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SEOUL STUDIO 2016 SEOUL STUDIO / UNCC School of Architec ture, UNC Charlotte

Jeffrey S Nesbit

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Student Researc h e rs :

Anna A n klin Dougla s Ca o Yagmu r Ers a y in Morgan Jaco bs Ronald Ozio g u Robby St u b bs

@2 01 6 Jef f rey S. Ne sbit Al l r i g ht s re s e r ve d No p a r t of t h i s volume may be use d or re produce d in any ma n n e r wi t h o u t wr itte n pe r mission from th e auth or

Al l wo r k i s d ef i ne d un de r dire c tion of: Jef f rey S . Ne s b i t

Wo r k co mp l ete d by stude nts of: S EO UL ST U D IO / UN CC, Summer 20 1 6 S ch o o l of A rch i te c ture, U NC Ch ar lotte

Fo r m o re i n fo r m ation on SEOU L ST U D I O contac t: Jef f rey S . Ne s b i t j n e s b i t 9@ u n cc .edu


SEOUL STUDIO 2016 SEOUL STUDIO / UNCC School of Architec ture, UNC Charlotte

Jeffrey S Nesbit


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modern vernacular, NEITHER BORING NOR PREDICTABLE


m o der n v e r n ac u l a r , N EI TH ER BO R I N G N O R P R E D I CTABL E San k i C h o e D ue to its co mp lex u rban attributes, Seoul never failed to g rab the atten ti on of a r chitects and p rovided in s pirati ons a nd r esour ces to th eir work . T he ri ch built envir on ment of this his to rical ci ty ha s ser ved as th e field fo r explorati on, a na lytica l res earch , an d co llective docum enta tio n. Sa dly, m ost o f the in s piring u rban str uctur es in Seou l are n ot always p lanned nor desig ned by arch itects. T heref ore i t is im por tant to rev is it the langu ag es of the m oder n ver n acu lar arch itectu re which a r e mos tly driven by s ocial and econom ic pr incip les. Neit h er bo ring nor pr edicta ble, res earch on s u ch mo d er n ver na cula r is es s ential in u n ders tan d i ng the conditions th at are tr u ly relevant to the cr ea tion of its bu ilt environ m ent. I t is not unco mmon r u nn in g into many ur ba n conditio ns that are res u lts from the laym a n’s practical in teres t yet yi el d solutions th at are high ly imagin ative, cr ea tive, a nd ap plicab le in plan ning f or the f utur e g r ow th/redu ction .

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Wi d el y reg ard ed as one of the m os t rapi d l y g rowi ng ci ti es i n the worl d , S eou l i s now ente ri ng a new phas e of d evel opm ent. T he prev i ou s d evel opm ental m od el f rom t he pos t-war peri od wi th i ts traf f i c-ori ented and g over nm e nt-d riven s trateg i es has s er ved i ts rol e i n m od e r ni z i ng the hard ware com ponent of the ci ty. L es t all the “ m i racl es ” thi s m od el has yi el d ed i n s av i ng the pos t-war, pos t-col oni al ci ty f rom the r u i ns and es cal ati ng i t to one of the m os t heav i l y u rbani z ed ci ti es i n the worl d . S eou l i s now f aced to d eal wi th the back l as hes of the rapi d m od er ni z ati on and d eal wi th the i nner d em ons of s u ch d evel opm ent. A new m od el f or i ts f u tu re g rowth wi l l have to s tay wi thi n the real m of com mu ni ty, i nf or m al i ty, and rev i tal i z ati on of exi s ti ng cond i ti ons rather than the g ood ol ’ s crap-and rebu i l d s trateg y. T hi s i s the exac t poi nt where the l ear ni ng s f rom the m od er n ver nacu l ar can becom e val u abl e.


In or der to p ro perly ob s er ve, a nal yz e, a nd docu men t th e co nditio ns of the m oder n ver n acu lar, we are as ked to break away f r om th e cu ltu ral p recon ce pti ons a nd obser ve the city with fres h eyes. Ju s t like ex plorers s et ou t o n an exped i ti on to g a ther n ew s pecimen for broa d eni ng their unde rs tandin g o f the wor l d , the a r chitects need to ventu re ou t in to the ci ty a nd collect res earch-wor thy s o u rces l yi ng out ther e in ou r ever yday life. T he whol e pr ocess is expected to in du ce in teres ti ng discussions and collabo rative ef f or ts. W hen equip ped with limited res ou rces a nd tim e, it is high ly recommend ed to eng a g e the metho d of s p ecu lation and super f icial ob s er vation s (th e ver y m ethod tha t we were as ked to refrain f rom thr oug hou t ou r architect u ral edu cati on) beca use it is th e mo s t efficien t to ol f or the f ir st tim e vis ito rs to p ro be into the ci ty. It is such ver y ins tan ce when s pecu l ative obser va tion is fin ally ju s tified and l ack of pr econceived k nowledg e can a ctu al l y tur n into as s ets. In o ther wo rds, it i s v i tal to pr eser ve th e p ers pective of th ose f res h of f the boat. It is no t s u ch an eas y tas k to m a inta in h owever : After days o f i ntens e

wal k i ng arou nd the ci ty, one wou l d f i n d them s el ves g rowi ng rapi d l y as s i m i l ated to the ci ty ; T he f req u ency of cam era cl i ck s s tar t to d ecreas e exponenti al l y; S atu ra ted textu re of the u rban s u rf ace g rad u a l l y f ad es ou t i nto a m onotonou s m onol i th i c s treet wal l i n ou r m ap of perce pti o n . L os s of the tou ri s t m ental i ty m ag i ca l l y trans f or m ou rs el ves i nto ‘ l ocal s ’ wh o no l ong er pos s es s the abi l i ty of g etti n g s u r pri s ed by the am ou nt of s atu rati o n thi s ci ty can prov i d e. T heref ore it i s i m por tant t o conti nu ou s l y trans l ate th e f i nd i ng s i nto an ef f ective g raphi c m ed i u m as m eans of conti nu ou s d ocu m enta ti o n bef ore i t becom es ‘ com f or tabl e’ . T h e d i ag ram s created throu g h thi s proces s wi l l s er ve as a powerf u l tool i n enhanci n g ou r u nd ers tand i ng of the u rban d ynami cs of S eou l and other A s i an ci ti es al i ke.

Sa n ki C h o e , Dir e c to r D e par tm ent of A rchi tec tu re Univers i ty of S eou l

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introduction


Seo ul stu dio CI T Y A S P R EC E DE N T Jef f r ey S N e sbi t Pr ocessing th e co ntempo rar y city i s undoubtedly complicated and s eemi ng l y i nsur m ounta ble. T he p ro du cts of u r ban system s a r e s haped from mor ph ologi cal l ayer s of tempo rality an d s p atial coll ag e. Pa r ticula r ly, the s trata o f n atu ral and f or m a l pr incip les acro s s divers e u rban pa tter ns eng ag e a s eries of inter nal l y r esponsive u rban imp lication s. T he i llusion of ho lis tic u nders tandi ng s i ng r a ined in Mo der n p lann in g meth od s g ener a tes overly ir relevant and ins ens i tive ur ba n a r chitectu ral implan tation s. In a ddition to th e is olated Moder n ar tif act, cur r ent tr ends in co mp lex for m al a r chitectur a l langu ag e ten d to ign ore a nd inver t co ntextu alization . Fo u nd ed on public r espo ns ibility, u rban s p ace and a r chitectur e op e rate alo ng an in teg rated , f luctua ting f ield roo ted with s ite an d ti m e specif ic r esp on s ivenes s. T h erefore, i t i s i m per a tive f u tu re s p ecu lation s in th e 2 1 s t centur y ur ba n domain op erate within the ex isting sensitive f lu ctu atio ns. Ins tead of a nticipa ting l arg e-s cale impo s ed plan ni ng g r ids a s g uides fo r a fu tu re u rb an i s m , m ethods of micro -extractio ns can ai d i n the pr oces s o f deter mining s ensi bl e

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f u tu re neg oti ati ons i n the evol u ti on of u rban m or phol og y. K nown as S eou l S tu d i o, thi s archi tectu ral s tu d i o i ntenti onal l y g enerates s ens i tive q u es ti ons concer ni ng the ri s e of capi ta l d evel opm ent. T he s tu d i o operates m ore as a d etective i nter rog ati ng and expos i ng what we d on’t k now i n an attem pt to reve al cer tai n as pects of hi d d en, i nter nal i z ed u rban m or phol og i cal exchang e. Us i ng pu bl i c archi tectu re as f ocu s f or eval u ati on, the work pr oceed s acros s three s tag es of k nowl e d g e; (1 ) m eas u ri ng the ci ty throu g h s am pl i ng , (2 ) d etecti on of u rban cod es, and (3 ) trans l ati ng u rban ev i d ences i nto neg oti abl e d es i g n cri teri a f or f u tu re res pons ive s pecu l ati on. A f ter bei ng al m os t com pl etel y d es troyed i n the Korean War i n 1 9 5 0 , S eou l has now be com e an extrem el y v i brant i nter nati onal ci ty com pri s ed of over 2 4 m i l l i on i nhabi tants m ak i ng i t the thi rd l arg es t m etropol i tan i n the worl d . To al l ow f or s u ch an enor m ou s popu l ati on , S eou l has i m pl em ented one of the worl d s l arg es t s u bway s ys te m s and has cu l tivate d a hi g hl y technol og i cal l y s av v y cu l tu re,


m a king f or a p owerfu l glob ally con necte d econom ic cen ter. Variou s level s of ca pita lism mixed with h is torical traces of a Joseo n Dyn as ty cu ltu re s ti mu l ate a n ex tr emely complex u rban patter n and f or m . Becau s e of th is and many other r ecent circu ms t ances, Seou l prov i d es a n exciting divers e framework f or an ur ba n la bo rator y to op erate with in . B oth navig a ting throu gh and experim enti ng within S eo u l’s u niq u e ch aracteri s ti cs g ener a te in q u iries into arch itectu ral u rban inser tion. In order to evalu ate in tens el y, tim e is devo ted to variou s on -s ite vi s i ts and per f or m ing an alys is s tu dies of tradi ti onal a nd contemp orar y neighb orho ods, and r eg ister ing co des in this mu ltivalent ci ty. In a ddition, the s tu dio ap plies knowl ed g e built f r om co mp rehendin g cu l tu ral dif f er ences s u ch as divers e n eeds, val u es, behavior al n or ms, an d s ocial h ierarchi es so students reco gn ize an d fu lly devel op an under sta nding of cu ltu ral divers i t y, and m or e cr itically, bu ild u p on s ite-speci f i c ur ba n inf o r med, arch itectu ral knowl ed g e.

Beyo n d The U r ban Ar t i f ac t L ear ni ng f rom the ci ty as a d es i g n preced ent becom es key. T he ci ty of S eo u l i s pe ppered wi th contem porar y u r b a n obj ects f rom am ong l ead i ng i nter nati o n a l archi tects s u ch as D ani el L i bes k i n d , MV R DV, UN S tu d i o, and Mari o B o tta . Mos t recentl y, the hi g hl y pu bl i ci z ed D ong d aemu n D es i g n Pl az a proj ect by Zaha Had i d has s parked mu ch controver s y. S et ou t to reg enerate the m arket d i s tr i cts of D ong d aemu n, the S eou l Metropol i ta n G over nm ent com m i s s i oned Had i d to re pl ace the ol d u rban s ettl em e nts i n or d er to cons er ve and create “ a pl ac e wh er e the pas t, pres ent, and f u tu re, peacefu l l y coexi s t” . T he over-s cal ed , obj ectori ented m eg a-proj ect rej ects a conti nuo u s res pons i bi l i ty to the cu l tu re of Kor ea n s ens i bi l i ty. A l thou g h a rem ark abl e f ea t i n s tr u ctu ral perf or m ance and g eom etr i ca l g ym nas ti cs, the res pons ivenes s to b o th contem porar y and trad i ti onal con tex t i s broken. T heref ore the contem por a r y archi tectu ral m as ter pi ece wi l l al rea d y es tabl i s h a new ar ti f act s tri pped f ro m a neg oti abl e and el as ti c f u tu re. B or rowi n g f rom Ros s i , “ W he re d oes the s i ng u l a r i ty

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of a n ur ba n ar tifac t b egin ; in its for m, i ts f unction, its memor y, o r in s o met h in g el s e a g a in?” T he Don gdaemu n neighb or hood i s lef t with a mas s ive arch itectu ral a r tif a ct inca p ab le o f car r yin g on local f or m , f unction , an d memo r y. Hys teri a of g eom etrically co mp lex s ingu l ar f or m ultim a tely produ ces broken and over ex posed collectio ns of is olated u r ban a r tif a cts. Even tho u gh th es e typ es of i nter na tiona l ly acclaimed projects can be i conic a nd compellin g fo r th eir illu s tri ou s g loba l a nd econ omic p res en ce, th ey f ai l to a da pt with in an on -g oing dialo gu e of cultur a l m emor y. On the contrar y, o th e r examp les of public a r chitectu re can be fo u nd as m or e sensitive res o lu tio n. T h e proj ect known a s Ss amziegil, des ign ed by l ocal a r chitect Choi Moo n-Gyu , tran s fo r m s public a r chitectu re into an inters ti ti al zone of pu b licn es s ; between the ‘ building ’ a n d ‘p u blic s pace’. Trans lated a s Ssa m zie “ s treet”, th e project in I ns adong ex tends a pu b lic s treet literally u p a nd into a sp iral p athway co ntinu o u s l y a lig ned with s ho ps and lo cal vendors. Com pleted in 2 0 0 4 , the h ighly s u cces s f u l

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‘ archi tectu re’ s eem s to d i s appear i nto the robu s t activ i ti es of pu bl i c i nteracti ons and exchang e. T he proj ect i s both a s u cces s f u l exam pl e of pu bl i c eng ag em ent and el aborates on hi s tori cal k nowl ed g e of Korean archi te ctu ral cu es. T hrou g h the s cal e of central i z ed pu bl i c s pace, m ateri al i ty, and ori entati on the newl y ad apted z one res em bl es org ani z ati on to that of trad i ti onal Korean characteri s ti cs (m ad ang and m ar u ) as wel l as i ntel l i g entl y trans f or m s the k nowl ed g e of the Korean m arket. Here the archi tectu re i s not a g l ori f i ed obj ect trans pl anted f rom exter nal s ou rces. R ather, the s trateg y creat ive l y i nter twi nes exi s ti ng k now l e d g e of pu bl i c Korean cu l tu re bu i l t ou t of a contem porar y archi tectu ra l d i ag ram s u ppor ti ng an u npred i ct abl e f u tu re. Fu nd am ent al l y, proj ects l i ke that of S s am z i eg i l prom ote conti nu ou s and col l ective neg oti at i on between exi s ti ng conf i g u rati ons and evol v i ng an archi tectu ral par ti ci pati on.


M ea suring Pr ocesses Philosophically the inves tig ation s here i n Seoul Stu dio p edag o g y s hift focu s f rom the object, o r ar tifact, to th e local l ens of inter acting u rb an behavio rs. T hes e two hig hly differen tiated architectu ral r esponses from ab ove (Ch oi an d Had i d ) dem onstr at e two en ds o f the ‘knowl ed g e’ conver sa tio n. B oth s u cces s fu lly advocate public eng ag emen t, alth ou gh at di f f erent sca les, Ssamziegil en co u rag es trans l ati on of pr eviou s pu b lic in ter ventio ns whi l e D D P sim p ly trans p os es a radical l y new a nd una ssociated u rb an en co u nter. T hi s sim ple a nalo g y b etween two di f f erent public a rchitectu res is u s ed as an educa tion al t o ol for s tu den ts to eval u ate ur ba n knowledg e. DDP, as wh i m s i cal a nd ha nd s ome as it may be, s i m pl y doesn’t car r y over any compreh ens i bl e knowledg e of previo u s or even exi s ti ng em bedded arch itectu ral cu ltu re. Work i ng in Seoul req u ires s p ecu lation beyond the inter nation ally s u perficial. R ather tha n bein g f lattered by glorified and isola ted ar tifacts, the pedag o g y here f ocuses effor ts in itially u p on a proces s of m ea su ring as p recedent. As T hom

May ne d es cri bes, “ T he tr u e ter ri tor y o f i nnovati on i n u rban archi tectu re, then , i s not i n the prod u cti on of pl atoni c s ol i d s, bu t rather i n the d es i g n of operati o n a l s trateg i es that d eal wi th the mu l ti pl e a n d overl appi ng f orces of a hi g hl y com p l ex and enti rel y u ncer tai n col l ective f or m ” . Expand i ng u pon Mayne’s obs er vati o n s beyond the s i ng u l ar “ pl atoni c s oli d s ” k now l e d g e f or the s tu d i o beg i ns wi th m eas u ri ng f rag m ents of the ci ty that a r e not f u l l y com prehens i bl e, and u ncer ta i n . S el ecti ons of l arg e nei g hborho o d s contai ni ng i ng red i ents of an u nk nown archi tectu ral vocabu l ar y are fi r s t i d enti f i ed . T he s tu d i es take on nei g hborhood -s cal e z ones i n or d er to recog ni z e patter ns of exi s ti n g bu i l t f or m . T he u rban m or phol o g i es at thi s s cal e are ou tcom es of l ayer ed i nter venti ons bas ed on an am al g am a ted and col l ective trans f or m ati on thro u g h ti m e. Intenti onal l y thes e z ones a r e not the au thori tative m as te r pl an o f a capi tal i s ti c g eneral i ty. N ei g hborho o d s i ncl u d i ng B u k chon, S eochon, Jaya n g , and Mu l l ae -d ong contai n ev i d ences o f hi s tori cal conf l i cts between pol i ti cs,

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econom ics, social behavio rs, an d cu ltu ral i m plica tions. Each of the n eigh bo rh ood zones r evea ls a variety o f den s ity, overl ap, colla g e, a nd con tinu ity. C an didly, the pur suit is not to u n ders tan d ‘why’, bu t m or e specif ically to u n ders tan d ‘what i s ’ . T he a im s of l arg e-s cale exercis es embrace the ig nor a nce of the u n k nown, and pr ovide f ields of par ticu larities acros s a wide-r a ng e urban s p ectr u m as th e m ore tr uthf ul ur ba n p recedent. I n or der to identify th e neighb orho od s i nher ent qualities mo re precis ely, we a m plif y a nd s low down o u r reading of the city into s maller in telligib le s ca l es. Ha nds-on m eas u ring allows s tu dents to f ur ther their tactile readin g o f the city i nto dig estible bits. As a meth od o f extracti on, the dissectio ns o f n eigh bo rh oo ds shed som e lig ht and expo s e p os s ible p atter n behavior s. D iv in g fu r ther down in s cal e, da ta a nd m ea su rable u n its are collected as a set of ur ba n ‘dna’ to b egin u nders tand i ng how the la rg e-s cale neighb or may be or g a nized. T his p ro ces s req u ires p reci s e m ea sur ing , docu mentatio n, and p ar ticu l ar dr awing techniq u es o f p hys ical, calcu labl e pr oper ties. Hu man patter n behavio r can

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be u s ef u l as a tool f or u nd ers tand i ng econom i cs and i nf ras tr u ctu re, t hou g h f or thi s s tu d i o ped ag og y the wor k f ocu s es on m eas u ri ng the hapti c, tacti l e i ng red i ents of u rban com ponent. I f we c an com prehend the s cal e of the m eas u rabl e, i t i s pos s i bl e to proceed ou tward i n s cal e to s treng then ou r u nd ers tand i ng of the u nk nown l arg er popu l ated patter n. S i m i l ar to Fu m i hi ko Mak i ’s noti on on g rou p-f or m f rom the 1 9 6 0 ’s, the ‘ d na ’ s ecti ons of f er bott om -u p expres s i ons of l arg er ne twork s. “ For m s i n g rou p-f or m have thei r own bu i l t-i n l i nk , whet her e xpres s ed or l atent, s o that they m ay g rown i n a s ys tem . T hey d ef i ne bas i c env i ronm ental s pace, whi ch al s o par takes of the q u al i ty of s ys tem ati c l i nk ag e. G rou p-f or m and i ts s pace are i nd eed proto-type el em ents, and they are prototypes becau s e of i m pl i ed s ys tem and l i nk ag e.” In a revers e d es i g n m ethod , the s m al l er extracti ons of f or m al “ prototypes ” of the nei g hborhood s al l ows f or a pos s i bl y m ore accu rate read i ng of S eou l ’s u rban


f r a g m ents. No t s o differen t th an Kev i n L ynch’s ci ty elemen t, the no de. “S om e of these concen tratio n no des are the f ocu s a nd e pitome of a dis trict, over wh i ch thei r inf luence radiates an d o f which th ey s tand a s a sym bo l.” T h is no tion o f th e nod e def ines no t s ingu larities o r “s ym bol s ” a s L ynch de s crib es bu t in s tead d ef i nes ca pa cities of identifiable, re peati ng them es with in a dis trict. T h e compl i cated a r r a ng em en ts an d idio s yn cratic f or m al r esolution of th e fragmented metropol i s m a ke f or a difficu lt evalu ation . T he a ppa r ently u n related u rban for ms acros s dense a nd h ighly varied zon es are not s o unr ela ted u p on inves tig ation o f th e ‘ d na’ , or ‘noda l’ s ection . T hes e neighb orhood s a r e not b as ed on top -down pl anni ng pr ocesses. T he mu ch more rich hi s tor y of Seoul’s co nf lictin g in g redients d iv u l g e va r ious, un -des ign ed con s eq u en ces and r esults. T herefore it is neces s ar y to sca le down, s low down, an d attem pt to pr ecisely identify s ite an d time speci f i c outcom es of a complex s elf-deter m i ned ur ba n f ield.

D et ec t i n g C i t y C odes T he 2 1 s t centu r y m eg al opol i s i s f i l l ed wi th a wi d e vari ety of u npl ann ed , non-d eter m i ni s ti c org ani z ati o n a l s trateg i es, whi ch are not bas ed m a s ter pl anni ng pri nci pl es. Mu ch of th e ‘ d na’ i ng red i ents f rom the m eas u r i n g proces s es d i ctate u npl anned and hi g h l y f l exi bl e u rban cond i ti ons. A s s ta ted prev i ou s l y, k nowl ed g e of the u nk nown mu s t trans pi re f rom preci s el y captu r ed m ethod s of d i s s ected s am pl i ng. T h i s extracti on proces s u s es bas i c techni q u es of photog raphi c d ocu m entati o n , or thog raphi c d rawi ng s (par ti cu l a r l y u s ef u l i n s ec ti on), and three-d i m ens i o n a l cu ts of each s am pl e. T he col l ected d ocu m entati on attem pts to accu ra tel y d e pi ct the k nown and m eas u ra b l e phys i cal characteri s ti cs. T hi s k nowl ed g e i s onl y s u ppl em ental to a mu ch l on g er tem poral i ty of on-g oi ng os ci l l ati ons i n the u rban cond i ti on. I ntenti onal l y, th e d raw i ng f reez es the par ti cu l ar m om en t i n ord er to d etect ope rati onal ci ty ‘ codes ’ . T hes e cod es becom e the org ani z ati o n a l tool s expou nd ed ou t f rom the prev i o u s l y d i s cu s s ed conf l i cts between urban

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m or pholog ical exchang es. For the city of Seoul in pa r ti cu lar, two s amp le typ ologi cal codes a r e ex tracted an d u s ed as ev idence f ound in th e city; ‘adaptab ility’ and ‘ hybr idiza tion’. T h e ev iden ces of s u ch detected codes aid in th e acc u racy of pr of ound ur ban k nowledg e.

Ad a p ta b ility T hr oug hout th e variou s fields in Seou l , codes of a da p tab ility impac t th e th res hol d of public activity. As an on -g oi ng a da pta tion created by individu ali z ed necessity, street facades beco me active i ng r edients embedded in th e f lex i bl e ur ba n f a br ic. C on ting en t o n time o f d ay, m onth, a nd year cycles, the f lexibi l i ty m odif y f a ça de s p ace allu de to exp an d i ng oper a bility of the u rban fo r m. T he a ctive a g ents o f adaptatio ns defin e cod es of self -g enerated, no n-deter mini s ti c oper a tions. Exten ded s u rfaces al l ow f or new volumes to be employed al ong the str eet f or b lu r red pu b lic prog ram . Som etim es thes e inter mediar y zones ex pa nd f r om interio rity ou t in to publ i c

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thres hol d s. T hes e new vol u m etri c pl aces can be u s ed as f l exi bl e prog ram s to s u ppor t vend or need s, pu bl i c i nteracti on, and cu l tivate a conti nu ou s l y chang i ng cond i ti onal s tate. I n ad d i ti on to pu bl i c archi tectu re i nf or m al l y expand i ng, d el eti ons, i ns er ti ons, and connecti ons f ol d i nto one another creati ng powerf ul tool s f or f u tu re s pecu l ati on. T heref ore, here i n the ad aptabi l i ty s tate, k nowl ed g e i s d ef i ned by the operati ons of f l exi bi l i ty, not f rom f or m al characteri s ti cs. Even m ateri al pal ettes and j u xtapos ed col l i s i ons s u g g es t pu bl i c behav i or and i nf or m a ci ty m ad e of u npl anned s pecu l ati on. N ot s o d i f f erent than the open-end ed d es i g n of S s am z i eg i l , pl aces i n the ci ty reveal a new k nowl ed g e bas e concer ni ng how ou r m eg al opol i s f rag m ents and s ti tch back tog ether u nd er thi s prem i s e of d es i g n ad aptati on. T he ou tcom es taken f rom the m eas u ri ng proces s es and d etecti on of cod es f or mu l ate trans l ati ons back i nto the al read y es tabl i s hed u rban s tr ata. N ew d es i g n cri teri a (not d es i g n f or m ) g enerate f ou nd ati ons bas ed u pon f ou nd phys i ca l ev i d ence of ci ty proc es s es. More s ens i bl e


ur ba n r eso lu tio n n ow h as the ab i l i ty f or the loca l, p hys ical and cu ltu ral co nti nu u m to ex ist. T he ‘ur ba n ar tifact’ con tinu ou s ly chang es, a da pts, a nd evo lves th ro u gh res pons ive a ssocia tion s an d collective behav i ors. T her ef or e, “in o rder to co ns tr u ct a m or phog en etic ap proach to u rb ani s m , the use of as s ociative des ign techni q u es needs to be evalu ated in ter ms of thei r a ssem bly.” In o th er words, the d es i g n cr iter ia provide tech niq u es fo r on -g oi ng a nd f utu re man ip u lation . In contras t to the plato nic derivate, “it is l es s the intellig ence of th e g eo metrical mo d el that unf olds mo r p ho g enetic po tentia l ” and oper a tes mo re alo ng a s eries o f emerg ent behavior s. Meth ods are em pl oye d thr oug h delicate tran s lation s o f th e f i el d ’s inher ent p erfo r mance an d s ys tem ati c ing r edients. B y s ens ibly ar ticu lati ng the ha ptic a nd regis tered logics, an anal yti cal str a tum is expo s ed. Pr eviously in the dis cou rs e of u rban idea listic plan ning, u to pian v i s i ons f or ‘wha t th e city s ho u ld b e’ need s m odif ica ti on . T he re are two p ri m ar y

i d eol og i cal s tates on where u topi an v i s i o n s f ocu s ; rati onal i s m and l i ber tari ani s m . T he rati onal i s t u topi an s chem a i s o n e of reg u l ati on and central i z ati on o n both power and g l obal org ani z ati o n a l s tr u ctu res. T he other, l i ber tari ani s m , occu pi es noti ons of i nd iv i d u al i z ed control , es peci al l y when i t reaches to th e pol i ti cal end eavors f or f reed om . T he wo r k here attem pts to operate i n a pos i ti on o f nei ther, the or g ani z ed cent ral i z ati on o r the d ecentral i z ed s tate. S i m i l arl y to th e Metabol i s m m ovem ent i n Japan d u r i n g the 1 9 6 0 ’s, “ thes e two types of u top i a s ref l ected the contrad i cti ons between a cal l f or ord er and a d es i re f or f reed om, a s wel l as the tens i on between a rel i ance o n cent ral i z ed , l arg e-s cal e org ani z ati on a n d a cl ai m of l ocal au tonomy and i nd iv i d u a l creativ i ty” . Expl ori ng the pos s i b i l i ty s pace of between two i d eol og i es al l ows f o r an expans ive t i s s u e of connectiv i ty. Bo th s tr u ctu ral l y and theoreti cal l y the s ta tu s of between two u topi an i d eal s pres en ts a new k i nd of d ys topi a of potenti al i ty. T h e ter m d ys topi a i s not ref er red as to br a n d a neg ative total i tari an env i ronm ent. A s u btl e d i s ti ncti on i s neces s ar y. A s the wo r k

27


situa tes between, larg e-s cale inf lu ences cer ta inly have demon s trated its impact on l oca l, sm a ll s caled ar ticu lated s tates. T he r ever se occurs as well. C ompo nent log i cs a t the sm a l l-s cale h ave the au tho ri ty to distr ibute an d p u s h ag ain s t su ch centr a lized ideo lo gical u to pian des ires. U nder sta nding th e city is too compl ex a s a ‘whole’. We n eed to s low down, and dissect com p rehens ible con tent to f or m educa ted design c riteria for n ew u rban i nser tions into the es tablis h ed, ever s o evolving ur ban co nditio n. It is with thi s under sta ndin g th at a fu tu re o f publ i c a r chitectur e an d u rb an des ign can and should com e ou t of in fo r med knowled g e f r om the f ound ev iden ces in o u r co m pl ex m eg a lopolis. Ra ther tha n ‘what the city s ho u ld be’ , why a r e we no t as kin g ‘h ow is th e ci ty oper a ting ’? Strategie s o f knowled g eba se investig atio ns are v ital in th e new pa r a dig m f or th e fu tu re of the 21 s t centu r y a nd beyond. As a to ol for adju s ting ou r desig n str a tegies at th e u rban s cale, i t i s now necessa r y to u s e dat a infor mational system s, a na lytical extractio n p r o ces s es,

28

and trans l ati onal m ethod s to enhance res pons ive ou tpu t. S i mu l ati ng ag ents bas ed on e xter nal i npu t i s i r rel evant and i ns ens i tive to the l atent activ i ty operati ng cons tantl y. T hi s m ethod i cal s eq u ence of l ear ni ng , eval u ati ng , trans f or m i ng , and neg oti ati ng i s neces s ar y f or both u nd ers tand i ng and d es i g ni ng i n ou r hi g hl y active u rban cond i ti ons i n the 2 1 s t cent u r y m eg al opol i s es arou nd the worl d .


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SEONGsu-dong CONTEMPORARY EVOLUTIONS


How do we examin e, detect, and des ign f or a n envir onm en t we know s o little abo u t? With the ever-in creas in gly complex layers em bedded into th e city’s den s e fab ri c, one piece of k nowledg e is for cer tai n; we a r e ur ba n detectives at bes t. Alth ou g h we will m or e than likely n ever know the city a s a whole, intellig ently decip hered ‘ codes’ f r om p u blic architectu res del iver clues f r om s u ch u nknown process es. I n other wo rds, recor ding o u tcom es dir ectly linked to s elf-deter mined u r ban a da pta tions can allu de to a s o r t of ‘d na’ r ea ding of the city’s ‘code’. I n or der to identify th e neighb orho od s i nher ent qualities mo re precis ely, we a m plif y a nd s low down o u r reading of the city into smaller in telligib le s cales. A s a m ethod of extractio n, th e dis s ecti ons of neig hbor ho ods s h ed s o me light and ex pose possib le p atter n b eh av io rs. Div i ng f ur ther down in s cale, data an d meas u rabl e units a r e collected as a s et of u rb an ‘d na’ sa m ples to begin u nders tandin g how the la r g e-scale neighb orho od may be or g a nized. T his p ro ces s req u ires p reci s e m ea sur ing , docu mentatio n, and p ar ticu l ar dr awing techniq u es o f p hys ical, calcu labl e

32

proper ti es. T he re s earch break s ou t i n 3 them es to captu re 3 par ti cu l ar u rban typol og i es - m obi l i ty, ad aptabi l i ty, and i nf ras tr u ctu re. Back into the transfor mative neighborhood of S eong s u -d ong S eou l S ou th Korea we at tem pt to trans cri be u rban cod es as a way to i nf or m new ecol og i cal l y and cu l tu ral l y s ens i tive u rbani s m . Prev i ou s l y i d enti f i ed by m achi ner y and pal i m ps es ts of i nd u s tr y m anu f actu ri ng , S eong s u -d ong has be com e a cu l tu ral es tabl i s hm ent f or the next g enerati on of ar ti s ts, f ood i es, and tri g g ered new s atu rati on of m od er n Korean c u l tu re. In attem pt to i d enti ty and u ncover patter ns of u npl anned g rowth, ou ts i d e of the expected g l obal capi tal i s t i c m arkets, S eong s u -d ong of f ers new d es i g n expl orati ons capabl e of e xtrapol ati ng f u r ther i nto a proj ec tive and conti nu ou s u npl anned , yet ecol og i cal l y s av v y, f u t u re. T he f ol l owi ng res e arch work s of f ers anecd otes of S eong s u -d ong f rom f ou r pri m ar y phas es ; s am pl i ng , u rban c od es, m or phol og i es, and eventu al l y l ead i ng to s pecu l ati ons of an u npred i ctabl e u rban evol u ti on.


“The t r u e t er r i t or y o f i n n o vat i o n i n u r b a n ar c hi t ec t u r e, t hen , i s n ot i n t he pr o du c t i o n o f pl at o n i c so l i ds, bu t r at her i n t he desi g n o f o per at i o n al st r at eg i es t hat deal wi t h t he m u l t ip l e an d o v er l appi n g f or c es o f a hi g hl y c o m pl ex a n d en t i r el y u n c er t ai n c o l l ec t i v e f or m � – T hom Mayne

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field notes D. Cao & A. Anklin As a research team we are looking at Seoul to base our research off of. Seoul is a big city, so by getting more specific with the research, we are in the Seongsu Dong neighborhood. Seongsu Dong is an area that is rapidly transforming with unprecedented changes in property value and land ownership. These changes have led to a clash between themes of old and new, fake and real, as well as unplanned vs established. We have three scales that we are looking at. As a team we came up with a research question that fits within our realm of interest and that question is (INSERT QUESTION HERE)? With each scale we work at there are more specific questions that are derived from the beginning research question. By analyzing Seoul at each scale as a team we can start demonstrating complex and contradictory relationships between urban viewing (urban spectatorship) and the regime of urban mobility (mobile subjectivity) (transition from big question into mobility) “By recontextualizing this expanded usage of information … in the context of social arrangement of urban mobility in Seoul, … the relationship of space with … technourbanist changes in Seoul focuses upon how social reorganization of urban mobility is reshaped through the new information…, which have increasingly penetrated everyday routines.” (Beginning slide quote) “The social arrangement of mobility has impacts upon on the production of subjectivity, how people experience and perceive the world.” (before or with mapping page) … it has been often forgotten that “mobility relies on immobility; it is precisely because certain subjects and objects are immobilized that others can travel [move]” ~Jörg Beckman As a research team we are studying and analyzing different aspects of Seoul. Seoul is a big city, so by getting more specific with the research, we are in the Seongsu Dong neighborhood. Seongsu Dong is an area that is rapidly transforming with unprecedented changes in property value and land ownership. These changes have led to a clash between themes of old and new, fake and real, as well as unplanned vs established. With the many themes we have three scales that we are looking at; small (mobility), medium (adaptability), and Large (infrastructure). By analyzing Seoul at each scale as a team we can start demonstrating complex and contradictory relationships between urban viewing (urban spectatorship) and the regime of urban mobility (mobile subjectivity) (transition from big question into mobility) With a straightforward category like mobility, the first sample(s) we looked at were literal mobile devices, like truck, pojangmachas, and the carts push around by ajummas in Seoul. With the collection of samples, we found many typologies of these devices that have changed to adapt to there surroundings. As we looked even further in the mobility in Seoul, we realized that there is a transformative mobility that allows these devices to adapt and exist together with one another and transformobility was how we looked at the samples we collected. Transformobility is the ability to readily change

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the condition, form, and location. Being adaptable to the surrounding conditions and need of the actor at different points in time in various locations. By hybridizing the two original terms to create a topic of transformability, we did not restrict ourselves to looking at something that has wheels but we looked at how something changes forms or conditions. With this definition we set our scope on 6 samples that could move and/ or transform. These are the six samples we collected to analyze: 1. Our first sample is the Hanok. We chose this as a sample of a traditional Korean house that creates space that can transform to adapt to its surroundings. i.e. the winter seasons, spring and fall, and summer season, there are different states at which the hanoks change to fit the surrounding weather conditions. This also transform the space that the hanok has. 2. the second sample we analyzed is the ajumma cart. This sample made its way into the sample because of the mobility it has and the transporting of goods. The way the cart can be compact and store a lot of goods and somehow expand its space is a very interesting way to look at something that is still around in Seoul today. The newer carts have motors and can be electric, while some are still mobile with the “ajumma” pushing them around the city. 3. the third sample we have is the pojangmacha. We looked at this because of the type of space the pojangmacha provides. Originally being able to moved through the city and providing spaces for people to sit down and eat in. The pojangmachas begin as a metal box and grow into a small restaurant. These eateries are able to set up and close down in a matter of minutes. 4. the flat bed truck is a staple sample because of the many variations that it can morph into. They can be anything from a market to a multistory moving truck. These trucks are sized to fit in a narrow street and are even found on sidewalks. 5. the box truck is seen with less variation than the flat bed but for a different reason. Many of the boxed variations are used for larger businesses to transport goods. This keeps the variations simple but significant and specialized. –explain variations 6. the last sample we analyzed was shipping containers. This is something within the neighborhood of Seongsu Dong that is becoming very popular. Although not technically mobile, the way in which the shipping crate can be used for different functions, like storage to being a retail stores, shows the transformative aspect that the container has. i.e. 3 types 1. warehouse – the original and recycled use of the shipping containers that stays true to the size and qualities of the containers 2. the individual commercial space (aka the police and valet stations) these show examples of using recycled and new shipping containers depending on the purpose 3. the retail that uses the containers hinders the recycled perk

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of the shipping containers by using newly manufactured containers. They go as far as having different sized containers that are used together to get the aesthetic. We then extracted codes from the DNA samples to help us understand why these transformative mobility samples shaped Seoul and Seongsu Dong. The codes we derived from the samples are basic diagrams of the mobile device(s). Each code is not specific to one type of sample in the collection of, but the diagrams can be applied to the other samples in and out of the determined the list.

with the transformobility that is currently still in Seoul, we can see how most of these samples have changed and adapted to the … (Anna do this)

What we learned: 1. Horizontality versus verticality a. Seoul is a city dominated by the people and the informal architectural occurrences rather than the formal planning and organization that is pushed forward by planners and designers. After the destruction of the city during the Korean war the city was built rapidly and now that it is settling it is having growing pains. By this we mean that the city is at its limits in many ways and now continues to try to expand, whether that means destroying smaller structures and building higher or maximizing space in existing forms. b. Mobile devices make up a large part of peoples lives and the culture of the city – however the city is seen as a vertical entity because of the buildings that permanently fill their space. The mobile devices move through and around the city with the actors to respond to needs in multiple places, unlike a stable structure could. This is especially effective when 2. Valet parking a. As a result of the people packing the land with profitable programs, the mobile devices throughout the city have been given only the street and very little of it. The infrastructure of the ever expanding city has neglected the vehicle and a place for it to rest when not in use. This results in the creation of underground parking and a adapting complex valet parking system. 3. Desire versus efficiency a. Modern anxiety b. People filling in space c. Maximize profitability d. People are using space as currency in the city. The apartments are efficient because they all have the same layout and this translates easily into known amounts of money. People desire to be “common” whether they have more or less money compared to the average person. This creates an interesting challenge architecturally because many of the same things are wanted to be repeated constantly. This begs the question – what is the role of the architect in a society that wants consistency and repetition/

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replication? Do architects need to go with the flow and design for the clients wants or do they reinterpret the needs and create a new form to meet the functions? 4. Negative versus positive space a. There are two ways in which designers create space (if you put it into black and white terms) – positive and negative space. Positive space is an infill that is closed off from the public and only used for its specific program. Negative space is a void that allows for public use and a variety of programs to happen in the space. Negative spaces often become “places” because of their lack of permanent program. 5. Action versus reaction a. The future is going to be/being built on reactions- the past was built on actions b. Two types of reactors i. Vegan (architects) 1. Responsive and sensitive to their environment and the culture of a place ii. Carnivore (architects) 1. Big architects that ignore the culture and surroundings 2. Abusive and non-responsive 3. Dropping context-less forms into existing spaces with no consideration for the existing people and their needs

What to move forward with: 1. How the city is used horizontally when it is usually referred to as a vertical compilation a. Vehicles b. Subway c. Peoples movement d. Urban sprawl e. Especially in our neighborhood – not concentrated on one small area but spread out across the neighborhood 2. Negative versus positive space a. The voids created by larger pieces of the city are filled in with mobile devices temporarily or permanently but they are the unplanned and reactionary pieces of the city 3. Vegan/Carnivore (action/reaction) a. Mobile objects/devices are inherently vegan because they are a direct response to the need of the people using them and the society in which they reside. Without the people they could not survive and in another city they could not survive. This makes the “vegan” aspects reliable on the people and the culture. 4. Adaptive mobile systems a. Example 1: valet parking i. Created because of the lack of planning for the vehicle and a cultural response to the ease of use b. Example 2: Pojangmacha

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i. Mobile eateries that originally were movable to avoid paying rent to maximize profit ii. Now mostly permanent, they offer a different dining option to people at different times of the day c. Example 3: Moving trucks i. Instead of having to move all of the belongings up through stairways, they created a moving system that uses 2 trucks – one to hold and transport the belongings and one to move them from the transportation truck through the window of the apartment

Things to think about: Austerity Urbanism Pop-up architecture Fashion shows, like at DDP Carnivals, street fairs, nightlife like Hongik Univ. Global Cities: Combine links to provide all that is needed to the inhabitants (food, water, street systems, electricity, products and services. i. This creates a new political ecology 1. The root of global ecological decline Global cities created polarization Information gathering: 1. Global cities a. Global cities combine links to provide all that is needed to the inhabitants (food, water, products, services, and power systems) b. The global city cerates a new political ecology which is the root cause of global ecological decline c. Political ecology is more interested in building a city with its own manufactured and polluting “ecosystem” and less interested in preserving the natural ecosystems 2. “Form is best expressed when designed to enclose a space that fosters overlapping and complex social exchange and interaction [for the urbanist].” – William Fain Jr. Goal[s] 1. we are looking at what exists now and how we can expand the limits of the mobile systems 2. to bring people together in social situations and encourage a sense of togetherness and public ownership 3. transforming everyday spaces into communal activities on occasion 4. Horizontal/Linear Urbanism 5. Components a. Store – charging and docking b. Move/transport c. Transform d. Combine

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transfor(mobil)ity

greenspace locations subway

0

25 m

50 m

100 m

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY


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47


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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

transform (v.) to change in condition, nature, or character; convert. to change in form, appearance, or structure; metamorphose.

transfor

mobility (n.) capable of moving or being moved readily. capable of easity being moved from place to place.

ity

(v.) the ability to readily change in condition, form, and location. Being able to adapt to the surrounding conditions and need of the actor at different points in time or in various locations.


AJUMMA CART origin date: 1970s description: the ajumma carts are carts that are being handled by “older woman” that push around food and other goods to sell on the streets use: the carts are used to allow ajumma to easily transport food and goods to sell to people on the street

12am 6pm 12pm

POJANGMACHA origin date: 1945 description: small tented eateries on wheels, or street stalls which sell a variety of popular street foods as such hotteok, kimbap, tteokbokki, sundae, odeng and others use: a place to grab a quick bite to eat during the day and grab a quick drink at night after putting in long hours at work

6am

12am 6pm

6am 12pm

HANOK origin date: 1363 description: first traditional Korean houses built to bring the natural world inside to allow residents to live peacefully with the simplistic and beauty of the natural spirit of nature use: living for families

12am 6pm

6am 12pm

FLAT BED TRUCK origin date: 1977 description: small trucks with flat beds for moving many goods through the city. The smaller scale allows these trucks to fit in the smaller streets use: the main purpose of the carts is to move goods. In some cases (mainly dealing with produce) the cars also act as a vending cart

12am 6pm

6am 12pm

BOX TRUCK origin date: 1970s description: small trucks with box beds for moving many goods through the city use: the main purpose of the carts is to move goods. the advantage of the box is shade and the possibility to air condition the interior of the box

12am 6pm

6am 12pm

SHIPPING CONTAINER origin date: 1956 description: a shipping container is a container with strength suitable to withstand shipment, storage, and handling use: the purpose of the shipping container is temporarily store goods for shipment. mainly used for storage. this later develops to using the shipping containers as storefronts and office spaces

12am 6pm

6am 12pm

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

AJUMMA CART


POJANGMACHA

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

FLAT BED TRUCK (BANGO)


BOX TRUCK

55


TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

HANOK


SHIPPING CONTAINER

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

1m

AJUMMA CART


handle

load

wheel coolers umbrella umbrella stand

move

cart travels to a tion

umbrella storing coolers

unload selling coolers unfolded umbrella

empty cart

sell

selling coolers

AJUMMA CART EXPANDED

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

3m

POJANGMACHA


metal roof

plastic stools

storage state/packed

small wheel storage large wheel

closed tarp

storage state

stacked tables and stools tarp expansion 1

space to order food

selling state - small

tables and stools for customers

tarp expansion 2

selling state - large

tables and stools for customers

POJANGMACHA EXPANDED

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

0.8 m

FLAT BED TRUCK


canvas roof metal frame storage area

wheel rolled canvas side

truck sides/flaps frame and tarp

truck sides/flaps accordian cover storage area

wheel

accordian riser platform

riser rotating mover base stationary mover base

storage area

moving truck

truck sides/flaps

FLAT BED TRUCK VARIATIONS

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

1.7 m

front elevation

BOX TRUCK


solid roof

storage area

wheel folded ridgid side

fold down flap folding flaps

solid roof

storage area wheel braced up flap

fold down flap hindge flaps

butterfly roof

storage area

fold down flap butterfly flaps

BOX TRUCK TRANSFORMATIONS

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

2.6 m

SHIPPING CONTAINER


stacked to create a larger storage space

rigid roof

storage area within

industrial [stacking] openable doors

single crate for few people

punched windows for natural light

main doors

operable side entry pockets for small outdoor spaces

stacked to create larger volumes and interesting shapes

human scaled elevations retail [shifting]

glass window inďŹ ll for entry and display

SHIPPING CONTAINER ADAPTATIONS

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

5.2 m

HANOK (TYP.)


roof

windows stay closed to retain heat stone encloser for heating (from below) maru at entry

winter

roof

windows open for ventilation stone encloser for heating (from below) maru at entry

spring/fall

raised wooden oor to cool from below roof

windows and doors open for ventilation

raised wooden oor to cool from below summer

HANOK TRANSPARENCY & TRANSFORMATION

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

CODE A one volume sits on the edge of a sidewalk and faces away from the street. a second volume moves perpendicularly about first volume along the street.

CODE B multiplies and disperses in multiple directions

CODE C

CODE D

(immobile) provides something for transportation to mobile code delivers to specific destination

provides something for transport and the smaller codes go to their destination

CODE E expands surfaces horizontally to create more space

CODE F reflected along an edge to create code f plan (immobile)

URBAN CODES - TRANSFORMOBILITY


CODE G a series of equal volumes in a repetitious pattern to create a larger network of similar figures

CODE H a fill and void system that is not equal or planned, but instead filled as needed in pockets and gaps

CODE I

CODE J

the moving of impermanent objects away from their destination in order to allow for the expansion of permanent objects

stacking and growing vertically while staying on a single plane horizontally

CODE K storage being utilized in a horizontal and vertical orientation in an expanding volume

CODE L replacing program upon removal and return of actors and objects

URBAN CODES - TRANSFORMOBILITY

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TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

TYPICAL ZONE OF MOBILITY

SECTION

EXPANDING MOBILITY

ZONE PUSHED BELOW GROUND

ZONE LIFTED ABOVE GROUND

ZONE PROJECTED ON FACADE

ZONE OF NEGOTIATION & TRANSFORMATION

AXONOMETRIC


Transformobility is the ability to readily change the condition, form, and location. Being adaptable to the surrounding conditions and need of the actor at different points in time in various locations. The trend in Seongsu Dong is transformation; the neighborhood is becoming a local hotspot because of it. What transformobility looks at is the ability for mobile devices to adapt within a certain location because of the people that in the neighborhood. From that this team speculates on Seongsu Dong and look at the ability to expand the limits of mobility to try and find an overlap with mobile devices and architectural mobility.

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FUTURE STATE

NEXT GENERATION

CURRENT STATE

PREVIOUS GENERATION

ORIGIN

SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

AJUMMA CART POJANGMACHA TRUCK


STAGED MODULE

PRODUCTIVE MODULE

GEODESIC

ACCORDION

HONEYCOMB

FOLD

ORIGIN

EXPANSION MODULE

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SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

ORIGIN

CONCEPT

TRANSFORMATION

the hanok has a space that is exible for different seasons and different events

this attachment to the outside used to be the only way to live, but now with the majority of Koreans (in Seoul) living in high rise apartment buildings there is a need for a reconnection to the outdoors and a temporary addition of space

the volume attaches to the side of the building through the window and the oor or module slides into the space to create a temporary extension and allow those in mid and high rise buildings to experience the outdoors

FOLD

HONEYCOMB


FORM

NEIGHBORHOOD BENEFITS

the module can take on many forms to serve the same purpose and exist at different scales

the module is clad in a solar ďŹ lm that helps to reduce the heat that enters the space and provides energy to the users. when stored the modules plug back into the city grid to give the remaining energy back to the city.

ACCORDION

GEODESIC

MORPHOLOGIES EXPANSION MODULE

77


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

ORIGIN

CONCEPT

TRANSFORMATION

the pojangmacha is a form that expands and contracts and was originally mobile but has turned into a more stationary object in the street scape over time

the staged modules strive to serve as a exible space that can be expanded and stacked

the modules can be used independently or together to serve different types of program with multiple levels

FOLD

HONEYCOMB


FORM

NEIGHBORHOOD BENEFITS

the form of the module can vary but the stackable and ability to expand space stays the same

since the modules are able to stack, fold, and move the streets can be opened up when the vendors are not present. this allows more space for public gathering and use of the street for things other than vending

ACCORDION

GEODESIC

MORPHOLOGIES STAGED MODULE

79


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

ORIGIN

CONCEPT

TRANSFORMATION

the box truck, speciďŹ cally the buttery box truck, is able to move goods around and open to create a larger volume during loading and unloading

there is a severe lack of greenery in the city and the pockets of greenery are disappearing in Seoungsu Dong every day. the idea of a mobile productive pod can assist in raising the quality of life to those in the area and help the environment

the productive modules house local plants for harvesting and selling, but more so these modules unfold to create a temporary green space for locals and fresh-off-the-vine produce for selling

FOLD

HONEYCOMB


FORM

NEIGHBORHOOD BENEFITS

the form of the module can vary but the ability to unfold the walls is important for both growing and for public use

the productive modules serve as gathering spaces and parks when they are being planted on the ground and then move up to the roof to be stored. while on the roof they continue to clean the air and make the area a cleaner place, even though they many not be seen they still have a positive impact.

ACCORDION

GEODESIC

MORPHOLOGIES PRODUCTIVE MODULE

81


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

commercial

business/commercial

residential offices

office/car dealership residential

commercial

restaurant

commercial car repair shop

LOCATION 1 : DWELLING & COMMERCIAL


pods attach themselves to the building through the window

farm pods unfold to plant and use as community space

the pods provide solar power to the users

the pods can attach to a variety of window types and have not hieght limits

the vending spaces are very exible in thier placement

the pods can attach to public zones to extend seating needs and occupancy the farm pods are stored on the roof tops during thier growing seasons

TRANSFORMOBILITY MAIN EVENT : SOCIAL EXPANSION

83


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

commercial

business/commercial

residential

residential

residential

park

commercial

commercial

LOCATION 2 : DWELLING & PARK

residential


pop up vending folds at to stack and move

pop up vending can be moved or left in a particular location. when left the vending space serves as public gathering space

farm act as miniture parks to allow community toahtther and to improve the local ecology

open and closed vending pods can be located adjacent to one another to have a dining space and a selling space

pods attach to any building type to allow for an expansion of the limited space

vending pods are light wieght and ďŹ t into voids that already exhist within the urban fabirc vending pods can be clustered to create larger entertainment areas and stages

TRANSFORMOBILITY MAIN EVENT : STAGING

85


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

police station

office/commercial

school/playground

cow&dog

residential

commercial/warehouse

LOCATION 3 : WORK & EDUCATION


crane on top of high rise buildings will lift modules off the streets to keep paths clear and will allow the plants to grow with maximum sunlight

productive modules are stored on the room during growing periods

open and closed vending pods can be located adjacent to one another to have a dining space and a selling space

the expansion model brings itself into the host to create an expansion of space as well as a new volume

pods attach to any building type to allow for an expansion of the limited space

productive pods serve as foarming areas and leade to fresher produce and cleaner ait

TRANSFORMOBILITY MAIN EVENT : PRODUCTION

87


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

SPECULATIONS ON TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY


SPECULATIONS ON TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

89


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

SPECULATIONS ON TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY


SPECULATIONS ON TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

91


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

SPECULATIONS ON TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY


SPECULATIONS ON TRANSFOR(MOBIL)ITY

93


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS


95


COSMETIC URBANISM


98


99


100


101


102


103


COSMETIC URBANISM

Cosmetic Urbanism

Urbanism (n.) The way of life of people who live in a large city.

Cosmetic (ad.) Used or done superficially to make something look better, more atractive, more impressive.

Urbanism

(ad.) The act of manipulating architectural elements to improve or enhance an architectural form in evolutionary adaptation to fit a way of life. Operational-structural/functional insertions within an existing for (Bones) Application-cosmetic renewal addition onto a form. (Face)

DEFINITIONS


COSMETIC URBANISM

APPLICATION

Operations on existing buildings which cosmetically renew the face.

code a

Urban Corporate Billboard

OPERATION

Operations that insert a new function into an existing building.

code d

Programmatic Insertion

code b

Programmatic IdentiďŹ cation

code e

Exterior Expansion

code c

Commercial Front

code f

Interior Insertion

URBAN CODING

105


COSMETIC URBANISM COSMETIC URBANISM

SIGNANGE AND ADVERTISMENT

COSMETIC SURGERY ADVERTISEMENT


COSMETIC URBANISM

COSMETIC AND BEAUTY SUPPPLY STORE BEAUTY & COSMETIC RETAIL

107


COSMETIC URBANISM

existing 2nd floor restaurant 1st floor commercial

APPLICATION APPLICATION - COMMERCIAL FRONT

COMMERCIAL FRONT


LG 전자 !

최고의 가게 에

어컨

!

!

!

!

판매 판매

전자

제품

!

LG

전자

판매

전자 전 자 전자 전자 전 자 전자 전자

의 최고 에어컨 가게

commercial front new building

APPLICATION

LG HOME APPLIANCE STORE

APPLICATION - LG HOME APPLIANCE

109


COSMETIC URBANISM

office tower wedding hall

APPLICATION

KB COSMETICS MANUFACTURER OFFICES/ SEONGSU DONG WEDDING HALL

APPLICATION - KB COSMETICS MANUFACTURING / SEONGSU WEDDING HALL


previous front existing exterior addition interior insertion

OPERATION

INDIPRESS EXHIBIT

OPERATION - INDIPRESS GALLERY

111


COSMETIC URBANISM

greenhouse existing house

OPERATION OPERATION - GREENHOUSE

GREENHOUSE


existing warehouse new program

OPERATION

CAFE - DALIM CHANGO

OPERATION - DAELIM CHANGO

113


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

Operational

Applicational

Operation + Application

EDGE INSERTION MORPHOLOGY

LOCATION 4 : YEONMUJANG-GIL SHOPS


skin envelopes exterior faces of new operational spaces

gallery and history museum of yunmunjang-gil inhabit interior and exterior edge of existing building

public circulation occurs within and around programmatic insertions

yun

mun

jan

g-g

il COSMETIC URBANISM

115


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

Operational

Applicational

Operation + Application

STUDIO IMPOSITION MORPHOLOGY

LOCATION 5 : GUTTED STRUCTURE


applicational skin follows operational punctures

fashion studios inhabit gutted structure

gil

ng

ja

un nm

yu

COSMETIC URBANISM

117


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

Operational

Applicational

Operation + Application

RECYCLERY WRAP MORPHOLOGY

LOCATION 6 : SEONGSU SCRAP METAL YARD


applicational tissue stitches operational spaces

extended spaces become consult center

voids and gaps between existing buildings now productive spaces and paths

steel fabrication workshops [ existing ]

COSMETIC URBANISM

119


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

SPECULATIONS ON COSMETIC URBANISM


SPECULATIONS ON COSMETIC URBANISM

121


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE


124


125


126


127


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

Infrastructure (n.) “The basic physical and organizational structures and facilities, such as buildings, roads, and power supplies needed for the operation of a society or enterprise.”

Armature (n.) “An armature is a linear spatial organizing device, like a street or highway with sequential, numbered houses or exits. Urban actors often use armatures as the approach to an enclave, to cut through enclaves, or as the link between two attractors.”

infrastructure as


TONGIN MARKET infrastucture type: street event type: market place armature type: through

SSAMZIEGIL infrastucture type: elevated street event type: retail + market armature type: peeled

J-BUG + TTUKSEOM RESORT STATION infrastucture type: elevated rail event type: public museam armature type: between

KONKUK UNIVERSITY STATION infrastucture type: elevated rail + subway event type: commercial armature type: rising

GYEONGBOKGUNG STATION infrastucture type: subway station event type: gallery + retail armature type: below

SEONGSU STATION infrastucture type: elevated rail event type: retail + instilation armature type: above

129


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

J-BUG


KONKUK UNIVERSITY STATION

131


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

SEONGSU STATION


SSAMZIEGIL

133


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

TONGIN MARKET


GYEONGBOKGUNG STATION

135


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

GYEONGBOKGUNG STATION - AXO


GYEONGBOKGUNG STATION - PLAN

137


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

J-BUG - AXO


5m

20m 10m

J-BUG - PLAN

139


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

KONKUK UNIVERSITY STATION - AXO


5m

20m 10m

KONKUK UNIVERSITY STATION - PLAN

141


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

SEONGSU STATION - AXO


5m

20m 10m

SEONGSU STATION - PLAN

143


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

SSAMZIEGIL - AXO


5m

20m 10m

SSAMZIEGIL - PLAN

145


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

TONGIN MARKET - AXO


5m

20m 10m

TONGIN MARKET - PLAN

147


storefront market

elevated market

public courtyard

A

seoul skyline

B

social space

Public Courtyard

Street Vendors

Street Vendors

A

jahamun-ro Street

B

city transit

active / passive landscape

Art Gallery

A

B

palace

art gallery

retail & installations

Code B

yolguk-ro street

Code C

B

Code D

A

Code A

INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

underground network

B

lifted network

retail

hospital

restaurants

A

retail / commercial

B

achasan-ro street

shops and exhibits

URBAN CODES - ARMATURE

storage and shops

lifted network

Code F

A

Code E

C


Urban codes were extracted from the city samples that synthesize findings of urban armatures. These codes reveal the exchange of event spaces and types in relation to path between poles of infrastructure. The interaction of path and event spark a dialogue about the de-laminated the ground of Seoul, in particular, Seongsu-dong.

149


INFRASTRUCTURE as ARMATURE

Peel/Diagnol

Ground Sloped

Through Below

Through Above

Ground Between

Ground Above+Below

Ground Above

Ground Below

Ground Condition

URBAN CODES - ARMATURE

Lift/Extrude

Wrap/Join


Phase 2

Phase3

Below Ground

On Ground

Above Ground

Phase 1

COMBINATIONAL CODES ESTABLISHED FROM LOCATIONS IN SEONGSU

151


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

i av Le ng Se gs on u Ttukseoum Station

Multi-use / Residential

Commercial / Residential

Office / Storage

Single Family Residential

ds ar w To u gs

on Se

gs

on

Se

r te en C u

n io at St

A Tower (Future Development)

B

M Tower (Future Development)

C A

E

D

LOCATION 7 : TTEOKSAM STATION


Golf Range

Exisiting

Expansion

Path Scultpture Garden A Tower Deck

Program Vertical Gallery

Residual Green Space

Bar & Restaurant

Subway Vendors

Public Park Space

153


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

Highrise Residential

t

To w ar ds S

eo n

s re fo ul

eo

gs

u

S ds ar w To

St at io

n

Commercial / Low rise Residential

Public Dock / Boathouse

8 Lane Highway

Han River

Pedestrian Tunnel

C

ds ar w To

A D

ug J-B

E

B

LOCATION 8 : SEONGSU WATERFRONT


Elevated Park With Cafe

Marketplace

Recreational Facility

Boat Dock

Bike Repair Shop

Biker Rest Area Wetland Surface / Amphitheater

Exisiting

Expansion

Path

Program

155


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

ds ar w To Tt uk om se n io at St

Industrial Storage +Work

Public Park Space

Bottom Commercial Top offices/Storage

Commerial / Shoe making Industry

Previous multi-use car park

Residential Apartments

B nm Yu ja

un il -g

ng

C A

LOCATION 9 : YEONMUJANG-GIL PARK


Outdoor Workshop

Market

Covered Market Shoe Cleaners

Yunmunjang-gil Deck

Community Park

Exisiting

Expansion

Path

Program

157


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS

SPECULATIONS ON INFRASTRUCTURE AS ARMATURE


SPECULATIONS ON INFRASTRUCTURE AS ARMATURE

159


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS


161


SEONGSU SPECULATIONS


163


164


REVIEWS / EXCURSIONS

165


166


167


168


169


170


171


S EO U L STUDIO / UN CC, Sum m e r 2 016 Participants Direc tor:

Jeffrey S Nesbit , UNCC / Haecceitas Studio

Student Researchers:

Anna Anklin Douglas Cao Yagmur Ersayin Morgan Jacobs Ronald Oziogu Robby Stubbs

Studio Crit ic & Host:

Dongwook Hwang, Building Laborator y Architec ture

G uest Design Critics:

Charles Choi, Choi Architec ts Choon Choi, Seoul National University Sanki Choe, University of Seoul Yoocheol Choi, Seoin Design G roup Isak Chung, a.co.lab Marc Brossa, University of Seoul Matt Haynes, USFK Strategic Analyst Chris Jarrett , UNCC Sung Hong Kim, University of Seoul Kuhn Park , Texas Tech University / Communication University of China

For more information on SEOUL STUDIO contac t: Jeffrey S. Nesbit jnesbit9@uncc .edu

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Seoul Studio 2016  

Known as Seoul Studio, this architectural studio intentionally generates sensitive questions concerning the rise of capital development. The...

Seoul Studio 2016  

Known as Seoul Studio, this architectural studio intentionally generates sensitive questions concerning the rise of capital development. The...

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