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ENDEAVORS E N G I N E E R I N G

PG 02

Heron Tower London

The city’s first steel intensive, six-star office development, combining luxury with strong environmental credentials. PG 28

Carlo Borer Switzerland

Swiss sculptor Carlo Borer’s work is defined by its unusual forms and complicated interplay between lines and surfaces.

I N N O V A T I O N S

Issue 3


CONTENTS

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Heron Tower, London Located in London, the Heron Tower is the city’s first steel intensive, six-star office development built around the revolutionary concept of a three-floor ‘village’ and combining luxury with strong environmental credentials.

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Dhananjay Dake, Construction Catalysers Pvt Ltd The Founder and Creative Director of Construction Catalysers Pvt Ltd, talks about how structures need to be a combination of good aesthetics, functionality and environment-friendliness, underpinned by technological innovation and sound engineering principles.

02 14

Restoration of Cutty Sark, Greenwich Meticulously conserved and presented, the restoration of the 143-year-old Cutty Sark in Greenwich, London by Grimshaw Architects transforms the material vestiges of the world’s only remaining tea-clipper into a bold memento of British seafaring supremacy.

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The Capital, Mumbai Anchored in the nerve of Mumbai’s financial centre, The Capital, designed by Hong Kong-based James Law Cybertecture International, is a futuristic structure that moulds form and functionality with the highest degree of sustainable performance.

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Defined by its unusual forms and complicated interplay between lines and surfaces, Swiss sculptor Carlo Borer’s work translates purely computed work into solid realisation with the artistic intention of stretching one’s imagination.

28 JSW STEEL EDITORIAL TEAM

Ashok Bharadwaj - Sr VP, Marketing Sandeep Khanna - DGM, Marketing Khushnaz Irani - Junior Manager, Marketing

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SPECIAL THANKS

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Dhananjay Dake - Founder and Creative Director, Construction Catalysers Pvt Ltd P V Rao - Managing Director, Pennar Engineered Building Systems Ltd (PEBS Pennar) Anshul Singhal - Director, JSW Severfield Mustafa Ghouse - CEO, JSW Sports Mukund Gorakshkar - GM–CSR, JSW Foundation

JASUBHAI MEDIA

Editorial - Rashmi Naicker Design - Mansi Chikani Sales - Parvez Memon

Mr P V Rao, PEBS Pennar The Managing Director of Pennar Engineered Building Systems Ltd (PEBS Pennar), discusses the evolution of PEBS Pennar, its innovations, challenges and the future of PEB industry.

JSW STEEL PATRONS

Subramaniam M - Sr VP, Sales - Long Products Sharad Mahendra - Sr VP, Sales - Flat Products Sanjay Jayram - Sr VP, CRM (Sales) & Head (SBU-A)

Sculptures by Carlo Borer, Switzerland

Rebuilding Faith In the aftermath of the disastrous floods and rains that lashed through Uttarakhand, JSW Foundation is co-ordinating the relief work in Uttarkashi district of Uttarakhand in association with Centre for Environment Education (CEE).

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Pipeline Steel Development and Production of High Strength Pipeline Steel.


FOREWORD Jayant Acharya Director (Commercial & Marketing)

Dear Friends, The past few years have been a journey of recovery from the global meltdown and consolidation in steel industry. The global economic climate posed several challenges, but we, as a nation, have made the best use of our resources and abilities to grow. India’s domestic steel demand survived the economic slowdown and is poised to increase in the coming years. With the rural sector contributing to almost two-thirds of India’s population, it is imperative to focus efforts towards the growth and development of the segment. This will play a key role in driving the domestic demand in future. There has been a significant difference recorded in the consumption of steel between the urban and rural areas. The rate of consumption in the rural areas is 12kg per capita which is remarkably lower than urban per capita consumption. Thus, the utilisation and development is in its infancy and vast potential still exists for the growth of this sector - some segments being steel grain silos, solar panels, low-cost housing, to name a few.With the rising influx of rural population to urban centres, it is building up an additional pressure on the already inadequate urban infrastructure. To counter this, the development of satellite cities and townships has become crucial. To match the pace of the changing scenario, steel-intensive construction which is faster and eco-friendly is the most feasible alternative to the traditional methods of construction. A rough analysis of global steel consumption shows that around 52 per cent of the world steel production goes to the construction sector. Share of steel consumption in the infrastructure and construction sector is higher in developing economics than in the developed ones. Chinese construction sector accounts for 57 per cent of the total finished steel consumption in the country. In India, nearly 63 per cent of finished steel consumption is in the construction sector. The increasing rate of urbanisation in the country with higher use of technology will help create new cities and new avenues for young India; thereby resulting in increased steel consumption. Through ‘Endeavors’, it is our aim to promote the consumption of steel in the country. We should seek motivation from the already existing iconic steel structures across the globe and encourage some of the good work being done in this sector in India as well. This issue features Heron Tower in London and The Capital in Mumbai, both, iconic and futuristic sustainable steel-intensive structures. They are pinnacles of modern architecture, with innovative usage of steel, energy efficiency and environment friendly construction. Wishing you all a very Happy New Year 2014. Happy Reading! Sincerely Yours, Jayant Acharya Director (Commercial and Marketing)


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COVER STORY

PATTERN perfect Located in London, the Heron Tower is the city’s first steel intensive, six-star office development built around the revolutionary concept of a three-floor ‘village’ and combining luxury with strong environmental credentials.

LEFT

Defining the northern edge of the city core, the development offers a flexible 4,083sqm of commercial office and retail space, with a public restaurant and skybar. RIGHT

At a height of 230m, Heron Tower is one of the the tallest towers in the city of London.


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A

t 230m height, Heron Tower, designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox for property development group Heron International, is one of the tallest buildings in the City of London, occupying a prominent site at the junction of Bishopsgate and Camomile. A transparent and articulate structure, the Tower responds to its context, tempering urban concerns, by making a positive contribution to the public realm and addressing environmental requirements through its maintenance, operation and use of innovative technology.

ABOVE

The richly textured North-eastern elevation of the tower reveals the stacked ‘villages’ and the atria.

The Tower comprises of a ‘three-floor village concept’, wherein each unit comprises of full base floor and two gallery floors arranged around a North-facing atrium. The main structure is fabricated of conventional composite floorplates supported at each level on steel columns. As a central structural core would have compromised the floorplate, the decision was made to move the building’s complete service systems to the South. This

involved incorporating a steel tube around the perimeter whose loads are taken by perimeter columns, into the secant wall foundations. Thus, the external steel structure helped cutting down the need for intrusive internal columns. This provided the structural stability needed by a 46-storey building while maximising the open floor space. The tube also helped speed up the process of construction, as the basement and the structure above could proceed in tandem. The durability and solidity of the Tower was, thus, enhanced by the use of material; combining stainless steel ‘linen’ finished cladding with clear glazing. This is translated at the street level with a setback of covered three-storeyed arcade on the Bishopgate and a full-height glazing, connecting the street to the building. Severfield-Reeve Structures were responsible for the connection of design, fabrication and erection of the 12,000 tonnes of steelwork required for the structure.


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The southern façade is incorporated with one of Europe’s largest integrated photovoltaic arrays which reduces solar gain, generates renewable energy and acts as a thermal shield.

TOP

The lobby features a 70,000-litre aquarium containing over 1,200 fish. CENTER

The Tower comprises of a ‘three-floor village concept’, wherein each unit can be maintained and operated individually. BOTTOM

Roof-level dining terraces, and public restaurant and bar provide unrivalled views across London.


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HOUNDSDITCH

OUTWICHSTREET

BISHOPSGATE Goods lift lobby Low rise lift lobby

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

HOUNDSDITCH

25.4m (approx)

Atrium void OUTWICHSTREET

BISHOPSGATE

49.5m (approx)

Goods lift lobby

Male toilets Female toilets

Low rise lift lobby

A TYPICAL LOWER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN

HOUNDSDITCH

25.4m (approx)

Atrium void OUTWICHSTREET

BISHOPSGATE

49.5m (approx)

Female toilets

Male toilets

Goods lift lobby

High rise lift lobby

A TYPICAL HIGHER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN


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SCHEDULE of net internal areas

Floor

Floor type

40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 Mwzz 1 G BI B1/1

Restaurant / Bar Restaurant / Bar Restaurant / Bar Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices Offices

Sqft

The use of three-storey ‘villages’, beautifully expressed on the façade and centred around atriums, break up the isolated stratification of individual floor, common in tall office buildings, to bring inter-floor engagement and interaction.

Sqm

5,049 3,089 5,285 10,775 10,366 10,764 12,540 12,142 13,509 12,540 12,142 13,099 12,540 12,142 13,509 13,540 12,142 12,562 11,603 11,603 12,938 11,969 11,571 12,938 11,969 11,571 12,938 11,969 11,571 12,938 11,969 11,571 12,938 11,969 11,571 12,938 12,583 12,185 12,938

469 287 491 1,001 963 1,000 1,165 1,128 1,255 1,165 1,128 1,217 1,165 1,128 1,255 1,165 1,128 1,167 1,078 1,078 1,202 1,112 1,075 1,202 1,112 1,075 1,202 1,112 1,075 1,202 1,112 1,075 1,202 1,112 1,075 1,202 1,169 1,132 1,202

Retail/Restaurant 4,435 Retail/Restaurant 1,335 Retail/Restaurant 2,077 Storage 657

412 124 193 61

Total Offices 439,552 40,836 7,847 Total Retail/Restaurant 729 Total Restaurant/Bar 13,422 1,247 461,478 42,873 Total Building

70,096sqft

Village 11 6,512sqm

37,781sqft

Village 10 HIGH RISE 3,510sqm VILLAGES

38,191sqft

Village 9 3,548sqm

37,244sqft

Village 8 3,460sqm

36,144sqft

Village 7 3,358sqm

36,478sqft

Village 6 3,389sqm

36,478sqft

Village 5 3,389sqm

36,478sqft

Village 4 3,389sqm

36,478sqft

Village 3 3,389sqm

36,478sqft

Village 2 3,389sqm

37,706sqft

Village 1 3,503sqm

Terraces East terrace level 38 North terrace level 38 Office terrace level 35 Total terrace

LOW RISE VILLAGES

1,249sqft 1,894sqft 1,442sqft 4,585sqft

SCHEDULE OF NET INTERNAL AREAS 250

200

150

100

50

m Name: City: Country: Illustrator: Status: Finished: Floors: Use: Antenna: Spire: Roof:

Heron Tower Greater London ENG United Kingdom John Hinds proposed 46 office

Tower 42 Greater London ENG United Kingdom John Hinds built 1980 43 office

30 St Mary Axe Greater London ENG United Kingdom SPE built 2004 41 office

242m 202.5m

183m

179.8m

A COMPARITIVE ANALYSIS

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116sqm 176sqm 134sqm 426sqm

The design of the Tower provides highly flexible workspaces, which support diverse tenant needs. A series of 11 three-storey ‘villages’ and one six-storey ‘village’ – with a full-height atrium at the heart of each ‘village’ – create independent spaces which can be maintained and operated individually, and also provide high levels of visual connectivity and maximum daylight penetration into the building. Each village, also has its own plant and can be naturally or artificially ventilated. These ‘villages’ are structurally expressed on the northern face by the stainless steel cross-bracing, articulated to the East and West, thus animating the façade. With the service core on the South side, the South façade was incorporated with one of Europe’s largest integrated photovoltaic arrays which reduces solar gain, generates renewable energy and acts as a thermal shield. The Tower’s variegated façades are carefully designed to suit their orientation. Sophisticated in form, yet sustainable in its use of material, the Heron Tower has achieved the BREEAM rating of ‘Excellent’ with estimated carbon dioxide production of 30kg/sqm per year. The use of


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three-storey ‘villages’, beautifully expressed on the façade and centred around atriums, break up the isolated stratification of individual floor common in tall office buildings, to bring inter-floor engagement and interaction. Responding to its urban context, the redevelopment of the Heron Tower site also incorporates significant improvement to the public realm; opening up a pedestrian section to the North and creating an arcade along Bishopsgate, providing a generous footpath to the busy street and addressing the Grade II listed St Botolph’s Church located opposite to the site. Roof-level dining terraces, and public restaurant and bar provide unrivalled views across London. The entrance lobby is defined by a dramatic 12m long tropical fish aquarium, the largest privately owned aquarium in Europe. The mass of the building is also recessed at the upper levels – at the restaurant and bar – cut back in three storeyed steps up to the highest point at the South-west corner, crowned by a 92ft stainless steel mast.

The durability and solidity of the Tower was, thus, enhanced by use of material; combining stainless steel ‘linen’ finished cladding with clear glazing. LEFT TOP

The 202m office tower was topped by a 28m stainless steel communication mast, taking the overall height to 230m. LEFT PAGE BOTTOM

FACT FILE

Bringing a touch of Manhattan to the London skyline, the Heron Tower is a straight forward structure that seeks to reconcile multiple design objectives in its planning, environmental performance, urban design, construction logic and expression. Project:

Heron Tower

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Architects:

Kohn Pederson Fox

Client:

Heron International

Structural/Fire/Acoustic Engineer: Arup

Heron Tower’s total structural steel piece count was 8,500 with a tonnage of 11,000MT.

Building Services:

ABOVE

DP9

Responding to its urban context, the redevelopment of the Heron Tower site also incorporates significant improvement to the public realm.

Foreman Roberts

Planning Consultant: Main Contractor: Skanska

Lighting Design:

Illuminating Concept


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INTERVIEW

“Craftsmanship and technology

go hand in hand…”

Dhananjay Dake, Founder and Creative Director, Construction Catalysers Pvt Ltd, talks about how structures need to be a combination of good aesthetics, functionality and environment-friendliness, underpinned by technological innovation and sound engineering principles.

A mechanical engineer by training, Dhananjay Dake specialises in new age architectural engineering. His work experience ranges from designing and manufacturing to installing structures. He started Construction Catalysers as a design and build consortium for new age architectural engineering. Since its inception, the company has completed more than 200 projects all over India and abroad. Dhananjay’s forte lies in buildings with low life cycle costs, prestressed cable nets, bi-directionally curved glass surfaces, tensile structures, pre-manufactured and assembled components, component buildings, lightweight high strength bridges, structural sculptures and ecologically diverse environments. As a professional and through his practice, Dhananjay has designed some of the most innovative structural engineering projects that have an integrated creative vision with cutting-edge technology. He has spoken at several national, international seminars and colloquia, and is a visiting faculty at some of the leading architecture and engineering schools in India. Dhananjay is currently working towards creating service integral structures and efficient synergy of the five elements.

Construction Catalysers has grown to become one of the leaders in the area of space structure design and architectural realisation. Could you trace its journey since its inception in 1987? What have been your key strengths? For Construction Catalysers Private Limited, the journey has been of a passion and hobby where the aim has been to transform dreams into realisation. My elder brother being in the field of architecture, intrigued me to explore it further. This opened a window for me to study structures where mechanical engineering played a vital role. The very first project was to make a scaled model for a warehouse. After this, I read a paper by honourable architect Buckminster Fuller and that inspired me to make space frames. This further led me to Frei Paul Otto for tensile structures. We always have the quest to give innovative complete design build ideas that are tailor-made for the specific purpose. That also helped us to explore various building materials and their properties. We have always strived and emphasised on detailing to the last screw size. The sculpted structural elements and minimalist approach for use of materials made our structures to be one of a kind. A mechanical engineer by training, you


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turned to architectural engineering as a way of combining education with your love for art. With rapid advancement in building, engineering and technological field today, what is the significance of integrating architecture and advanced engineering with technological sophistication? Nature has been my inspiration where all sciences are together and do not stand alone. Likewise no single stream of knowledge can give solutions in design. The integrations of five elements (earth, water, sky, wind and energy) for the spaces to live in, demand for a cohesive thought process.

ABOVE

A cable stayed FoB at Vallabhnagar, Pimpri Chinchwad, Pune

In the competitive global market scenario, structural engineering firms recognise the necessity of providing low cost, high quality designs within a smaller time frame. Could you explain some of the solutions that are adopted today to provide for the same? Globally, tensile structures have proven to stand up to the parameters of low life cycle cost, fast erection and high quality. Tensile

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structures have also been very versatile for the volumes to be covered and are in a range from reservoirs, dams, bridge roofs, etc. The synclastic surfaces also help to reduce section sizes that make the structure look aesthetically pleasing. What has been the most challenging project that you have worked on in your career? ILFS Dome: We were awarded this contract in 1998 and it was a challenge for our team to execute a job of that scale (50m long axis x 35m long axis diameter oval atrium) and at height of 40m at that time. The building was almost at the finishing stage at the time of our execution, so we had to face a lot of challenges while handling those huge girders. We had to install the structure with manpower and Derrick and mind you, we could not use cranes then. Your work in many ways prefigures the critical challenge to what architecture as a practice embodies. Although it may sound


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Globally tensile structures have proven to stand up to the parameters of low life cycle cost, fast erection and high quality. like a very generalist question, do share with us your vision on sustainability and your opinion about the current architectural environment. World over, the scenario is to make iconic structures. This has led us to explore new materials and at the same time, technology is also being applied. It has also enabled us to give justice to the environmental and social aspects guiding the design. I feel this is the era where craftsmanship and technology go hand in hand to realise unprecedented dream work. ALL IMAGES

The ILFS dome at Bandra Kurla Complex.

With the stress of innovation amidst the unprecedented rate of urbanisation and

industrialisation, what are the challenges the structural engineers around the world would be facing? And what are the solutions that they are coming up with, especially in India? Leave alone the structural engineers, the new age demands all professionals to have a holistic approach for their solutions to the world where different streams of knowledge and technology work towards achieving. As far as the Indian scenario is concerned, I feel we have not explored material properties to the hilt for their structural strengths. One has to give way for lateral thinking process.


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ARCHITECTURE

RISE OF THE

PHOENIX Meticulously conserved and presented, the restoration of the 143-year-old Cutty Sark in Greenwich, London by Grimshaw Architects transforms the material vestiges of the world’s only remaining tea-clipper into a bold memento of British seafaring supremacy.

A

unique attempt at the conservation of a small fragment of Britain’s maritime history, the design of the Cutty Sark hauls the structure and copper shell of the 19th century ship and erects a museum to its glory. The Cutty Sark is positioned within the freshly landscaped Cutty Sark Gardens, the riverfront gateway to the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site. While the hoisted sail of the 963 tonne ship majestically towers in the horizon, the museum forms an ocean of glass below, almost as if portraying its return to the waves. The glass bed supported by a triangulated canopy structure provides a new entrance at the northern end of the site and shelters an underground museum space. Docking in water being impracticable owing to the extent of corrosion, the Cutty Sark itself is suspended three meters off the ground and balanced as if sailing on this bed of glass. A series of steel armatures on either side of the ship hold it airborne, as the mighty vessel hangs still, confident, frozen in a limbo between the ground and flight. Two portal doors within the canopy mark the main entrance and reveal a double height reception area directly beneath

the stern of the ship. The rudder of the vessel divides the space longitudinally with the entry bridge to the right and the main staircase into the dry berth to the left.

Revival From the Ashes… Eliminating the salt-induced corrosion of the iron frame of the ship, the originally conserved iron work identifies itself with white painted vertical ribs, horizontal keelsons, deck beams and supporting posts. In contrast, all freshly introduced strengthening steelwork is distinguished with a coat of grey. The inner faces of her massive hardwood hull planks are fixed to the ribs; all 540 of them being individually removed, cautiously treated for any decay and damage and reattached to the ship. Substantial timber lining the hull is salvaged from rotting and rusting of iron frame and is recovered wherever possible to maintain utmost authenticity. Having stood on its keel in a dry dock for years, Cutty Sark’s hull, sagging and deforming due to the weakening of the iron ribs, is treated through a dual approach. The corroded iron


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ABOVE

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The structure and copper shell of the 19th century Cutty Sark is hauled and a museum is erected to its glory.


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The steel structure not only preserves the shape of the ship’s iconic hull, but also enables an additional public space to be created in the dry berth below, allowing visitors to walk underneath and admire the ship’s form.

ABOVET

Conceptual sketch. RIGHT TOP

The Cutty Sark is suspended, hanging still and confident, frozen in a limbo between the ground and flight. RIGHT BOTTOM

The glass bed supported by a triangulated canopy structure provides an entrance and shelters the underground museum.

frame is replaced with new sections of steel ribs. The redistribution of the weight of the ship is done by lifting the vessel at regular intervals along its length with 12 new triangulated steel frames. These frames take the form of an inverted coat hanger, with two tie rods from the ship’s keel running diagonally to each end of a horizontal strut that span the width of the ship immediately beneath the Tween Deck. This inverted hanger frame carries the dead load from the ship’s keel and masts to the new external support points, affixed immediately above the uppermost waterline.

A Bridge to the Past… The journey of discovery of the historic Cutty Sark begins with the entrance bridge at the stern of the ship that leads to the interior at the lower Hold Deck level. To exhibit the structural concept of the

ship and the dry berth with utmost visual clarity, the bridge is designed without any vertical supports. Four raking posts spring up from the lowest of the dry berth steps to meet the curved steel section which spans from the reception to the ship. As the bridge approaches the ship, it reaches the first of the supports spanning from the dry berth wall to the stern of the ship through an upper step bridge. As the visitor approaches the hull, the doorway into the ship becomes visible. This single entry point minimises the removal of existing iron-work, and the sliced timber planks are left exposed to reveal the composite structure of the hull. For intuitive way-finding, stainless steel hand-railings, web-net balustrading and pale blue rubber flooring run as constant elements throughout the interior of the museum.


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Reliving History…

ABOVE RIGHT

The Bridge is designed without vertical supports, but with four raking posts instead. ABOVE LEFT

Lacing the vessel at the waterline, the supporting cradles tie the ship together and hold it aloft.

One enters the historic seafaring titan at the Hold Deck Level, the storage space used for Cutty Sark’s cargo. A new steel deck is provided to act as, both, a passageway and a viewing point for the interior of the hull. An extremely complex but elegant prestressed system hangs and stabilises the ship in its new position. The steel structure not only preserves the shape of the ship’s iconic hull, but also enables an additional public space to be created in the dry berth below, allowing visitors to walk underneath and admire the ship’s form. Lacing the Hold Deck are the supporting cradles, which simultaneously tie the ship together and hold it aloft. New metal plates along the perimeter hold the iron ribs together, passing around the ship below the Tween Deck and encased beneath the reinstated hull planks. The twelve sets of horizontal beams and diagonal ties form a triangle between the metal plates and new box keelson which encases the ship’s original keel, fixing its vertical position and preserving the ship’s iconic shape from within. A thirteenth cradle completes the system by connecting the stern of the ship to the keel. To cause as little visual distraction as possible

from the ship’s original structure, the new steel cradles have been integrated with the existing fabric of the ship wherever possible. The bases of the ship’s three masts also pass through the space to rest on the keel below. The three cargo hatches remain, two of which are used for vertical circulation within the ship by means of a new stair and platform lift. All new circulation routes are kept within existing openings in the ironwork skeleton of the ship, to minimise interventions in the existing fabric and ensure that all alterations are reversible. Ascending from the lowermost Hold Deck, the visitor reaches the Tween Deck. Historically a secondary cargo storage area, the deck now functions as the main exhibition space within the ship. Placed at the either end of the space are the solid iron walls which separated the ends of the ship from the cargo areas in case of damage at sea. The uppermost Weather Deck is open to the sky and provides stability to the hull and a weathertight enclosure for the decks below. The route continues from the Weather Deck across a suspended bridge to the Access Tower, a new ancillary structure


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on the right side of the ship. The bridge is supported from the tower, and is structurally separate from the ship. The main function of the tower is to provide a secondary accessible route for all to the ship and dry berth, as well as housing fully accessible restrooms, vertical circulation cores and a secondary ticketing and security kiosk. The steel components of the tower and bridge are exposed, reminiscent of the functional elements of a working dockside with internal black stained timber cladding echoing shipyard and maritime coastal structures. The façade is single glazed to maintain views to the ship.

ABOVE LEFT

The uppermost Weather Deck is open to the sky and provides a weathertight enclosure for the decks below. ABOVE RIGHT

The canopy structure and the vessel with its 100ft-high masts and their rigging.

The route then descends the tower stairs to reach the level of the dry berth floor below the hull of the ship. It passes through the new basement, constructed adjacent to the dry berth to house essential services and restroom facilities for the public and a new preparation kitchen for events. Passing through a short corridor, one reaches the opening to the dry berth, arriving below the lifted colossal hull of Cutty Sark for the very first time. Resting three metres above the ground, the contours of the Muntz metal clad hull are visible as if

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the ship is suspended in water, with the glass canopy enveloping the space to meet the hull at its highest waterline. The canopy structure is completely separated from the hull, to allow movement of the ship under the wind loads and avoid unnecessary intrusions into the fabric of the vessel. The 24 struts additionally resist substantial wind loads created by the 100ft high masts and their rigging. This array of vertical angles, formed as they lean over to follow the contours of a waterline, stabilises the ship and prevents it from swaying, or oscillating in the wind or to the rhythm of visitor movement. The glazing is solar coated, to provide maximum energy efficiency within the space below, and protection from heat. The walls of the dry berth purposefully left exposed narrate an important event of the ship’s story. Formerly housed within the confines of the Tween Deck, the largest collection of merchant navy figureheads in the world owned by the Cutty Sark Trust is displayed beneath the bowsprit of the ship and Cutty Sark’s own figurehead ‘Nannie’. Accessed by the existing concrete steps of the dry berth and located above the figureheads is the viewing gallery, which positions one


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TOP LEFT

The inclined compression struts from the new strike plates in the hull. TOP RIGHT

The canopy structure is completely separated from the hull to avoid unnecessary intrusions into the vessel. CENTER

The triangulated canopy and the solar-coated glazing. BOTTOM LEFT

The 12 pairs of inclined compression struts from the new strike plates in the hull to the dry berth wall support the ship aloft. BOTTOM RIGHT

The cafĂŠ at the southern end.


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SECTION THROUGH THE HOLD DECK

SECTION SHOWING THE COMPLEX BUT ELEGANT PRE-STRESSED SYSTEM THAT STABILISES THE SHIP IN ITS POSITION

directly below the bowsprit of the ship, with a full view of the bow of the hull and the cradle supports beyond. Springing from the new strike plates in the hull of the ship, the twelve pairs of massive inclined compression struts rest upon the existing dry berth wall, ensuring safety and stability.

History helps provide identity. Though we live in a time of rapid change and progress, where we prefer to define ourselves in terms of where we are going and not where we have come from, history is an extremely important element for our identity and hence, is its conservation. The restoration of the Cutty Sark tea-clipper, a small element of Britain’s history and its transformation into an assertive relic of Britain’s pride, secures its future as an inspiration for adventurers to come. It ensures that the understanding, respect and value linked with human achievements and their significance to the history of the world remain unscathed.

SECTION THROUGH THE TWEEN DECK

FACT FILE

The cradle system is entirely adjustable via giant turnbuckles set within the primary ties and struts, which carry the weight of the ship and its visitors down to the mass concrete of the original dry dock. A café at the southern end offers a chance for refreshments and the dry berth functions as a unique event space, able to cater for up to three hundred guests seated directly below the ship’s hull. Ascending the main stair, the visitor returns to the reception and retail area, before exiting to Cutty Sark Gardens.

Project:

Cutty Sark

Location:

London, England

Architects:

Grimshaw Architects

Principal Architect:

Sir Nicholas Grimshaw

Design Team:

Chris Nash, Diane Metcalfe, Jorrin Ten-Have, Den Farnworth, Joe Laslett

Client:

The Cutty Sark Trust

Engineering Consultants: Buro Happold

Photographs:

Jim Stephenson

Completion: 2012

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ARCHITECTURE

A Symbiotic

Expression Anchored in the nerve of Mumbai’s financial centre, The Capital, designed by Hong Kong-based architect James Law Cybertecture International, is a futuristic structure that moulds the form and functionality with the highest degree of sustainable performance.


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E LEFT

The futuristic commercial building aims to house some of the most prestigious and prominent international corporations and banks. ABOVE LEFT

With a series of offices set upon a retail podium, the commercial complex is a graceful structure with sinuous lines and an intriguing profile. ABOVE RIGHT

The West elevation of the building features an incredible step-in glazedvalley façade, in the form of an organically warped glass curtain wall.

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stablishing a new dialogue with the existing suburban expression of the city, The Capital, designed by James Law Cybertecture International is a combination of innovation, technology and the urban fabric, in a way that is environmentally conscious and sustainable. Located in Mumbai’s financial nerve centre, The Capital aims to change office building design and inspire a new wave of building in India with a strong focus on energy efficiency. Spread over 32,000sqm, the structure combines the perceptible resource of construction materials with intangible assets such as technology, multimedia, intelligence and user interactivity. The revolutionary concept provides a symbiotic relationship between the urban fabric and technology.

a lobby that is three-storeyed high. The West elevation of the building features an incredible step-in glazed-valley façade, in the form of an organically warped glass curtain wall that stretches up to the full height of the building and gives the entrance a unique statement. The magnificent front-east façade of the building is inscribed with an inset elliptical feature which houses LED panels that is not only employed as a dynamic information display but also acts as a functional shading device for the building’s front yard. A PVDF coating on the exterior minimises UV radiation and makes the façade easier to maintain, while diffusers in the ceiling reflects natural light into the atrium all the way down to the lower podium level, reducing lighting demands.

With a series of offices set upon a retail podium, the commercial complex is a graceful structure with sinuous lines and an intriguing profile that welcomes its visitors to

The design promotes material and façade approaches that are integral to the performance of the building systems, and are not just as aesthetic elements.


24

ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

Every feature and function is based upon enhancement and a performance-driven design which benefits both the occupiers and environment through a minimal carbon footprint.

In addition, spot cooling in the atrium reduces the cooling load, while operable windows in the offices encourage natural ventilation. Natural waterfalls and vegetation in the atrium also help in enhancing the natural cooling effect. Meticulous planning offers huge plates with scalability option that are best utilised with flexibility and efficiency. The building has a ten-storey tall atrium in the shape of an oval, containing an architectural ellipse that has offices looking over the green space and integrated with premium amenities like smart parking and sky lobby, thus offering tenants an office space of AAA-rating. The structure’s design focuses at capitalising on nature and its features, making this commercial hub an eco-friendly investment. Every feature and function is based upon enhancement and a performance-driven design which benefits both the occupiers and environment through a minimal carbon footprint. The building factors in a sustainable ecosystem, derived from an integrated and seamless employment of innovation and technology to give the building’s inhabitants a conducive environment to work in.


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ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

OFFICE

GLASS WITH LED

3000

H

OFFICE

3000

OFFICE

9800

9800

5

9800

6

9800

7

9800

8

9

9800

10

9800

11

9800

9800

12

REFUGE AREA

13 14 9550 6425

3000

5525

A

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

11150

OFFICE

3000

AHU

3850 3900 3900 3900 3900 3900 3900

OFFICE 8

OFFICE 8

OFFICE 7

OFFICE 8

OFFICE 8

OFFICE 7

GLASS WITH LED

L.V. ELV RM.

F.LAV

OFFICE

800 3000

7550

COMMON CORRIDOR

COMMON CORRIDOR

D.C. ROOM

6450

L.V. ELV ROOM

LT PANEL ROOM

D

COMMON CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV COMMON ROOM CORRIDOR

L.V. ELV COMMON ROOM CORRIDOR

OFFICE

OFFICE

E

H

OFFICE

F.LAV ENTRANCE ATRIUM LOBBY

F

COMMON CORRIDOR

3900

OFFICE

OFFICE

4200

LOADING SPACE

L.V. ELV RM.

3000

LIFT LOBBY TO BASEMENT

AHU

3300

LOADING SPACE AHU M. LAV

L.V. ELV ROOM

COMMON CORRIDOR

M.LAV

4775 FLUSHUING WATER TANK

2150

L.V. ELV ROOM

2150

H

L.V. ELV ROOM STP & SOFTENING PLANT

2150

L.V. ELV ROOM

2150

F.A SHAFT

250

R.C.C. FLAT SLAB EDGE LINE

WATER TANK AND PUMP ROOM

L.V. ELV ROOM

2500

2660

L.V. ELV ROOM

2500

SUPPLY COMPANY HT BREAKER ROOM

SECURITY CABIN

6200

LEGEND

6200

G

8675

SECURITY CABIN

8475

7625

CONSUMER HT BREAKER ROOM

3150

6450

OFFICE

TRANSFORMER ROOM-6

TRANSFORMER ROOM-5

TRANSFORMER ROOM-4

C

FOOD COURT

TRANSFORMER ROOM-3

GYM/SPA

TRANSFORMER ROOM-1

EXH SHAFT

TRANSFORMER ROOM-2

B

COMMON CORRIDOR

COMMON CORRIDOR

OFFICE

OFFICE

3900

9800

4

OFFICE

3900

3

OFFICE

3900

2

3000

1

L.V. ELV ROOM

OFFICE

94225

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

OFFICE

L.V. ELV ROOM

L.V. ELV ROOM

OFFICE

3000

3000

REFUGE AREA

L.V. ELV ROOM

3900

3000

G

OFFICE

3900

REFUGE AREA

3900

OFFICE 14

OFFICE

3900

L.V. ELV ROOM

OFFICE

3900

3000

7625

3000

OFFICE 15

OFFICE 9 OFFICE 10 OFFICE 11OFFICE 12 OFFICE 13

3000

OFFICE 8

OFFICE

3900

L.V. ELV ROOM

OFFICE

OFFICE

83000

L.V. ELV ROOM

OFFICE

OFFICE

3900

L.V. ELV ROOM

3000

L.V. ELV ROOM

G

3900

5525 7550 6450 2500

OFFICE 6

H

7625

MEP AREA

OFFICE

OFFICE

F

F

6450

MEP AREA

OFFICE 4 OFFICE 5

OFFICE 1

11150

E

11150

2500

E

6450

D

BOUNDARY LIMIT

6450

UPPER FLOOR LIMIT

OFFICE 3

C

7550

GROUND FLOOR LIMIT

VOID OFFICE 2

C

D

UPPER FLOOR LIMIT

VOID

B GROUND FLOOR LIMIT

BOUNDARY LIMIT

B

5525

3000

A

3000

13 14 5425

3000

9550

3000

12

3000

9800

3000

11

9800

3000

10

3000

9800

3000

9

9800

3000

8

9800

3000

7

9800

3000

6

3000

9800

3000

5

3000

9800

3000

4

3000

9800

3000

3

9800

3000

2

3000

1 A

L.V. ELV ROOM

SECURITY CABIN

3

OFFICE 2

REFUGE AREA

SKY LOBBY

OFFICE 7

OFFICE 8

OFFICE 5 OFFICE 7

OFFICE 4 OFFICE 5

(MEZZANINE FLOOR)

D.G. ROOM

OFFICE 4

FOOD COURT

OFFICE 3

OFFICE 2

3900 3900 3900 3900

OFFICE 2

OFFICE 2

OFFICE 2

OFFICE 1

OFFICE 1

OFFICE 1

OFFICE 1

GYM/SPA

3900

3900

3900

3900

OFFICE 1

3900

OFFICE 1

2600 2150 2150 2150 2150

EAST ELEVATION

83000

OFFICE 1

4775

TRANSFORMER TRANSFORMER TRANSFORMER ROOM-4 ROOM-2 ROOM-6 TRANSFORMER TRANSFORMER TRANSFORMER ROOM-5 ROOM-3 ROOM-1

OFFICE 2

OFFICE 3

OFFICE 5

3900

2850 3000 3000 3000

3000

OFFICE 8

3000

3000

RESTAURANT

3000

3000

OFFICE 4

3000

3000

OFFICE 5

OFFICE 2

REFUGE

3000

3000

OFFICE 5

OFFICE 3

REFUGE AREA

3000

3000

OFFICE 4

OFFICE 3

OFFICE 1

3000

3000

OFFICE 4

REFUGE AREA

REFUGE

3000

3000

OFFICE 4

REFUGE AREA

OFFICE 1

3000

3000

OFFICE 3

OFFICE 2

OFFICE

3000

3000

OFFICE 3

OFFICE

3000

3000

OFFICE 2

REFUGE AREA

REFUGE AREA

OFFICE

3000

3000

OFFICE

OFFICE

3000

3000

OFFICE

OFFICE

3000

3000

OFFICE

REFUGE AREA

3000

3000

OFFICE

OFFICE

3300

3000

OFFICE

MEP AREA

2400

2850

OFFICE

2 9800

3900

9800

3900

4 9800

3900

5 9800

OFFICE

(MEZZANINE FLOOR) 5025

6 9800

3900

7 9800

3900

8 9800

3900

9 9800

BOUNDARY LIMIT

UPPER FLOOR LIMIT GROUND FLOOR LIMIT

BOUNDARY LIMIT

3475

10 9800

3900

11 9800

3900

12 9550

UPPER FLOOR LIMIT

13 6425

GROUND FLOOR LIMIT

14

3850

SECTIONAL ELEVATION

4200

EIGHTH FLOOR PLAN


26

ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3


The design promotes material and faรงade approaches that are integral to the performance of the building systems, and are not just as an aesthetic element. LEFT

FACT FILE

ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

Project:

The Capital

Location:

Mumbai, India

Architects:

James Law Cybertecture International Holdings Limited

Client:

The magnificent front-east faรงade of the building is inscribed with an inset elliptical feature which houses LED panels for information display and also works as a shading device.

VIJAY Associates (WADHWA) Developers

ABOVE TOP

Pratibha Industries Ltd

Meticulous planning offers huge plates with scalability option that are best utilised with flexibility and efficiency.

M&E Engineers:

MEP Consulting Engineers Pvt Ltd

C&S Engineers:

M/S Mahimtura Consultants Pvt Ltd

Contractor:

Completion of project: December 2011

Building height (metres):

ABOVE BOTTOM

103m

Waiting area at the lobby of the building.

Building height (storeys):

ABOVE RIGHT

The building factors in a sustainable ecosystem, derived from an integrated and seamless employment of innovation and technology

27

32 storeys

Gross Floor Area (square metres): 68000sqm

Site Area (square metres): 6676sqm


28

ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

ART

Zoetic Forms Defined by its unusual forms and complicated interplay between lines and surfaces, Swiss sculptor Carlo Borer’s work translates purely computed work into solid realisation with the artistic intention of stretching one’s imagination.

E

very work of sculpture, ancient or modern, figurative or abstract, or some combination of both, is said to give expression to the aesthetic relationship between a material and the space it occupies and transforms. It is to the specific attributes of the material — its physical scale, its material character, and its formal structure — that a sculpture owes its principal identity as a work of art. Yet one’s response to that identity is inevitably contingent upon the ways in which the structure of the form engages and redefines the circumambient space in which it is seen.

At the heart of each of Carlo Borer’s open-form, discreetly beguiling sculptures, lies a conundrum. How can substantial metal appear so weightless? How can the linearity of a material be transformed to such fluidity? Just as a Möbius strip doubles back on itself to create a trick of infinity, Borer’s works, subtly probe contradictions amid certainties. Despite their rounded contours, his works do not make an organic impression in the sense of biomorphic natural growth – for this, the curves change direction too abruptly, the lines too unpredictable and the cuts


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

29

Carlo Borer’s works are sculptures of experience and as such, they refer to space and the spatial situation of the viewer. They are fundamentally multi-perspective and must be approached visually from all possible angles by walking around them.


30

ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

The peculiar geometry of these structures of gleaming chrome steel or, lately, of rusted steel, stands somewhere unclassified between the poles of natural charm and technoid construction. and angles between the individual surfaces dysfunctional. The peculiar geometry of these structures of gleaming chrome steel or, lately, of rusted steel, stands somewhere unclassified between the poles of natural charm and technoid construction. Many of these sculptures circle around themselves, some form a system of closed rings or loops that intersect at different points. Borer acknowledges that some of his works have a certain ’psychedelic quality‘ due to this irresolvable strangeness. Since with the exception of a very few works, Borer leaves his sculptures untitled; he foregoes determining their effect or guiding the viewer’s imagination in a certain direction. Borer’s works do not depart from closed volumes and compact masses. Instead, lines and surfaces in space are the essential creative elements of his works; surfaces turning in on themselves and hard edges form a stark contrast within their forms. He develops all of his sculptures with the aid of special CAD (Computer Aided Design) programmes. The artist deals with two basic creative variations; the first is drawing freely in space, whereby each line always refers to a second track. In this, the surfaces that come about move through space in an open or closed profile, namely called the ‘two guide sweep surface’, which are later imbued with solid volume. Often these are works moving as waves or loops. At times, they are


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

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ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

Borer leaves his sculptures untitled, and thus foregoes determining their effect or guiding the viewer’s imagination in a certain direction.


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

incomplete ‘rolled-up’ surfaces, perforated at times with numerous openings. The ‘two guide sweep surfaces’ distinguish themselves in a manner where each point of one line is connected by a straight line to a respective point on a corresponding second line. In this way, the individual surfaces of the spatial structures are calculated and unwound and are consequently projected onto two dimensions in a manner that individual surfaces are cut out of sheets of steel using laser. The complete sculpture is then assembled from these individual plates. This also applies to the second basic possibility of inventing forms at the computer. In this instance, however, Borer takes a defined geometric solid as a point of

33

departure and cuts segments out of it using negative geometric forms. For the most part, the initial forms – which Borer also refers to as ’mother forms‘– are cones or blunt cones which may be rotated symmetrically. Carlo Borer’s works are sculptures of experience and as such, they refer to space and the spatial situation of the viewer. They are fundamentally multi-perspective and must be approached visually from all possible angles by walking around them. One may only properly experience their complicated geometry if one follows their outlines and grasps the interplay between material forms and perspectives as well as the changing relationships between the forms with their unexpected curves and angles.


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ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

CUSTOMER SPEAK

Steel is likely to be predominantly used for many years into the future

Mr P V Rao, Managing Director of Pennar Engineered Building Systems Ltd (PEBS Pennar), discusses about the evolution of PEBS Pennar, its innovations, challenges and the future of PEB industry.

PEBS Pennar is a reckoning power in the Pre-Engineered Steel Building Solutions providers in India as a single podium that delivers varied solutions like Design, Manufacturing, Supply and Installation of Pre-Engineered Steel Building Solutions and Building Components. Associated with PEBS Pennar since its founding year, Mr P V Rao has been an intrinsic part of its exceptional journey and milestones. Rising from his stint as the President of the company, he went on to become the Executive Director In May 2010. In February 2013, he was promoted as the Managing Director of the company owing to his outstanding leadership qualities which have commanded PEBS Pennar to a significant growth in a short span of time. Apart from this, Mr Rao also contributes to the industry as the Joint Secretary of Pre-Engineered Building Manufacturer’s Association (PEBMA) and as an active member of the Institution of Engineers, the largest multidisciplinary engineering professional institution of India.


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

Do enlighten us about the experience and expertise that defines your journey with PEBS Pennar. What kind of growth has the company witnessed since it was founded in 2008? PEBS Pennar has successfully leveraged the expertise of its parent company to make a mark in the construction industry in a remarkably shorter span of time. The company has achieved a total revenue of `326Cr in FY13 against `35Cr in FY10 which is in line with the company projections and achieving a stronger growth with orders from some of the biggest names in the country - namely Bosch, Schneider Electric, Proctor & Gamble, Godrej & Boyce, Larsen & Toubro, UltraTech Cement Ltd, Dr Reddy’s Laboratories, Hindustan Construction Company, Indian logistics, etc to name a few, covering a variety of industry segments such as Cement, Glass, Heavy Engineering, Tobacco, Sugar, Logistics, Automobile/Auto Ancillary, Pharmacy, etc.

LEFT TOP

Jayabheri Orange County, Ground+10 floors building, Hyderabad. LEFT BOTTOM

Mounting structures for 6.21 MW SPV project for Cirus Solar, Hyderabad. ABOVE

A Manufacturing Unit for Schindler India Pvt Ltd, near Pune, Maharashtra.

PEBS Pennar has diversified into new segments like Cold Form Structures, and Solar mounting structures with diversified portfolio and technical expertise. The Company has also expanded its venture into the Multi-storied Building and Multi-level car park sectors. Could you tell us about your landmark projects? What significant ventures are in the pipeline? PEBS Pennar has completed a landmark project for UltraTech Cement Ltd which is a Stacker Reclaimer building with a clear span

35

of 99m. The building is 350m long and has 27m peak height. This is the largest clear span building ever built by any PEB company in India and is also believed to be the largest clear span building in Asia. The project was a challenge with respect to both designing as well as installation. It had no reference which made the entire design to be contesting. Stability was the major concern with collateral load of dust from the existing unit, wind speed and seismic load. PEBS Pennar has completed a Ground+7 formulation/R&D building for Bharat Biotech which is 33m high. Decking system used for flooring has a capacity of taking load up to 7KN per square meter. The roof and the wall panels are provided with thermal insulation to maintain it cool from the outside atmosphere. A Ground+10 commercial building for Jayabheri Properties - Orange County at Hyderabad, which is one of the landmark projects and completed in a remarkable time. Also a Ground+3 lab building for Gland Pharma at Hyderabad which is completely air-conditioned and completed in an exceptionally less time. The company has bagged an order of multilevel car park for Lu Lu Mall, Cochin, through Sobha Developers. The project is under execution and will be completed by the end of this year. A warehouse building for IOT Infra commissioned by ONGC OPAL is being built at Dahej, Gujarat. The building is 1km long and 135m wide with an area of 131,350sqm.


36

ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

The structure is the largest single PEB building ever done by any PEB manufacture which covers such a vast area. Could you tell us about key technological innovations? What are your strengths in R&D? Covering a wide spectrum of application areas, PEBS Pennar has brought innovation, design distinction, international expertise and above all, global quality to every customer who aspires for technological and structural superiority.

TOP

Schindler India Pvt Ltd, Pune, Maharashtra.

Double Lock roofing system is one of the USPs of PEBS Pennar which is being offered in technical association with NCI Group, USA. It has built a track record of being the most reliable leak-proof roofing system globally. The product is FM approved and UL90. The system comes with leak proof warranty of 10 years. With its assured weathertight advantages, this system is better suited for India. Regarding the benefits of the system, it reduces risk of leakages from roof, facilitates thermal expansion and contraction of the panel without any damage. It is tested for wind uplift, fire and hail damage, offers simplicity, flexibility and durability, and comes with pre-punched panels and components.

Pre-Engineered building systems epitomise efficiency. Would you say that this building system is also energy efficient or sustainable? How? We follow strict adherence to design codes and practices. We have the latest engineering updates and softwares to design highly complex buildings. Our designs are vetted by institutions like IIT Madras and IISC Bengaluru on regular basis. Normally, our steel buildings fetch 15 to 20 LEED points and can gain more by adding some features like roofing system with high SRI index, roof top solar system, energy simulation, etc. We have a specialised department to advice customers on Green Buildings. Our factory building is the first building in India to be rated under Gold category by IGBC. Sustainable construction aims at reducing the environmental impact of a building over its entire lifetime, while optimising its economic viability and the comfort and safety of its occupants. In the current scenario, adapting to the climate change is one of the prominent factors which any company has to consider seriously. Keeping these factors in mind, PEBS Pennar rather than aiming for a


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

In current market scenario where ‘Time’ is the vital factor, major corporate houses, architects and civil consultants are much inclined towards the faster construction technique. short-term economic benefit, has focused on finest practices which emphasise on long-term affordability, quality and efficiency. PEBS Pennar strictly follows the environmental norms and also encourages its customers, vendors, transporters to follow these norms. As one of the leaders in pre-engineered metal building solutions, what according to you is the future for this technology? In current market scenario where ‘Time’ is the vital factor, major corporate houses, architects and civil consultants are much inclined towards the faster construction technique. The introduction of PEB in commercial buildings and the residential sectors will create a new market in PEB industry and thus, expanding the scope of pre-engineered buildings beyond warehouses and industrial construction. Moreover, there is huge shortage of skilled workers like masons, carpenters, rod benders, etc and that is another reason for the shift towards PEB as an alternate solution which is economical and fast to construct. Do you think the Indian market has become receptive towards pre-engineered buildings in comparison to the traditional methods of constructions? For the past 10 to 12 years, the focus of the world has shifted to India and China, the emerging superpowers of the world. Any sector, whether it is manufacturing, logistics, energy, infrastructure, commercial, metro rail etc, is growing at a great pace and all these sectors require high performance, economical and faster delivery steel buildings to run their operations. When PEB industry was introduced to India, it started growing with a slow pace but eventually it had picked up from the year 2004. There is

37

a significant acceptability for PEB in India and majority of consultants, architects, institutional customers, etc are widely promoting PEB’s in view of significant advantages compared to conventional buildings. This technology is being diversified into several new segments such as high-rise building structures, power plants, pharmaceutical industry, metro rail stations, steel plants, stadiums, etc. Considering the benefits of PEB concepts like faster construction, single point solution, and factory controlled quality standards; many consultants have acknowledged that PEB is the best alternative. As infrastructure construction across the country is combining speed, economy, safety, strength and aesthetics at awe-inspiring levels, steel structures, for quite some time a primary foundation element, have risen as complete solutions in construction projects for various structural requirements. In this era of competition, it is increasingly important to build more economical structures, which provide good integrated system performance. Steel is basically better suited for bigger, taller, and longer span and geometrically complex structures, as a result, steel is likely to be predominantly used for many years into the future. PEBS Pennar is a young company, rapidly growing on the path of success. What are the plans of growth in the near future? Are there other sectors that the company looks forward to diversify into? The demand for PEB is on the rise, PEBS Pennar is planning to expand its production capacity (currently 90,000MT) by setting up another manufacturing facility in Northern region. The plans are in the advanced stage. The Company reached a turnover of `326Cr this year and poised to achieve `450Cr by 2014. The company is focusing on exports with a plan of setting up manufacturing unit in Africa by 2015 and setting up Sales Offices in East Africa, South America and Middle East Countries.


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ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

JSW SPEAK

REBUILDING FAITH - UTTARAKHAND

REHABILITATION

In the aftermath of the disastrous floods and rains that lashed through Uttarakhand, JSW Foundation is co-ordinating the relief work in Uttarkashi district of Uttarakhand in association with Centre for Environment Education (CEE).

T

housands have been devastated by the flash floods and rains in Uttarakhand. Many structures have been swept away. It is estimated that thousands of people are now without shelter and livelihood. This unprecedented incident jolted the whole nation and a cohesive action for relief and rehabilitations is on its away to improve the living conditions. Being a responsible corporate, JSW Group stood up for the cause to extend its support to the people of Uttarakhand. JSW Foundation is co-ordinating the relief work in Uttarkashi district of Uttarakhand in association with Centre for Environment Education (CEE). Education has been identified as the main intervention at the moment. All the required permissions have been obtained to work in schools from offices of the Director as well as Chief Education Officer (District head). For interventions in schools, JSW Foundation along with CEE is concerting with two other organisations namely Azim Premji Foundation and Bhuvneshwari Mahila Ashram. A Co-ordination Committee has been formed to work together to maintain uniformity. All disasters pose a monumental challenge to the total community. Everyone, who is exposed to

the disaster, experiences disruption in their lives to varying degrees. Among the survivors, the most affected are people whose lives are disrupted more severely by the disaster. These include those who have lost their homes, lost their family members and community. The most vulnerable group is of the children. JSW-CEE zeroed down to need of psychosocial care among children as the need of the hour. Its response to help flood affected people in Uttarkashi intensified further during the month of September. CEE is being invited as the lead resource agency for trainings on psychosocial care organised by education department/SSA. Block Resource Persons (BRCs), Cluster Resource Persons (CRCs) and teachers, numbering above 600, got orientated through these programmes about identifying the symptoms of trauma, dealing with children having mild to moderate trauma, teaching learning methodology and tools for post disaster education scenario. Our psychosocial care programme ‘Umang’ reached out to 6,000 children from 40 schools in Bhatwari block where the highest number of schools got affected during the floods. Eighteen students from these schools


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

were identified as trauma-affected. In almost all the cases, children had lost their homes in the floods. These children are under observation and if need be, will be referred to qualified psychotherapists. ‘Umang’ also known as ‘joy of learning’ is a combination of formal and informal learning, with partly curriculum-based activities. The day long module begins with talking to the children in a friendly and caring atmosphere, telling stories, listening to them, reciting poetry, involving them in arts and crafts, games and other fun activities to help them open up, speak out and express themselves to release their stress. Thus, they share their feelings and agony with other children and realise that many of them have undergone the same trauma and they are not the only ones to be affected by the disaster. Teachers from most of these schools were oriented separately on identification of symptoms of trauma, activity based participatory teaching and learning with reference to tackle emergency situations. Around 600 have become familiar about post disaster trauma and their role in helping the affected children to cope up with the stress. While the field team worked with affected people, the back office team has

39

developed suitable Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials which includes a pictorial year planner with tips on natural disasters, a brochure on psychosocial care for teachers and parents, a kit on fun ways of learning about disasters, all in Hindi. Some of the children from primary schools in Uttarkashi shared their emotionally moving stories about their ordeal. All of them shared how horrific the nature’s fury was. Their innocent eyes witnessed the unprecedented damage unfolding right in front of their eyes. Many walked miles in hostile conditions to reach to safety. Many witnessed the pain of losing their homes, harvests, family members, schools and cattle washing away in flood. All of them are longing for the lives they once had. They want their parents, family and friends by their side. They are in need of food, water and shelter. And above all – love and care. They appeal to all to restore their schools so that they can get on to their studies like before. This is what JSW Foundation and CEE have set out to do in Phase 2 of this Uttarakhand reconstruction project.


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ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

ADVERTORIAL

Development and Production of High Strength Pipeline Steel In view of the ever-increasing pipeline length and operating pressure, the development of high-strength steel makes a significant contribution to pipeline project cost reduction. high material toughness at low operating temperatures. A particularly important trend has been the exploitation of sour oils and gas reserves, which has required the development of linepipe steels with resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking (HIC). Thus, in addition of higher strength and toughness, the pipeline technologies require improved resistance to corrosion to be met with specific alloy additions and special control over non-metallic inclusions.

T

he predicted growth in energy consumption in the coming decades necessitates focused efforts for transporting large amounts of natural gas to the end user. Large-diameter pipelines are the best and safest means of transport. The high cost of natural gas forces the pipeline operator to explore all the possibilities of reducing the cost of a pipeline project in the future. For higher transportation efficiency, the trend in the pipeline design is to use larger diameters with higher operating pressures. This results in a requirement for steel with high yield and tensile strengths. The operation of pipelines in arctic regions, and/or the transportation of Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) also demands

Both welded and seamless pipes are used in pipeline construction, but as the welded pipes can be made in larger diameters than the seamless pipes, the high capacity pipelines are essentially made from the welded pipes. Both longitudinally and spirally welded pipes are used in the line pipe industry. The welding operations, thus, require that the materials should be weldable not only during pipe manufacturing process but also at the pipe laying sites where the control over welding conditions becomes difficult. All these requirements, over the years, are met through the provision of steels with progressive increase in yield strength, high weldability and sufficient toughness to restrict crack propagation particularly at low operating temperatures. While the selection of appropriate chemical composition is important to meet the requirements, the thermo-mechanical processing helps to achieve the specific property requirements. In the case of offshore pipelines, the operating pressure is not as most important as the


ENDEAVORS | ISSUE 3

ambient water pressure. Therefore, one of the design criteria for offshore pipelines is less the strength but more the collapse behaviour of the pipe. The pipe to be used in offshore pipeline construction should possess not only good material properties but also good geometry to ensure good collapse strength. As the H2S content of the gas being transported increases, the requirement for HIC resistance of the pipe material increases. When an aqueous phase is present, CO2, H2S and chlorides are extremely corrosive. For applications in such corrosive environments, a pipe made of either all-corrosion resistant material or of a low-alloy steel pipe clad with a high-alloy corrosion resistant material is used. The most popular document specifying the linepipe material is the American Petroleum Institute (API) standard API 5L [API, 2000] that specifies steel grades with a range of properties that cover both the high test linepipe and spiral weld linepipe steels. The API specifications were introduced in 1948 and at that time included only one grade X42 with yield strength of 42ksi. Since that time, higher strength steels have been developed and the specification now include grades up to X80 with the yield strength of 80ksi. These specifications give very broad requirements for chemical composition, specifying only the maximum permitted levels of carbon, manganese, sulphur and phosphorus. In the seventies, the hot rolling and normalising was replaced by thermomechanical rolling. The latter process enables materials up to X70 to be produced from steels that are micro-alloyed with niobium and vanadium and have reduced carbon content. X70 and beyond, possess highly refined grain and high cleanliness. They are characterised by the low sulphur content and reduced amount of detrimental second phases such as oxides, inclusions and pearlite. An improved processing method consisting of thermo-mechanical rolling plus subsequent accelerated cooling, emerged in the eighties. By this method, it has become possible to produce higher strength materials like X80,

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having a further reduced carbon content and thereby excellent field weldability. Additions of molybdenum, copper and nickel enable the strength to be raised to that of grade X100, using the same process. JSW Steel contributes to reduce operational cost of pipeline during its life cycle by investigating the various required parameters for high strength steel. JSW Steel is one of the pioneers in manufacturing API grade in the country. At our Vijayanagar manufacturing facility, the company is in relentless pursuit of technological advancement, unwavering focus on innovation, strident emphasis on quality to further raise the bar for API grade. These constant initiatives enabled the company to manufacture upto X70 for the need of line pipe manufacturers and have lead us to gain confidence of leading API grade line pipe manufacturers like Welspun Corps Ltd, Jindal SAW, Ratnamani Metals & Tubes Ltd, Man Industries and Maharashtra Seamless Ltd, to name a few. JSW has supplied API 70 & API 65 Grade Steel to many prestigious projects built in India that today epitomise the leading-edge constructs of the nation. Projects supplied with API 70 Grade Steel • IOCL - Dadri Panipat RLNG Pipeline, Paradip Raipur Ranchi Pipeline Project • HPCL - Mundra Bhatinda Pipeline Project • GAIL - Dabhol, Bengaluru, Chennai, Kochi, Kottinaad, Mangalore Bengaluru Project Projects supplied with API 65 Grade Steel • IOCL - Sidhpur-Sanganer Product pipeline, Paradip-Haldia Crude pipeline • HPCL - Mundra-Delhi • GAIL . - Roorkee-Haridwar Spur Line Project, Bhilwara Chittorgarh Pipeline Project, KG BASIN Network • GSPL - DSAW Linepipe Project, Anjar


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JSW Endeavors - Issue 3  

Through ‘Endeavors’, it is our aim to promote the consumption of steel in the country. We should seek motivation from the already existing i...

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