Page 1


10Options of Modularity

14Detail Drawings

18System Diagrams 28Proposed Implementation

40Model Images


6

Design

UPDATE O F THESIS I argue that the typology of the “community shopping center� does not exist as a single built form. The common approach to this building type has been to design an empty shell that will later be given a direction by the content of the tenants. Therefore the shopping center does not express a unique character without the support of the individual shops that compose it. This commonly accepted formula is the incorrect method and is flawed from the start. Each different type of shop exhibits a unique typology. The whole blend of private, public and service space creates an identity within each individual shop typology. That is to say that the common design of a cafe varies from that of a bookstore, a grocery store, a restaurant or a drycleaners.


Design

7

To force a unique spatial condition into a generic and sterile box form is folly. The mini-typologies should not conform to the standards of a predefined space. Each shop should be free of rudimentary constraints and be allowed to exercise the variable composition of its mini-typologies. Therefore, the best solution for a constantly changing building form, is to implement pre-fabricated, modular building techniques. Every shop typology will be defined by a standard composition of various pre-fabricated elements. This ordering is only suggestive at best. The shop client may change and tweak the base design to cater to the individual needs of the unique shop.


8

Design

The other problem that faces the “community shopping center” is the condition of the building over time. The traditional shell formula reflects the temporary nature of the small, up-start business. The vacant bays are an unavoidable and ugly element of this building type. By redefining the typology of this building type, this complication is solved very easily. The new “community shopping center” model develops as shops purchase space on the site. On the flip side the “community shopping center” would also deflate as shops close and move away. This ebb & flow would be a natural condition for the redefined typology. This temporal action also contains a


Design

9

deep seeded connection to its rooted community. The “community shopping center� only does as well economically as its surrounding neighborhood. Consequently, the progress and decline of the shopping center reflects the progress and decline of the community. Thus further solidifying the very intimate connections between the commerce and residence of the area.


10

Design

OPTIO NS O F MO DULAR IT Y With the advent of new fast and expediant methods of mass production, mass customization is realized. Tenants have a variety of choices available to them when purchasing their retail space and are not limited to a small decision pool.

VERTICAL W VWP_SG_01

VWP_DIG_01

VWP_WC_02

VWP_WC_16

storefront glass panel

double insulated glass panel

access SIP

variable SIP

intended for maximum retail exposure

louvers allow for natural cooling other models include doorway cover and exterior lighting and ventilation

uv protected tinting is available uv protected tinting is available store signage also available

store signage also available

wood cladding available in a variety of species

semi-thermal insulation dep on the model cut is variable to allow for exterior fac ades

uv protected tinting is available wood cladding available i variety of species store signage also available uv protected tinting is avai

store signage also availab


Design

11

WALL PANELS

pending

VWP_WC_01

VWP_WL_02

base SIP

wood louvers allow for natural wood louvers allow for natural diffuse lighting diffuse lighting adjustable louvers to control wood cladding available in a natural daylighting as well as variety of species extend into the public realm

thermal insulation

allows access to foundation dynamic mechanics for interior lighting, plumbing and electricity

in a

wood cladding available in a variety of species

ilable

store signage is available

ble

wood cladding available in a variety of species

VWP_WL_01


12

Design

EXTERIOR ROOF PANELS

HORIZONTAL HORIZONTAL EXTERIOR INTERIOR PANELS PANELS

ERP_SG_01 ERP_GR_01

HIP_RF_01 HIP_HWF_01

HEP_TW_04 HEP_PCC_02

solar gain panels allow for sustainable energy for the site and shops

natural rubber flooring allows for desired interior surface

hardwood panels may be used instead of default concrete panel

hevea hardwood is another option for interior surface

wood type available in a variety of species

green roof panels to reduce radiant and sustain the building envelope naturally green panels model also used on grounds

many other models exist with various material choices all mechanic access is recessed under all interior panels.


Design

13


14

Design

DETAIL DR AW INGS detailed plan of a sample module 1/2” :: 1’

pre-cast 1.5Óhick t concrete roof panels continuous perimeter water sheathing

3Õ 3/8 Ó

2Õ Ó 0

2Õ Ó 0

3Ó st eel tube custom modular framing 9.5Óhick t SIP panel

10Õ Ó 09Õ Ó 6 2Õ Ó 0

1Õ Ó 6

2Õ Ó 0

3Õ Ó 0

double glazing system natural ventilation user controlled louvers for air intake


Design

15

e

connection joint for framing system

gasket for water tight seal to structural frame 3Ă• x 3Ă• reinforced site cast footings


16

Design

DETAIL DR AW INGS detailed section ZZ’ of a sample module 1/2” :: 1’

5Õ Ó 7

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ Ó 7 Z

5Õ Ó 7


Design

17

ZĂ•


18

Design

LIFE CYCLE O F THE MO DULE diagram of the proposed method of construction and removal of built form on the site

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

area on site is chosen for installation slab foundation and spot footings are poured on site primary roof structure and modular frame are added secondary roof system is installed based on shop requirements wall panels are added to enclose space and access underground mechanical grid shop goes out of business, wall panels are returned to manufacturer module frame, roof and foundation remain as trace of previous tenant shop space is resused as new wall panels are added to enclose a new program


Design

19

1

4

2

5

3

6

7


20

Design

SITE LAYO UTS With the advent of new fast and expediant methods of mass production, mass customization is realized. Tenants have a variety of choices availabe to them when purchasing their retail space and are not limited to a small decision pool.

Test Program layout size, location and arrangement of the shops is influenced by the current program at 26th + Boston

69% 31%


Design

21

Interstitial space layout

51% 49%

Shop space layout

83% 17%

Corb layout

47% 53%

Green space layout

27% 73%


22

Design

PRO GRES SIO N OV ER TI M E The MRS is intended to work over time as a growing and declining entity. The two integral parts of the MRS are the semipermanent modular wall panels that enclose building space and the permanent framing system that also carries the roof . These two parts exist on two different scales of time. The module will eventually be disassembled when a shop closes, the panels are removed, and the space is dismantled. The leftover framing, foundation and roof remain as a trace of what has been before. This extra space not only allows for the extension of the public arena, but also serves as basesframing for future shops. Just add panels, and the once empty area becomes defined as a building envelope

2 months

4 months

8 months


Design

16 months

23

32 months

64 months


24

Design

LAY ERED SITE PLAN This drawing explains how the MRS works on the site by using a purely hypothetical site layout. All programmed space is regulated by the constraints of the 18’ x 18’ framing module. Each foundation lie on top of the mechanics grid that diverts and delgates power, drainage and water to the individual shops on the site. Each cut reveals new information available at that level Roof Plan Like all the other aspects of this project, the roof is also modular. Panels are broken down into desired function, with roof gardens amd photovoltaic panels being at the top of the list. The UV panels gather sunlight and cycle this energy back into the site grid. Rood gardens are not only desirable for aesthetic, but also provide valuable radiant heat prevention and passive evaporative cooling.

Structure Plan Besides the mechanics grid, and exterior ground panels, the structure remains as the most dominant permanent forms on the site. This structure is based on the 18x18 proportions and define the backbone for the entire site. All module panels are tiled on to this structure to compose the myriad of shopping forms available. The uniques design of the stucture allows for open connections to any new modules arriving on the site.

Plan This cut expresses the relationship between the interior shops and the exterior spaces. Doors open on axis to neighboring shops along the concrete or wood exterior panels. The 3x6 grass panels remain on site until removed to make way for new modules or tranferred vertically onto the roofs of new shops.

Mechanics Plan Running underneath grade, hidden from above, lies a comprhensive grid that supplies the site with drainage, water and power. The lines are laid down during inital site construction, and are powered on as the site expands. Individual power and plumbing boxes paced out across the site allows for the grid to dynamically change according to the varied demands of the site.


Design

25


26

Design

SYSTEM DI AGR AMS fig.1 passive cooling

certain wall panels are equipped with the ability to let natural air flows into the building. These can be controlled by the shop owner, and act as an alternative to HVAC systems that have a far greater impact on energy requirements.

fig.2 public vs. private the segregation between the public and private sectors of the shopping center are dictated not only by vertical boundries but also horizontal ground panels. The grass panels laid accross the site act as the contgous park area. Non-grass panels define pedestrian and shopper areas.

fig.3 natural daylighting

large plate glass windows on the facade allow for natural daylighting to fill the shops. This makes for a lighter load on energy consumption and healthier atmospheres

fig.4 interior lighting at night there are multiple sources of artificial light built into the SIP panels. Light may stream from the walls or ceiling panels. Quantity of light sources is up to the shop owner, allowing for a range based on store function.

fig.5 water collection

in areas of high rainfall water collection panels may be added to the modules. These allow for grey water recirculation, creating a more sustainable site

fig.6 solar collection photovoltaic panels are standard on most slanted roof units. These panels are connected into the entire site’s power grid, thus every module acts as a sponge to recycle power into the entire shopping center

fig.7 radiant heating

the interior floor panels of the modules each act as a seperate link in a wide grid of water pipes. Right under the hardwood surface lies a radiant heating system, allowing for equal distribution of heat throughout the entire module

fig.8 mechanics grid built into the site is a mechanical system that powers, waters, and drains the entire site. This grid allows for each module to be placed anywhere on the site. The hookups to the module enter in one location and are distibuted throughout the floor, walls, and ceiling.

fig.9 light diffusion

some SIP panels come equipped with louver systems. These allow natural light into the shops, but diffues it to deny radiant heat

fig.10 roof garden the roof garden epitomizes sustainable design, and for good reason. The garden reduces heating by adding mass and thermal resistance. and facilitites colling through evaporative cooling. Also, these roof panels are the very same as the ones pre-existing on the site.


Design

27


28

Design

SITE PLAN Indiana ave.

The Neighborhood of Tech Terrace Lubbock, Tx.

19th st.

The site for this project is demonstrative at best. Due to the modular nature of this project, and the mass manufactured nature of modern commercialism, the site could be Anytown, USA. For a case example of how the building system is implemented, the intersection of 26th and Boston was chosen. This location already hosts a vibrant community shopping center, and is therefore a highly suitable location for the refinement of the strip-mall building type.

26th st.


University ave.

Boston ave.

Design 29


30

Design

ELEVATIO NS The elevations are also derived from the proposed site layout using the existing center program.

south elevation 3/16�:1’

5


Design

5Õ 4Ó

31

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5

LOWe


32

Õ 4Ó

Design

east elevation 3/64”:1’

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

e ’S

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó


Design

33

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó


34

Design

north elevation 3/64”:1’

36Õ 0Ó 18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó


Design

35

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó


36

Design

west elevation 3/64”:1’

18Õ 0Ó

18Õ Ó 0 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ 4Ó

5Õ Ó 4


Design

37

18Õ 0Ó 5Õ 4Ó

5Õ Ó 4

5Õ Ó 4


38

Design

PRO POS ED PLAN 1/16�:1’ Site plan of the MRS using the current program at 26th and Boston. This includes the majority of shops that are currently in business.


Design

39


40

Design

MODEL PICS To emphasize the concept of constant interchangeability and variability, this model was made. Each walnut module is independent and able to move within the site grid. This model not only emphazises the modular concept but also acts as a testing ground of potential and propable site layouts.


Design

41


42

Design

MODEL PICS A 1/2�:1’ model was also built to exhibit the unique interchangeable module system. This model is fully seperable with distinct roof, frame, foundation and wall components. The model is held together through a system of hidden magnets which keeps all pieces composed and regulated within the construction system


Design

43

MRS  

A Thesis in architecture on the nature of retail design as it pertains to modular systems of construction.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you