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ISSUE

7 OCT 2010

Settle College Principal’s Newsletter This issue Sixth Form Collaboration & Results Dates for your diary & Exam Info Notices School News Destinations A2 Students Student Success Trip Reports EPQ Presentation Report Sport Governing Body Response to North Craven Review Consultation Privacy Notice Extra Curricular Clubs

Farewells & Welcome Farewell Mr A Johnson: Science, Head of Kingsdale House Mr L Holtby: DT Technician

Welcome Mrs V Lewis: English & Media Studies Miss S Morley: PE & Business Studies Miss R Harper: Science & Maths Mrs T Murphy: Psychology

Student of the Month The winners for September were: Wharfedale: Eilish Rucastle Kingsdale: Kevin Shuttleworth Ribblesdale Adam Batty Malhamdale: Emma Gilbert Technologist of the Month: Zachary Cottam Community Award: Kevin Shuttleworth

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7-8 P9 P10 P11-13 P14 P15-16

Sixth Form Collaboration We are delighted to announce that we are now working in partnership with Skipton Girls‘ High School to broaden our post-16 offer to students and ensure that minority subjects can still be offered. We are also in discussion with Craven College to explore what additional subjects we may be able to offer to students. These are very exciting times for the Sixth Form. At Open Evening on 10th November, we hope to launch our expanded offer to students. Obviously, the event is primarily aimed at Year 11 but we know that parents and students from Years 9 and 10 will also be looking ahead, so you will all be most welcome.

Results 2010 Once again, we were very pleased with the examination results achieved by students. At GCSE, 73% of students gained 5 A*-C including Functional English & Maths, while 46% gained 5A*-C including GCSE English & Maths. At AS level, results improved for the third year in a row. At A2, we were delighted that 8.5% of students gained the new A* grade, which is above national average. Nearly all subjects had a 100% pass rate at A2 and, in Art, all students received Grade A—a very significant achievement. Well done to all.

The North Craven Review Many thanks to parents who took the time to attend the recent public meetings for the North Craven Review. A copy of the Governors‘ response to the consultation document is at the back of the newsletter for your information. Please remember, you can respond to the consultation document on line using the following link: https://forms.northyorks.gov.uk/eforms and scroll down until you get to Review of Provision for Children and Young People aged 0-19 in North Craven. The deadline is 5th November 2010.

Telephone: 01729 822451 | Fax: 01729 823830 | E-mail: admin@settlecollege.n-yorks.sch.uk | Website: www.settlecollege.n-yorks.sch.uk


Term Dates 2010-11

Dates for your Diary

Autumn Term 2010

GCSE Mock Examinations

College closed for halfterm holiday: Monday 25th-Friday 29th October 2010 Term ends: Friday 17th December 2010 Spring Term 2011 (Tuesday 4th January 2011 is a training day for staff) Term starts: Wednesday 5th January 2011 College closed for halfterm holiday: Monday 21st-Friday 25th February 2011 Term ends: Friday 8th April 2011 Summer Term 2011 (Tuesday 26th April is a training day for staff) Terms starts: Wednesday 27th April 2011 College closed:

Year 11 Parents’ Evening: Wednesday 3rd November 2010. Sixth Form Open Evening: Wednesday 10th November 2010. All students, but especially Year 11, are invited to attend the Open Evening when we will showcase the AS, A2 and BTEC courses the College has to offer. Year 12 Parents’ Evening: Tuesday 23rd November 2010 Christmas Production: Tuesday 30th November-Friday 3rd December 2010. This year‘s production is ‗The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe‘ which promises to be a spectacular event. Each evening, the chorus will comprise pupils from our feeder Primary schools. Tickets are on sale from Mrs Rushton in the main office. Adults £5:50, Children £4:00. Senior Prize Giving: Monday 13th December 2010, St Alkelda’s Church, Giggleswick The event will celebrate the achievements of students from last year‘s Year 11, 12 & 13. We are looking forward to welcoming our guest speaker, former student and now successful author, Marina Fiorato.

Monday 2nd May 2011 (Bank Holiday) College closed for halfterm holiday:

Exam Results Dates Summer 2011

Monday 30th May-Friday 3rd June 2011 Term ends: Friday 22nd July 2011

Please note that the exam boards have agreed the following dates for exam results next year: A2/AS Level: Thursday 18th August 2011 GCSE: Thursday 25th August 2011. If is very helpful if students can avoid holidays over these dates.

Mock GCSE exams for Year 11 will take place from Friday 3rd December to Friday 10th December 2010. Mock GCSE Exams for Year 9 & 10 students will take place between Monday 17th January to Friday 21st January 2011. Modular exams will run from Monday 10th January to Wednesday 2nd February 2011. The timetable is on the College website and students will receive a copy after halfterm. All students have a copy of the examination board rules in their planners. Having black pens is essential as all examinations have to be completed in black ink. Students need a clear pencil case or bag and they need to ensure that they bring a calculator to Maths and Science examinations. Mock grades are support applications to the Sixth Form estimated GCSE which are sent examination boards.

used to for entry and for grades, to the

The mock exam results will be taken into consideration by the exam boards if, for any reason, a student is absent from their external exams. Therefore, it is important that students approach these exams as they would external exams.


Governing Body Appointments

We are delighted to following reappointments to the Governing Body: Mrs Jean Bradley: Community Governor Mr David Heather: Associate Member Mrs Jean Lonsdale: Associate Member

Family Learning

Thank you to the parents who completed the form in the Parent Information Pack indicating preferences for family learning activities. A programme of courses will be published for the Spring Term and will be available in the next Newsletter and on the College website.

Privacy Notice (Data Protection Act 1998

Attached to the newsletter is a document showing how you or your child can access information held electronically by the College. The DfE consider that young people over the age of 12, with the maturity to make their own decisions, should generally be able to request to see their personal information themselves under the Subject Access Provisions (S.7) of the Data Protection Act. However, it is for the school, as data controller, to assess whether the child is capable of understanding the personal information in question and so decide whether the parent needs to make the request on the child‘s behalf. We would be grateful if you could bring this document to your child/ren‘s attention.

Financial Support

Examinations Updates

The Jenny Walker Fund Students whose parents are in receipt of any of the following payments:

 Income Support  Income Based Job Seekers Allowance  Support under Part VI of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999  Child Tax Credit may make application for financial support for specific school activities, eg

 help towards the cost of a school trip  funding for locker rental, etc. Any application should be made directly to the Principal and must be accompanied by an original document confirming receipt of one of the above payments. The document will be returned. Each application will be considered on its merits but usually part financial support only will be available to ensure the fund is of benefit to the most students. Decisions on the allocation of the fund will be made by the Principal under delegated powers from the Governing Body. Please note that parents seeking support with uniform purchase should contact The Education Office in Harrogate (Tel: 01609 533405).

Extra Curricular Clubs Please find attached to this newsletter a list of the extra curricular clubs available to students. All students are encouraged to join in.

All Year 11 students have sat ALAN tests (Adult Literacy and Numeracy). This is an examination that is completed on line and, if students achieve the Level 2 qualification in both Numeracy and Literacy, they gain 46 GCSE points which is equivalent to a Grade B. There will be an opportunity for students who did not pass first time round to do a re-sit test week beginning the 8th of November 2010. In November the re-sit exams begin for English GCSE for Year 12 students. Timetables are on the College website under College Information, Exams.


School News

Parent Pay Parent Pay is a relatively new system in College, where parents can log on at home and pay for trips etc. using credit or debit cards. They can also order and pay for uniform via the uniform shop. This service alleviates the need to bring cash or cheques into College and is now the preferred method of payment. To access the shop, go onto the Settle College website, click on Links, then click on Uniform Shop. To access Parent Pay – www.parentpay.com then log on use your personal log in details. If you are unsure of your log on details, please contact Mrs Rushton who will be pleased to send out new details.

Student Teaching and Learning Group

Parent Partnership Group

Parent Partnership Group meetings will be held on: 21st October 2010 17th February 2011 26th May 2011 23rd June 2011 (All Thursdays) Meetings will be held in the Sixth Form Centre from 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm. All parents are welcome to attend these meetings where we discuss a range of whole school issues. We are always seeking parental views and input into key policies and areas of school improvement.

The student Learning and Teaching Group will continue to meet this year. This group has representatives from each Year group and meets with Ms Costello, Vice Principal, half-termly. The main topics/ focus for discussion this year are:   

 

The use of new technology to aid learning. How far has assessment for learning been embedded across the College? Students will be trained as ‗Lead Learners‘ and they will lead starters and plenaries in some lessons. Student input into the College Improvement Plan. Student input into our Teacher Learning Community group.

Open Day/Evening At the end of September, we held our annual Open Day and Open Evening. During the day we were visited by students from our feeder Primary and Middle schools with their teachers to see the College on a normal working day. In the evening, the College put on a wonderful set of displays in subject areas to show the type of fun activities available to students, including the ever popular French Café. Many positive comments were received from our visitors, particularly how confident and fluent our student speakers were and how helpful and polite the guides were. Many thanks to all the students involved, particularly our Head Boy/Head Girl team for their organisation of the guides.


We were delighted with the results of our Sixth Form students who have now moved on to a wide range of exciting courses and careers. We wish them well for the future and look forward to hearing of their continued success.

Destinations A2 Students 2010 Destinations: A2 Students 2010 Surname

First Name

Destination

Course

Allsopp Balsamini Bathers Beresford Bradley Brown Brown Charnley Clarke Cook Curley Davies Dugdale

Ann Marco Danny Sami Peter Eloise Joe Michelle Laura Alice Dan Mathew Joanna

Lincoln RAF Employment Employment Nottingham Leeds Employment Leeds UCLAN Craven College Employment Brighton Harper Adams

Heritage Studies

Fox Gray Green Harker

Danny Rebekah Jonathon Ruth

Edge Hill Sheffield Employment Cumbria

Harris Harris Harrison Hutchinson

Chris Joshua Jasmine Hannah

Sunderland Employment York UCLAN

Hutchinson Jeffrey Kennedy

Samuel Alexandra Gavin

Leeds Met Teesside UCLAN

Lambert Lambert Lee Lund Milligan Milward Moorby Murray Murray Reynolds Richardson Richardson Rushton Shepherd Stead Stronach Tennant Watson Waugh Whitaker Wilcock Wood

Charlotte Karen Thomas Rachel Finlay Justine Emma Sophie Declan Martin Hayley Sarah Robert Frank Annie Kirsty Gemma Zoe Ellie Tom Rebecca Ashleigh

Northumbria York Hull Lancaster Gap Year Lancaster Manchester Teesside Cumbria Newcastle Gap Year Bangor Gap Year Leeds Met Employment Lincoln Kendal College Birmingham Glasgow Gap Year Employment UCLAN

English and Philosophy Human Physiology Art Foundation Forensic Psychology Beauty Therapy Outdoor Sports Rural Enterprise and Land Management Web Design Radiotherapy and Oncology Primary Education with Special Needs Business and Marketing Linguistics Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation Sport and Exercise Science Interior Architecture Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation Media, Culture and Society Bio-archaeology History Art Foundation Pre-Medicine Children's Nursing Law Physical Education Marketing Psychology Sport and Exercise Science Media Production Beauty Therapy Textiles Biology Music Theatre

Former Student Success We are delighted to report that former student, Philip Bowker has been awarded a Degree of Master of Arts in Management Studies (Philosophy) from the University of Aberdeen.

Reduced Price Software for Students Students of Settle College can purchase reduced priced Microsoft & Adobe software through our link with RM‘s The Basement. This can be accessed via the College website by going to the ‗Departments‘ page, to ICT and clicking on the link that looks like this:

You will be taken to the software shop where you can choose the software and order it directly with RM. They currently have Microsoft Office 2010, which is what we operate in College, for £39.07 (a saving of around £50 for the normal student copy) so represents great value for money. The software is limited to one copy per student and it‘s a single copy for use on one PC/ Laptop only.


STEM Club The Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths Club started up again on the 21st October for Year 9 pupils. This club is run every other Wednesday after school from 3.30pm-5:30pm to promote the STEM subjects. In the club, students encounter fun activities to develop their understanding of how things are made and how they work. Activities include making rockets and tower structures, programming robots to undertake a variety of tasks, including playing football and designing and building an electric powered vehicle. The activities are vast and varied and there is no cost incurred by students. The next meeting is on the 3rd November. If you are interested please contact Mr Scott for more information.

A selection of products from the STEM Club

Charlie Develops High Performance Sporting Products From 20th to 23rd July, Charlie Hirst, enjoyed a unique learning experience at The University of Manchester. Sponsored by The Drapers‘ Company and working with the University‘s Centre for Textile Science and Technology, the course gave nearly 50 aspiring 15 to 17 year old students the opportunity to learn about the vibrant, innovative and global industry of sports materials, which brings together science, technology, engineering and imagination to develop high performance sporting products.

Charlie celebrates his success

Over the four days, the students had an introduction into this fascinating subject, with lectures on subjects including electronic solutions for sports textiles, and a demonstration by Speedo of their high performance textiles which reduce drag. A visit to Sigmatex, one of the world‘s leading carbon fibre convertors, gave the students an insight into carbon fibre composite manufacture.

Charlie Hirst (Contd/…) Students had a hands-on experience working in teams to complete a challenge which involved designing, making and testing an innovative pattern for a rugby ball. Throughout the course the students developed life skills such as teamwork, communication, problem solving and time management. At the same time they got to sample university life, whilst finding out about relevant engineering degrees and future training routes. Social activities included a film evening and a sports night. On the final night, The Smallpeice Trust hosted a conference style dinner and disco, where students and supervisors had the opportunity to socialise and share their experiences of the week. Spokesperson for The Smallpeice Trust, Claire Fisher commented, ―We are delighted to be working with the university to provide students with a valuable insight into the rapidly changing and increasingly sophisticated technology used in sports materials. We hope the students now have a clearer understanding of the exciting career opportunities available to them in this sector.‖ Outreach Administrator for the School of Materials, Karen Donnelly-Bale added ―It is really important to improve awareness of high performance textile technology among young people, as they will be developing the science and engineering applications of the future. We are very pleased to have been able to do this on the Sports Materials course in Manchester‖ The Sports Materials course is run by the independent educational charity, The Smallpeice Trust, as part of an ongoing programme of residential courses to help young people aged 10 to 18 learn and develop skills in engineering, design, technology and manufacturing. Through running over 32 residential courses and STEM enrichment sessions, The Trust has reached out to around 15,603 students across the UK in the past year. The new course timetable for 2011 will be launched in September. Places are allocated on a first come, first served basis. To find out more, visit www.smallpeicetrust.org.uk, or telephone The Smallpeice Trust on 01926 333200.


Battlefields Trip Report (written by Year 11 student, Sarah Atkinson)

I‘ve been asked to write a report on the World War One Battlefields Trip which took place from Thursday 15th July until Sunday 18th July 2010. Before signing up for the trip I asked myself why I wanted to go and I suppose the answer was that I wanted to see for myself the places my brother and Grandad had talked so much about since my brother also went on the trip in 2009. I soon found friends who were also going and, although I didn‘t take history as a subject at GCSE, I still felt I wanted to go and have a different experience if nothing else. We travelled from school to Hull on Thursday afternoon and boarded the ferry on time. After sleeping overnight and eating breakfast onboard we set off from Zeebrugge and travelled across France to the Somme. Friday was focused on the Battle of the Somme. We went to Authuille Military Cemetery near the town of Albert. It is one of the smallest cemeteries we visited, with 455 graves. We listened to the song ‗Willie McBride‘ before leaving the coach which set a sombre tone and helped us to focus on what the trip was about. From Authuille we travelled to the Newfoundland Memorial at Beaumont Hamel. Newfoundland gave us an insight into what the actual battlefields of the war were like. Although we weren‘t able to see the field as it was during the war, the park gave us a clear indication of the various sizes and distances all over the field of battle. The obvious scars of the war remained: the lines of trenches, the pock marked ground from grenades and shells, and the preserved ‗Danger Tree‘. All brought about an intense feeling of the past. We then went onto ‗Thiepval Memorial to the Missing‘ which is a monument to the missing soldiers who fought at the Somme. This was a place I‘d heard a lot about and, as we rounded the trees and saw the vast structure, I was lost for words. The stone arch, in the middle of a green field at first looks like out of place, but then it appeared to proclaim that it was there because it had to be, just like the soldiers, whose names are inscribed there, had to fight. Climbing up the steps to the platform was a surreal experience. I found out it held over 73,000 names before we got there, but then it was just a number on paper. To actually see each name carved onto the walls and to think they had all been people was an incredibly sad and moving experience.

We went from Thiepval Memorial to the Lochnagar mine crater. This was where the British had dug under No Man‘s Land, the German front line to plant explosives. The size of the crater was incredible and it was a sad reminder that both sides lost many men. I was lucky enough to be able to visit the memorial at Contalmaison, part of the Somme front, where my great grandfather had fought. I had time to stop and think, on my own, about how so many died or risked their lives for peace and freedom. It was a few moments that were quiet, calm and thoughtful and I really appreciated them. Next we visited Vimy Ridge, one of the most beautiful and striking memorials we saw. The landscape known as Hill 145, on which the memorial is built, was a vital part of the German defence system and for the first three years of the war all attempts to capture it failed. It was only in 1917 when the four divisions of the Canadian Corps stormed and successfully took the area. Three days later they secured it, but it was not all without cost. Today the memorial does more than commemorate the battle of Vimy Ridge. It is a monument to all the Canadians who fought for a better world during the First World War. It is a beautiful memorial, but like many of the others, is one that has to be seen firsthand to be fully appreciated. From Vimy Ridge we drove to Ypres and checked in at the Menin Gate Hotel – a small youth hostel across the road from the Menin gate itself. That evening at eight o‘clock, as every evening in Ypres, we watched the Last Post Ceremony which takes place underneath the vast structure of the Gate, called the Hall of Memory. Ninety-two years on, the people of Ypres still remember the war and the fallen which shows the incredible impact the war had across Europe. The Last Post song that played evoked a solemn atmosphere and as we stood beneath the names of 54,896 Commonwealth soldiers who died without graves, it felt as though a connection between then and now was still alive. It amazed me that the ceremony takes place every evening and I admire the tradition that remembers all those war denied the burial they deserved. On Friday evening we went out for a meal in Ypres before returning to the hotel for a debriefing on the day. Saturday morning we travelled from the hotel in Ypres to the Pool of Peace and the Lone Tree Cemetery. The Pool of Peace is a mine crater of 1917 and has since been reclaimed by nature, making it a beautiful and quiet place. The Pool used to be an ugly scar in the landscape and also an ugly reminder of the War and of death.

Thiepval Memorial – The Somme


Battlefields Trip Report (contd/…) Now it is as though nature has taken back the Pool and turned it from a place linked with death and hostility, to a place teeming with life and peaceful solemnity. The result of this natural transformation provides an atmosphere of heightened remembrance. After paying our respects at the Lone Tree Cemetery, we set off to the Flanders Field Museum in Ypres. It was a very interesting museum and was definitely worth a visit. It was filled with artefacts and information, real people‘s stories and many poems and songs. I could‘ve stayed there a long time, watching, listening and reading as there was so much to see. After the museum, we had free time in Ypres. It was market day so there was plenty to do and see but the main attraction for me was the two chocolate shops on the main street! After we‘d had our fill of real Belgian chocolate, we headed to Hill 62 Sanctuary Wood Museum. The trenches here had been preserved so walking through them brought about intense feelings of the past. Shelled treetrunks with bullet holes, pools of black water and towering trees are all that remain around the Sanctuary. Even in the bright sunlight it was a haunting but intriguing place. Friday afternoon we visited Tyne Cot Cemetery. Again, like Authuille, we listened to a song inspired by World War One – I Want to Go Home. I don‘t think anything could have prepared me for seeing Tyne Cot but that song was almost as moving as walking into the cemetery. I was very grateful for the MP3 list we were given before the trip. The whole cemetery was filled with complete sadness and the scale was unbelievable. It was too much to grasp – all the white headstones, the great white cross towering above everything. Every description I heard of Tyne Cot before I went myself did no justice to actually seeing it with my own eyes. It was overwhelming and incredibly sad. The regret and sorrow of the War felt as if it would always be there even when people‘s memory fades. Settle College students laid their wreath of poppies here and I also laid my cross before an unknown soldier‘s grave. The last site on our schedule was Langemark Cemetery – the German cemetery. I t is at first a huge contrast to Tyne Cot but walking through the place with the same daylight as filled Tyne Cot the place spoke of the same grief and sadness.

I was shocked to find out that 45,000 dead filled a quarter of the space that Tyne Cot did, which held 11,000. Upper Wharfedale Students laid their wreath here. I thoroughly enjoyed this trip, and would recommend it to everyone who is interested. I believe I found this trip so very personally involving because we were provided with so much background information, which I took full advantage of. This made the experience very interesting and deeply moving. The trip puts a lot of things into perspective and is an opportunity to pay your respects to the men who died for our freedom and peace. I loved finding out about my own family history as well as spending time with friends and travelling with them. I got to see firsthand all these significant and historic sites and learned so much while we were there that I never would‘ve learned had I gone without school. It is one of the best trips I‘ve ever been on: it was a great experience and I would love to go again.


EPQ Day (written by Year 13 student, Ellie Parker) th

On Wednesday 14 July, I went with nine other people from Sixth Form who are currently doing the extended project qualification on a trip to Manchester University. First, we did a workshop looking out what sources we could use to find information for our projects and how to pick out the reliable information. The talk was really useful and we gained a lot of excellent advice on how to start completing our projects. After stuffing our faces in the University canteen, we went to the University library to have a talk with one of the librarians there on how to use a University library, which was new to all of us. She gave us a long talk on how to find out if the library had a book or journal we were looking for. Then we all had the chance to do some research for our projects. Manchester library is the third biggest University library in the UK so obviously we got very lost to begin with, as each floor is as much of a maze as the next. After navigating our way through the shelves to find books on our topics we could write notes or photocopy chapters to help us with our projects. We all found this day very helpful, especially in how to start writing our projects and how to find our way around a University library, which is essential information for going to University. This would be an essential trip for future students doing the extended project as it has been great use to all who went with their projects. A selection of quotes from the students involved are below: I found researching the media helpful and can now see what I need to do for my EPQ and where to find the information – Emily. The research workshop was very helpful. It’s helped me to see where I need to start – Madelaine Experience using a University library was invaluable as we begin our own research – Ella Learning about researching helped me to identify which sources to use for my own project – John Now I have a much better idea of where to start and where to go from there – thank you! – Evie The use of a University library was a good experience for the future when wanting to apply for University and continuing research for the EPQ – Eleanor

Young Gardeners Given Seeds of Hope Students at Settle College have been successful in winning a Big Lottery Fund Awards For All grant to support a new gardening club. Extended Schools Co-ordinator, Liz Wade, who drafted the bid based on what students were interested in said ―This is wonderful for the students who were very creative in their ideas and interests‖. Students want to improve the College grounds and also add to the local community by growing bedding plants for ‗Cultivating Settle‘ which led on Settle‘s entry to the Yorkshire in Bloom competition. College students previously supported ‗Cultivating Settle‘ in 2007 when they helped clear undergrowth and plant trees at the Millennium Gardens site. Science Technician, Vykky Pickup, will run the club and is already working with students and local businesses to create a vegetable plot which will test organic and nonorganic growing methods. Students hope to follow in the great local tradition of showing their produce in nearby horticultural shows. Volunteers to help run the club would be very welcome as are donations of unwanted garden tools, plant pots, seed trays and garden containers. Please contact Liz Wade on 01729 825921 for volunteering or if you would like items picking up. For additional information: Gardening Club: Liz Wade, Vykky Pickup 01729 825921 Cultivating Settle: Ann Ambrose 01729 822809

Local Leader in Education Mr Bancroft has been appointed as a Local Leader in Education (LLE) for North Yorkshire. This involves training from the National College of School Leadership to work as a consultant Headteacher supporting other schools in the LA. This will enable the College to share good practice and experience with others at the same time as picking up new ideas for the benefit of the students.

Boys’ Sports News There will be a full report on boys‘ sports in the Christmas newsletter.


Step into Sport Conference Three Year 10 students will represent Settle College at the Step into Sport Conference at Queen Margaret‘s, Escrick this week.

Sport

Step into Sport is a Government funded scheme which aims to increase participation in volunteering and community sport and train the next generation of coaches, leaders and officials.

Craven Sports Partnership Cross Country Final Settle College recently hosted the Craven Sports Partnership Cross Country final. Over twenty College students volunteered to act as marshals, course stewards, timekeepers and results adjudicators.

Luke Woodrow, Kerry Holgate and Faye Ambler were selected from a strong group of young leaders. They will attend workshops in the morning and then will have the opportunity to complete a bolt on award in a sport of their choice.

Kangoo The Kangoo boots are certainly doing some good service across North Craven. Last term the Kangoo boots did a ten week block at Ingleton Middle School and this term they are being enjoyed by the students at Settle Middle School. The twenty students involved in the Kangoo Club are thoroughly enjoying the opportunity to try something new and Miss Vickery is amazed at the energy they can muster on a Friday night!!

Settle College students ensured the event ran smoothly and with 128 competitors, parents and helpers this was no easy task. Ian Parker, the event organiser, commented on the way our students conducted themselves and the way they contributed to success of the event.

Gemma Millman, Emily Gill & Sophie Baker acted as marshals to help make the day a success!

Leadership Academy The Craven Sports Partnership Leadership Academy is going from strength to strength, with even more Year groups being represented. Training sessions include aqua splash training and first aid for leaders. Settle College now has 18 students at the Academy, including 2 Platinum Ambassadors. Well done to our selected students.

Two Year 6 Middle School students enjoy the competition

Girls Active Primary Link Last term the Girls Active piloted the Sainsbury‘s Active Scheme in local Primary schools. The Scheme was such a success that even more Primary schools have signed up to get involved. Settle College students volunteer to be trained in the delivery of the Active Kid‘s Scheme, Sainsbury‘s provides bags of equipment worth over £200, Settle students liaise with the Primary schools to decide which Key Stage and which events to target and then run clubs after school. Over twenty College students have volunteered to do the training, so ten Primary schools will have the opportunity to have the clubs. At the end of the programme, the Primary school keeps the bags of equipment so everyone benefits. The format has worked so well that Upper Wharfedale is about to follow the lead of Settle College and introduce a programme of training for its young leaders.

Settle College students enjoyed the training and are looking forwards to starting at the Primary schools.


North Craven Review Settle College Governors’ Response The Governors welcome the Review and wholeheartedly support the LA‘s proposal for a single age of transfer, Year 6 to remain in the Primary schools and Years 7 & 8 to be educated at Settle College. The Governors are also in full support of retaining a strong and vibrant post-16 provision in Settle in collaboration with Craven College and other partners. We are also committed to ensuring that provision for Year 7 & 8 builds on and extends the best practice already seen in the Middle Schools. To that end, we would expect these Year groups to be mainly taught within the existing building of Settle Middle School, while accessing specialist facilities within Settle College for Science and Technology. The reasons are as follows: Ensuring high quality provision for pupils from 0 -19 We agree with the proposition that two transitions out of alignment with Key Stages can be detrimental to pupil progress. Over the last four years, the College has worked hard to improve Key Stage 4 results with some success. However, we have a maximum of 2 ½ years to fully prepare students for GCSE and staff who have worked in 11-16 or 11-18 schools note that the transition to independent learning in this short time is challenging for many students and, in particular, boys. This is despite the good work of the Middle Schools. We note that the Middle School voluntary SATS results in Year 8 are very high and in some years have placed pupils in the first percentile for achievement. However good these results are, the Year 8 pupils do not tackle the higher order elements of Key Stage 3, such as trigonometry in Maths; therefore, these results are not comparable to pupils taking SATS in Year 9 or to those taking them in Year 8 who have covered these higher level topics. Thus pupils‘ confidence often drops as they arrive at the College and for some (and particularly in Maths) it is difficult to restore this confidence. We, therefore, believe that the continuity of a single institution from age 11 would allow students to gain and retain confidence and be better prepared for the rigours of public examinations. Students arrive at Settle College at the most challenging time in their emotional and physical development. This can make it difficult for them to gain the affiliation to the institution which is found in secondary schools with a Year 7 intake. This, in turn, means that students are less likely to choose to stay at Settle College after 16 than they would be in an 11-18 school. In reality, the school has only two years up to Year 11 to gain the students‘ affiliation, compared to the more usual four. Although, in the past, poor performance at GCSE and beyond can be cited as a reason for students choosing not to stay on in the Sixth Form at Settle College, this is increasingly not the case and student numbers are rising. However, they are still below the average staying on rate. The size of the College is also a reason; we cannot provide the range of courses required by some students and, for others, a move to a bigger environment is the right thing. However, evidence of other 11-18 schools convinces us that with the opportunity to work with students from Year 7 onwards we would retain more students into the Sixth Form. This, in turn, would allow for greater breadth of provision which would enable more of those who currently feel they have no choice but to go elsewhere to stay on into our Sixth Form. The retention of a Sixth Form, in turn, will allow us to retain high calibre staff with the consequent benefits for provision and range of courses for the whole school. Conversely, if the status quo remains, Settle College will find itself too small to provide the breadth of courses required by many students and parents, not just in the Sixth Form but also at Key Stage 4. Even in our present system, entitlement to a second language is very limited in Year 8, whereas in very many Secondary schools all pupils have full entitlement to a second language by Year 7. We also believe that an 11-18 school is able to provide a much greater range of specialist resources (particularly in Science and Design Technology) than current Years 7 & 8 can access. We believe that some parents are currently opting out of the North Craven system because their children are ready for the full range of Secondary provision at age 11. Children from very small Secondary schools in the Lune Valley are choosing to attend very large (1500+) schools in Lancashire and Cumbria with no apparent detriment to achievement. However, an enlarged Settle College would still be a small Secondary school of approximately 730 pupils with all the advantages for pastoral care that brings.


Student Numbers Currently Settle College is operating at about 75% capacity. The significant fall in roll of the last three years will continue to a low point of under 400 students by 2019. In order to rectify our current budget deficit, we currently have no choice but to make severe staffing cuts. This will affect future provision (especially in the Sixth Form) and will lead to a further drift of families away from the College. This will also affect the Middle Schools, where families seeking to secure their children‘s education will opt for the security of high quality provision from the age of 11 elsewhere. We believe that the status quo is not an option. The only things it will achieve are: a rapid decline in rolls, the closure of more primary schools and Ingleton Middle School by attrition, the loss of the Sixth Form at Settle College and serious disadvantage to North Craven pupils, especially those around the Settle area, who will be faced with long journeys to access the breadth of provision they require. The pupil numbers shown in the Review have been provided by the schools. It has been asserted that proposed building in the area will ensure that pupil numbers will rise again. We do not believe this to be the case in the medium to long term. The current economic climate means that recent new builds remain unsold. Young families already struggle to buy in this area. There are insufficient children within the system now to support our 14 schools and 11 are already in deficit. We cannot gamble on an unknown rise in the birth rate which even if it happened in 2010 would have no impact on Settle College until 2023. Maintaining Breadth As noted above, the current size of Settle College makes it impossible to maintain breadth of provision, especially in the Sixth Form. From 2010, all students from Year 9 upwards have started GCSE courses. The primary reason for this is the belief that younger students can achieve as well and, in some cases, better at GCSE if they spread their course over three rather than two years. However, this has also been a means of maintaining breadth of provision. By educating Years 9 & 10 (and 11 from 2011) in the same classes, we can offer minority subjects such as Music and Spanish, which would otherwise die. The projected continuing fall in rolls will mean that, without some radical change, even these innovative approaches to curriculum design will be insufficient to provide a broad choice to students at Key Stage 4 let alone in the Sixth Form. We have recently introduced Level 3 BTEC courses into the Sixth Form in Media Studies, Forensic Science, ICT and Sports Studies. These are popular and are helping a broader range of students stay on at Settle College but they are costly, taking double the teaching time of a traditional AS/A2 course. This has had an impact on our budget and is not sustainable in the long term. Collaboration The College is absolutely committed to two way collaboration with other partners in maintaining Sixth Form provision in Settle. With or without the North Craven Review, this is vital to providing young people with what they want without placing an unnecessarily large travel burden on to them. However, for this to work we need the pupils to be building their trust and confidence in the College from Year 7 onwards. Dialogue on post-16 collaboration is already underway for commencement in September 2011. Providing for Years 7 & 8 We understand parents‘ concerns that Years 7 & 8 will get a lesser deal in an 11-18 school. Should the proposal go ahead, the College is clear that Years 7 & 8 must have at least as good provision as they currently have in the Middle Schools: 1. The Settle Middle School site would be used as a discrete Year 7 & 8 base. 2. Pupils would come over to the College site for some teaching in subjects requiring specialist equipment and rooms, gradually assimilating them into a bigger school environment. 3. LA capital investment would be used wisely to ensure facilities were upgraded. 4. We would look carefully at the policies and practices of the Middle Schools seeking to incorporate the best of these into Settle College. All teaching staff at Settle College are fully trained to teach across the 11-19 age range. It should also be noted that the majority of teachers at Settle College have recent, successful experience of teaching Years 7 & 8 in other schools. All the Leadership Group have experience of leadership in schools with Years 7 & 8. Contd/…….


Transition Arrangements We will work closely with the teachers and leaders of the Middle Schools to ensure a smooth transition as we move towards a two tier system. We will expect to maintain and build upon the strong ethos already present within the Middle Schools. We would ask that the LA looks carefully at the specific funding arrangements for transition to ensure that staffing is as secure as possible during this period. Early Years & Sustaining Small Primary Schools Although it will be very sad if the Middle Schools are lost as a result of the Review, this has to be counter balanced by the fact that the small village schools will have a better chance of survival than if there is no change. Under the proposal, all communities that currently have a school will still have at least one. Our discussions with the Primary schools gives us confidence that there is both the will and experience within those schools to take on Year 6 successfully. 1. Children will continue to be educated within there community for one more year providing continuity of learning throughout KS2 and removing the dip in attainment caused by transition 2. Children‘s Centre Services will be established in Settle and Ingleton as well as the current base in Hellifield providing better access to Extended Services across the area Economic Efficiency There would be considerable economies of scale in moving from three very small secondary schools to one 11-19 school. This would release resources to be spent judiciously on learning and teaching. Summary The Governors have absolute confidence that the LA proposal is the correct way forward. We believe that the current three tier system, despite its many merits, is increasingly fragile. We are certain that an expanded Settle College, working in strong post-16 partnerships, can provide a vibrant and successful place of learning for the 11-18 year old population of North Craven for many years to come. We are optimistic about the opportunities this will present to our young people and look forward to working with the LA to make them happen with the minimum disruption to those currently within the system. The Governors of Settle College


Privacy Notice - Data Protection Act 1998 We, Settle College, are the Data Controller for the purposes of the Data Protection Act. We collect information from you and may receive information about you from your previous school and the Learning Records Service. We hold this personal data and use it to: Support your teaching and learning; Monitor and report on your progress; Provide appropriate pastoral care, and Assess how well your school / PRU is doing. This information includes your contact details, national curriculum assessment results, attendance information and personal characteristics such as your ethnic group, special educational needs and any relevant medical information. We will not give information about you to anyone outside the school without your consent unless the law and our rules allow us to do so. We are required by law to pass some of your information to the Local Authority, North Yorkshire County Council, and the Department for Education (DfE) and where appropriate we will send to relevant national health service personnel (e.g. school nurses) information on individual pupils changing school (or address) to ensure continuity of health care. If a child moves to another school we will ensure a handover of appropriate data we hold, and we will cooperate with other schools s/he has attended to endeavour to complete any outstanding issues. If you want to see a copy of the information we hold and share about you then please contact Mrs G Daley, Data Manager, at Settle College. If you require more information about how the Local Authority (LA) and/or DfE store and use your information, then please go to the following websites: www.northyorks.gov.uk/schoolrecords and http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/management/ims/datamanagement/privacynotices/pupilsdata/ http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/management/ims/datamanagement/privacynotices/pupilsdata/thirdpartyorgs/ If you are unable to access these websites, please contact the LA or DfE as follows: Data Management Officer North Yorkshire County Council, Financial Services, County Hall, NORTHALLERTON, North Yorkshire, DL7 8AL website: www.northyorks.gov.uk email: datamanagement.officer@northyorks.gov.uk Telephone: 01609 533219 Public Communications Unit Department for Education Sanctuary Buildings Great Smith Street London SW1P 3BT Website: www.education.gov.uk email: info@education.gsi.gov.uk Telephone: 0870 000 2288 Post 14 Qualifications: If you are enrolling for post 14 qualifications we will be provided with your unique learner number by the Learning Records Service and may also obtain from them details of any learning or qualifications you have undertaken. Further information regarding the Learning Records Service can be provided by Mrs H Fawcett, Examinations Officer at Settle College, or found on the Internet at www.learningrecordsservice.org.uk. Connexions Services: Once you are aged 13 or over we are required to pass on certain information to the Connexions services. Connexions is the government's support service for all young people aged 13 to 19 in England. We must provide both your and your parents(s) name and address, and any further information relevant to the Connexions services‘ role. However, you (if you are over 16) or your parents can ask that no information beyond name and address be passed to Connexions. Please inform Mrs G Daley, Data Manager at Settle College, if you wish to opt-out of this arrangement. For more information about Connexions please contact the Local Authority as shown above.


EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES – 2010-2011

What?

When?

Where?

Who for?

Who is running the session?

Malham Safari Sculpture Workshop Gardening Club

Lunchtime

Room 45

All Years

BS

Lunchtime

Room 9

All Years

V Pickup

Boys‘ Rugby

Lunchtime

Years 9 & 10

AS

Homework Club

After School until 4:30 pm

Library

All Years

PM

Art Workshop & Catch-up Dance

Lunchtime

Room 45

All Years

EW

Boys‘ Rugby

Lunchtime

Year 11

AS

Basketball (Week B) Homework Club

Lunchtime

All Years

MHr

All Years

PM

Community Website for Settle Singing group

Lunchtime

Library until 4:30 pm Room 8

All Years

SM

1.40-2.10

Room 21

All Years

KMo

ICT Catch up

After School

Room 31

Years 9-11

SRe

STEM Club

3:30-5:30 pm

Room 27

All Years

GS

Running Club

Lunchtime

All Years

RH

Girls‘ Rugby

Lunchtime

Year 9 & 10

AS

Hockey

Lunchtime

All Years

Basketball (Week A) Computer Games Club

Lunchtime

All Years

MHr

Lunchtime

Room 24

All Years

GS

World Film

Period 5

Years 12-13

JHo

Sports super league

Period 5

6th Form Centre PE facilities

Years 12-13

SM, CW, AH

1st XI football

Period 5

Field

Years 12-13

MHr

Mural project

Period 5

Room 45

Years 12-13

BS

AQA Baccalaureate

Period 5

Room Y

Years 12-13

MB

Running Club

Lunchtime

Local hills/ roads

All Years

RH

Girls‘ Mountain Bike Club

3:30pm-4:30opm

Local hills/ roads (Meet by the bike lock-up)

All girls

RH/J Onions

Homework Club

After School until 4:30 pm 1:45-2:15

Library

All Years

PM

Room 31

All Years

SRe

Monday

Tuesday

Lunchtime

After School

AV

Wednesday

ICT Catch up


EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES – 2010-2011 (Contd/…)

Thursday Netball

Lunchtime

All Years

AV/SM

Boys‘ Football

Lunchtime

Year 9

AS

Gardening Club

Lunchtime

Room 9

All Years

V Pickup

Homework Club

After School until 4:30 pm After School

Library

All Years

PM

Room 31

Years 12-13

SRe

Lunchtime

Room 40

All Years

AH

Lunchtime

Room 8

All Years

HW/FM

Lunchtime

Room 27

Years 9 & 10

GS/MG

ICT Catch up Chess & Draughts Club Science Homework Support Warhammer Club Friday Badminton

Lunchtime

All Years

AS

Boys‘ Football

Lunchtime

All Years

MHr

Girls‘ Football

Lunchtime

All Years

AV

Mountain Biking

3:30pm-5:30pm

Local Hills

All Years

AS/RH

Homework Club

After School until 4:30 pm 1:45-2:15

Library

All Years

PM

Room 31

All Years

SRE

10.50-11.20

Room 21

All Years

KMo/JS

ICT Catch up Woodwind Ensemble

Settle College Newsletter October 2010  

Settle College Newsletter October 2010

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