Page 1

ARCHITECTURE

PORTFOLIO

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT 2010/2013 Juliana Vélez Duque


ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT 2010/2013 [juliana.vd@hotmail.com]

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/contodoelfeeling/

Juliana Vélez Duque


ARCHITECTURE

PORTFOLIO

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT 2010/2013 Juliana Vélez Duque


I

Personal Information

Hi ! there

page

4

CURRICULUM VITAE ABOUT ME Name: Juliana Last Name: Vélez Duque Date of Birth: 21 september 1990 Place of Birth: Medellín, Colombia Cityzenship: Colombian Portfolio: http://issuu.com/juliana.vd/docs/ undergraduate-portfolio

CONTACT Adress / City: Telephone / Cellphone number: E-mail:

Cra 35 # 5 Sur 350 Apto 10-01 / Medellín, Colombia (+57 4) 311 38 31 / (+57 312) 287 97 14 juliana.vd@hotmail.com

BASIC EDUCATION [ 01/1995 - 12/2008 ]

Gimnasio los Pinares School, Medellín, COLOMBIA Elementary and high school

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES [ 01/2009 - 06/2010 ]

EAFIT University, Medellín, COLOMBIA. Product Design Engineering. 3 terms.

[ 07/2010 - A la fecha ]

Pontificia Bolivariana University, Medellín, COLOMBIA. Architecture 4th year

[ 09/2013 - 12/2013 ]

Napier University, Edinburgh, SCOTLAND. Exchange student, 1 term

COMPLEMENTARY EDUCATION [ 01/1995 - 12/2002 ]

Marymount School, Medellín, COLOMBIA. English Courses

[ 01/2008 - 12/2008 ]

LEXICOM English School, Medellín, COLOMBIA. Advanced English Courses


Juliana Vélez

[ 01/2002 - 12/2007 ]

Alliance Francaise, Medellín, COLOMBIA. Cursos de francés

[ 01/2011 - 06/2012 ]

National Learning Service (SENA) Basic Construction Courses

[ 03/2013 ]

WORKSHOP: Laura Spinadel (BUS Architecture) + UPB “Housing that builds future”

ACADEMIC HONORS [ 01/2008 ]

Student President Gimansio Los Pinares School, Medellín, COLOMBIA

[ 11/2011 ]

Honorific Mention for Academic Excellence Best Project: Acuatic Herbarium Pontificia Bolivariana University, Faculty of Architecture

[ 11/2011 ]

Recognition: Sense of belonging and collaboration in faculty transformation processes Pontificia Bolivariana University, Faculty of Architecture

[ 11/2011 ]

First place in faculty’s 75th year commemoration Workshop with project: “Traffic Jam Living” Pontificia Bolivariana University, Faculty of Architecture

[ 10/2012 ]

People’s Choice Award in the Workplace of the Future Competition with project: “Space without Space” Fentress Global Challenge, Fentress Architects.

[ 03/2013 ]

Second place in “Housing that builds future” Workshop Laura Spinadel (BUS Architecture) + UPB

SKILLS Languages

Spanish: Native Language English: Fluent (TOEFL 112) French: Basic Understanding

Software Skills

Computed Aided Design AutoCAD 2013 Architecture Graphich development Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign Adobe Premiere, Corel Draw X5


I

Personal Information

page

6

Modelling 3D & Rendering Rhinoceros 4.0 PRO Engineer Wildfire Lumion 2.5 Programming & Hardware Processing Arduino

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE [ 11/2010 ]

Ctrl G Lab. www.ctrlgarquitectos.com/ Collaboration with MAMM project

[ 12/2011 ]

Architect. Carlos Molina. Collaboration with Masters dreegre investigation “Conexión Río”

[ 08/2012 ]

Obranegra Arquitectos. http://obranegra.com/ Carlos Pardo + Juan Manuel Pelaez Collaboration with Pacific Rubiales Private Contest.

[ 12/2012 - 05/2013 ]

INDISA S.A - http://www.indisa.com/ Design team development of the project “Litoral Estrella” (Children Playground) and it’s graphic support.

PERSONAL REFERENCES Name: Contact number: E-mail:

Obranegra Senior partner and head of design department Architect Carlos Alberto Pardo (+ 57 4) 311 6700 carlospardo@obranegra.com

Name: Contact number: E-mail:

Asesor de relaciones internacionales UPB Miguel Ángel Betancur (+ 57 4) 3544546 miguel.betancur@upb.edu.co

Name: Contact number: E-mail:

Director del departamento de diseño en Planta Baja Arquitecto Juan David Botero (+ 57 4) 3667305 juandavid@plantabajaestudio.com


PROJECTS The following projects are a showcase of academic development from my undergraduate studies in architecture. The selection shown in this portfolio portrays my identity as an architect by highlighting my research interests and showing how I have conceptualized various design challenges.

A ACADEMIC PROJECTS

A.1/ Microclimates: Landscape Intervention A.2/ Quimbaya Culture Museum A.3/ “Traffic Jam Living” A.4/ 6 degrees of separation: Housing Project

R RESEARCH PROJECTS

R.1/ SAP “South American Project” Atlas R.2/ I “Slot”Casino: Research on a Strip

P PERSONAL PROJECTS

P.1/ Space Without Space (FGC 2012) P.2/ Litoral Estrella: Children playground


A

Academic Projects

page

8

MICROCLIMATES: LANDSCAPE INTERVENTION

1

COLD MICROCLIMATE

Concrete color

A.1

PROJECT BRIEF

LOCATION: Arví Natural Park, Medellín, Colombia PERIOD: 07/2010 - 11/2010 TEAM: Juliana Vélez COORDINATORS: Luis Callejas, Federico Mesa

Arví Natural Park is located in Santa Elena, next to Medellín, Colombia. It is the biggest park near the city, with 1761 hectares of forest open to the public. The challenge here was to study the park and identify a natural feature or phenomenon to replicate or emphasize through architecture. A concept arose from the simple desire to stay in the sun when wandering through a cold pine forest. Could it be that people might want to absorb the sun as if they were plants themselves? This idea lead to a solution that could be easily replicated anywhere in the forest based on microclimate factors. “Microclimates” is a landscape intervention in which the environmental conditions of the forest are enhanced using different modules.

Section’s location on general plan

2

MODULE SPECIFICATIONS INCLINATION: Down MATERIALS: Metallic platforms to enhance cold. Moss platform ACTIVITY: Moss observation.

HOT MICROCLIMATE

Concrete color

Section’s location on general plan

3

MODULE SPECIFICATIONS INCLINATION: Up MATERIALS: Metallic platforms to enhance warmth and concrete resting areas. ACTIVITY: Take the sun.

COOL MICROCLIMATE

Concrete color

Section’s location on general plan

4

MODULE SPECIFICATIONS INCLINATION: Level MATERIALS: Metallic platforms to enhance cold and moss plant pots. ACTIVITY: Walking.

WARM MICROCLIMATE

Concrete color

Section’s location on general plan

MODULE SPECIFICATIONS INCLINATION: Level MATERIALS: Metallic platforms to enhance warmth and sitting areas. ACTIVITY: Resting


Juliana V茅lez

Secci贸n A-A

VIEW OF THE PROJECT


A

Academic Projects

page

10

Model 1:100

GENERAL FLOOR PLAN The pieces vary in their design according to the microclimate they seek to amplify. Places in the sun were destined for resting areas, whereas cooler spaces where thought to contribute to the forest growth and engage the visitor. In order to establish accurate location for potential intervention, a map of the microclimates was elaborated based on light, moss growth, trees, and terrain slope. The general floor plan shows the disposition of the modules in the area of study and the microclimates associated with them.


Juliana VĂŠlez


A

Academic Projects

page

12

QUIMBAYA CULTURE: MUSEUM UNDERSTANDING QUIMBAYA CULTURE: KEY ELEMENTS

A.2

PROJECT BRIEF

LOCATION: “Bicentenario” Park, “La Playa” Avenue, Medellín, Colombia PERIOD: 01/2011 - 06/2011 TEAM: Juliana Vélez COORDINATOR: Horacio Valencia

Two thousand years before America was discovered, Cauca Medio was inhabited by the Quimbayas. Their culture is known for their work with gold and depiction of farmers, hunters and miners. In this project the indigenous Quimbaya culture was studied. After narrowing key cultural elements, an abstract composition was created as a first approximation to the project. In the drawing, the power of the shaman, shown in the center, represents human beings and our connection with nature. Surrounding the shaman is the “poporo” symbolizing life and death. The beginning and the end. “Poporos” were usually made of gold that was extracted from the riverside. For inspiration, the museum was thought to be a “poporo” that contained the power of the Quimbaya culture. As the museum is located beside Santa Elena river, the project was an allegory of the gold extraction from the water into the earth as a religious symbol.

ORFEBRERÍA

ANIMAL POWER

Gold work was highly important for Quimbaya culture. It represented power and prosperity

Quimbayas used to believe that their shaman could transform into animals and aquire its powers.

TERRACING

CYCLIC CONCEPT OF LIFE

Because of the great mountain range, Quimbayas used to create terraces for their settlement.

POPORO: LIFE SYMBOL The “poporo” symbolized fertility and was considered a religious object of power.

Quimbaya used to bury their dead in womb-like vessels as a metaphor of life after death.

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY Quimbayas where known for their harvesting and their salt trade.

QUIMBAYA CULTURE: ABSTRACT COMPOSITION


Juliana VĂŠlez

10.00 m 8.00 m

5.00 m 3.60 m

0.00 m

Fachada Sur


A

Academic Projects

page

14

Santa Elena River

Model 1:100

Pavillion Bridges

The museum appears to be divided in two different buildings, but is connected in the underground level. It has two exhibition bridges open to the public, an outdoor theater, three exhibition rooms in the inside, a coffee shop, Information counter, museum offices and WC. GENERAL PLAN


Juliana VĂŠlez

Access main exhibit room - 3.50 m

Theater Access - 3.50 Theater Square

Main access 0.00 m


A

Academic Projects

page

16

“TRAFIC JAM LIVING”: URBAN LEISURE SITUATION AT HAND: UNBEREABLE TRAFFIC

A.3

PROJECT BRIEF

LOCATION: “El Poblado” Park, Medellín, Colombia PERIOD: 09/2011 TEAM: Mónica Suárez, Carlos Daniel Montoya, Juliana Vélez. COORDINATOR: Pontificia Bolivariana

For the 75th anniversary of the Architecture faculty, UPB proposed a three day workshop in which the student body had to come up with different interventions inspired on urban leisure. “Urban Leisure” is based on the concept that a person who lives in the city (Homo Ludens) seeks to maximize joy in urban living. The challenge here was how urban spaces should respond to this need, and how might joy be materialized with a spatial proposal. The idea behind “Traffic Jam Living” was to reinterpret the time wasted in regular traffic jams, and make it a fun and enjoyable experience. In order to change the notion of this particular situation, it was necessary to establish a chaos condition among the streets, where citizens were obligated to participate in the proposed interaction. What if we were pushed to enjoy being stuck in traffic? By creating a physical blockage on the streets, leisure would be imminent. The intervention consisted in closing

IDEAL SITUATION: ENJOYING THE TRAFFIC JAM

1 up


Juliana VĂŠlez


A

Academic Projects

page

18

GENERAL PLAN

several streets with different car typologies that, once grouped, will compose diverse party experiences. In that order of ideas, by putting together a pool car, a bar, and a music car, people would get a pool party. If there was a grass car, a food car, and a bed car, people would create a camping area, and so on with the rest of the activities. The result of the proposal was a net of leisure situations, all possible by the compilation of simple elements that could be recreated in the inside of a car.


Juliana Vélez

TYPOLOGIES OF THE INTERVENTION CAR TYPE ACTIVITY

Pool

Grass

Bar

Food

Bed

Movie

Nightclub

Music

HOW MANY CARS DO YOU NEED?

Pool Party

13

Day of Sun

20

After Party

14

BBQ/ Picnic

15

Film Festival

22

Slumber Party

17

Camping

16 SCORE: 117


A

Academic Projects

page

20

6 DEGREES: HOUSING PROJECT CHARACTERISTICS OF THE LOCATION: COMPOSITION

A.4

PROJECT BRIEF

TERRACE The ceiling is adequated so it can be a usable space within the house. It can conect to the neighbor house depending on the slope.

OUTSTANDING VOLUME A higher residual volme appears when the slope changes within the street. There is an opportunity to connect the different houses with it.

LOCATION: Castilla Neighborhood, Medellín, Colombia PERIOD: 07/2013 - 11/2013 TEAM: Juliana Vélez COORDINATOR: Juan David Botero

As an academic exercise, the design of a colective housing project is proposed in the Castilla neighborhood, on a specific block. After a conscious study of the entourage, the findings highlight a high complexity and richness in the spatial configuration of the typical houses of Castilla. Even though this constructions have technical and architectonical difficulties, they create gaps that promote social relationships and give identity to this area. Tunels, stairs, bridges, terraces and patios, are found among the houses and small buildings. These places are the ones that allow a permanent visual relationship between the inhabitants of the area. It is easy to reconize each other and relate to the space where they interact. Accordingly, the intention of the project is to recreate this conditions while guaranteeing quality architectural housing that solve the major problems that are found today in this spaces. As a result, a building of 5 different housing typologies is created along with a public ground floor that integrates the project with the urban surroundings.

“STREET LEVEL” HOUSES “UNDERGROUND” HOUSE They are located according to the “street It appears as a consecuence of the level”, but need the existence of a bridge change in slope as the street or external stairs to salvage the height of progresses. It is possible to access such the “underground house”. houses because the street is elevated.

TYPOLOGIES: THE IDENTITY OF THIS HOUSES Niches

Patios

Tunnels Niches

Terraces


Juliana Vélez

5M 7M

7 M 10 M

MODULE

70 M2 ENTRANCE INVITATION

IMPLICIT ENCLOSURE

STAIR

PATIO

55 M2

N

2,

A

B

E

D

C

F

1

1

2

2

B

3

3 B

S

A

B

D

C

F

E

B

G

I

H

J

B

K

L

B

4

4 B

,

S

5

5

6

6

G

H

I

J

K

L


A

Academic Projects

page

22

T4

41

2 PEOPLE Students Single mom

M2

T3

37

1-2 PEOPLE Student Student couple Single mom

M2

T1

70

2 - 3 PEOPLE Working couple Family Students

M2

T2

103

The composition of the different apartments is created according to the inclination that creates either patios or stairs. These collective elements structure the network that conforms the building. This is how, as the floor began to stack up, stairs, bridges, alleys and voids start to appear. All of these strategies, which are evident in the section, are provided to replicate the spatial richness that is already found in this particular neighborhood. The target is to mantain their architectural identity.

M2

3 - 4 PEOPLE Family of 4 Group of students


Juliana Vélez

1

Longer facade orientated to the patios to avoid sunset and overheating of the apartment.

4

Gardens that adress the lack of vegetation in the neighborhood.

7

Voids that create diverse heights in between the different floors of the building.

2

Pierced walls that allow ventilation and control the entrance of light.

5

Exposed stairs that encourage social interactions between the inhabitants.

8

Public ground floor that stimulates the social interactions of the entire block.

3

Opaque glass that use the indirect component of light for illumination.

6

Joined patios that promote activities within the building.

VIVIENDA ESTUDIANTES

VIVIENDA ESTUDIANTES

VIVIENDA ESTUDIANTES

6

VIVIENDA ESTUDIANTES

VIVIENDA PAREJAS

4

5 PATIO COLECTIVO

VIVIENDA FAMILIAS Y PAREJAS

2

3 VIVIENDA FAMILIAS

PRIMER PISO PÚBLICO

1

8

BIBLIOTECA

PASAJE INTERIOR

TERRAZAS DE COMIDA

7

RESTAURANTES PARQUEADEROS


A

Academic Projects

page

24

The facade of the building responds to the different connections that are seen in the section. It is possible to creaty connectivity by different elements. In this order of ideas, it is possible to spot 3 different configurations in the facade: Stairs, Patios and voids. The 5 different typologies that compose the building adress a diversity of users that are already in the area. This is how a collaborative community is projected to conform an eclectic building with diverse senses of the ocupation of space.

BY VOID

VISUAL RELATIONS ALONG THE BUILDING

CONECTION LINKS BETWEEN FLOORS

BY STAIR

SPACES FOR SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

BY PATIO

FACADE STRATEGIES: CONNECTING


T2

T2

T3

T1

T2

T3

T1

1

T2

N

2

T3

T3

T1

N

FLOOR

T1

FLOOR

Juliana Vélez


A

Academic Projects

page

26

1

T2

T2

T1

As a result, the project is a building that tries to integrate the city with a mix of public, collectiva and private T3 spaces. T3 The use of patios and stairs as a meeting point, replicates the sense of neighborgood that is often found in this particular block. It is way of preserving the social interactions that already exist in this place. Finally, it is thought to be a social network that builds the city from the collective interactions that come from within the project.

N

2

FAMILIAS / PAREJAS

T2

FAMILIAS

VIEW OF THE PATIOS


Juliana VĂŠlez


R

Research Projects

page

28

SAP : DARIEN: COCAINE DREAM 1-2

R.1

PROJECT BRIEF

LOCATION: Darién region, Chocó, Colombia PERIOD: 01/2012 - 06/2012 TEAM: Mónica Suárez, Juliana Vélez. COORDINATORS: Felipe Mesa, Miguel Mesa, Maria J, Sanín

3-4

Invited by Harvard GSD, as part of The South America Project (SAP), teachers Miguel Mesa, Felipe Mesa and Maria J. Sanin, propose an investigation that researches the connectivity difficulties between Colombia and Panama through the “Darien Gap”, based on the different situations that affect the area. Each group of students chose a controversy to map its physical and social implications in the territory. Cocaine processing and distribution is one of the most renowned Colombian problems, and has earned the country a pejorative image in the international community. Being that Chocó is one of the poorest regions in the country, it has been destined to the harvesting of coca leaf, cocaine production and distribution. Throughout the investigation process, the research team established the main causes, facts and consequences of cocaine production. Mapping exercises resulted in the overlap of different situations that helped portray the complexity of the problem.

5-6

7-8


Juliana VĂŠlez

9 -10

17 - 18

11 - 12

19 - 20

13 - 14

21 - 22

15 - 16

23 - 24


R

Research Projects

page

30

“SAP” SOUTH AMERICAN PROJECT EXHIBITION - UPB

Research conclusions determined that the harvesting of coca leaf in the Darién region has perpetuated a violent situation between the guerillas and the indigenous population. The growth of this product doesn’t represent a significant profit for the people in the production process, but escalates in exponential proportions in the trafficking and dealing stage. Eradication policies threaten the biodiversity hotspot that is located in the Darién Gap. Any solutions need to take this into consideration in order to preserve the endangered species that inhabit these territories.


Juliana Vélez

11 - 12

COMO SE HACE LA COCAÍNA / HOW COCAINE IS MADE Todos los productos químicos utilizados para la fabricación de la cocaína tienen sustitutos que influyen en su calidad. Every chemical product used for the cocaine process has its substitute which affects its quality.

3

2

1 Se maceran las hojas de coca partiendolas en pedazos mas pequeños, añadiendo cal, y en algunas ocasiones cemento. Coca leaves are reduced to smaller pieces and mixed with quicklime for the maceration process. It may also be used cement.

Se agrega queroseno a la sustancia resultante para extraer el alcaloide de la coca. Se retiran los restos de las hojas y se obtiene la pasta cruda.

A la pasta cruda se le añade acido sulfúrico disuelto en agua y permanganato de potasio. Posteriormente se le incorpora amoníaco disuelto en agua.

kerosene is added to the mix in order to separate the alkaloid. Resting pieces of leaves are removed leaving the raw paste.

Sulfuric acid diluted in water is added to the mixture along with Potassium permanganate. later, ammonia dissolved in water is incorporated as well

4

5

Despues de filtrar y secar la mezcla se le da forma de ladrillos para su transporte. Esta se conoce como la pasta base

La pasta es diluida en acetona y se filtra una vez mas. Despues de este proceso se le agrega ácido clorhídrico.

After filtering and drying out the blend, it is given the form of bricks for easier transportation. This is what is known as the base paste

The base paste is diluted in acetone and it is filtered once again. hydrochloric acid is put into the blend afterwards.

Hojas de coca

30 kg

Pasta cruda

1,2 kg

6 la base diluida se seca al sol o en una estufa. El polvo blanco que se obtiene es el clorhidrato de cocaína. Este producto es lo que se conoce como cocaína de alta pureza The diluted base is dryed out in the sun or on a stove. the white dust obtained by this process is the cocaine hydrochloride. this product is what is called “high purity cocaine”

Pasta base

140 gr

Cocaína pura

100 gr

Los desechos químicos restantes del proceco se utilizan para hacer drogas mas baratas como el crack Chemical waste left from the process is used to elaborate cheaper drugs such as crack Fuente: Gendarmería Nacional / Sedronar. Argentina


R

Research Projects

page

32

I (SLOT) CASINO : RESEARCH ON A STRIP

R.2

PROJECT BRIEF

LOCATION: Las Vegas, Nevada Medellín, Colombia PERIOD: 06/2012 - 11/2012 TEAM: Lucas Arango, Mónica Suárez, Juliana Vélez. COORDINATORS: Natalia Uribe

While conceiving the topic of study, the main concern of the research team was to portray a building which responded to its function in an honest way. Accordingly, it became very important the feelings that this kind of edification would have to create in order to attract inhabitants to those particular spaces. After examining a number of case studies, the concluding referent that garnered most of the team’s concerns was the actual casino. This is mainly because it’s a building that devotes its conception to the comfort of the gambler. The importance of casino design has been relevant to contemporary architecture, since Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown published their book “Learning from Las Vegas”. I (slot) Casinos is a research that exalts the wonders of commercial design and its connection to marketing and spatial illusions. As an attempt to communicate the value of this kind of architecture, the research project focused on Casino design from its urban implications to its interior design.


Juliana VĂŠlez


P

Personal Projects

page

34

SPACE WITHOUT SPACE : FGC 2012 WORKPLACE EVOLUTION: SPACE PARADOX OUR GRANDPARENTS [ The cublicle empire ]

P.1

PROJECT BRIEF

LOCATION: Unspecified PERIOD: 10/2012 TEAM: Mónica Suárez, Juliana Vélez, Sebastián Vélez. COORDINATORS: Fentress Architects Fentress Global Challenge

Fentress Architects proposed a contest about what would the workplace of the future be like, in terms of space. “The international competition was created to give the global design community an opportunity to showcase their talents”.1 200 student submissions participated and “Space Without Space” was within the 11 finalist that where chosen, and was awarded with “People’s Choice Award” with the video entry “Space Without Space”2. While designing the workspace of the future the design team encountered a space paradox: The crescent wave of telecommunications has enabled workers to connect themselves to the cloud without requiring physical interaction, which has undermined the value of a working environment. Accordingly, the future will be a freelance era. The freelancer was chosen as a subject of study because of their working dynamic. They work 1 Fentress Architects official page: http://www.fentressarchitects. com/edge/global-challenge/2012/winners/ 2 Video Entry Link: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=MAdiV6y07UA

OUR PARENTS [ Working by departments ]

NOWADAYS [ The little office ]

FUTURE [ The freelancer era! ]


Juliana VĂŠlez

HOW TO DO IT?

1

Traditional workplace

4

Can connect physically again

2

What if we explode it? Destroy the cubicle

5

And create a living network

3

People working isolated Metro Station

Boulevard

Airport Metro Station

Colombia

Bus Station

Japan

Square

Boulevard

Park Street France

Airport Spain

Street Street

Park

Laos Train Station

Street

Boulevard

Park Metro Station

China

Airport

USA

Bus Station

Park

Boulevard Square Bus Station

Russia

India Metro Station


P

Personal Projects

page

36

under their own schedule, rules and disposition. They have been taught to market themselves thoughout the net and are used to working by specialized areas. The freelancer is its own brand. The existence of a network has obliged people to live under a metaphysical state of mind, in which they have to be in two different sensitive planes. Based on this circumstances, it was decided to approach the architecture project from a virtual sense of space. This would enable people to connect themselves without the need of a material working environment.


Juliana VĂŠlez

Working environment... What do you need?

airport

park

square

train station

air

plant

reunion

locker

outside

furniture

light


P

Personal Projects

page

38

By creating an interconnected web of actions and places, users can choose their working conditions according to their needs and preferences. The proposal was to provide spaces with continued availability that generated a flexible working network. People are accustomed to being connected 24/7, which has changed the way users relate to their jobs and obligations. Being reachable every second is a new way of living. In order to supply the productivity levels that this demands, there must exist a physical infrastructure that enables the web to be materialized.


Juliana VĂŠlez

HOW DOES IT FEEL LIKE How does it feel like

HOW DOES IT LOOK LIKE

People Diversity, colaboration, interaction, multidisciplinary

Fluid Workplace Eliminate physical barriers, dynamic spaces, changeable and adaptable.

Pay and Productivity The network allows you to be fully connected all time, everywhere.

Technology Virtual net materialized with technological elements.

Employee Wellness Workers choose their ideal working environments from a large selection of options.


P

Personal Projects

page

40

“LITORAL ESTRELLA” : CHILDREN PLAYGROUND

Ma

3

P.1

p a del Par q ue

PROJECT BRIEF

I

LOCATION: Cartagena, Colombia PERIOD: 12/2012 - To date TEAM: Mónica Suárez, Juliana Vélez, COORDINATORS: INDISA S.A Ing. Fabio Vélez.

H

4

5

Litoral Estrella (star coastline) is a kids playground that is created to materialize the fantastic world of “Captain Star”.

G

F

Located in Cartagena, Colombia, the park is near the beach. Surrounding the park is set of buildings that are destined for accomodation. The Client brought the story and the characters, and it was responsibility of the design team to develop the spatial design of this imaginary world.

C

E

D

After revising the tales of the captain and his friends, several fictional places where established and a map for the park concept was created. The park is divided in 3 different areas, that respond to diverse age stages. A wet zone in the center of the park helps regulate the temperature of the complex and provides a lot of entertainment.

J

5

A

B

2 1

3D Models, videos, plans and graphic design layout were elaborated in order to explain the concept and to make it suitable for children to comprehend.

w/c

Mar


Juliana VĂŠlez


page

42

Reproduction in whole or part of the contents of this work without citing the source, or without a prior authorization for it, its unauthorized and it’s use will result in the legal actions that correspond. The ideas expressed in this publication are those of the authors.


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2010/2013

2010/2013

Juliana Vélez Duque

Juliana Vélez Duque

[juliana.vd@hotmail.com]

[juliana.vd@hotmail.com] page

44

Juliana Vélez - Undergraduate Portfolio  

The following projects are a showcase of academic development from my undergraduate studies in architecture. The selection shown in this por...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you