Page 1

PROPOSAL FOR A KNOWLEDGE COMMUNITY

UTB 2.0


CHOICE The University of Texas system will determine the future location of the University of Texas at Brownsville and the current choices appear to be either an URBAN or GREENFIELD context. These two markedly different futures for securing the mission of UTB must consider both short- and long- term interests of the institution. For the purposes of this proposal, three categories of influence are used to evaluate a plan to expand UTB within [greater] Downtown Brownsville. These include: Form, Economics, & the UTB 2.0 model for student, regional, and institutional success.

PROBLEM STATEMENT To develop a design program and economic model for establishing [greater] Downtown Brownsville as a knowledge neighborhood leveraging the economic and social impact of the local academic institutions to 1) meet UTB’s short-term and long-term needs and mission, 2) develop connections between the existing Texas Southmost College campus, Historic Downtown, and future UTB Academic Village, 3) support the entrepreneurship of local businesses, and 4) steward the success of students and well-being of the region.

BCWORKSHOP CANNON DESIGN CDC BROWNSVILLE PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE U3 VENTURES


SYSTEM OBJECTIVES

UT STRATEGIC PLAN

[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

The UT System has established a clear set of objectives guiding the activity of the institution. UTB’s future campus growth offers a unique opportunity to create a physical environment that can support and significantly advance these objectives.

ENHANCING STUDENT SUCCESS

Proximity of student residences to campus reduces travel time and expenses. Connection to local economy provides access to competitive workforce. Urban presence closes the gap between primary education and the University. International and non-local students are supported by diversity of housing, walkable neighborhoods, community resources, and cultural institutions.

RESEARCH, COMPETITIVENESS + TECH TRANSFER

Access to existing resources within Brownsville increases research capabilities. City is an urban laboratory for public health research and practices. UTB provides civic leadership to Brownsville/Lower Rio Grande Valley. A regional/global healthcare competitor is supported by an integrated working environment.

IMPROVING HEALTH IN TEXAS

Cyclical relationships between health care and education increase community health care knowledge base. Green spaces, bikeability, and public transit encourage student health. Community provides readily available patient populations and health access for the community improves.

ARTS AND CULTURAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Cultural identity of the urban city attracts and retains students and faculty. Students and faculty engage and contribute to the culture of Brownsville. Music program is enriched by local arts culture through community attendance and participation.

IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND EFFICIENCY

Shared services between the city and University promote dynamic interaction. Reuse of buildings and previously developed land preserves open/farm land. Minimized redundancy of existing systems, physical assets, and transportation infrastructure decreases development cost. Flexible campus that avoids monofunctional spaces and is used year round.

INTEGRITY, ACCOUNTABILITY, + PUBLIC TRUST

Urban presence increases public understanding of the UT system. City and University partnership positions UTB as a national model of leadership. UTB further invests in its home-base city.


CONTEXT VILLLLA V VI VILLA VE VERDE ERD RDE

WESSTT B WEST BROWNSVILLE ROW RO WN NSV SVIILLLE

MITTTTE C MITTE CU CULTURAL ULT LTURAL DISTRICT DIISSTTR RIC IC T BU B BUENA UEEN NA VI V VIDA IDA DA

SSO SOUTHMOST OU UTTHMOS HM H MO OSST HIISSTTOR H HISTORIC ORIIC C D DO DOWNTOWN OW WN NTTO OW WN N

UTTB + TTS U UTB TSC SC C CA CAMPUS AM MP PU USS


UTB will grow to a 20,000-student university of national and international prestige. The way in which the physical characteristics of the institution are created will be directly related to the context where the institution resides. The choices available include both opportunities and challenges.

HARL HA HARLINGEN RLIN ING GEEN

If we evaluate the choices based upon short- and longterm RGV development patterns, the dynamic requirements necessary to create an innovative learning environment, as well as student success, there is a very strong argument to remain in [greater] Downtown Brownsville.

SSA SAN AN BE B BEN BENITO ENI NITTO O

In order to achieve UTB’s mission, the choice to remain in [greater] Downtown Brownsville will: secure long-term needs of 300+ acres of land while also securing the short-term functional needs of 500,000 sqft of existing, new, and renovated space; generate local economic investment in UTB jobs, public space, & transportation systems;

LOS FRES LO LOS FFRESNOS FR RES ESN NO OS

USA MEXICO

continue proximity to feeder schools and maximum number of projected college age attendees, as well as continue to reduce student burden associated with transportation.

BRO BROWNSVILLE OW WN NSSV VIILLLLE

[[G [GREATER] GR REEAT ATEER R] DO D DOWNTOWN OW WN NTO TOW TOW WN N

MATA MA MATAMOROS AMO MOROS ROS RO

ETHNICITY

INCOME

31%

9%

12% 4%

82%

AVERAGE PER CAPITA INCOME MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

7% 12%

TEXAS 40%

HISPANIC WHITE BLACK AM. INDIAN ASIAN OTHER

$15K BROWNSVILLE

POVERTY RATE

$30K

TEXAS 16.8% $45K

TEXAS BROWNSVILLE 35.8% BROWNSVILLE


FORM AVA AV AIILA ABL BLEE LA LAND AND N _3 348 48 ACR CREESS CRES UTB UT B EX EXISTI ISTI IS TING NG BUI UILD DIN ING NG SQ SQFT FT_5 FT _5 560 6 ,9 911 1 SQF QFT ACADEMIC VILLAGE

URBA UR URBAN BAN VILLAGE VILL VI LLLAGE AG GE AVA VAIL IILLAB BLE L LAND_ AND_ AN D_13 3 ACR CRES E BU UIILLD DIN NG SQ SQFT_4 FT_4 FT _41 10 0,128 ,1 12 28 8 SQF Q T ON-SSITE ON ON-S ITTE PA P RK KIN NG_52 G_ _52 29 SP SPAC ACES AC ES ES O -STR ON -SSTTR REE EETT PA ARK R IN NG G__2 24 48 SP 48 PAC ACES ACES ES


URBAN FORM For the first time ever, the majority of humanity lives in an urban setting. This fact, coupled with projections of population growth has forced the issues of urbanism to the forefront of future opportunities and challenges. The [greater] Downtown Brownsville urban form offers the potential to maximize the UT System and UTB’ s resources by capitalizing on existing systems and physical assets, anticipated population growth, contemporary settlement patterns, and sustainable practices. Additionally, the volatility of academic learning must also consider a traditional strategy while allowing for the potential discovery of new models. The single most important asset to accomplish this objective is LAND. [Greater] Downtown Brownsville has the land necessary for traditional development in proximity to UTB’s existing assets and within a larger urban form.

CITY OWNED LAND_119 ND 9 ACRES BLDG _114,47 _ , 7 74 SQFT

AVAILABLE LAND

AVAILABLE BUILDINGS

96%

4%

42%

360 ACRES

OPEN MARKET LAND_4 __43 43 ACRES BLDG DG G __298,654 , SQFTT

LAND OWNERSHIP

BUILDING OWNERSHIP

33% 12%

12% 58%

360 ACRES

971,039 SQFT

32% URBAN VILLAGE ACADEMIC VILLAGE

23% 58%

CITY OWNED UTB OWNED CITY NEGOTIATED OPEN MARKET

30%

971,039 SQFT


FORM

TRANS

IT

MI E

RESID

TT

L NEI

O YC

ACADEMIC VILLAGE | NEW FACILITIES 6_ 6 _LI LIB BR RAR ARY IN INFO NFO ORM RMA RMAT MAT ATIO ATIO ION TE TECH HNO NOLO OLO LLOGY OGY GY 120 20,0 ,0 000 00SQFT 00SQ 00 SQFTT SQ

ENTIA

CIT

RE

GHBO

9

VI

8 7

AG

EC

AM

DS

10

LL

RHOO

ITECH

PU

S

4 RES

UR U URBAN RBA BAN VI BAN V VILLAGE ILLLAG AG E 3

5

IDEN

1

TIAL

7_AC 7_ AC A AC AD DEM MIC C CEN NTE T R_ R_16 160 0,00 0, 0 0S 0 QF Q T 8_BUSI 8_BU 8_ BU USI SIN NEESS SS SCH CHOO CHOO OL_ L 12 27, 7,00 000S 00 0SSQ QFFT 9_MU 9_ USI S C PR ROG OGRA RAM_ M_60 0,0 000 00SQ S FTT SQ 10_K 10 __K KIN INES NESSIOLO IO OLO OGY + GYM M_4 41 1,,00 0 0SSQF Q T

2

6

ACADEMIC VILLAGE | EXISTING UTB ASSETS 1 B 1_ BIIO OM MED DIC CAL A RESSEA EARC ARC R H_ H_58 58,5 ,588 588 8SQ SQFT FT 2_STTUDEN 2_ 2_ST UD DEN ENT + A AD DMI M NI NIIST SSTTRA RATI RATI TIVE VEE SER ER VI VICE CEES_ S_12 12 28, 8 00 000 000S 0SSQF QFT FT 3_LI 3_ L FEE + HEA LI EALTTH SC S IEENCES NC N CESS_1 _103 03,7 ,760 ,7 760 60SQ SQFT FTT 4_ _ SC CIIENCE EN NCE CE ENG GIN NEE EERI RING ING + TEC ECHN HN H NOL OLOG OGY_ Y_14 Y_ _14 145, 5 03 039S 039S 9 FQ QFTT 5_CA 5_CA 5_ ASA S BEL ELLA LA ON--CA CAMP M USS RES MP ESID I EN ID ENC CEE_ 126, 126 12 6,,5 52 24SSQF QFTT


STRATEGY Two time periods must be considered in positioning the future UTB form as an institutional anchor in [greater] Downtown Brownsville.

8

IC

9 7

HE

10

UR

Long-term _ 2030 The assets secured in short-term provide flexibility to develop the future environment for learning over time, whether that is several million square feet of traditional classrooms or new, technologically-driven virtual spaces. The Urban Campus and Academic Village provide an environment for thousands to live, work, and play while also continuing the direct service model of practical learning.

SID

BL

RE

PU

EN

CE

S

Short-term _ 2015 Employing a two-part model: with the urban campus and the academic village, UTB 2.0 is established within a traditional campus format with necessary instructional and support space. The Urban Campus is integrated within Historic Downtown, centered on business and the cultural arts. The Academic Village begins with new construction of a Knowledge Space anchoring historic and future spaces for learning. Existing facilities are used for public health, engineering, and sciences, with administrative offices placed in the current business building.

AL TH

4

BA

NC

3

AM

1

PU

S

5

RESIDENCES

2 6

LAND BUILD OUT

PROGRAM AREA

49

= 1 CITY BLOCK (10,000 SQFT)

BUILDABLE AREA USE PARKING AREA (ACRES) BUILDING AREA (ACRES)

7.5

1,645 SPACES

EXISTING UTB ASSETS LIBRARY + INFO TECH KINESIOLOGY + GYM

75.5 ACRES

STUDENT SERVICES BUSINESS SCHOOL MUSIC PROGRAM

32

19

BUILABLE AREA (ACRES) INFRASTRUCTURE (ACRES) PUBLIC SPACE (ACRES)

17

5,344,267 SF PROGRAM* *ASSUMING A FLOOR AREA RATIO OF 1:2.5


ECONOMICS $1.5MM

$441,791

VALUE OF LAND CONVEYED TO UTB

CITY OF BROWNSVILLE NEGOTIATED 83 ACRES OF LAND FROM OUTSIDE ENTITIES PURCHASED OR TRADED BY THE CITY OF BROWNSVILLE AND DEEDED TO THE UNIVERSITY

$1,105,351 CITY OF BROWNSVILLE 119 ACRES OF LAND OWNED BY THE CITY OF BROWNSVILLE TO BE DEEDED TO THE UNIVERSITY

$6MM

$1MM

GREATER BROWNSVILLE INCENTIVE CORPORATION (GBIC) $5,000 FOR EVERY JOB ASSOCIATED WITH THE [GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE. APPROXIMATELY 1,000 JOBS ARE ESTIMATED TO BE CREATED.

$5MM

BROWNSVILLE COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT CORPORATION TO PAY FOR OR SUBSIDIZE “QUALITY OF LIFE PROJECTS, INCLUDING CULTURAL AND ATHLETIC AMENITIES

$560,000

SALES TAX GROWTH 2% INCREASE ON THE 2010-2011 SALES TAX

$48,000

MIXED BEVERAGE TAX GROWTH

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TAX

$7.8MM TAX INCREMENT FINANCING (20 YEAR PROJECTION)

APPROXIMATELY $48,000 PER YEAR IS EXPECTED TO BE GENERATED.

$7,300,000 PARKING METER TAX GROWTH PARKING METERS RAISED FROM $0.25 PER HOUR TO $0.50 PER HOUR. APPROXIMATELY $300,000 PER YEAR IS EXPECTED TO BE GENERATED.


[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE: GREENFIELD CONTEXT ACADEMIC VILLAGE + URBAN VILLAGE

ECONOMICS It is in the direct interest of the City of Brownsville to maximize its resources and position its geography competitively while also continuing its historical leadership role for the Rio Grande Valley region. The University of Texas at Brownsville must select a geography that both allows for future potential growth and provides the highest potential gain from a knowledge community. UTB as an institutional anchor offers Brownsville a catalyst for unparalleled vibrancy and opportunity. The gains are symbiotic, as being in [greater] Downtown Brownsville allows the City to provide economic tools and methods that can only be used in the urban core. The investment by the City to generate a competitive urban choice has brought economic development, utilities, transportation, and planning together within a unified approach in order to advance the UT System and UTB mission.

AREA

COST

AREA

COST

BUILDINGS + GROUNDS EXISTING BUILDINGS [$0/SQFT] RENOVATED BUILDINGS [$245/SQFT] NEW CONSTRUCTION [$245/SQFT]

560,911_SQFT 383,128_SQFT 120,000SQFT

$0 $93,900,000 $29,400,000

560,911_SQFT 0_SQFT 500,000 SQFT

$0 $0 $120,000,000

LAND UTB ASSET CONVEYED ACQUIRED

115_ACRES 177_ACRES 68_ACRES

$0 $0 $7,800,000

115_ACRES 0_ACRES 300_ACRES

$0 $0 $20,000,000

OFFSITE UTILITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE OFFSITE UTILITIES ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION WATER TOWER

N/A N/A N/A

$0 $0 $0

CENTRAL PLANT

N/A

$0

TOTAL

10,000_SQFT

$36,000,000

SOFT COSTS OPERATIONAL BURDEN

$1,000,000 $1,250,000 $1,250,000

1 LOCATION

UNKNOWN

$167MM

$2,500,000 $36,000,000

2 LOCATIONS

UNKNOWN

$182MM


UTB 2.0 CULTURAL IDENTITY COMMUNITY COMMUNITY

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT LN HEALTH + WELLNESS

NS TRANSIT B HUB

BUSINESS INCUBATORS SERVICE LEARNING


THE SHIFTING UNIVERSITY

PERMEABLE CLASSROOMS pp APPLIED LEARNING g

r

ia l

he

hc alt

a re e

d u c at i o n c u l t u

ra l

his

to

ry

gi

c

er

he

sy n

b ss

a ge

er o rd

nsit hub bike link

g o ve r n m e n t l aw e

s t ra

nt r

to r

es

wa

lk a

ble

c o l l a b o r a t i ve d e ve

lo

pm e

nt

Providing an ambitious and forward-thinking strategy willl necessitate a careful balance of: 1) embracing trends in digitall learning, 2) addressing systemic challenges of delivering students from cradle to diploma, 3) promoting a thriving campus life and unique sense of place, 4) connecting education theory to real life application, and 5) maintaining structurall flexibility to embrace future changes.

ba

p re

cu

ne

u

NEW MODELS OF MENTORSHIP + p COLLABORATION

in

UTB’s future offers a unique opportunity to strategically position the University as a leader in progressive higher educationall thought by addressing the challenges of contemporaryy society, relevant to today’s changing world. These challenges are largely civic and require a comprehensive developmentall approach. Twenty-first century institutions around the world d are approaching learning from a holistic perspective, furtherr integrating their educational model within the communities which they serve.

ACCESS TO KNOWLEDGE

“We are in the midst of a transfer in our economy from an industrial economy to sophisticated service industry...With most of our people living in cities, a diverse new population, it is the urban university that is on the cutting edge of change.”

“The fundamental mission of universities is to educate students. And there is no better way to teach students than to involve them directly in real-world problem solving.”

-Marguerite Barnett, president of the University of Houston

-Partnerships For Smart Growth


UTB 2.0

GREENFIELD GRE G GR GREE REE EENF NFIE N FIE IELLD DC CAM CAMPUS AM A MPU PUS SU UBU URB RBAN N LAN ND U DEEVE UN V LO OPE PED

“The Board of Regents of the University of Texas system is committed to stewardship of the environment and promotion of the principles of energy efficiency and sustainability. The Systems commitment to energy savings goals, reductions in carbon emissions, and sustainable design is evident in existing practices, and the institutions will continue to implement well thoughtout initiatives that increase efficiencies, reduce emissions, and promote sustainability practices that contribute meaningfully to the environment, while still achieving excellence in higher education.” - UT System Sustainability Practices, Policy Statement, August 20th 2009

[[GRE [G [GREATER] GR REEAT ATER ER] DO DOWN DOWNTOWN WNTO WN TO TOW OW WN NV VILLAGE ILLA LAGE AG GEE UR RBA AN LAN A D DEEVE D V LO OPEED


SMART GROWTH The [greater] Downtown Brownsville urban form offers the potential to maximize the UT System and UTB’s resources by capitalizing on existing systems and physical assets, population growth, contemporary settlement patterns, and sustainable practices. The two potential campus contexts, Urban and Greenfield, inherently create significantly different environmental impacts based on their locations and development histories alone.

5 MILES

1 MILE

[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

10 MILES

5 MILES

POPULATION DENSITY < 60 PERSONS PER SQ. MILE 1 MILE

60 - 249 PERSONS PER SQ. MILE 250 - 999 PERSONS PER SQ. MILE 1000 - 4999 PERSONS PER SQ. MILE > 5000 PERSONS PER SQ. MILE

6% AVERAGE COMMUTER COLLEGE

OTHER STATIONARY COMBUSTION ELECTRICITY CUSTOM SOURCES COMMUTE

*SOURCE: ASSOC. FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SUSTAINABILITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION

18

26

40

50

60 GOLD

6%

SILVER

9%

LOCATION-BASED LEED POINTS CERTIFIEDUT GOAL

SOURCES OF EMISSIONS

SITE POINTS

“Increasingly, universities are taking up the role of providing civic leadership in cities and regions...The challenge for these urban institutions is to understand that their sustainability depends on the long-term health of their city -- as an economy, as a labor market, as a housing market, and as a human ecological system.” -Rosalind Greenstein, Urban Anchors

10 MILES

URBAN POINTS

Building in an urban context offers several sustainable, smart growth benefits that are absent in greenfield development, including: 1) access to pre-developed land, preserving farmland, green space, and the natural watershed, 2) reliance on existing city transportation and utility infrastructure, 3) access to mixed-use buildings and land, creating flexibility for cost effective future expansion and reducing redundancies in University programming, 4) proximity to housing choice and historic walkable neighborhoods, and 5) contributing to a balanced regional development plan.

GREENFIELD CAMPUS


UTB 2.0 GREENFIELD CAMPUS

10 MILES

5 MILES

1 MILE [GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

10 MILES

UTB STUDENT ADDRESSES

5 MILES

1 MILE


EMPLOYEE + STUDENT POPULATION BASE UTB 2.0 must develop in tandem with the [greater] Downtown Brownsville population and in close proximity to UTB students and faculty in order to minimize the burden associated with extended commutes as well as to capitalize on long-term student recruitment. Today, over 50% of UTB students reside within a five-mile radius of the current Fort Brown campus. Area demographic projections show that the majority of future college-age students will also live in this same area. Proximity increases the likelihood of student success by decreasing an individual’s financial expenditures and allowing for greater flexibility in one’s daily schedule. In addition, [greater] Downtown Brownsville is positioned with immediate access to multi-modal transit, maximizing regional connectivity without isolating the local student body.

GREENFIELD CAMPUS

[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

UTB FACULTY ADDRESSES

FUTURE STUDENT POPULATION

1 MILE 400

[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE STUDENTS (18-24) GREENFIELD CAMPUS STUDENTS (18-24)

5 MILES 800 1200

2015 2020 2025 *SOURCE: ESRI COMMUNITY ANALYST

5K

10K

10 MILES 15K

5K

10K

15K

20K


UTB 2.0 GREENFIELD CAMPUS

10 MILES

5 MILES

1 MILE [GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

10 MILES

PUBLIC EDUCATIONAL FACILITES

5 MILES

1 MILE


STUDENT PREPAREDNESS UTB student success is dependent on the quality of education a student receives before University matriculation and on the ability of a student to secure employment after graduation. [Greater] Downtown Brownsville offers an opportunity for UTB 2.0 to inclusively integrate its academic programs within complementary programs that already exist in the community. These partnerships will elevate student achievement at all levels and will contribute to the creation of a knowledge neighborhood.

GREENFIELD CAMPUS

Proximity to feeder schools UTB is already invested in local programs that address primary student achievement and secondary education preparedness through early learning success centers and quality of life/public health research partnerships with the City. Continuing these efforts, [greater] Downtown Brownsville feeder schools can serve as laboratories in which education and health science students can begin to influence the trajectory of future UTB attendees.

[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

Proximity to jobs Job preparedness and placement are crucial to the success of a university. [Greater] Downtown Brownsville offers students immediate access to internships, work-study programs, business incubators, and post-graduate jobs.

JOBS TO POPULATION RATIO 100% 75% 50% 25% 0%

NUMBER OF JOBS 1 MILE RADIUS 5 MILE RADIUS 10 MILE RADIUS

[GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE 10,000

20,000

GOVERNMENT EDUCATION INST. HEALTH SERVICES FINANCE RETAIL /TRADE MANUFACTURING CONSTRUCTION *SOURCE: INFOGROUP - ESRI COMMUNITY ANALYST; TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

GREENFIELD CAMPUS 30,000

10,000

20,000


UTB 2.0 GREENFIELD CAMPUS

10 MILES

5 MILES

1 MILE [GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

10 MILES

LOCAL BUS NETWORK REGIONAL BUS NETWORK

5 MILES

1 MILE


CONNECTIVITY

TRANSIT HUB

In order for students and faculty to take advantage of the benefits that a [greater] Downtown Brownsville Village offers, transportation to and from UTB as well as transportation between UTB and surrounding city amenities must be efficient.

UN

A [greater] Downtown Brownsville location is fortunate to benefit from Brownsvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existing position as a regional hub. In addition to proximity to Route 4 and Route 77, [Greater] Downtown Brownsville and existing UTB assets are at the heart of an extensive public bus network that services all of Brownsville, the Lower Rio Grande Valley, and parts of Mexico. The newly built La Plaza Station is within walking distance to much of the [greater] Downtown area and connects to multiple city-wide bus, bicycle, and pedestrian routes. Because of this, UTB 2.0 is inherently accessible to safe and affordable options for regional and local commuters and is able of link riders to work and play destinations throughout the city. Additional connections- designated bike lanes, shuttles, and pedestrian paths-between UTB Urban and Academic Villages will only strengthen the existing strong network.

IV ER SI TY

URBAN VILLAGE

E AV NU E

ACADEMIC VILLAGE

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION LOCAL BUS NETWORK PLANNED BROWNVILLE BIKE TRAILS PROPOSED URBAN + ACADEMIC VILLAGE CONNECTOR

ACCESSIBILITY

BUS ROUTES WITHIN 1 MILE RADIUS

REGIONAL BUS LOCAL BUS PRIVATE BUS

$743 ADDITIONAL ANNUAL COST TO STUDENTS COMMUTING BETWEEN GREENFIELD AND [GREATER] DOWNTOWN

GREENFIELD CAMPUS

UT CAMPUS COMMUTER COMPARISION SAN ANTONIO [SUBURBAN] AUSTIN [URBAN] DRIVE

PUBLIC/SHUTTLE [GREATER] DOWNTOWN VILLAGE

CARPOOL WALK/BIKE

35%

74% 23%

32% 3% 0%

5% 28%

*SOURCE: ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SUSTAINABILITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION


UTB 2.0

URBAN VILLAGE

ACADEMIC VILLAGE

POPULATION DENSITY RESIDENTIAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS HEALTH MUSIC + CULTURE EDUCATION COMMERCE


AMENITIES + ACADEMIC STRENGTHS As universities compete for academic standing, location and identity play an increasingly important role in shaping a competitive edge. Urban universities especially benefit from this trend, as downtown settings offer greater accessibility, cultural resources, and a more lively campus community. The future growth of UTB will be linked to its ability to utilize the dynamic environment that exists in Downtown Brownsville to enrich its academic programs and to attract and retain top students, researchers, faculty, and staff. UTB’s position as an international border university paired with its ability to utilize the diverse community and rich Downtown culture as an urban laboratory for learning, increases UTB’s desirability as a forward- thinking educational model.

Health: The great public health challenges of this century are concentrated in urban areas, and students need a variety of patient populations and settings for study and work to tackle global epidemics. Brownsville’s historic core is rich with potential to develop relationships and healthy living strategies through bike lanes, walking trails, parks, quick access to nature reserves, and resacas. The UT Public Health department is already actively engaged with local studies and health centers. Music and Culture: The intersection of the campus and the city energizes the cultural life of both, providing increased performance and learning opportunities for students and faculty while building a vibrant regional arts destination. Existing infrastructure available is easily converted or returned to the purpose of supporting the arts. Adjacency to the city’s music events and Mexico’s rich music history is an added benefit for students to build upon the rich history of Brownsville. Education: Elementary, middle, and high schools are within direct proximity of UTB and demonstrate the mutually beneficial outcomes of embedding a university within communities that are historically underserved and underrepresented in higher education. Physical proximity provides a diversity of teacher training settings and close connection to local school systems. Commerce: Close connection to the local economy provides increased internship, job placement, and work-study opportunities as well as experiential learning and real-life case study situations. The City of Brownsville offers many internships and training opportunities for students in the [greater] Downtown Brownsville area.

HEALTH | WASHINGTON PK

CULTURE | HISTORIC MUS.

EDUCATION | TSC

BUSINESS | MARKET HALL


7T

H

ST

UTB 2.0 TY

SI

ER

IV

UN AVE

E AV

AT

ERN

INT

AL ION

URBAN VILLAGE SWIPE CARD BUILDING ACCESS ACTIVE PUBLIC SPACE STUDENT/PUBLIC DENSITY PATROLS

VILLAGE LINK ENHANCED LIGHTING CALL BOXES VILLAGE SHUTTLE DESIGNATED BIKE PATHS PATROLS

ACADEMIC VILLAGE SWIPE CARD BUILDING ACCESS ACTIVE PUBLIC SPACE STUDENT DENSITY ENHANCED LIGHTING PATROLS


CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY UTB’s investment in [greater] Downtown Brownsville will attract economic development funds generated by tax increment financing to areas surrounding the Academic Village. Mutually beneficial investment will fund improvement projects that elevate the quality, safety, and attractiveness of the public realm, such as redesigned complete streets along University, International, and other primary north-south connectors. In addition to funding, the 24- hour presence of UTB students downtown will bolster street life, retail, and other amenities as well as community interactions that occur in the most successful university districts and college towns. This virtuous cycle of economic development is what Judith Rodin, former President of the University of Pennsylvania, described as “enlightened self-interest.” By focusing its campus Downtown, UTB can anchor a vibrant urban district, provide greater access to Brownsville’s economically challenged population, and meet its current and future needs while benefitting the city and the greater Rio Grande Valley.

7TH STREET

POTENTIAL UNIVERSITY AVE

PEDESTRIAN SCALE OF EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE BIKE LANE DEFINED PLANTED MEDIAN

WALK

LANE

LANE

WALK

WALK

BIKE

LANE

LANE

MEDIAN

LANE

LANE

BIKE

WALK

72’

33’

POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL AVE CAR LANES NARROW, BIKE LANE ADDED SHADE STRUCTURES

Fort Brown Elizabeth St

Intl Bridge Mexico

SEATING BIOSWALE PLANTED MEDIAN

WALK

BUFFER

WALK

PARK

LANE

LANE

MEDIAN

LANE

LANE

PARK

BIKE

118’

7TH STREET

UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD

INTERNATIONAL BOULEVARD

WALK


FORM DETAILS


FORM

URBAN VILLAGE

5D

4E

5E

3F

4F

5F

4G 3H

6F


PKNG. LOT P .83 . IMPROVEMENT SF

$8,424 $ $8,

N1

S3

$156,000 $ 56,000

S1

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

N/A LAND COST

S2

N1 N 1 ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 5D 1

S4 S5

1


URBAN VILLAGE

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 4E

IMPROVEMENT COST

FORM

1

N1

O. BLDG 1.79 102,347

$405,600 $ 05,600 $1,041,800 $ ,0 ,800

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

N2

ACREAGE

N1 S1

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 5E

IMPROVEMENT COST

N1 N 1

1 5D

4E 5E

4F 5F

6F

3F

4G

3H

S4

$30,000 $37,192 $3 , 9 $ $126,000 $ , $7,137 $ , $8,750 $ , $6,562 $ , $54,250 $ , $71,095 $ , $33,000 $ , $60,222 $ ,

B

3,556 N/A N 600 6 00 6,790 9,818 9,8 8

S3

.14 .69 .69 .06 .06 .32 .32 .17 .

A

S3 S2

N N1 1 V. BLDG V N N2 2 P PKNG KNG . LOT LOT S S3A 3A S S3B 3B S S4

2

2


LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

$421,930 $ ,930 $70,269 $ $138,128 $ $227,718 $ $177,995 $48,648 $48,053 $ $220,280

.26 ..08 .0 08 14 1 4 ..14 14 ..41 ..14 ..07 .0 0 . .21

11,832 , 3 3,629 5,9444 29,510 9 9, 9,127 5,0 5 5,026 6 2,948 , 8 22,228 IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE ..90 ..90 .9 90

65,127 65,636

5

$53,3 $53,321 $ $221,999 ,999 $ $47,575 , $ $484,575 ,

N2

N1 N 1 N2 N 2

4

N1

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 4F

3

S2

N1 N2 N 2 N5 N 5 N6 N 6 S1 S S2 S S3 3 S S4

N4

S1

$92,160 $9 , 60 $27,840 $48,000 $48,000 $ $115,200 $38,400 $19,200 $57,600

N1

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 3F

3

4

5


URBAN VILLAGE

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGEE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 5F

IMPROVEMENT MPROVEMENT COST

FORM

1

N1

PKG LOT 1.79 P 1

11,368 1

$102,493 $ 0 , 93 $315,062 $3 5,06 $

N1

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

V. BLDG 1.79 434,925

N1

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 6F

IMPROVEMENT COST

N1 N 1

2

$120,580 $1,029,104 4

1 5D

4E 5E

4F 5F

6F

3F

4G

3H

2


11,150 IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

LAND COST

BLOCK 3H

N4

.14 N/A

N2

O. BLDG IMPROVEMENT SF

PKG LOT 1.56 1

N1

$59, $59,245 5 $29,611 $ 9,6

$48,000 $ 8,000 $205,224 $ 05,

S2

3

N5

S1

N1 ACREAGE

N1 N 1

N1

CURRENT USEE

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 4G

3

4

4


FORM

ACADEMIC VILLAGE

11J

12J

3J

19J 5J

4J 13J

14J

20J 21J

7J 6J

2J

15J


N1

BLOCK 3J IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

3 3,304

LAND COST

PARK P ARK 54.2

IMPROVEMENT SF

N1 N 1

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGEE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 2J

$ $113,481 3, 8 $32,166 $3 , 66 N1

O. BLDG 11.4 141,109 $2,22,132 $487,452 N1


ACADEMIC VILLAGE

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SQFT

ACREAGEE

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 4J

IMPROVEMENT COST

FORM

N5 N4 N3 N2

S4

N1-A S3

N1A N1A N1B N1B N2 N2 N3 N3 N4 5 N5 S1 S2 S3 S S4

V. BLDG V LLAND V. AND V LLAND V. AND V LLAND V. AND V.. LAND D V.. LAND D V.. LAND V. LAND V. LAND O. O BLDG

.90 ..80 80 1.2 1 .2 ..90 90 ..90 90 ..80 80 1.2 . 1.2 1.2 1.0

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A / N/A / N/A / N/A / N/A / 5,066

$137,737 N/A $ 3 , 3 / $118,135 N/A $ , / $138,251 N/A $ , / N/A $118,396 $ , / N/A $118,396 $ , / N/A $243,936 $ , / N/A $ $196,804 , / $ $196,804 , N/A N/A $ $239,841 , $ $392,040 $253,650 $

11J 3J 5J 4J 6J 2J

12J

19J

13J 14J 15J

20J

21J

N1-B S2 S1


N1 N 1 N2 N 2 S1 S 1 S2 S 2

V LAND V. V LA V. LLAND AND O. O. B BLDG LDG V. V. B BLDG LDG

3.23 1.00 1.0 .00 1.00 1.0 .00 1.41 1.4 .41

N/A N/A 4,754 4 N/A

$492,446 N/A $ 9 , 6 / $217,800 N/A $ , / $392,949 $292,933 $ , $ , $582,687 N/A $ , /

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

N/A

LAND COST

PARK P ARK 21.5

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 6J

N1 N 1

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 5J

$6 $62,350 ,350

N/A /

N1

S1

N2

S2

N1


FORM

N/A $1,604,020

N/A

IMPROVEMENT MPROVEMENT SQFT

IMPROVEMENT MPROVEMENT COST

ACADEMIC VILLAGE

LAND COST

N1

ACREAGEE

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 11J

V. LAND 80.2

IMPROVEMENT COST

$990,999 $463,544 $ $100 $

N/A A N/A A N/A A

IMPROVEMENT SF

LAND COST

N1 N2 N 2 N3 N 3

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 12J

V. LAND 23.0 V. V LAND LAND 2.66 2.66 V. V LAND LAND .71 .7 1

N/A N/A N/A

11J 3J 5J 4J 6J 2J

12J

19J

13J 14J 15J

20J

21J

N1

N1

N2

N3


N1 N 1 N2 N 2 N3 N 3 C1A C 1A C1B C B C2 C C3A C 3 C3B S1 S2 S3

V. V LAND V. V LAND LAND LA O. O. BLDG BLDG V. V LAND LAND LA PRKG G LOT O PRKG G LOT O PRKG LOT O PRKG LOT O. BLDG PRKG LOT O. BLDG

.99 . 1.53 1.5 .53 1.13 1 .13 .64 .6 4 .6 1.56 .56 .5 1.30 .30 .3 1.13 . 3 1.19 .61 .61 .61

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

IMPROVEMENT SF N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A / N/A / N/A / N/A / 1,248 , N/A / 450

$637,452 $63 , 5 $ $58,785 $ , $44,142 $ , $22,219 $ , $111,963 $ , $21,429 $ ,

$361 $36 $230 $ N/A / N/A / N/A / N/A /

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 14J

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A / N/A /

LAND COST

1.63 1 1.04 1.0 .04 .78 .7 8 .7 1.02 1.0 .02 2.86 .86 .8 .98 .9 8 .9

LAND COST

PRKG LOT P PRKG PRKG LOT LOT LO OT PRKG PRKG LOT LOT LO OT PRKG PRKG LOT LOT LO OT PRKG G LOT O PRKG G LOT O

IMPROVEMENT SF

N1 N1 N2 N2 N3A N3A S3B S 3B S1 S S2 S

ACREAGE

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 13J

$128,757 N/A $ 8, 5 / $99,874 N/A $ , / $74,078 N/A $ , / $83,531 N/A $ , / $90,492 N/A $ , / $184,181 N/A $ , / $59,262 N/A $ , / $62,370 N/A $ , $99,317 $96,422 $ , $ , $2,275 $88,633 $ , $ , $28,460 $133,031 $ , $ ,

N3-A N2

N1

N3-B S1

S2

N3 N1 C1-A

N2 C3-A C2

C1-B S1 S2 S3 S4

C3-B S5


3.10 3 2.02 2.02 2.02 2.02 2.02 2.02 2.69 .69

N1 N 1 S1

V. LAND 2.27 2 V. LAND 3.79

N/A N/A

$63,368 $105,576

N/A NA N/A

11J 3J 5J 4J 6J 2J

12J

19J

13J 14J 15J

20J

N1

N2

N3

N/A $134,992 $ 3 ,99 / N/A $44,053 $ , / $914,922 $61,674 $ , $ , $851,656 $61,674 $ , $ , $1,038,933 $82,075 $ , $ , ,

IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

CURRENT USE

BLOCK 19J

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT MPROVEMENT SF N/A N/A 40,500 40,500 60,685

IMPROVEMENT COST

V. LAND V. V LAND LAND O. O. BLDG BLDG O. O. BLDG BLDG O. O. BLDG B DG

ACADEMIC VILLAGE

LAND COST

N1 N1 N2 N2 N3 N3 N4 N4 N5 5

ACREAGEE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 15J

IMPROVEMENT MPROVEMENT COST

FORM

21J

N1 S1

N4

N5


N1 N 1 V. V LAND 37.1

V. V LAND 60.7 IMPROVEMENT SF

ACREAGE

CURRENT USE

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

N/A $371,200 $3 , 00 $ $8,241 $ $8,

IMPROVEMENT IM MPROVEMENT COST COST

BLOCK 21J LAND COST

N/A

LAND COST

IMPROVEMENT SF

N1 N1

ACREAGE

CURRENT USEE

BLOCK 20J

$189,070 $ 89,0 0 N/A /

N1

N1


University of Texas at Brownsville Charrette  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you