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JCP

JUAN C. PADILLA | ARCHITECTURE

PORTFOLIO


UNDERGRADUATEDESIGN


PERFORMING ARTS CENTER | santa monica, ca

1. Basic city geometry

2. Rotation

3. Angle

4. Decomposition

A rectilinear city geometry disintegrates when it meets the non-defined ocean.

The project objective was to create a visible landmark that closes the gap between civic center development and the vibrant commercial area along 3rd street promenade in downtown Santa Monica. The location of the site was used as the concept for the dramatic design of the Performing Arts Center. Santa Monica sits between a powerful geometric metropolis and the subtle non-defined ocean. The design represents the collision of these two very contrasting and dramatic atmospheres.

Site view in relation to the ocean

East elevation

North Elevation (entrance)

South West

Wall detail model

Structural model


Section perspective A 8 Fourth floor

1.Entrance 2.Auditorium 3. Lobby 4. Box office 5. Support rooms 6. Lounge 7. Stage 8. Roof terrace/bar

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Open

Third floor

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Second floor (entry)

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PROCESS 4

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First floor

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Tools used: - Rhinoceros - Brazil - Adobe Illustrator - Adobe Photoshop - AutoCad - SketchUp - Laser Cutter

3 Lobby perspective

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HORACE MANN MIDDLE SCHOOL LIBRARY | san diego, ca Education is constantly evolving and, therefore, so should our learning spaces and methods. Student and faculty retention, outdated facilities, access, safety, curb appeal, community involvement, outdoor instruction, school pride, and overall quality were some of the downfalls of the current campus that impulsed a redesign.The program of the library was divided into a student wing, a community wing, and the moment where they both meet. The goals were to promote student and community common use, indoor and outdoor connection, and use of sustainability as a teaching tool

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1. Entrance 2. Reading Lounge 3. Book Stacks 4. Community Rooms 5. Service Rooms and Offices 6. Study Rooms 7. Media Lab 8. Outdoor Reading

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Floor Plan

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1 Section A


Outdoor amphitheater

School entrance and drop off


Library entrance

Interior perspective


Urban edge

Courtyard

Program

Expansion

Tools used: -SketchUp -SU Podium -AutoCad -Adobe Photoshop -Project Vasari

Light

Water Collection

Shading

Form diagram

PROCESS

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SUSTAINABLE FEATURES One of the main priorities of the design was to use the building as a sustainable teaching tool for the users. As part of curb appeal, the design includes two green walls [a.] with the school colors to promote school pride. The butterfly roof is host to solar panels [b.] and a rainwater collection system [c.]; the water is collected at a pool that serves as landscape. On the community rooms, the façade includes an operable screen [d.]that diffuses natural light and allows users to control the amount of it that enters the room. The exposed structure was used as a shading device [e.]as well as a learning tool. The building was kept narrow to allow better cross ventilation. A sufficient amount of north glazing spilling to the outdoor amphitheater is provided to allow plenty of natural light. This in turn provides accessibility to daylight and outdoor views from every room inside the library.

c.

d.

b.

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e. a.

South elevation

The “great wall” [f.] is used as a structural element as well as a visual connection between out and in.

Structural diagram

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GUADALUPE CHAPEL | carlsbad, ca

The Guadalupe Chapel is a chapel dedicated to the Virgen of Guadalupe; it is part of the campus at St. Patrick Catholic School in Carlsbad, Ca. . Guadalupanos, the Virgin’s worshipers, have particular rituals that had to be considered, such as an abundant presence of flowers and candles. The program called for a chapel that would fit around 40 people, the solution was a dynamic structure design in which the outside environment is brought to the inside. By creating two different structures and overlapping them I was able to create windows that would provide a wash-down lighting effect on the icon. Water was brought into the interior space which serves as water supply for the flowers and a candle room provides a private space for prayer.


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Site plan

Floor plan

1. Entrance 2. Pews 3. Flowers 4. Icon 5. Pool 6. Cabinets 7. Holy water 8. Candle room 9. Side windows 10. Rose garden


PROCESS

Precedent study: MIT Chapel by Eero Saarinen


PROCESS

Tools used: - AutoCad - SketchUp - Adobe Photoshop - Hand Modeling

SUSTAINABLE FEATURES The use of soft natural light was extremely important. A light well [a.]captures the southern sunlight and bounces it off directly to the icon. The side windows [b.] create a soft washed natural light background. Solar panels [c.] provide energy at night for the few interior lights. The purpose of low lighting is to avoid light pollution and allow the candle room [d.]to glow and illuminate rooms creating intimate and powerful spaces. The pool immediately outside of the candle room serves as a reflection surface for the candle lights. Self-watering flowerpots [e.]minimize the use of water, moisture sensors determine if the plants are thirsty and supply the proper amount of water. Cross ventilation [f.] allows for

a. c.

f. b. d. e. Section A



undergraduate PORTFOLIO - Juan C. Padilla [2011]