Page 1

JESSICA GROSSI

architecture portfolio


DESIGN 01

INSIDE OUT: CONSTRUCTING THE CUSTOM ENVIRONMENT

02

INNER COAST: OUTER LIMITS

03

THE CITY WITHIN THE CITY: FORTEZZA DA BASSO

04

KGW SALON & SPA

05

CATALYZING THE URBAN EDGE

06

SEAM, BORDER, SKIN: LOFTED PROFILES

07

PROJECTIVE CARE UNIT

M. ARCH I Thesis Project, Trenton, NJ (2011)

Pavilion for America’s Cup, San Francisco, CA (2011)

Institute of Architecture, Urbanism, & Civil Engineering, Florence, Italy (2010)

Freelance Documentation & Design, Lawrenceville, NJ (2010)

Urban Library and Community Center, Syracuse, NY (2009)

Library Addition for the People’s Place, Syracuse, NY (2009)

Healthcare & Safe Motherhood Clinic, Tamale, Ghana (2010)


DRAWINGS & ANALYSIS

JOHNSON MUSEUM OF ART

08

URBAN ANALYSIS: FORM AND IDEOLOGY

09

SEAM, BORDER, SKIN: PROGRESSION OF THE SECTION

10

FREEHAND CHARCOAL DRAWINGS

11

COLOR STUDY PAINTING AND COLLAGE

12

Enclosure Study (2011)

Diagramming the Development of Florence, Italy (2010)

Sectional Study of Bibliothèque Sainte-Genevieve (2009)

(2008)

Little Yellow Horses by Franz Marc (2006)


DESIGN


01

INSIDE OUT: CONSTRUCTING THE CUSTOM ENVIRONMENT M. ARCH I Thesis Project, Trenton, NJ (2011)

My thesis delves into the notion of interior environments as reflections of personality that can directly affect the public realm, in this case Trenton NJ. My project became an implementation of structural furniture upon the city of Trenton and, as such, its attempt to redefine housing and ideas of interiors. The impetus for this was the concept of the Soul Box, the Art Nouveau idea of using the interior as a way of expressing individuality as well as becoming a haven from the urban metropolis. However, the Art Nouveau style had a difficult time responding to the masses as it lacked the ease of mass customization and mass production. Half a century later, IKEA was able to tap into this idea of the Soul Box while being able to produce products that can be customized at an affordable price. Though IKEA addresses the interiors of the domestic realm, it fails in applying the system of flat-packed products to the creation of complete spaces. Seeing this void, my thesis began to develop a structural furniture system that, though comprised of basic components, has the potential for customization at any economic level. Mercer County, New Jersey, especially along Route 206 in Princeton, Lawrenceville, and Trenton, was seen as the best example of a clear cross section of all economic levels. Trenton became the focus site as it was the densest and most impressionable, with a variety of user groups and housing situations. The user groups were defined as Family of Four, Single Mother, Retired Couple, and Single Male/Female and were seen as renting or owning property. Currently, Trenton is mainly comprised of single family attached homes, with two families occupying one house. The implementation of structural furniture within these buildings, as well as adjoining vacant lots, allows for the capacity of the house to increase and the customization of the interior and exterior for the user. In the case of 513-521 Brunswick Avenue, the two houses and one vacant lot were transformed from housing four user groups to eight distinct user groups.

Trenton, NJ

Scale: 1” = 500’

Route 206 Corridor

Scale: 1” = 150’


513-521 BRUNSWICK AVENUE


495 BRUNSWICK AVENUE

PROGRAMMATIC REQUIREMENTS

SINGLE FAMILY ATTACHED

FAMILY OWNER| Clinton J. Carter

KITCHEN

MASTER BEDROOM

RESIDENTS| Clinton J. Carter, wife, two children CLINTON J. CARTER| 39 years old Black Native to New Jersey High School Graduate Employed| Private Wage Worker

DINING ROOM

2 BEDROOMS

2 FULL BATHS

LIVING ROOM

ESTIMATED HOUSEHOLD INCOME| $55,000

STAIRCASE

REC ROOM

1 HALF BATH

561 BRUNSWICK AVENUE

SINGLE MOTHER

PROGRAMMATIC REQUIREMENTS

SINGLE FAMILY ATTACHED

Single Mother

OWNER| Walter T. Morton RESIDENTS| Susan Sporn, two children

MASTER BEDROOM

KITCHEN

SUSAN SPORN| 32 years old Black Native to New Jersey High School Graduate Employed| Salary Worker ESTIMATED HOUSEHOLD INCOME| $40,000

2 BEDROOMS

1 FULL BATH

1 HALF BATH

535 BRUNSWICK AVENUE

COUPLE

DINING ROOM

LIVING ROOM

STAIRCASE

PROGRAMMATIC REQUIREMENTS

SINGLE FAMILY ATTACHED

OWNER| Jose E. Rivera RESIDENTS| Jose E. & Juanita Rivera

MASTER BEDROOM

KITCHEN

Couple

JOSE E. RIVERA| 63 years old Hispanic Native to New Jersey College Graduate Employed| Retired Private Wage Worker ESTIMATED HOUSEHOLD INCOME| $60,000

1 BEDROOM

1 FULL BATH

1 HALF BATH

825 BRUNSWICK AVENUE

SINGLE

DINING ROOM

LIVING ROOM

STAIRCASE

PROGRAMMATIC REQUIREMENTS

1 TO 2 BEDROOM APARTMENT RENTALS

OWNER| Brunswick Village Apartments

1 BEDROOM

KITCHEN

RESIDENTS| Abel Reyes ABEL REYES| 24 years old Hispanic Native to New Jersey Did Not Graduate High School Employed| Salary Worker ESTIMATED HOUSEHOLD INCOME| $16,000

1 FULL BATH

LIVING ROOM

Single


COMPONENT ASSEMBLY

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INTERIOR WALL FURNITURE COMPONENT ASSEMBLY

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EXTERIOR WALL FURNITURE COMPONENT ASSEMBLY

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RIGHT NOTCHED

SINGLE (2’) UNIT DOUBLE (4’) UNIT

RIGHT GROOVED

DOUBLE (4’) UNIT LEFT NOTCHED

LEFT GROOVED

CORNER UNIT

16'-

0"

SPATIAL CONSTRUCTION WITH CORNER STRUCTURE

"

8'-0

WALL FURNITURE COMPONENT ASSEMBLY

"

8'-0

FIRST FLOOR

SPATIAL CONSTRUCTION WITH CORNER STRUCTURE

WALL FURNITURE COMPONENT ASSEMBLY

First Floor

SECOND FLOOR Second Floor


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First Floor

Second Floor

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Couple

UP

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Single Mother

UP

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Family

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Apartment Complex 1& 2


02

INNER COAST: OUTER LIMITS

Pavilion for America’s Cup, San Francisco, CA (2011)

The design vehicle for this investigation was the new America’s Cup racing facilities in San Francisco, a strategically sited event space that could have an effect on the public life of the city beyond the timeframe of the event. The project engages questions of how architecture can intervene in and proactively transform San Francisco’s Embarcadero, a former working port that is now an urban waterfront landscape. The scope of the project involved designing new facilities at Piers 27-29 for the America’s Cup race, including the main pavilion, public hospitality and exhibition area, media center, viewing platforms, and yacht berths. The intervention was allowed to make connections at the site’s edges, to the Embarcadero, the adjacent piers, and the Cruise Ship Terminal. The early phases involved the design of a three-dimensional “construct” which delved into ideas of inward and outward oriented spaces. The ideas addressed through this construct offered the beginnings for architectural propositions to be brought to the site. A reinterpretation of the evolving coastline of San Francisco yielded a construct with continuous surfaces that folded upon one another, creating spaces that could be imagined as occupiable above and below. Ultimately, the idea of evolving profiles became the strategy for design, integrating the original structures located upon Pier 27-29 as drivers for the creation of a new architectural profile that would rise out into the bay. The lofting of the truss systems of two separate structures towards one another and to the bay creates a new profile. As a result, the final structure becomes a series of folding surfaces that act as interior and exterior seating platforms with views oriented towards the America’s Cup racing route.

Pre-Industry and Infill

1873

1929

Present Day


Angel Island Marin Headlands

Pier 27 Truss Treasure Island

Alcatraz Golden Gate Bridge

Pier 29 Truss

Pier 27

Pi

er

29

Bay Bridge


Merchan dising

spitality

Merchan dising

Team Ho

Bathroo m Bathroo m Merchan dising

m

Ba th ro o

Fo o

d

C

ou rt

Ticketing

Site Plan

Ground Level

Ticketing


ForeDeck Club

Exhibition Space

Gathering

Amphitheater

Event Seating

Amphitheater

Second Level

Third Level


Section A

Section B

Section C

Section A

Section B

Section C


03

THE CITY WITHIN THE CITY: FORTEZZA DA BASSO Institute of Architecture, Urbanism, & Civil Engineering, Florence, Italy (2010)

This project presents the opportunity to think about, experiment with, and determine an attitude regarding the thinking and making of the built environment and its relationship to a given set of histories and values that exist in a European city. The Fortezza da Basso of Florence was originally a defense station for the Medici government in the 16th c. Today the Fortezza is home to Florence’s largest annual fashion shows, trading events, and concerts. It also represents a miniature representation of the city of Florence itself. The Fortezza offers two recurring conceptual and physical problems that occur in contemporary cities: the challenge of contemporary representation in a historically defined context and the problem of fragmented urban form, space, and program. Interdisciplinary demands are quite strong on the arts of architecture and urban design. As such, the proposed program is the design of an Institute for the Advanced Study of Architecture, Urbanism, Civil and Environment Engineering. The building and grounds are seen as open to the public and as an extension of the urban environment of the city. Acting as an extension of the urban environment, the proposed structure becomes a part of the larger surrounding infrastructure, mimicking the train tracks that wrap around the Fortezza da Basso. Just as the train network link the city of Florence to its surroundings, the Institute acts as a direct connection to the walls and existing buildings within the Fortezza, moving students and visitors throughout the entire site.


N


N

First Level

N

Second Level


N

Third Level

N

Fourth Level


KGW SALON & SPA

Freelance Documentation & Design, Lawrenceville, NJ

KGW Salon & Spa required the assessment and creation of a renovation proposal for an existing one story residential house in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The project included designing an enclosed sun porch addition to the rear of the house to act as the main salon space while the existing interior spaces were reprogrammed as ancillary salon and spa areas.

Main Salon

Massage

Washing & Drying

Kitchen

Office

Facials & Waxing

04

Reception

Waiting


05

CATALYZING THE URBAN EDGE

Urban Library and Community Center, Syracuse, NY (2009)

This studio focused on the idea of catalytic interventions and the capacity of architecture interventions to generate and articulate larger urban process. The site for this project was located in Syracuse, defined by the intersection of East Fayette St. and Westmoreland on the South and Erie Blvd on the north on the east side of the city. The chosen site escapes a clear definition as it is neither urban nor suburban. The site confronts a range of scales and conditions through its adjacency to a traditional residential neighborhood to the south and the Erie Blvd commercial strip to the north. Programs emerge in a seemingly spontaneous manner, inhabiting the site erratically as reactions to the external cultural or economic demand. The result is a series of urban grey zones which lack any sense of internal block consistency, unification, or programmatic rational missing. The key element of this project was to embrace these grey zones, designing an urban library and community center within one of these zones that would enhance itself through the strengths of its neighbor. The chosen grey zone is situated beside an urban housing development as well as several residential houses and commercial structures, all connected through walking paths and views. Moving away from the housing development, the topography of the site becomes extreme in its fluctuation between being steep and shallow. With this in mind, the urban library strives to embrace these topographical changes. The structure mimics the changing elevation through a series of overlapping floor plates which provide views from above and below into each area.


Day Care Main Library

N

Ground Level

Offices

Gallery

Cafe

Main Library

Study Models

Sub-First Level

N


Offices Auditorium Cafe

Children’s Library

Sub-Second Level

N

Basement Level

N

Final Model


Section B

tion Middle East

Section A

Sectional Perspective

N

Section A

Section B


Sectional Perspective


06

SEAM, BORDER, SKIN: LOFTED PROFILES Library Addition for the People’s Place, Syracuse, NY (2009)

A first-year studio exercise considered the border line of profiles as both an analytical tool to comprehend architectural relationships and a generative device for making architecture. The potential of a profile was explored by documenting and deploying the complex lines that make up the interior of Hendricks Chapel on the Syracuse University campus. Creating a digital photographic collage, the studied element, in this case the wall of the main gathering space, began to be seen as an assemblage of many parts. Multiple scaled vertical profiles were produced to articulate this area of the building. From this, the technique of lofting in Rhino was used to experiment with generating surfaces from the profiles. This resulting surface was utilized in creating a new programmatic space for use within Hendricks Chapel in conjunction with The People’s Place, a student-run operation that services the SU campus with coffee, refreshments, and lounge space in the basement. The new intervention functions as a library, the surface acting as built-in shelving and seating.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

IV Pump OR Bed

Crash Cart

Thermal Blanket Machine

Anesthesia Machine

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Instrument Cart

Instrument Cart

OR Bed

Soiled Linen Hamper

Ventilator Anesthesia Cart

Anesthesia Machine

Venitlator, IV Pump, and Monitor with drawer space for ventilator tubing and anesthesia equipment

Ultrasound Ultraclave with electronic base and instrument storage

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRO

Trash

OPERATING ROOM

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Ultrasound

Crash Cart

PRODUCED BY A

Thermal Blanket Machine

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Check-Up Bed

IV Pump

Ultraclave

Check-Up Bed

Monitor with electronic base and instrument storage

Instrument Cart

MATERNITY ROOM

CT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Ultrasound

Ultraclave

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDEN

PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

DENT PRODUCT

Ultrasound

Monitor

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

IV Pump

CED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Monitor Ultraclave

Computing

Trash

PRODUC

ODUCT

Soiled Linen Hamper

Computing

ODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

The goal for this new health care facility is to reexamine issues of programming associated with hospital design, providing spatial arrangements dictated by equipment requirements and disease treatment, thus creating an efficient environment. The resulting facility will deal with the climatic issues, utilizing SITumbra, a glass curtain wall system, as a means of addressing heat gain as well as program viscosityÂŹ. The SITumbra will passively modulate the solar gain of the building by deferring the heat away from the structure through the newly developed material. All these elements combine to create a three zoned clinic, with the internal program working in tandem with the actual structure. The transparency of the facade increases as privacy within decreases.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUC

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

This comprehensive design studio revolved around the design of a new model of health care facility for deployment in Tamale in The Republic of Ghana in West Africa. In addition, the program of the Projective Care Unit required the specific and rigorous understanding of medical and healthcare technologies. This facility must accommodate frontline, primary, preventative, surgical, trauma, and diagnostic functions in a compact, innovative unit. Within this set of specialties there are two primary areas: Intensive Care and Primary Care with supporting programs. While the health care facility must be flexible to accommodate a range of needs, the number one focus is on safe motherhood with safer prenatal care, births, and early childhood.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Healthcare & Safe Motherhood Clinic, Tamale, Ghana (2010)

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

07

PROJECTIVE CARE UNIT


Total Incident Radiation

Total Absorbed Radiation

Total Incident Radiation

W h / m2

Total Absorbed Radiation

W h / m2

5000+

5000+

4540

4540

4080

4080

3620

3620

31 60

31 60

2700

2700

2240

2240

1 780

1 780

1 320

1 320

860

860

400

400

CURTAIN PANEL 1

Total Incident Radiation

Total Absorbed Radiation

CURTAIN PANEL 2 Total Incident Radiation

Total Absorbed Radiation

W h / m2 W h / m2 5000+ 4540 4080 3620 31 60 2700 2240 1 780 1 320 860

5000+ 4540 4080 3620 31 60 2700 2240 1 780 1 320 860 400

400

CURTAIN PANEL 3

CURTAIN PANEL 4


Low-E Emittance Double Pane Glass

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT Me

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Ph

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Ma

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Zone 3

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Recovery Re

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Clinic

PRODUCED BYBYAN PRODUCED ANAUTODESK AUTODESK STUDENTPRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENTSTUDENT PRODUCT

July 1, 12:00 pm

Bio-composite and Recyclable Polymer

Low-E Emittance Double Pane Glass

2

OR

1

1

Lab

Lab 1

Lab

Children's Exam

2

2

OR

3

OR 2

www.autodesk.com/revit

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

4

4

Recovery

3

Waiting

Recovery

5 Education

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

www.autodesk.com/revit www.autodesk.com/revit

Consultant Consultant Address Address Address Address Address Address Phone Phone

5 Education

Waiting 3

Consultant Consultant Address Address Address Address Address Address Phone Phone

Consultant Address 5 Education Address Address Phone

Recovery

3

OR

Waiting

Consultant Consultant Address Address Address Address Address Address Phone Phone

Waiting

PRODUCED BY PRODUCED BY AN AN AUTODESK AUTODESK STUDENT STUDENT PRODUCT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

n's

Zone 2

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Sc

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

om

Zone 1

OR

an

X-Ra y Ro


Mechanical Lab

Clean Utility

Dark Room

X-Ray Dirty Utility

Doctors' Office OR

W.C.

OR Sub-Sterile

ICU Children's Exam

W.C.

Scrub Room Exam OR Children's Exam Maternity

Clinic

Pharmacy

Maternity Recovery

Recovery Education

N TOTAL SUNLIGHT

TOTAL RADIATION


East Elevation

West Elevation

North Elevation


South Elevation


STROZZI

RUCCELLAI

MEDICI

PAZZI


DRAWINGS & ANALYSIS


Enclosure Study (2011)

SKYLIGHT DETAIL

Mechaniccal Duct

Drain Pipe

08

JOHNSON MUSEUM OF ART

The skylights are located at the Sculpture terrace, an outdoor extension of the third floor. These skylights are set down into the sides of the concrete in such a way that they appear to float in place. Zooming in on the skylight, it becomes apparent that the glass is not flat but rather angled downward towards the center of the structure. This allows water to funnel off of the glass rather than pooling above.

Poured In Place Concrete

Rigid Insulation

Plywood Neoprene Gutter Metal HVAC Header

Sealant Aluminum Stop

Damper

Aluminum Fascia

ARC623 Advanced Building Systems

Laminated Safety Glass

Invisible to the eye, the skylight has a gutter system built into its surroundings. Water is able to run off the glass and enter the gutter where it is then distributed out through a drainage pipe. Nestled within this system is the mechanical system below.

Spring 2011


Neoprene Rope

Neoprene Blocking

Sealant

Glass

Damper

Metal Air Supply Cabinet

The north elevation acts similarly to the south elevation, with a large series of glass panels looking out onto the landscape. The way the enclosure acts with the mechanical system demonstrates its level of transparency as a skin while retaining its exterior image of being bold and massive.

Poured In Place Concrete

Rigid Insulation

Metal Angle

Gypsum Board

Diffuser

ARC623 Advanced Building Systems

NORTH ELEVATION DETAIL

The window sills along all four sides fluctuate between being perfect 90 degree angle sill and having a 45 degree slant set out from the glazing system. This slanting of the window sill allows air from the HVAC system to come out through the envelope and up through the air supply cabinet. There is an unseen connection between the rooms and the plenum. These elements are hidden from the user’s sight by once again embedding these systems within the concrete core of the building.

Spring 2011


09

URBAN ANALYSIS: FORM AND IDEOLOGY Diagramming the Development of Florence, Italy (2010)

RADIAL GEOMETRIES Using historical and contemporary maps, photos, and archival resources, the development of the city of Florence through key historical periods was drawn through a series of two and three dimensional diagrams. These analytical drawings illustrate the city form as seen through selected armatures with specific programmatic and spatial systems that revolve around key buildings and spaces. In doing so, a hidden aspect of the city was revealed. Analyzing four specific armatures from overlapping time periods of Florence’s urban expansionist history, it becomes clear that there is a secret relationship. These four narrative arrangements relate to one another through an outward radial progression, originating at the original Roman city center of Piazza della Repubblica. These narrative paths act as sight lines that focus towards the center of the city.


CENTER OF FLORENCE ARMATURE The first armature focuses upon the three different centers of Florence. The religious center of Santa Maria del Fiore and the civic center of Palazzo Vecchio emerged as the new focal points of the city. However, the two still correspond to the original Roman center of Piazza della Repubblica, equidistant to the true city core.

BRUNELLESCHI ARMATURE The second armature is the narrative created by the commissioned works of Brunelleschi, including the Ospedale degli Innocenti, Santa Maria del Fiore, and Santo Spirito. Once again the two extremes of the progression are the same distance from the Roman center and the natural walking path from one to the other includes Piazza della Repubblica.


MEDICI ARMATURE The third armature includes the projects commissioned by the Medici family, of which there were many. The narrative begins at San Marco and its gardens and travels past Palazzo Medici, San Lorenzo, Palazzo Vecchio, and the Vasari Corridor, ending at Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens. The two Medici gardens act as the bookends for this armature and focus back to Piazza della Repubblica.


POGGI ARMATURE The final armature is the urban renovation by Giuseppe Poggi in the 1860s, where the city walls were demolished and a ring road with new piazzas at key points was established. The radial center for this road system is the Roman city center with Piazzale di Porta Romana, Piazzale di Porta al Prato, Piazzale Dontello, Piazza Cesare Beccaria, and, most important with its own narrative progression, Piazzale Michelangelo focusing back towards this central point.


10

SEAM, BORDER, SKIN: PROGRESSION OF THE SECTION Sectional Study of Bibliothèque Sainte-Genevieve (2009)

Hand drafted on two 25”x38” sheets, the sectional drawing of Bibliothèque Sainte-Genevieve was an investigation of the ceremonial progression of space specific to the Parisian library. Since attention needed to be made to the seam of the two sheets, another important aspect of the drawing was the understanding of Bibliothèque Sainte-Genevieve being the seaming together of the heavy masonry base and the light iron arches of the main library hall. From this analysis, the section of Bibliothèque Sainte-Genevieve was combined with that of Prada Tokyo to create a hybrid section. The section addresses the same issues of ceremonial progression through two distinct spaces and the movement between an enclosed and heavy space with an open and light space. This is done through the merging of the diagrid glass structure of Prada and the masonry core of of Bibliothèque Sainte-Genevieve.


11

FREEHAND CHARCOAL DRAWINGS (2008)


12

COLOR STUDY PAINTING AND COLLAGE Little Yellow Horses by Franz Marc (2006)

Based on Franz Marc’s 1912 painting Little Yellow Horses, this series employed two different mediums to replicate the image through hue, shade, tint, and intensity seen in the original Marc painting. The first original is a replication through the use of paper materials such as magazines, cardstock, construction paper, and color aid paper, all of which were cut or torn then pieced together with rubber cement to mimic the general hue. The second original is executed through acrylic paints on canvas, using at most ten different acrylic paint colors, which were then mixed to match each specific color of the image.


Jessica Grossi | Architecture Portfolio  

Portfolio of work completed while in the Masters of Architecture program at Syracuse University

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