sunseeker II seat one while their latest evolution, the Sunseeker Duo, has room for two Image by Irena Raymond

Eric Raymond founded Solar Flight in 1986 and continues to test new ways to fly on solar power alone

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BBJ MAX by Jim Gregory

FULL SCALE COMPLETE COMFORT IN A NEW ULTRA-LONG-RANGE BUSINESS JET TO THE DELIGHT OF THE INDUSTRY AND CLIENTS, Boeing unveiled its new BBJ MAX 8 at the last NBAA show in Orlando. Based on the Boeing 737, the company’s bestselling commercial jetliner, it stands out for its performance, reliability and size. The BBJ MAX 8 offers a range of 6,325 nmi (11,714 km), and is able to fly from Los Angeles to Seoul in 12 hours. Its cabin size is similar to today’s BBJ 2, but with a 19-ft (6-m) longer cabin. Delivery of the new model is expected between 2017 and 2018. “We anticipate the BBJ MAX 8 will be a very strong seller as a VIP aircraft and will likely capture a larger share of the market because it’s the right combination of performance, space and comfort,” says Captain Steve Taylor, BBJ’s president. The BBJ MAX 8 will be the first member of the BBJ MAX family to feature fuel-efficient CFM International LEAP-1B engines and Boeing’s Advanced Technology split-tip winglets, 42

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as well as a redesigned tail cone. Boeing also intends to develop a BBJ version of the 737 MAX 9 commercial airliner. Similar performance improvements are anticipated, such as a range of 6,255 nmi (11,584 km) with an even larger cabin. Since introducing Boeing Business Jets in 1996, Boeing has sold 157 units, with more than 30 per cent of them operating in Asia Pacific. The Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) and Weststar Aviation Services Sdn Bhd currently use the Boeing 737-based business jet platform. RMAF flies an earlier version of the 737 in VVIP configuration for a prime minister, while Weststar operates a VIPconfigured 737 aircraft, based at Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport in Selangor. Lion Air, Indonesia’s largest privately run airline, operates numerous versions of the Boeing 737. With over 7,000 Boeing 737s sold, more than a thousand of them are often airborne at any one time somewhere in the world.


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KALOGRIDIS INTERNATIONAL by Charmaine Tai

G RAC E 44

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AN AIRCRAFT’S AESTHETICS AND PERFORMANCE DEPEND ON MANY THINGS — and using the right interior material is one. A familiar name in the aircraft industry, Dallas-based Kalogridis International, founded by George Kalogridis in 1976, designs and produces bespoke wool and silk carpets, as well as internal wall coverings and bulkhead tapestries for private and commercial jets. While these were popular, it became evident that an improved material was needed. Bulkhead coverings were limited to hard, solid surfaces without acoustic abilities. Together with research and development designer LiChing Liu, the team developed improved surfaces known as deconels — patented 3D decorative panels that are softer, non-metallic, heat- and flame-resistant, lightweight and cost-effective. They are resistant to pressure marks and reduce noise levels by as much as 3.5 decibels. First introduced in 2003, they are applied to aircraft’s bulkheads, headliners, window panels and dado panels. They are also designed to suit multidimensional surfaces of any space, including yachts, offices, private residences and even private casino rooms. More than 300 designs are available, ranging from aerial views of the desert to split bamboo. >>

OPPOSITE PAGE Kalogridis International’s portfolio also includes a Cessna Citation Columbus business jet

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP A Gulfstream G550 is fitted with Kalogridis’ carpet, and deconels for its window panels The deconels can be embellished with crystal beads and LED lighting Personalised artwork can be imprinted on the carpet and deconels

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FROM TOP The hand-crafted carpets are dyed in-house The Dancing Ivy deconel design features a signature embossed and recessed leaf pattern

Each deconel is bespoke. George Kalogridis and his team of in-house designers work closely with clients, and consult architects and top interior designers. Inspired by everyday experiences, Kalogridis once designed circles that mimicked the texture of grated wasabi. Natural and synthetic fabrics, as well as wood veneer, are often incorporated. The deconels can be embellished with metal inlays, crystals and LED lighting, as well as painted with original artwork on request. To add definition, several effects, including embossing, pleating, carving, shading, gold- and silver-leafing, can be done. Clients can choose from a variety of materials, such as ultraleather and ultrasuede, for sound-proofing. Smaller aircraft take 10 to 12 weeks to complete while large commercial aircraft require at least four months. One can find the deconels in a Bombardier Challenger, Falcon 2000EX and Gulfstream G650, among other private jets. Aircraft interior design companies Gore Design and Greenpoint Technologies, as well as heads of state, are also regular clients. Others include Singapore Airlines which requested deconels for its aircraft. An American airline saved significant operational costs, as the deconels helped to reduce aircraft weight and fuel consumption. The company also works with designers from Asia. Liu, who is Taiwanese and trained in pottery, drums up oriental designs with traditional flare. While most clients lean towards minimalist and contemporary designs, the company notices that its growing Asian clientele prefers culture-specific design elements, such as cherry blossoms and bamboo motif. Kalogridis recalls a Japanese client who specifically wanted gold leaves imprinted on the deconel. Kalogridis plans to expand the company’s portfolio by combining its carpet and deconel designs — packaged as an overall concept for its clients. The carpets are hand-crafted using 100 per cent New Zealand virgin wool and silk, and are dyed in-house. Bespoke designs feature a range of textures and colours that complement the deconels, highlighted by metallic threads. Kalogridis says: “Deconels are a relatively new aircraft concept that not many people know about. Our mission in the next few years is to educate the market, to let them know what it can be used for.”

LIGHT CRAFT Kalogridis International has recently developed a new technique for weaving fluorescent yarn into carpet. A range of patterns and graphics, such as company logos, can be incorporated. The company’s group of designers is currently working on a wave pattern, using piles of thick yarn. It is said that the soft carpet’s fluorescent effect resembles the glow of sea anemones.

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OPPOSITE PAGE An aircraft seen flying under Salcano’s bridge in Slovenia in 2009 Image courtesy of Jurko Lapanja

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP A biplane seen flying under the Niagara River bridge amidst strong currents Image courtesy of the Library of Congress

The annual Red Bull Air Race sees pilots competing in various obstacle courses and manoeuvres Image courtesy of Red Bull

BY NATURE AND TRAINING, pilots are astute and careful risk managers. But as everywhere else, there are thrill-seekers, willing and hopeful to put their skills to the test. Thus, from the dawn of aviation, flying an aircraft under a bridge has presented an irresistible challenge. If there is reasonable span and bridge height above the water surface, the stunt requires no more judgement and finesse than in a typical approach and landing. But as any military-trained pilot will contend, the surrounding environment can present complex risks. First of all, in most cases it is strictly illegal, other than for example during certain air races in Rotterdam or Budapest. Elsewhere, such attempts have come to grief after the aircraft in question hit telephone wires, power cables — even boat masts or cable cars. Yet, some pilots remain undeterred. In San Francisco, helicopters are allowed to fly tourists under and over the roadway of the Golden Gate Bridge when there is good visibility. They are not the first, though. At the end of the Second World War, returning American soldiers in B-25 Mitchell bombers and mighty B-17

Flying Fortress aircraft bellowed under the Golden Gate Bridge to celebrate their homecoming. The tradition was briefly revived in the 1970s when crews returning from Vietnam blasted down the bay in F-4 Phantom aircraft. Spiritual home to these stunts is the Tower Bridge over River Thames in London, which features two decks: the lifting road deck, 28 ft (9 m) above the river and two glazed walkways in the upper span that link two buildings. This leaves an inviting >> JETGALA

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ABOVE Pilots have to prepare themselves mentally before starting the track to achieve a successful dive Images courtesy of Jurko Lapanja

BELOW Red Bull Air Race pilots will start the track at speed of up to 370 km/h, 2.5 metres above the water and around 6 metres under the bridge Image courtesy of Red Bull

>> 112 ft (34 m) gap in between. Pioneer aviator Frank McClean (1876-1955) was the first to fly under the top span of the bridge in August 1912 in his Short floatplane. He had elected to land safely on the river and float back downstream, only for his aircraft to collide with a barge. At the last London Olympic games, two helicopters dived under Tower Bridge for filming of a James Bond themed sequence at the opening ceremony. Though spectacular, it failed to match a notorious stunt in 1953 when English flying ace ‘Mad Major’ Christopher Draper (1892-1979) flew under 15 bridges along the River Thames in a 100-hp Auster monoplane — in protest against government treatment of war veterans. Another daredevil was the late and celebrated aviator Jim Greenwood, who flew under a bridge for the last time in 1964 in Washington. He took off in an open-cockpit Fleet biplane from Beacon Field airport. “This one afternoon, I was out flying, and I got this impulse to do something a little bit different,” once said Greenwood. He saw the 14th Street bridge from a distance. “I knew I had enough clearance — it wasn’t a whole lot — but I knew I had enough.” He soon emerged from the other side of the bridge, and for a brief moment, road traffic had come to a stop. 50

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THROUGH THE LOOKING EIGEN GLASS by Jim Gregory

MATTER OF TASTE 52

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Through the Looking Eigen Glass offers bespoke solutions such as coordinating VIP vacations and events

MANAGING ONE’S BESPOKE LIFESTYLE REQUIRES DETAILED, personal and professional attention. Through the Looking Eigen Glass, a London-based company established by Veronica Marlene Paulus in 2011, provides planning and management of VIP travel with exclusive and tailor-made executive charter services and bespoke activities. Aside from managing private air and sea charters, it entails brokerage, event planning, coordinating upper-class accommodations and custom interior design of jets and superyachts. Through the Looking Eigen Glass’ philosophy is rooted in the recognition of fine connoisseurship, which dates back to ancient Greek practice — one that encouraged appreciation for art and knowledge over commodification. Paulus adds that connoisseurs today, similar to her clients, are valuable tastemakers who are selective and often certain of what they want while working with an organiser, architect or designer. Paulus, who is well-versed in art and philosophy, references Voltaire, who once said: “Just as the gourmet immediately perceives and recognises a mixture of two liqueurs, so the man of taste, the connoisseur, will discern in a rapid glance any mixture of styles. He will perceive a flaw next to an embellishment.” High-net-worth personalities, especially from China, Russia and the Middle East, comprise the majority of the company’s clients. Royalty, heads of state, international celebrities and other prominent personalities are also regular clients. Paulus says that clients conduct business and leisure activities in almost all parts of the world, and wherever and however they travel, they must feel at home and be presented with a comfortable working environment. “Today’s megawealthy are making their lifestyle plans for the next decade and the upsurge in demand is high.” says Paulus. The company recently orchestrated a client’s 40th birthday party in Anguilla in the Caribbean. It organised private flights, fine dining on a yacht and golf outings for guests. >> JETGALA

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Through the Looking Eigen Glass offers its clients multi-functional solutions, including art collection and travel

>> Before starting the company, Paulus engaged in financial advisory and curatorial expertise in fine art, as well as high jewellery assessments and private art dealerships. Paulus’ expertise was highly sought by high-net-worth personalities for independent advice. She then founded The Astraea, a boutique bureau that caters to jewellery collectors and fine-art connoisseurs. Her practice was dependent upon the trained eye of the connoisseur, a commitment to certain aesthetic standards, and an inclination to exclude works of art, modes of interpretation, and classes of artists or architects who do not conform to a preconceived canon of values. The opportunities presented by her clients’ requests for a similar bespoke service for other luxury products led to the beginning of Through the Looking Eigen Glass. It is no surprise then that Through the Looking Eigen Glass applies its expertise related to high jewellery and art when tailoring interiors of VIP jets and yachts. Selected precious stones can be used to decorate jet interior settings and furnishings. “There is no limit when it comes to 54

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customisation of mounting amenities and bespoke design,” says Paulus. Its team of industry experts work closely with the client, providing advice when selecting, purchasing and designing interiors of aircraft or yachts. Multi-lingual brokers are able to meet clients monthly in several countries, ranging from Hong Kong to Moscow and New York. A supporting crew is provided to manage requirements of clients’ journeys from departure to arrival. While personalisation is important, Paulus says that aesthetics and functionality are mutually significant. “While state-of-the-art add-ons include espresso machines, touchscreen lighting, cinema systems, installation of aquariums, grand pianos and hot tubs,” she says, “it is also about having the right communication systems on board.” Having the most advanced models and technologies in place is important and a constant challenge for companies like Through the Looking Eigen Glass. Paulus says clients seek multi-functional solutions. Designers have to be more inventive and clients’ expectations have heightened in recent years. Specific requirements also include purchase of aircraft and yachts that are off the market, as well as beating long waiting lists. Paulus adds: “For most private clients, price is a secondary issue, and timing is everything.” The company’s goal is simple: whether it is in buying a business jet or collecting a renowned piece of art, it serves clients with decades of international business experience and a dedicated professional team. It is in believing that catering to clients like how a connoisseur would treat its area of interest will deliver the best results.


WINGS EUROCOPTER by Sandy Tan

VENTURE EASY A SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEUR FINDS PEAK PURPOSE Eurocopter’s twin-engine EC135 has a VIP variant, the EC135 Hermès, with a distinct colour scheme and skid design

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For Manila-based entrepreneur Joey Concepcion, travelling by helicopter saves time, a key component of his growing business success. In 2002, he established a helicopter charter company Executive Helijet Services (EHSI), offering a fractional ownership programme for Eurocopter’s EC130 B4 and EC135. Concepcion’s other ventures include a popular food and beverage company and Gonegosyo, which incubates and supports 600 young entrepreneurs. “I personally use it

[the helicopter] for work and for my advocacy,” he says, “as we go to the provinces to inspire many micro and small entrepreneurs in order to mentor and teach them.” A trademark of Eurocopter’s helicopters, the Fenestron shrouded-tail rotor has eight to 18 blades that distribute noise over different frequencies, rendering more sound and secure flights. The concept was first used in the 1960s and is now found on several Eurocopter models, including the EC130 B4 and EC135.


The light, single-engine EC130 B4 and the twin-engine EC135 can each carry one pilot and up to seven passengers and feature customisable interiors with comfortable, energyabsorbing seats. Large sliding doors provide easy access and the spacious cockpit features a VEMD® (Vehicle Engine Monitoring Display) integrated system that reduces pilot workload. The EC130 B4, featuring a Turbomeca Arriel 2B1 turbine engine, cruises up to 130 kts (240 km/h). The EC135, with either two Turbomeca Arrius 2B2 or two Pratt & Whitney PW206B2 engines, cruises up to 137 kts (253 km/h) and is ideal for longer distance travel, especially over water. Concepcion’s helicopters are maintained by Eurocopter Philippines, established in the country in 1997. The entrepreneur expects to expand his fractional ownership business by adding more aircraft and owners on board. “This is the most practical way as one maximises the resources through sharing…many of the owners use it for work and, of course, recreation,” he says. While a private aircraft serves similar purposes, Concepcion prefers to fly in a helicopter as it makes it easier to land anywhere he wishes in the Philippines. And road traffic-free family trips are just the icing on the cake.

ABOVE LEFT Businessman Joey Concepcion offers fractional ownership programmes for the EC130 B4 and EC135 FROM TOP Concepcion says it is easy to land anywhere he chooses in the Philippines with a helicopter The EC135 and EC130 B4 models feature energyabsorbing seats The cockpits of the EC135 and EC130 B4 models have an integrated monitoring system that reduces pilot’s workload

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The four-to-five day journey begins from Eros Airport in Windhoek, Namibia

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FLYING SAFARI by Roger Norum

EYE-OPENING ADVENTURES ON AN AIR BUS

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Above Namibia — a light and agile Cessna 210 Centurion sweeps across remote landscapes, vast deserts, great gorges and rock formations and then it dips lower — almost kissing the earth. From this vantage point, passengers sense how bleak, lonely yet hauntingly beautiful Africa can be. Most travellers explore Africa’s wilderness by commuting between luxury lodges, which hardly offers a real perspective on the continent and its impact on the senses. On a flying safari however, discovery of the world knows no bounds. These tailor-made adventures have grown in popularity in recent years. Pilots fly you across areas that are inaccessible by road or boat. It is very different from journeys in cattle-like vehicles through a series of wilderness lodges. The Skeleton Coast Safari, for example, involves flying and driving between three private camps in intriguing locations along the Skeleton Coast, north of Namibia’s Atlantic Ocean coast. Skilled pilots fly close to the action below, hovering just above old diamond mines or a concentration of shipwrecks. The founders of this flying safari were taken with Namibia ever since their father pioneered eco-tourism across Africa decades ago. Trained pilots all of them, they have been conducting their iconic flying safaris along the Skeleton Coast and its remote hinterland since 1977. Passengers depart from Eros Airport in Windhoek for the Namib Desert and coastline, touching down at regular intervals to explore the land’s geological formations and rock carvings made by bushmen centuries ago. From there, it is 60

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OPPOSITE PAGE From the aircraft, travellers observe the scenic desert landscapes below, including aerial views of migrating birds, Kuiseb Canyon and adjoining red dunes

THIS PAGE After land excursions and observing wildlife, the flying safari continues with aerial views of shipwrecks along Conception Bay and vast, shadow-lined desert landscapes across Sossusvlei

All images courtesy of Bailey Robinson

on to Etosha National Park and the Skeleton Coast which diverse fauna and flora are best appreciated when covering the distances by plane — the alternative would be two weeks of hard-going, off-road driving. The only towns you land in are Windhoek and Swakopmund, and every other landing is made on private bush strips. Upon touch down, the expeditions take passengers on scenic drives along laconic coastal dunes, the black lunar ridges of Ugab, panoramas of Hartman’s Valley (which extends to the Kunene River on the Angolan border), settlement of the nomadic Himba community, endangered black rhinos and rare desert elephants. Accommodation is organised in comfortable, fully equipped tents. Some guests combine a flying safari with a top-end, white-tablecloth lodging experience afterwards. Either way, the world is yours on the next flight out.

SPACE ODYSSEY London-based Bailey Robinson also conducts tailor-made air safaris, operating all year round. It will also offer suborbital space flights on Virgin Galatic’s SpaceShipTwo and WhiteKnightOne spacecraft. It will be two to three years before the first commercial flight officially takes off yet bookings are already on offer. Travellers will depart from Spaceport America in New Mexico, which is under

construction. The first two days will consist of G-Force and flight training, launch simulation and personal communications console training, followed by final medical checks and flight de-briefing. On the day of departure, passengers will be flown for two and a half hours up to 50,000 ft, traveling four times the speed of sound as the surroundings fade from blue to black.

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MS-760 by Steve Slater

PI N T- S I Z E D PI O N EER A BLAST FROM THE PAST MAKES A TURBO-CHARGED COMEBACK

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OPPOSITE PAGE The Paris has long been admired for its robust design, low operating costs and docile handling

THIS PAGE The four-seater aircraft features a sliding cockpit hood and maintains a maximum operating ceiling of 23,000 feet (7,010 metres)

Image courtesy of Melanie Lee

Image courtesy of Team MS760

THE FRENCH ARE KNOWN FOR STYLE AND INNOVATION. And the Morane-Saulnier MS-760 Paris aircraft demonstrates this beautifully. Not only did this aircraft mark the advent of the Very Light Jet category (the VLJ), but it also pre-dated by a decade the first generation of business jets, such as the Hansa Jet and Lear Jet. Following the Second World War, the French Air Force was looking for a new jet-powered primary trainer. Among the bidders was MoraneSaulnier, reputed for fast and agile aircraft dating back to the Morane Bullet monoplanes used in the First World War. Yet, its MS-755 Fleuret lost the contract, which instead went to the more dainty Fouga Magister. The Fleuret was later re-designed as a four-seater, piston-powered light aircraft — a game changer in its range. The first prototype of the MS-760 Paris aircraft made its maiden flight on 29 July in 1954. Before the de Havilland 125 (later known as Hawker Beechcraft), the Lear Jet, or even the North American Sabreliner, no other production business

aircraft offered cabin pressurisation, a maximum speed of 432 mph (695 km/h) and a range sufficient to fly coast-to-coast across the US non-stop. The sliding cockpit hood contained seals that allowed cabin pressurisation and maintained a maximum operating ceiling of 23,000 feet (7,010 metres). The aircraft’s wing span of 33 ft 3 in (10.1 m) makes it little larger than the six-seater Piper Saratoga or Beechcraft Bonanza utility aircraft. Even beneath a fighter-style sliding canopy, there was plenty of room for the four occupants. The Paris was praised for its docile handling with its low-mounted, straight wing and T-shaped vertical stabiliser. The high tail was created to keep its surfaces out of the hot efflux from its two 400-kg Turbomeca Marboré turbojet engines at the aft fuselage. When landing, a cushion of air trapped under the wings created additional ground effect while the high tail continued to fall, so that almost without any pilot input, the aircraft made a near perfect arrival. If the final approach was made too quickly, the same ground effect could cause the >> JETGALA

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FROM TOP The cockpit is pressurised, airconditioned and features dual controls Image courtesy of Melanie Lee

Refurbished MS-760 aircraft have a turbofan upgrade and upgraded avionics with optional Garmin 600 and Chelton Synthetic Vision panels Image courtesy of Dave Miller

SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (external)

34 FT 12 IN

10.4 M

WINGSPAN

33 FT 3 IN

10.1 M

HEIGHT (external)

8 FT 6 IN

2.6 M

MAXIMUM RANGE WITH IFR RESERVES

1,000 NM IFR

1,852 KM IFR

(850 NM ALTERNATE)

(850 NM ALTERNATE)

MAXIMUM PASSENGER SEATING

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4 PASSENGERS

HIGH SPEED CRUISE

400 MPH / 644 KM/H / 348 KTAS

CERTIFIED CEILING

25,000 FT

7,620 M

TAKE-OFF DISTANCE

N/A

N/A

MAXIMUM TAKE-OFF WEIGHT

8,650 LB

3,920 KG

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>> aircraft to ‘float’, eating up a considerable length of runway in the process — one of the Paris’ few handling flaws. In 1955, Beechcraft secured rights to build and market the aircraft as a personal executive jet in the US. Despite rave reviews and a string of celebrity passengers, a sales tour secured only two orders. On hindsight, the Paris was perhaps too innovative and radical for the business market at the time. Climbing into a fighter-style cockpit with a sliding canopy in bad weather proved inconvenient, and the Marboré turbojets were notorious for an ear-splitting whistle. Once cabin-class aircraft such as the Lear Jet arrived, sales prospects dwindled. But the Paris remained popular among private buyers which included the Shah of Iran, the King of Morocco, Venezuelan billionaire Napoléon Dupuoy and German industrialist Harold Quandt. Most of the 165 aircraft built were also flown by the French, Argentinian and Brazilian air forces. In 1966, Morane-Saulnier was succeeded by Daher Socata, manufacturer of the TBM range of single-engined business turboprops. In 2009, US-based JetSet International Ltd purchased more than 30 MS-760 from the French and Argentinian governments, along with the type certificate, tooling, parts and engineering drawings from Daher Socata. The refurbished aircraft are given new leather interiors, fresh paintwork and a state-of-the-art computerised instrument panel. The airframes are also customisable and equipped with modern Pratt & Whitney or Williams turbofan engines and glass cockpits. New models are also in the pipeline. With this, as well as other very light business jets that we continue to witness today, are proof that the Paris’ legacy is far from over.


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Your contribution makes a difference. Donate online at www.wingsforlife.com


WINGS

MOO N TRUC K GOLDEN SPIKE COMPANY by Brian Moore

PRIVATE SPACE TRIPS — FAR-FETCHED NO MORE

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OPPOSITE PAGE Astronaut Neil Armstrong landed on the moon on 20 July, 1969 during the historical Apollo 11 space flight

THIS PAGE The lunar expedition involves launch vehicles and a lander that will transport two passengers to the moon’s surface and back to Earth

Image courtesy of NASA

Images courtesy of Golden Spike Company

WHAT’S NEXT — after the yachts, the private jets and the Tourbillon collection? A weekend on the moon? Looks like such a luxury could soon be within reach. The likes of Virgin Galactic have been developing casual flights to the edge of space. Now comes the next step — the Golden Spike Company (GSC), a group of former NASA engineers, astronauts and private investors plans to take us further. To the moon, on the first commercial manned flight. Co-founder and director of business development Max Vozoff says that first test flights will begin in 2018 and the first customer expedition is expected around 2020. The company publicly announced plans in December and is currently in Phase A of development. The expedition, expected to cost USD1.5 billion per flight in today’s money, involves four launch vehicles. The first pair positions a lander in low lunar orbit while the second pair sends a crew vehicle with two passengers to meet the lander. The two passengers are then flown to the moon’s surface and returned to Earth. Other company services also include lunar orbital missions, flight design, regulatory approvals, medical, crew preparation and post-landing activities. GSC’s program closely follows the Russian space flight industry model of the 1980s and 1990s, when other nations’ astronauts were flown for a fee to Salyut and Mir space stations for scientific experiments. Participating governments included Malaysia, Japan, Finland and the Czech Republic. The company believes the program is relevant. Customers may wish to visit the moon for traditional or ambitious reasons “such as resource extraction...for construction, rocket propellants or water/oxygen and other consumables in support of a human habitat,” says Vozoff. He adds that GSC’s program also offers entertainment, marketing and branding services that governments cannot. GSC plans to reduce estimated operational costs of about USD8 billion by using “existing, off-the-shelf hardware whenever possible and not designing anything unless it is unavoidable,” says Vozoff. In January this year, the company announced a partnership with aerospace and defense technology company Northrop Grumman Corporation to design and develop the new lunar lander. Skeptics contend that operational costs will be higher than estimated and that GSC has yet to develop a vehicle powerful enough to fly people to the moon and back. But just as the final spike laid down in the First Transcontinental Railroad in 1869 had revolutionised America’s transport system and economy, the first commercial manned flight to the moon might just take us beyond the lunar frontier.

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Image courtesy of EBACE Show Management

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TURBULENT IS A TERM often used to describe the European aviation industry of late. European airlines were expecting a startling loss of USD1.2 billion last year, the International Air Transport Association reported. Economic losses and declining passenger traffic have engulfed Europe’s aviation industry, plagued by debt crises. However, what comes down will — hopefully — go up again. Last year’s Honeywell Business Aviation Forecast reported that although flight activity in Europe was expected to decline by approximately 3 per cent, it will pick up in 2013. As a business hub for more than 53,000 ultra-highnet-worth individuals (UHNWIs) with a collective estimated net worth of USD6.95 trillion, Europe still is the second largest private aircraft market after North America. According to data from wealth intelligence company Wealth-X, these UHNWIs form 28 per cent of the global UHNW population, and their combined wealth makes up 27 per cent of the world’s UHNWIs’ combined net worth.


Private jet operator and manager NetJets cites Europe as its second largest market, accounting for 17 per cent of its global business jet deliveries. With increased demand from Russia, NetJets Europe and other private air charter companies expanded operations in Moscow. RusJet, a private charter company based in the country, expects an annual growth rate of 10 per cent in Russia’s business aviation sector. Sales of Gulfstream business jets in Russia increased nearly fivefold between 2007 and 2011. All of these indicators point towards a healthy demand from the Russian UHNW population. In Turkey, a more modest 3.8 per cent increase of UHNWIs still made a difference in the country’s aviation industry. Air charter operator Avinode reported an overall increase of 4.8 per cent between January and October last year in Turkey’s business jet traffic. The president of a Turkish ship management company reportedly enjoys flying his Falcon jet for at least 120 hours every month. Other private jet owners in Europe include a German CEO

Image courtesy of Dassault Aviation

of a steel company who owns two Cessna Citation jets and an English chairman of a financial firm who also owns a Cessna Citation jet. More long term prospects are on the horizon, as leading manufacturers such as Boeing are expecting demand from Europe for 7,760 new aircraft. Bombardier also sees Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States receiving 2,240 new business jets between 2012 and 2031 — hence, it is only a matter of time before Europe becomes more than just a runner up.

EUROPE IS STILL THE SECOND LARGEST AIRCRAFT MARKET AFTER NORTH AMERICA

Private aviation activities are ramping up in countries like Russia and Turkey Bottom images courtesy of EBACE Show Management

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by Alex Unruh

CAPTAIN SPEAKING... WINGS OF KINDNESS

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“WHEN A DEADLY EARTHQUAKE STRUCK HAITI IN 2010, A CLIENT OF THE COMPANY I FLY FOR LANDED HIS PRIVATE JET ON A SHORT SECTION OF USABLE ROAD”

T

he air around me has a crisp chill and snow blankets the ground and pine trees outside. I sit near a wood-burning fireplace that warms this cabin high up in the Rocky Mountains. As I write this, it’s the time of year when one thinks of kindness and giving more often than usual. And while movies and news portray Christmas charity as mainly a food and gift distribution exercise, few know that it can also come in the form of a private jet. When a natural disaster strikes, private aircraft are used to survey the extent of damages in the affected area and assess how relief can be offered. Private aircraft, which require minimal support equipment to operate, are used to transport supplies and volunteers, as disasters tend to destroy basic infrastructure. When a deadly earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, a client of the company I fly for landed his private jet on a short section of usable road. Every day for several weeks, he brought in relief supplies, medical professionals and volunteers. No other mode of transportation could have done this as effectively as a private aircraft, in the same way that no one can render more help than a willing heart. Medical evacuation complements disaster relief, and is used to transport patients with urgent needs to a location with appropriate facilities. Medivac fleets vary from two to 70 aircraft. A well-known operator in Australia has a 61-strong fleet that flies more than 80,000 hours annually — equivalent to 27 million kilometres. In North America, there are volunteer organisations through which aircraft owners donate the use of their aircraft to transport patients with terminal illnesses to receive medical treatments. Many of these patients live in areas where specialised care is not available, and face health issues when travelling on commercial airlines. This service is near and dear to my heart because my mother was able to use it during her nine-year battle with cancer. She succumbed to her illness about two years ago. Private aviation also serves people who live in remote areas, such as parts of Africa, Indonesia, the Australian outback and Alaska, where water and basic amenities do not come easy. These communities rely on private aircraft to deliver food, water, medicine, clothing and construction materials, as well as mail and transportation. A private aircraft has several purposes. Let us remember that they don’t always serve champagne on board only. Image by Mitch Russo www.lenstraveler18.com

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PRESIDENTIAL SUITES by Charmaine Tai

SUITE

GENEVA URBAN COMFORTS IN A FRENETIC CITY

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Lake Geneva forms a charming backdrop to the thriving city’s traditional and contemporary architecture

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FTEN REFERRED TO AS THE ‘CAPITAL OF PEACE’, Geneva is many things to many people. Home to the second largest office of the United Nations after New York, the spiritual centre of the highest echelons of watchmaking, a discreet financial hub, an artist’s pen and, of course — a place to find the world’s best cheese fondue. The picturesque city gently wraps around the shores of Europe’s largest Alpine lake, and is framed by the snow-capped Mont Blanc. Known as one of the western world’s most liveable and at the same time most expensive cities, Geneva has a rather modest local population of around 200,000 people only. But as a popular second home and often visited destination for high-flyers, it offers some of Europe’s most exclusive accommodations.

GENEVA IS KNOWN AS ONE OF THE WESTERN WORLD’S MOST LIVEABLE AND MOST EXPENSIVE CITIES The Royal Suite at the Four Seasons Hotel des Bergues Geneva boasts spacious dining and living rooms with ornate Victorian interior design

Hotel des Bergues, the city’s first hotel established in 1834, remains a favourite among royalty, heads of state and businessmen. Restored by French designer Pierre-Yves Rochon, it is now known as Four Seasons Hotel des Bergues Geneva with more spacious and elegant rooms. Its new Royal Suite on the first floor features high ceilings and furnishings covered in Parisian silk and velvet. The 306-sq m (3,294-sq ft) suite has a private terrace overlooking Lake Geneva, and five bedrooms with a walk-in dressing room plus a master bathroom. A personal assistant stationed on the floor caters to guests’ requirements for future stay.

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BELOW, FROM LEFT A four-poster bed sits in the master bedroom of Swissôtel Metropole Geneva’s Presidential Suite

In Summer, guests at the Hotel Royal can have lunch outdoors under hundredyear-old olive trees

The Swissôtel Metropole Geneva, built in 1854, overlooks the English Garden and the Mont Blanc bridge. Natural daylight fills every corner of the 300-sq m (3,229-sq ft) Presidential Suite, which features separate living and dining areas, and can be rented separately for exclusive meetings. Other amenities include a private sauna, Jacuzzi, Turkish bath and a state-of-theart entertainment centre. Guests can add two Advantage Lakeside rooms to the suite for added space. >>

ROYAL CHARM Hotel Royal, part of Evian Resorts, is located in Évian-les-Bains in the French bank of Lake Geneva — also known for springs that are the source of bottled Evian water. Designed by architect Jean-Albert Hébrard and inaugurated in 1909, the hotel features a fan-shaped façade, set amidst a stunning backdrop of lush greenery and snow-capped mountains. It features 152 rooms and suites. Its 80-sq m (861-sq ft) Presidential Suite has one bedroom, a private lounge and a spacious balcony. Interconnecting rooms are also available. Guests can enjoy spa treatments, as well as excursions and sporting activities organised by Evian Resort.

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>> Located between Hotel d’Angleterre and Le Richemond Geneva is Beau-Rivage, founded in 1865 by the Mayer family and still reverred for its traditional Victorian charm after several renovations and redecorations. The 160-sq m (1,722-sq ft) Royal Suite has three bedrooms with an adjoining Deluxe or Executive room, a separate dining area and a spacious lounge. A striking feature is its five-storey lobby, and history buffs often rent the Empress Suite, where Empress Elisabeth of Austria died after she was assasinated by anarchist Luigi Lucheni on a nearby quay in 1898.

ABOVE The Royal Suite at Beau-Rivage features spacious interiors, renovated by Leila Corbett RIGHT The Royal Armleder Suite at Le Richemond Geneva features a modern setting and visitors can enjoy views of Lake Geneva from the balcony

OPPOSITE PAGE Hotel d’Angleterre’s Presidential Suite retains a Victorian charm. Modern features include bullet-proof windows and sound-proof walls

Le Richemond Geneva, first opened in 1875, houses the most prestigious suites in the city. The Royal Armleder Suite features two private, furnished garden terraces with a 360-degree view of Lake Geneva flanked by St. Pierre Cathedral. The 250-sq m (2,691-sq ft) suite features contemporary furnishings with fine marquetry, heated parquet flooring and original art deco, some of which are created by interior designer John Stefanidis. It has three bedrooms, a dining room, a living room and a lounge area. It can accommodate up to nine guests.

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DIRECTORY Beau-Rivage 13 Quai du Mont Blanc 1201 Geneva Switzerland T: +41 (22) 716 68 25 F: +41 (22) 716 60 65 E: reservation@beau-rivage.ch Four Seasons Hotel des Bergues Geneva 33 Quai des Bergues 1201 Geneva Switzerland T: +41 (22) 908 70 00 / +41 (22) 908 70 53 F: +41 (22) 908 74 00 E: reservations.gen@fourseasons.com Hotel d’Angleterre 17 Quai du Mont Blanc 1201 Geneva Switzerland T: +41 (22) 906 55 14 E: bookan@rchmail.com Le Richemond Geneva 8-10 Rue Adhémar-Fabri 1201 Geneva Switzerland T: +41 (22) 715 70 00 E: info.lrg@dorchestercollection.com

Celebrities and heads of state also enjoy staying at the Presidential Suite at Hotel d’Angleterre, designed by celebrated architect Anthony Krafft and built in 1872. Located in the shopping and financial district, overlooking Lake Geneva, the hotel has 36 rooms and six suites. Its 110-sq m (1,184-sq ft) Presidential Suite can be extended to include four additional bedrooms. It features bullet-proof windows and sound-proof walls. Other special features include 24-hour room service, private butler services and a private limousine available on request.

Royal Hotel Evian Resort South Shore Lake Geneva, 74501 Evian-les-Bains, France T: +33 4 50 26 85 00 E: reservation@evianroyalresort.com Swissôtel Metropole Geneva 34 Quai General Guisan 1204 Geneva Switzerland T: +41 (22) 318 3200 F: +41 (22) 318 3300 E: geneva@swissotel.com

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SPECIAL EDITION WATCHES by Alvin Wong

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INNOVATIVE MECHANISMS, FINE CRAFTSMANSHIP AND PRECISE, CREATIVE DETAIL ARE WHAT horological feats are made of — and how a watchmaker’s signature is formed. A timepiece can inspire many variations and some rank as one-of-a-kind. We take a look at eight unconventional watches that are set to stand the test of time.

A. Lange & Söhne Grande Lange 1 “Lumen” The new platinum-clad watch, limited to 200 pieces, is inspired by the 19th century Five-Minute Clock in Dresden’s Semper Opera House. The watch features luminous outsize date display on a translucent, smoked crystal dial, framed by a 40.9-mm in diameter platinum case. Time and power reserve indications are found on a blackened silver surface. More horological merits include its 400-part hand-wound Calibre L095.2 movement with 72 hours of power reserve.


Audemars Piguet Jules Audemars Minute Repeater Tourbillon Chronograph This timepiece combines three complications in one: the minute repeater, tourbillon and chronograph, housed in a 950 platinum, 43-mm in diameter case. It features a Calibre 2974 movement with 48 hours of power reserve. Its skeletonised dial reveals intricate decorative patterns, complemented by goldapplied Roman numerals and gold hands. The minute repeater with twin gongs is activated by a lever on the left side of the case.

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Blancpain L-Evolution 00222A-1500-53B The L-Evolution collection, first introduced in 2009, features sporty and dynamic models with calibres and dials constructed in layers. The new One Minute Flying Sapphire Carrousel features a Calibre 22 T movement with five-day power reserve, housed in a 43.5-mm in diameter case. Its lower plate features plique-Ă -jour enamel decor, and the upper plate is decorated by using submicronic and micro-engraving technology. It is limited to 15 pieces.

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4

. Breguet Heritage Phases De Lune Retrogade 8860 From the brand’s Héritage collection, the awardwinning timepiece features a self-winding Calibre 586L movement with 40 hours of power reserve. It sports a curved tonneau case in 18-carat rose gold, a dial with a centre in mother-of-pearl, engine-turned by hand in a flinqué alterné pattern, and a frosted, silver-plated chapter ring. Without adding to the height of the movement, a uniquely shaped plate was made for the moonphases with a rose gilt moon at one o’clock. The watch is waterresistant to 30 metres.

Bulgari Daniel Roth Tourbillon Lumière The Lumière has a distinct open-worked dial, complemented by a fine blue satinbrushed ring with diamond-polished dots to indicate time. It sports a skeletonised Calibre DR 780 movement, framed by a 44-mm in diameter platinum case, and hand-decorated with re-entrant angles and hand-hammered finishing. It has a power reserve of 64 hours, indicated on the reverse side of the movement. The masterpiece took six weeks to complete.

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Franck Muller Giga Tourbillon The Giga Tourbillon in a black PVD coated, 18-carat white gold Cintrée Curvex case has a large 20-mm tourbillon, which fills half of the watch. It is powered by four 16-mm barrels, 4-mm wider than traditional ones. Its Caliber FM 2100 movement is reversed with bridges placed on the open-worked dial side. It features a nine-day power reserve, and the high-yield escapement which drives the balance wheel produces a distinct sound, resembling the triple clicks ck of a marine chronometer.

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6 Patek Philippe Ref 5213G From the brand’s grand complications, this timepiece fuses the perpetual calendar and minute repeater in one handsome 18-carat white gold Calatrava case with a 40.6 mm diameter. It features an automatic Calibre R27 PS QR movement, 48-hour power reserve and an exquisite silver opaline dial with a retrograde date and day, month and moonphase displays. A slide piece in the case activates the minute repeater with twin gongs.

HUBLOT ANTIKYTHERA Limited to four pieces, the wristwatch is inspired by the ancient Greek astronomical calculator. The watch emulates the ancient Antikythera mechanism in Hublot’s new Calibre 2033 CH01 movement, which telescopic hands point to spiral discs of varying radii. It is housed in a rectangular micro-blasted black PVD titanium case, 49.99-mm long and equally wide. It also displays several calendars, including the Egyptian calendar, the zodiac and moonphases. A piece was sold at an auction; another will remain with Hublot while the rest will be displayed in museums.

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LUXE ROLLS-ROYCE JONCKHEERE by Katrina Balmaceda

RECREATING ONE OF THE MOST UNIQUE ROLLS-ROYCE CARS IN HISTORY

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The design of the Rolls-Royce Jonckheere Aerodynamic Coupé II retains the original’s famous features, including the round doors and large front grille

AT CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE events in the US and England, the 1925/1935 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Jonckheere Coupé stirs up much awe. But for all the admiration it receives, it does not qualify to receive major prizes, as the original records of its manufacture and design had been lost during World War II. Originally ordered by an American lady around 1925, the Phantom ended up in the ownership of an Indian Rajah instead. It is not certain who sent the car to Belgian coachbuilder Jonckheere Carrossier for customisation in the 1930s, and exactly who designed the new look. But the resulting features have made this car unique and storied — oval doors with split-opening half-moon windows

(which earned it the moniker ‘Round Door Rolls’), huge front fenders, a colossal front grille, twin sunroofs and a sloping radiator shell with a tall stabiliser fin. It had room for bespoke luggage at the rear. It was relatively quiet even with its six-cylinder, 7.66L OHV inline six engine that could manage a top speed of 140 km/h (87 mph). The Hooper convertible body became an aerodynamic coupé, with an overall length reaching six metres. Despite its uniqueness — or perhaps, because of it — the car barely remained with a single owner, frequently changing hands in the 1940s and ’50s. In dire condition, it finally reached America, where its new owner coated it with gold-dust paint and displayed it as a sideshow at fairs where people paid a dollar each to view the car. The Phantom coupé disappeared again from the public until the late 1980s (some histories put it at 1991), when a Japanese collector bought it at an auction — and afterwards kept it away from the public eye. California-based Peterson Museum acquired it in 2001 and restored it to its original black-gloss beauty, and presented it at the 2005 Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach. VDL Jonckheere today focusses on manufacturing buses and luxury coaches. But recently, it commissioned Turkish designer Ugur Sahin to create a modern version of its famous Phantom coupé. “It is challenging to reinterpret something from the past which has a very imposing and impressive character like the original car, into a modern shape without losing its core essence,” says Sahin. “Many things like the proportions and lines, and the impression some shapes give, are very essential to recapture in the new design.” Sahin’s design retains most of the original’s unique features such as the colossal grille and round doors, and injects modern elements to the car, which is named RollsRoyce Jonckheere Aerodynamic Coupé II. JETGALA

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ROYAL HUISMAN by Elga D. Reyes

P L E AOSF U R E PASSAGE REFINED YACHTS — A REFLECTION OF MARITIME ELEGANCE

EYE-OPENING ADVENTURES ON AN AIR BUS

text to come

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Behind every successful venture is always an efficient and passionate team. Royal Huisman, a family-owned custom yacht builder established in 1884 in the Netherlands, is a liege of the ocean. From making wooden fishing boats to designing and building superyachts, it achieves ship-shape perfection for a new generation of voyagers. The Royal Warrant-bearing company has a 30,000-sq m facility in Vollenhove with a team of 380 delivering a wide portfolio of yachts, both newly built and refitted. Blue Papillion, for example and still under construction, has tailored features for both racing and traversing continents. Recently delivered was the Kamaxitha, a classic and lightweight Spirit of Tradition ketch — 49 m on deck and 55 m with bowsprit. Its traditional design references early working sailers. It also features the builder’s signature Alustar hull. First used in its 34-m sloop Pamina, launched in 1990, Alustar proved a light and strong alternative to steel. It is largely corrosion-resistant and improves performance. The shipyard was also the first to use aluminium alloy as building material. One of Royal Huisman’s more acclaimed vessels is the Twizzle, launched in 2010 as the shipyard’s first flybridge sailing yacht. The commissioning client, who previously owned a 47-m Perini Navi and a 55-m Feadship, had requested the comforts and amenity of a motor yacht with long-distance cruising capability. Aquatic aficionados in Asia have the rare chance to charter the 57.6-m flybridge ketch. It has arrived >>

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THE TWIZZLE CAN BE USED AS A REGATTA PARTICIPANT OR A FLOATING HOME

>> in Phuket for extended cruising in the Andaman Sea until this April. Destinations include Thailand, Burma, Andaman Islands, Malaysia and Singapore. It features four suites and can carry eight to nine passengers plus five crew members. Twizzle can be used as a regatta participant or a floating home. Separation of the bridge from the Twizzle’s main deck frames unobstructed views of the horizon from the dining salon and the aft seating cockpit. Redman Whitely Dixon designed its exterior, while Todhunter Earle Associates designed the interior. It was a first collaboration between Royal Huisman and the two firms. Naval architecture done by Dubois Naval Architects was also another first. It has a speed of 17 knots (32 km/h) and its Panamax rig with 62-m mainmast carries 1,952 sq m of sail up-wind and down-wind at 2,872 sq m. Space in the hull is maximised to fit everything from electronics to fire-fighting equipment. One of the chief engineers, Val Zahov, says: “There isn’t a single air-gap on Twizzle unless it is dedicated to storage.” A custom-made transom slides down and opens up into an innovative swim platform that is height-adjustable, depending on the tide. Guests can enter the water via a carbon-fibre ladder. An extensive water sports inventory stowed in the lazarette holds two Castoldi Jet tenders, two guest kayaks, one sailing dinghy, a Nitrox scuba compressor and tanks, dive and snorkel equipment, and fishing gear. The shipyard’s team work closely with clients, as well as a range of top naval architects and designers, meeting regularly to discuss the project. For those who are not ready to take on a full custom build project, a selection of pre-designed concepts and engineering packages are also available. As an added service, existing clients can request for private cruises aboard Royal Huisman’s yachts, and the rest remains uncharted. 88

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REFIT & RENEW Launched in 2011, Royal Huisman’s custom refit service Huisfit restores, renovates and maintains classic, sail and motor yachts. Among its refit projects over the past year is the 70.7-m Lürssen motor yacht Skat. The tender bay garage was renovated, and exterior furniture for the main and bridge decks were installed. Other new features included a Jacuzzi deck. The Huisfit service can be conducted at the Vollenhove shipyard, or in deep water locations to suit the owner or captain.


WWW.BASELWORLD.COM


LUXE MIURA GOLF by Paul Prendergast

MIURA GOLF

SAMURAI SWING by Paul Prendergast

IN AN ATHLETE’S QUEST TO PERFECT HIS GAME, there is also the search for the equipment — car, shoes or racquet — that will help him maximise his strength and win the gold. Miura, a Japanese maker of forged golf clubs, has one suggestion. It has partnered with Kyoung-Ju Choi, a South Korean professional golfer known as KJ, to create a replica of the Miura forged irons that KJ used when he won The Players Championship on the PGA Tour in 2011. KJ won the championship at the Tournament Players Club at Sawgrass, Florida, on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff over American David Toms, recording the biggest win of his career to date and his eighth PGA Tour victory. Miura will make only 300 KJ Choi Special Limited Edition Irons sets. Each set includes the same model of pitching wedge that KJ carried at TPC Sawgrass, the CB-501 model 4-iron, along with special Miura 54- and 59-degree wedges. Adorning the clubs are shafts designed by KBS — also the same type that Choi used — and rubber grips by PURE Grips.

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FORGING THE TOOLS OF CHAMPIONS

The clubs are available for sale as a set or individually, and buyers may request a particular set number — provided it has not yet been sold. Each club is presented in a wooden display box. Each set is numbered and accompanied by a letter of authenticity signed by both KJ and Katsuhiro Miura, the company’s founder and designer. Manufactured by Katsuhiro, the collaboration has proven a success so far. Katsuhiro’s exquisite craftsmanship is also a result of his experience in samurai-sword making. Miura president Adam Barr says: “We planned this project very carefully, and when we approached KJ with it, he was very enthusiastic.” Part of the sale’s proceeds will go to the KJ Choi Foundation, which reaches out to children around the world through a mix of sports-based programmes (especially golf) and educational initiatives.

One can buy individual clubs or the entire set of KJ Choi Special Limited Edition Irons


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Plate Tableware or part of a watch movement? Discover the world of Fine Watchmaking at www.hautehorlogerie.org

Plate | The plate which bears the various movement parts and in particular the bridges. The dial is usually affixed to the bottom side of the plate. The plate is pierced with holes for the screws and recesses for the jewels in which the pivots of the movement wheels will run.

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LUXE

FRANCK MULLER by Sandy Tan

RAPI D REV O LUTIO N

INNOVATION DRIVES AN AMBITIOUS WATCHMAKER

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FRANCK MULLER, FOUNDED IN 1992, has grown to own over 50 patents, operates 40 shops around the world, and seven production sites in Switzerland. Muller says what continues to motivate him most is the creation of new mechanisms, and carrying on the work of master watchmakers who have made history. At the fourth World Presentation of Haute Horlogerie & Jewellery (WPHH) in Monaco last October, new timepieces unveiled marked another milestone in the watchmaker’s innovations. The three-day event was hosted by the Franck Muller Group at the Grimaldi Forum exhibition centre. Most tourbillons complete a rotation every 60 seconds but the Thunderbolt Tourbillon, powered by four barrels, does so in five seconds — said to be the fastest in the world. The complex timepiece, developed by the Franck Muller team, features a Calibre FM 2025T movement with 60 hours of power reserve.

Another feat is the Gold Croco watch, a new addition to the Croco Collection. It sports a Cintrée Curvex 39.6-mm in diameter gold case, framing a gold steel dial etched with a crocodile scale pattern. It houses an automatic calibre and 42 hours of power reserve. The Cortez GPG adds to the brand’s Conquistador GPG collection, and it is available in three versions: central seconds with date, chronograph or tourbillon. It also comes in combinations of either rose gold and titanium, or ergal and titanium, as well as a fully titanium version. The sporty timepiece features 42 hours of power reserve. Going back to basics, the new vintage 7-Days Power Reserve mechanical wristwatch sports classic details with an iconic Cintrée Curvex case. Its complex

Calibre FM 1700 movement is fitted with an extra barrel. The watch features a 7-day power reserve — a window located at 11 o’clock displays the amount of power left at any time. The watch is available in stainless steel or pink gold, and with a white or inked enamel. More than 1,200 guests comprising industry experts and the international press previewed the timepieces, including the newly launched collaborative collection, Roberto Cavalli by Franck Muller. The event continued with celebrations on a private beach at Le Méridien hotel and a gala dinner at Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo. And with more installments of the event set for this year, it won’t be long till we witness another set of Muller’s creations.

FROM LEFT The sporty Cortez GPG watch is available in three versions: central seconds with date, chronograph or tourbillon The Gold Croco watch sports a harmonious gold steel dial The 7-Days Power Reserve watch is water-resistant to 30 metres Co-founder and CEO of the Franck Muller Group Vartan Sirmakes, fashion designer Roberto Cavalli, and Franck Muller at the gala dinner at Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo

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LUXE CHICARA NAGATA MOTORCYCLES by Jeff Heselwood

ART ON WHEELS

Nagata’s first design is the Chicara Art One which features a 1939 Harley-Davidson flathead engine

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP The sleek Chicara Art Four features a 1966 Honda moped engine Nagata hand crafts every part of the motorcycle except for the engine and drivetrain Nagata’s motorcycle designs are often inspired by nature and industrial products

“TO DECIDE THE STYLE OF A BIKE, I START WITH THE ENGINE, AND THEN USE THE DETAILS TO FIND A STYLE THAT MATCHES”

BURT MUNRO (1899-1978) (1899-1978), a motorcycle racer from New Zealand, spent 20 years modifying a 1920 Indian motorcycle before he finally used it to set a land-speed world record of under 1,000cc at Utah’s Bonneville Salt Flats race in 1967. He was immortalised later in the 2005 movie The World’s Fastest Indian, starring Sir Anthony Hopkins. Renowned Japanese motorcycle maker Chicara Nagata says he relates easily to Munro — for both men, taking the high road is not an option. Nagata, 51 years old, was 16 when a motorcycle accident almost killed him. Despite having endured intensive therapy and multiple blood transfusions, the incident steeled his resolve to create art in honour of those who saved him, and those who did not survive accidents like his. Nagata, who lives in Kyushu Island, south of Japan, became a graphic designer in 1982 and opened his studio in 1992. Nagata has since rekindled a passion for motorcycles and started building his first custom piece, the Chicara Art One, which took seven years to complete. It is a mechanical work of art, manufactured and assembled by hand using hundreds of steel, aluminium, chrome, brass and copper components. Except for its vintage 1939 Harley Davidson flat-head engine and drivetrain, Nagata hand crafts every part of the motorcyle from the hand and foot controls to the throttle and clutch linkages. It won the grand prize in the 2006 AMD World Championship of Custom Bike Building. Shortly after, his work gained recognition in France, Belgium and Germany. In 2008, Nagata created the Chicara Art Three as a tribute to Japanese motorcycle manufacturing pioneer Meguro Manufacturing, founded in 1937. It consists of 500 components, a vintage 1950 Meguro engine with 1.5 hp and 1950 Triumph transmission. >> JETGALA

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>> “To decide the style of a bike, I start with the engine, and then use the details to find a style that matches,” says Nagata, who single-handedly designs and manufactures the motorcycles. He has built more than 13 motorcycles so far and illustrates his design digitally first before producing each piece. Each motorcycle takes about 5,000 to 7,000 hours to complete without using expensive, high-level equipment or machinery for welding and metalworking. Nagata’s motorcycles have been showcased around the world, including New York and Geneva. The most recent exhibition took place last year at the Maximilian Büsser and Friends’ M.A.D. Gallery in Geneva. It showcased Nagata’s 50cc moped Chicara Art Four, created in 2008. It weighs less than 70 kg and is fitted with a vintage 1966 Honda engine. The motorcycle has a sleek and streamlined frame, and combines both classic and modern styles. The front forks are extended chopper-style, sporting classic Michelin wheels and narrow spoked units. It took Nagata more than 3,500 hours to build the motorcycle from scratch. Nagata’s work is often inspired by animals, insects, plants and industrial products. He says: “I live on graphic design. To make motorcycles is not my job but my life’s work.” The lengthy manufacturing process has produced challenges, though, which have made quitting seem like an easy choice. But he quickens his resolve again, adding: “If we don’t give up, we can make it.” Nagata remains tight-lipped about any new project and has only revealed that an electric motorcycle is in the works. Naturally, it will be done on his own terms, and in his own time. 96

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FROM TOP The Chicara Art Three, recently featured at the M.A.D Gallery in Geneva, is built on vintage Meguro motorcycles of the 1950s The Chicara Art Two features a narrow body in chrome with a single shock rear set-up


LUXE

PARFUMS SALVADOR DALI by Carol Lee

SC ULPTURED SC ENT ARTFUL FORMULAS CAP A HIGH NOTE

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OPPOSITE PAGE Each metallic gold bottle from the Dali Fabulous Collection features a lip motif to represent a woman’s sensuality THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT The Le Roy Soleil Parfum, inspired by one of Dali’s paintings, has a fruity and spicy scent The Dalifor Parfum from the Crystal Editions contains fruity and woody notes of tangerine, grapefruit, Egyptian jasmine and Turkish rose Launched in 1983, the Dali Parfum was the first fragrance created by the artist

SALVADOR DALI (1904 (1904-1989) 1989) is many thin things ngs to m many people paintings of course people. Surreal paintings, course, along w with films, jewellery and memorable sculptures like the Lobster Telephone and Mae West Lips sofa. Much more surprising to many people is the artist’s own perfume line, created in 1983. The iconic Dali perfume in a lip- and nose-shaped crystal bottle was a gift to the artist’s wife, Gala. It contained scent of jasmine, Dali’s favourite flower, often tucked behind his ear when painting, as well as Gala’s favourite, the rose. The bottle’s design was inspired by his 1981 painting Apparition of the Aphrodite of Knidos: the goddess of love and beauty Aphrodite’s lips symbolised sensual femininity, and her nose was as an allusion to the sense of smell. Since then, Dali had composed more ‘art perfumes’, produced by Parfums Salvador Dali under the company Cofinluxe. Contemporary special editions — the Dali Fabulous Collection and Crystal Editions — celebrate Dali’s original fragrances, colourful personality and his passion for art and fashion. The former boasts four impressive metallic gold bottles containing richer and more concentrated eau de parfum. The Dali Fabulous 1’s design follows the original lip-shaped bottle but dipped in gold. It features a feminine, floral scent of frankincense, bergamot, clove, rose and jasmine made more intense. The spicy and woody Dali Fabulous 4 exudes more masculine notes of Ceylon cinnamon, cedarwood, amber and musk.

The Crystal Editions comprises four perfumes, including the original Dali perfume. Each bottle is made of hand-blown crystal and artisanal art glass, and features a unique scent. The Le Roy Soleil Parfum contains an oriental and spicy scent, housed in a hand-painted and gold-plated Baccarat crystal, sun-shaped bottle — also inspired by one of Dali’s watercolour paintings. Other Crystal Editions perfumes feature feminine notes, accompanied by floral, fruity and woody scents. Dali once said: “Among the five senses, smell is unquestionably the one that best gives the idea of immortality.” Be it perfume as art, or art as perfume, it is the wearer of Parfums Salvador Dali who becomes the ultimate canvas. JETGALA

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LUXE TAJ LAKE PALACE by Charmaine Tai

ROYAL MYSTIQUE A FLOATING HAVEN IN INDIA’S CITY OF LAKES

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PRESTIGE AND PLEASURE REIGN OVER THE 18TH CENTURY TAJ LAKE PALACE on Lake Pichola in Udaipur. Formerly known as Jag Niwas, the regal structure was built on a fouracre (16,000-sq m) island in 1743 and inaugurated as a summer palace in 1747 by Maharana Jagat Singh II, 62nd successor to the royal dynasty of Mewar. Built of marble and semi-precious stones, it held royal meetings over generations. Yet the palace was not always a beacon of luxury as time, neglect and severe weather had left it poorly maintained. It was during the 1960s that the palace’s grandeur was restored. Maharana Bhagwat Singh’s conservation efforts turned the palace into one of the world’s most romantic hotels — and in 1971, Taj Hotel Resorts and Palaces took over management. The palace’s original charming courtyards, corridors and pavillions, which are inlaid with stone, gilt molding and mirrors, are maintained. It features 83 rooms with hand-painted motifs, mosaics, swings, stained glass and silk bolsters. >>

OPPOSITE PAGE Guests can enjoy rooftop dining at Taj Lake Palace’s terrace which overlooks Lake Pichola THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP

Intricate modern and traditional Indian craftsmanship adorns Taj Lake Palace’s interiors Most corners of the palace are flanked by Lake Pichola and surrounding islands

The palace, located on a four-acre island, is accessible only by boat

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LUXE WINGS

LEFT Suites at Taj Lake Palace, some of which face the lily pond, feature a mix of Rajasthani and European design elements RIGHT The romantic Chandra Prakash Suite features sculpted marble columns and fine fretwork

>> Almost every part of the hotel is flanked by views of nearby Aravalli Hills, temples of the Old City and Jag Mandir island. Guests are ferried by boat from City Palace on the east and are welcomed by a shower of rose petals and traditional refreshments upon arrival. Rooms and suites feature Indian craftsmanship with treasured artefacts, mosaics, silks and ornately carved furniture. The romantic Chandra Prakash Suite, meaning Lustre of the Moon and where the Maharaja in the 1930s held court, features gilt moldings, sculpted marble columns and fine fretwork. The 1,734-sq ft (161-sq m) Shambhu Prakesh Suite is known for its Rajasthani and European interior designs with high curved arches, as well as an elegant library and adjoining balcony. It was named after Maharana Shambhu Singh, known for his political reforms in the 1860s. Customised or pre-planned itineraries include the royal Mewar fare at the lily pond (where courtesans once welcomed royalty to the palace), sailing on a 150-year-old ceremonial barge, or a heritage walk through the palace to learn about Rajasthani miniature painting and cooking lessons. The Jiva Spa offers Ayurveda aromatherapy, treatment using Indian herbs, as well as body scrubs, wraps, yoga and meditation. The spa is also offered outdoors on the Jiva Spa boat and other outdoor activities include jeep safaris, wildlife trekking at the royal hunting lodge or the Kumbalgarh Fort. Elephant, camel and horseback riding can be privately arranged. Restaurants by the palace’s lily pond, rooftop or poolside offer Indian, Western, Mediterranean, Italian, French and Japanese cuisines. A range of catered events are also available for celebrating special occasions. Guests can dine on a pontoon adorned with silk rugs and hand-crafted bajots. Personalised and engraved menus are presented on wood, marble, glass or hand-made paper. Chefs prepare fine dining Rajasthani delights on a Gangaur boat where eight rowers in traditional attire steer guests around Lake Pichola as they are served by personal butlers, accompanied by music and fireworks if preferred. At dusk, guests are serenaded by a flautist. And even though the Taj Lake Palace is no longer a royal abode — guests’ experiences are nothing short of one.

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COORDINATES OFFICIAL AIRPORT NAME: Udaipur Airport IATA CODE: UDR ICAO CODE: VAUD LATITUDE: 24° 37’ 4” N LONGITUDE: 73° 53’ 46” E ELEVATION: 1,670 feet (509 meters) RUNWAY: 08/26, length 9,000 feet (2743 metres) x 148 feet (45 metres) RUNWAY PCN: Asphalt, 045FCXT TOWER FREQUENCY: 122.30 LIGHTING SYSTEM: PAPI NAVAIDS: TYPE:

VOR-DME / NDB

ID:

UUD / LU

NAME:

UDAIPUR

CHANNEL:

106X / -

FREQUENCY:

115.9 / 384

DISTANCE FROM FIELD:

At Field / 2.7 NM

BEARING:

From Navaid - / 265.1

JET A-1: YES JET B: YES P +91-11-24632950 F +91-294-2655953 E apdvaud@aai.aero www.airportsindia.org.in


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JAMIE NELSON by Sandy Tan

FREE FOCUS 104

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AN AIRCRAFT BONEYARD IN THE CALIFORNIAN DESERT gave fashion and beauty photographer Jamie Nelson the ideal location to shoot for a sportswear collection. The series depicts a woman’s strength in isolation — and was composed by dramatic angles and lines, and contrast between the scale of model Angelika Kocheva and the aircraft. “The size of the aircraft gave a different perspective for me than any in-studio shoot can give,” says Nelson. “It gives a certain breath of fresh air to the shoot, to be able to…work within vast landscapes, desert, and sky.” The location also allowed Kocheva to move freely but it was hard to keep her safe while climbing onto wings of very old and decrepit aircraft in high platforms. But it was capturing poses at high areas in beautiful weather that brought life to the series. Nelson, born in 1983 and based in New York, discovered her love for photography in high school and at 17 years old, she studied at Brooks Institute of Photography in California for four years. Although high fashion brands and magazines are her usual clients, Nelson says she focusses on creating art rather than advertising a product. She adds: “I’m a workaholic, driven by perfection and obsession. I love what I do and love being able to share my vision with the world.” www.jamienelson.com

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“THE PLANES WERE INSPIRING TO SHOOT ON AND AROUND BECAUSE OF THE SCALE OF THE MODEL VERSUS THE AIRCRAFT”

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“WE SEE STRENGTH IN THE WOMAN IN TOTAL ISOLATION, HOLDING HER OWN AMIDST A VAST AIRPLANE GRAVEYARD”

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Photographer: Jamie Nelson @ Judy Casey Hair: Ryan Taniguchi @ Marek and Associates Hair Color: Joseph Mullen Makeup: Lottie @ The Wall Group Stylist: Hanni Pontani Model: Angelika Kocheva

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“I LOVE PROJECTS THAT INCORPORATE INSPIRING LOCATIONS, INTERESTING LIGHTING CHALLENGES AND SURPRISES”

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF entertainment system. Designed by Edése Doret, the aircraft’s cabinetry work features wood veneer, leather and polycarbonate materials. Chongqing Helicopter Investment (CQHIC) has acquired Michigan-based Enstrom Helicopter. The company plans

to expand Enstrom in the Asian market, and increase production rates mainly in Michigan. Founded by Rudy Enstrom in 1975, Enstrom has delivered 168 light helicopters in the past decade — 17 in the past year — and has 25 orders on backlog, including four from Chinese buyers.

April and certification is expected in the second quarter of the year. The aircraft seats six passengers and two crew members. It has a maximum range of 1,300 nmi (2,308 km) and maximum cruise speed of 400 kts (740 km/h). Gulfstream has released a set of drawings for its supersonic business jet design. This comes after Gulfstream

announced it is close to overcoming noise problems, which prevented commercial supersonic aircraft from operating over populated areas. The drawings reveal development of a

Embraer Executive Jets’ first madein-the-USA Phenom 300 has made its first flight, also marking the anniversary

the Phenom 100’s first maiden flight. Delivery of the light Phenom 300 is scheduled to go to the Melbourne-based flight department, which will use it as a fight demonstrator aircraft. Phil Krull, managing director of Embraer’s USbased production facility, says it is on schedule to produce eight Phenom 300 per month in the coming months. Cleveland-based Nextant Aerospace, manufacturer of the 400XT light jet, has named former Hawker Beechcraft corporate executive, Sean McGeough as its new president. Nextant founder

and CEO Kenneth C. Ricci says that McGeough, who previously led Hawker’s operations in Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific, is beneficial to Nextant. His focus will be on developing global marketing strategies and initiatives for sustained growth. The fourth Boeing Business Jet of private jet operator Royal Jet is halfway through its USD9 million refurbishment programme. The BBJ, named A6-AIN, will cater to royal and VIP guests and will feature new livery painting, aircraft maintenance and system upgrades, as well as state-of-the-art in-flight 116

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Hawker Pacific has sold its Diamond Aircraft twin-diesel, DA42-NG demonstrator to the Australian Wings

Academy (AWA). Based in Gold Coast, Queensland, the aircraft will be used by the academy for flight training services. The sale came from a lead during Hawker Pacific’s 2012 Demonstration Tour and is the second aircraft to be sold at the tour. The durable and cost-effective DA42-NG — powered by Jet A1 AE300 turbo diesel engines — adds to AWA’s current DA40 multi-engine training aircraft. Cessna’s Citation M2 light business jet has begun its initial production run in

the company’s facility in Kansas, US. The aircraft will have interior installation, painting, testing and delivery done at the site. The first M2 is slated for delivery in

telescoping nose, highly sloped fuselage and variable-geometry wings. Gulfstream has also been assigned an experimental aircraft designation by the US Air Force for an undisclosed supersonic aircraft called the X-54. Piper Aircraft named Piper Summit Aircraft China Ltd, Beijing, as the authorised dealer in China for sales of a

new Meridian single-engine turboprop aircraft. The new Piper dealer will be headed by chief executive officer Jack Chan and company president Aaron Gao. “The annual growth rate for piston and turboprop aircraft operating in China is approaching 40 per cent, reaching 1,700 aircraft by the start of this year,” says Chan. The Piper dealer has conducted several Meridian demonstrations for potential customers . >>


BUSINESS AVIATION ON FULL DISPLAY IN SHANGHAI — MAKE PLANS TO BE THERE

Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport at Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre In Partnership With Shanghai Airport Authority and Co-hosted by NBAA, the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA) and the Shanghai Exhibition Centre (SEC)

WWW.ABACE.AERO


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF Pilatus plans to introduce its first twin-engine business aircraft, the PC-24, at the European Business

Aviation Convention & Exhibition (EBACE) in May. The PC-24 joins the ranks of its PC-12, a Pratt & Whitney PT-6 powered jet that entered service in 1994, which deliveries have topped 1,100 units. The Swiss manufacturer, with expertise in business and military single-turboprop aircraft, has tapped into the PC-12 returns to fund other projects, including the PC-21 military single-turboprop. More announcements will be made during EBACE. Embraer Executive Jets has delivered its 200th aircraft of the Legacy family, a Legacy 650 large executive jet to

China’s Minsheng Financial Leasing Co. Ltd (MSFL) in São Paulo, Brazil. The aircraft is one of the 13 Legacy 650s ordered by MSFL, which will be used by an anonymous Chinese customer. The Legacy 650 can accomodate up to 14 passengers and has a range of 3,900 nmi (7,223 km). MSFL has also ordered three ultra large Lineage 1000s. Russian customers can now register and operate the Embraer Lineage 1000 ultra-large business jet, which

has received its Type Certificate from the Interstate Aviation Committee. This adds to the strong reception of Embraer’s Legacy 600s and 650s, owned by Russian customers. The Lineage 1000, equipped with a fly-bywire technology, has a range of 4,500 nmi (8,334 km). Customers can fly non-stop from Moscow to New York. Aviation Industry Corp. Of China (AVIC) is developing a China New Generation Business Jet (CNGBJ). A 118

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scale of the design was displayed at their booth at Airshow China 2012. The CNGBJ is reportedly a high-end large and long-range business jet with a fly-by-wire technology, highly integrated avionics and new-generation propulsion systems. It will also have a high dispatch rate, low operating costs, green low-carbon emissions and is said to be more cost-effective than same-level products. Dassault Falcon has established a subsidiary, Dassault Falcon Business Services (Beijing) Co. Ltd, to represent

the Falcon brand in the growing Chinese market. The division, headed by general manager Jean Michel Jacobs and chairman Jean Rosanvallon, will have a regional customer service headquarters in Bejing. Scheduled to operate early this year, the office will comprise local specialists in receiving and processing spare parts orders, warranty and FalconCare claims. At least two type-rated Falcon pilots, based in Beijing, will provide jumpseat support to new and existing Falcon customers. Jet Professionals, based at Al Bateen Executive Airport in Abu Dhabi, has been granted a professional trade license by Abu Dhabi Airports Free Zone Authority to provide aviation consulting services in the Middle East and Asian markets. The license will allow support of global service providers, OEMs and private and commercial flight operations. Jet Professionals is a wholly owned subsidiary of Jet Aviation, a General Dynamics company. Jet Aviation has signed aircraft management and flight support agreements for a Challenger 300, Global 500 and Gulfstream G550

in the Middle East — expanding the company’s fleet to 22. With the aircraft and added support, owners and operators, as well as pilots and flight departments, will receive improved management service. The company

operates FBOs in Jeddah and Riyadh, and has recently added VIP handling services in Medina in Saudi Arabia. Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. has begun delivering its mid-sized G280 aircraft. The G280 earned type certificates from the US Federal Aviation Adminstration and the Civil Aviation Authority of Israel last August. The G280 is a joint venture between Gulfstream and Israel Aerospace Industries. The aircraft, which can fly non-stop between London and New York, features fuel-efficient Honeywell HTF7250G engines and has a range of 3,600 nmi (6,667 km) at Mach 0.80. Gulfstream had brought a G280 to several fixed-base operators in the US for employees to ensure a smooth entry-into-service for the aircraft. Cessna Aircraft Company and China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Company Ltd. (CAIGA) will conduct

the final assembly and marketing of the Cessna Citation XLS+ aircraft in China for the Chinese market. The joint venture is subject to various government approvals and customary conditions. Cessna’s Wichita, Kansas operations will provide components and parts manufacturing and sub-assemblies for the aircraft.

Piaggio Aero and its appointed dealer

for China, CAEA (Beijing) Aviation Investment Co., Ltd presented the P. 180 Avanti II at the 2012 Air Show China. The aircraft was delivered directly

to Free Sky Aviation, Piaggio Aero’s first Chinese customer and operator. The aircraft is said to set a new standard for Chinese business aviation users with its low cabin noise, sea level pressurisation and a range of nearly 1,500 nautical miles. The delivery of a second aircraft will follow shortly.


AIRBORNE BIOFUEL by Jim Simon

FOOD FOR FLIGHT COULD BIOFUEL BE AVIATION’S ‘LIQUID GOLD’? The global aviation industry consumes more than five million barrels of oil, not each month or each week, but every day. A third or more of the industry’s budget goes to petroleum fuel, and its consumption by aircraft is said to contribute up to two per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Some industry giants are turning to biofuel to ease the crunch. Biofuel is derived from sustainable resources such as algae, crops and man-made waste like recycled plastics and used cooking oil. Last October, the National Research Council of Canada test flew a Falcon 20 jet, powered completely by unblended biofuel derived from genetically engineered mustard seed. In the long run, it is expected that there will be lower fuel costs, owing to cheaper source materials and lesser reliance on petroleum-based fuel. Solazyme, the producer of an algae-based fuel blend used by Continental Airlines in 2011, sold the blend at the same price as petroleum fuel — but high prices are typical of new, unconventional commodities. Boeing began testing biofuel in 2008 and has since successfully demonstrated that fuel from biological sources such as algae, jatropha and camelina are as efficient as the petroleum-based one. Critical test criteria included freezing point, flash point, fuel density and viscosity. Boeing has been working with the US military since 2009 to test biofuel on high-performance aircraft 120

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such as the supersonic F/18 Super Hornet. Many manufacturers and airlines are members of Sustainable Aviation Fuel Users Group, a non-profit organisation committed to accelerating the development and commercialisation of sustainable aviation biofuel. Members believe that it will help achieve a carbon-neutral lifecycle while performing as well as, or even better than, petroleum-based fuel. Airbus, a SAFUG member, has also launched an initiative to accelerate aviation biofuel commercialisation in Europe. Partners include the European Commission, some European airlines and key European biofuel producers. They are aiming for at least four percent of the fuel, used in the European Union, to be derived from biological sources by 2020. In the past two years, commercial airlines have also demonstrated flights running on 20 to 100 per cent biofuel. In 2008, Virgin Atlantic flew a 747 using a 20 per cent biofuel blend, and in 2011, KLM carried passengers on a 737-900 using biofuel derived from used cooking oil. To date, KLM has logged 200 similar flights. Alaska Air Group says flying from Seattle to Washington, DC, or Portland, Oregon, on a 20 per cent biofuel blend is akin to taking 26 cars off the road for a year in terms of reduced greenhouse-gas emissions.


BUSINESS AVIATION –– MAKING THE DIFFERENCE IN EUROPE Nearly 500 Exhibits • 60 Aircraft on Static Display • Over 12,000 Attendees

TUESDAY, MAY 21; WEDNESDAY, MAY 22; & THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 Palexpo and Geneva International Airport Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero


AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

PLANE SPEAK ABSOLUTE ALTITUDE Measurable height of an aircraft above the actual terrain. ABSOLUTE CEILING The maximum altitude above sea level at which an aircraft can maintain level flight under Standard Air conditions. AGL (Above Ground Level) Altitude expressed as feet above terrain or airport elevation (see MSL). AILERONS An aircraft control surface hinged to the rear, outer section of each wing for banking (‘tilting’) the aircraft. AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT Comprehensive services provided by a management company for an aircraft owner. Details vary. AIRFOIL The shape of any flying surface, but principally a wing, as seen in side-view (cross section). AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE Official notification to aircraft owners/operators of a known safety issue with a particular model of aircraft. ALTIMETER A highly sensitive barometer that shows an aircraft’s altitude above mean sea level by measuring atmospheric pressure. ANGLE OF ATTACK The angle between the airfoil’s chord line and the direction in which the aircraft is currently moving. AOG (Aircraft on Ground) Aircraft unfit to fly, in need of repair. Owner’s worst nightmare. APPROACH (DEPARTURE) CONTROL Radar-based air traffic control, usually at an airport tower, providing traffic separation up to 40 miles. APRON Hard-surfaced or paved area around a hangar. Also, ‘ramp’. ATC (Air Traffic Control) Service providing separation services to participating airborne traffic and clearances to land, take off or taxi at airports. AVIONICS The electronic control systems airplanes use for flight such as communications, autopilots, and navigation. BLOCK RATES Pre-paid hours for air charter at a contracted price. CARBON OFFSET Monetary contributions to renewable energy research and production projects to ‘offset’ carbon emissions of an airplane.

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CHARTER The ‘renting’ of an aircraft with crew for a personal, business, or cargo flight from one point to another.

FBO (Fixed Base Operator) A business operating an airport terminal for non-airline, general aviation aircraft.

CHARTER CARD Pre-paid air charter plan, either for a block of charter hours at a pre-defined fee, or a set debit balance in dollars.

FERRY FLIGHT A flight for the purpose of returning an aircraft to base or delivering an aircraft from one location to another.

CLASS I NAVIGATION Operation of aircraft under visual meteorological conditions (VFR) primarily based on ‘see and avoid’ procedures. CLASS II NAVIGATION Any en route flight operation that is not Class I, i.e. instrumentbased navigation (IFR). CLEARANCE Formal instructions from air traffic control authorising a specific action (climb or descend, entry into controlled airspace).

FLAPS Hinged surfaces on the inboard rear of wings, deployed to increase wing curvature (and thus, lift). FLIGHT PLAN Filed by radio, telephone, computer, or in person with Flight Service Stations. FLIGHT TIME Portion of the trip actually spent in the air. FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP The purchase of a ‘share’ of an aircraft.

CONTRAILS Streaks of condensed water vapour created in the air by aircraft flying at high altitudes; a.k.a. vapour trails.

FUSELAGE An aircraft’s main body structure housing the flight crew, passengers, and cargo.

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE An airspace of defined dimensions within which air traffic control service is provided.

GENERAL AVIATION Part of civil aviation comprising all facets of aviation except scheduled air carriers.

CRUISE SPEED The normal speed attained at altitude once the aircraft is no longer climbing and is en route.

GLASS COCKPIT See FIS.

CRUISING ALTITUDE A level altitude maintained by an aircraft while in flight. DEADHEAD To fly the return leg of a trip without cargo or passengers. DRAG Resisting force exerted on an aircraft in its line of flight opposite in direction to its motion. Opposite of thrust. DUTY TIME That portion of the day when a crewmember is on duty in any capacity (not just in the air), limited by regulations. EFIS (Electronic Flight Information Systems) Glass cockpit avionics that integrate all flight parameters into one optimised instrument. ELEVATOR An aircraft control surface hinged to both rear horizontal stabilisers, changing the aircraft pitch attitude nose-up or nose-down. EMPTY LEG Also known as ‘one-way availability’. Usually posted as available for travel between two airports during a certain time period. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) The Department of Transportation’s agency for aviation.

GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellitebased navigation system operated by Department of Defence. GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning System) System designed to alert pilots if their aircraft is in immediate danger of flying into the ground. GROUND SPEED Actual speed that an aircraft travels over the ground also called ‘shadow speed’. HANGAR An enclosed structure for housing aircraft. Originated with lakebased floating homes of the original German Zeppelin airships. HEAVY JETS See ‘Large-Cabin Jets’. HORSEPOWER The motive energy required to raise 550 lbs. one foot in one second, friction disregarded. HUD (Head-Up Display) A transparent display that presents data without requiring the user to look away from his or her usual viewpoint. IATA CODE International aviation code for international airports. ICAO CODE Civil aviation codes for airports.


AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) Rules for flights into clouds and low visibility, by reference to cockpit instruments and radio navigation. ILS (Instrument Landing System) A precision instrument approach system permitting aircraft to land with low ceilings or poor visibility. JOINT OWNERSHIP Purchase or lease of an aircraft by a number of owners, often through a partnership or limited company. KNOT (Nautical Mile per Hour) Common measure of aircraft speed equalling 6,080 feet or about 1.15 miles. (For mph, multiply knots by 1.15.) KTAS True airspeed, in knots. LARGE-CABIN JETS The largest size aircraft that doesn’t require a major airport runway. Typical capacity 9-15 passengers. LAYOVER A night spent in the middle of the trip in a city other than home base for the aircraft and crew. LEG Describes one direction of travel between two points. Commonly used in referring to a planned itinerary. LIGHT JETS See ‘Small-Cabin Jets’. MACH SPEED A number representing the ratio of the speed of an airplane to the speed of sound in the surrounding air. MAYDAY An international distress signal to indicate an imminent and grave danger that requires assistance. MID-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 7-9 passengers. MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) Company licensed to provide services for the upkeep and airworthiness of airplanes. NAUTICAL MILE Defined internationally as equivalent to 1,852 metres or 1.15 statute miles. NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) A radio transmitter at a known location, used as an aviation or marine navigational aid. PAN PAN International call signal for urgency, indicating uncertainty and usually followed by the nature of the alert. PART 91 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering corporate flight departments. PART 121 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on scheduled airline operations, including the publication of a schedule.

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PLANE SPEAK

PART 135 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering charter carriers.

TARMAC A paved airport surface, especially a runway or an apron at a hangar.

PART 145 Certificate allowing an organisation to perform maintenance and alterations on US-registered aircraft.

TAXI TIME Portion of the trip spent rolling between the gate, terminal, or ramp and runway.

PATTERN The path of aircraft traffic around an airfield, at an established height and direction.

THRUST The forward force produced in reaction to the gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. Opposite of drag.

PAYLOAD Anything that an aircraft carries beyond what is required for its operation during flight.

TRAILING EDGE The rearmost edge of an airfoil.

POSITIONING Ferrying aircraft for departure from other than originating airport.

TRANSPONDER An airborne transmitter that responds to automated air traffic control interrogation with accurate position information.

RADAR System that uses electromagnetic waves to identify the range, altitude, direction, or speed of moving and fixed objects. RAMP The apron or open ‘tarmac’ in front of an FBO or terminal facility. This space is busy, used for deplaning, parking of aircraft, etc. ROLL One of three axes in flight, specifying the action around a central point. ROTATE In flight, any aircraft will rotate about its centre of gravity, a point which is the average location of the mass of the aircraft. RUDDER Aircraft control surface attached to the rear of the vertical stabiliser (fin) of the aircraft tail. Forces the plane to veer left or right. RUNWAY HEADING Magnetic direction corresponding to the centre line of the runway. SLATS Small, aerodynamic surfaces on the leading edge of the wings of fixed aircraft which allow the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack. SLIPSTREAM The flow of air driven backward by a propeller or downward by a rotor. SMALL-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 5-8 passengers. SQUAWK A four-digit number that a pilot dials into his transponder to identify his aircraft to air traffic controllers.

TURBINE Engine that uses compressed air to generate thrust to spin a metal shaft inside the motor, used in jet engines and turboprop aircraft. TURBOPROP An aircraft in which the propeller is driven by a jet-style turbine rather than a piston. VERY LIGHT JETS (VLJ) Small jet aircraft approved for single-pilot operation, maximum take-off weight of less than 10,000 lb (4,540 kg). VFR (Visual Flight Rules) A defined set of FAA regulations covering operation of aircraft flying by visual reference to the horizon. VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Range) Ground-based radio navigation aid. VORTICES Regions of high velocity that develop at the tip of a wing as it flies through the air. WIND SHEAR Large changes in either wind speed or direction at different altitudes that can cause sudden gain or loss of airspeed.

STATUTE MILE A unit of length equal to 5,280 feet.

WINGLET A small, stabilising, rudder-like addition to the tips of a wing to control or employ air movement, thereby increasing fuel economy.

SVS (Synthetic Vision System) A technology that uses 3D to provide pilots with intuitive means of understanding their flying environment.

YAW One of the three axes in flight, specifying the side-to-side movement of an aircraft on its vertical axis.

TAIL NUMBER An airplane’s registration number.

YOKE The control wheel of an aircraft, akin to an automobile steering wheel.


THE SOMALY MAM FOUNDATION The quest for a world where women and children are safe from slavery.

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AIRBORNESHOWDIARY

EBACE Geneva

FEBRUARY 2013 26 FEB – 03 MAR AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW AND AEROSPACE & DEFENCE EXPOSITION 2013

Avalon Airport, Geelong, Victoria, Australia

www.airshow.com.au

Al Bateen Executive Airport, Abu Dhabi

www.adairexpo.com

MARCH 2013 5 - 7 MARCH

ABU DHABI AIR EXPO 2013

APRIL 2013 16 – 18 APRIL

ABACE 2013 (ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION) Aviation Service Centre, China

www.abace.aero

EBACE 2013 (EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION)

Palexpo and Geneva International Airport, Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero

Sywell Aerodrome, UK

www.expo.aero/uk

50th INTERNATIONAL PARIS AIR SHOW

Paris Le Bourget Exhibition Centre, France

www.paris-air-show.com

NBAA 2013 (NBAA 66th ANNUAL MEETING & CONVENTION)

Las Vegas Convention Center, Nevada, USA

www.nbaa.org

Cheongju International Airport, South Korea

www.seoulairshow.com/eng

Dubai World Central, UAE

www.dubaiairshow.aero

MAY 2013 21 – 23 MAY

31 MAY – 02 JUNE AEROEXPO UK 2013

JUNE 2013 17 – 23 JUNE

OCTOBER 2013 22 – 24 OCT

29 OCT – 03 NOV SEOUL INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE & DEFENSE EXHIBITION 2013

NOVEMBER 2013 17 – 21 NOV

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DUBAI AIRSHOW


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AIRBORNETAILHOOK

Despite a swollen right hand from a glove malfunction, Kittinger followed through with his record jump from the Excelsior III in 1960 Image courtesy of US Air Force

FIRST FELIX by Rainer Sigel

THANKS TO MODERN MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION CHANNELS, last October’s record skydive by Austrian superjumper Felix Baumgartner was more than adequately documented. Less known is the man who had set the previous world record in 1960 — US Air Force Colonel Joseph William (Joe) Kittinger II (ret.). Baumgartner jumped from 128,100 feet — more than four miles higher than Kittinger’s jump in 1960 — and in the process broke the sound barrier. Baumgartner is a 43-year old former Austrian military parachutist with over 2,500 jumps to his credit. In 1960, Kittinger was only 32, and a captain in the US Air Force. He is 84 years old now, lives in Florida, and by contrast, his record jump was only his 33rd skydive. Whereas Baumgartner jumped in a custom-made full-pressure suit from a pressurised capsule, Kittinger ascended in an open, unpressurised gondola and wore an Air Force standard partial-pressure suit. Kittinger is one of the US Air Force’s highest decorated veterans. In May 1972, his F4D Phantom fighter jet was downed over North Vietnam and he and his Weapons Systems Officer Lieutenant William Reich spent 11 months as POWs in the infamous “Hanoi Hilton” prison. Kittinger mentored Baumgartner throughout his preparations, and was present during the record jump. Real heroes, it shows, don’t need the limelight. Or sponsors with deep pockets.

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ExecuJet - Issue 05  

Inflight Magazine of the ExecuJet Aviation Group

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