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ALEXANDER KUZIO DESIGN + FABRICATION PORTFOLIO SPRING 2013


TABLE OF CONTENTS: ABOUT...................................3 CURRENT WORK..................4 ! WOODWORK.......................22 ! WORKSHOP.........................33 !

CONTACT: AKUZIO@RISD.edu ALEXANDERKUZIO.com HIGHERJOINT.TUMBLR.com ! 323.899.5417 ! 139 IVES ST. PROVIDENCE, RI 02906

ALEXANDER KUZIO

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ABOUT Alex is a designer, fabricator, product researcher, woodworker, CAD/CNC enthusiast and armchair philosopher of objects. He is finishing up his first year in the Furniture and Product Design MFA program at the Rhode Island School of Design. Before attending graduate school, Alex had a background in custom furniture and set design, which kept him roving between Maine, Texas and New York. Currently he is interested in unique summer internships and just talking with designers and makers about the objects that surround us.

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CURRENT WORK

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BUNKER STOOL

This stool was designed to last. The piece is made with relatively low production costs and is easily reproducible. It is intended to be used indoors or outdoors, with a removable Ash seat that can be stored to protect against the elements.

Ash, Cement, Steel (16.5” x 11” x 11”) 2012

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IDEATION After setting the parameters of designing a concrete and wood stool, the form went through many explorations. The final design was based on a curling puck and was a form that maximized the inherent strength of concrete.

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PROCESS CNC routing seat; Maquette; Full scale mock up; Mold made from 2bot foam cutter; Cement mixing; Jig for casting

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The objective of this desk was to elevate two surfaces using no mechanical joinery. The success of the project relies on a structure that creates compression points that allow for localized stresses and torque to be dispersed throughout the whole of the desk.

2 PLANES/5 SUPPORTS Render: Polished stainless steel tube, Tempered glass (31” x 50” x 28”) 2012

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PROCESS The original plywood constructions showed that the form was stable and could support a significant amount of weight.

Four full scale models were made to find the correct angles and processes to make the steel supports pressure fit into place.

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IDEATION The original idea of the structure came from a desire to work with the inherent strengths of the pyramid form. It was important to make the piece appear to be collapsible to emphasize the simplicity of the structure. A number of unique construction jigs and full scale layouts were developed to make the prototypes.

L3

bottom face entry holes for right legs

L4

readjust point in pro to

L3

line up right edge. converging upwards

line up right edge. (converging upwards)

ALEXANDER KUZIO

top face right cutting pattern

line up with left edge

right edge

for left legs

in proto

top bottom face entry holes

right edge

R1

readjust

left edge

R1

R2 C

L4

front

R2 C

line up left edge. (converging downwards)

L4

left edge

bottom face entry holes for left legs (converging downwards). Line up left edge.

L3

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MODULAR PYRAMIDS

This public bench was intended to create unique offset spaces that would encourage social interaction between users. It was designed specifically for the Fort Point area in Boston. The geometric facets are a response to Boston’s modern skyline, while the organic patterns laser cut into the metal evoke the water element that is central to the city’s identity.

Render: Laser cut steel, powder coat, hardware (36” x 60” x 28”) 2013

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IDEATION The structural composition of this piece was made so that 1) modular units can come together to create several different forms depending on their arrangement. This allows for a series of benches to be arranged in a public space that are tied together in materials/theme but differ in specific form. 2) Pieces can be shipped flat by utilizing steels unique ability to bend and retain integrity. A system of tabs and hardware allow each unit to connect to another unit from a number of different angles.

Dimension A 18”

20.7

5”

20.75”

20.75”

20.75”

27.5”

model A

model B

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PROCESS Initial sketches; Freeform clay maquettes; Pattern exploration; Laser cut stainless steel 1/8� scale model

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MODULAR PLANTER

The modular planter can be customized by the user then rearranged and added to over time. A single form manufactured in different colors allows for a wide variation in composition. An average small household plant lasts only 8 weeks; changing the planter’s form promotes a unique relationship with each new plant.

Render: Ceramic, Dye, Glaze finish (3” x 6” x 6”) 2013

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PROCESS The ability to situate each planter in two different positions relies on a central pin system that is unaffected by the outside contour and has both positive negative registrations so it can be used either above or beneath a partnered module. In order to test if the simple seal could hold water and soil, a prototype was made from plaster. The mold was designed in Rhino and CNC’d in foam. The original inspiration for the form came from the 1950’s Southern California firm, Architectural Pottery

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TENSION STOOL

This stool was designed to elevate our idea of collapsible, flat pack furniture. By exposing the joinery it showcases a simple but clever fulcrum structure that pulls the joints into tension when the user sits down.

Ash, Rope, Polyacrylic (18” x 21” x 14”) 2012

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STUDY MODELS This project produced a large number of study models that explored seating in which every piece in the structure relied on every other piece to make it function as a load bearing object.

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This piece was milled from a solid mahogany block using a CNC router. Instead of trying to sand away the residual marks left by the router bit, the CNC machine was manipulated to exaggerate its tool paths and generate distinctive surface patterns.

INNER LAMP

Mahogany, Lighting components, Oil finish (9” × 7” x 6.5”) 2013

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IDEATION (top row)

PROCESS (bottom row)

Cocktail napkin sketch; Series of inspirations from temples, caves, and geodes; Impressionistic painting to convey feeling of lamp

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Using Mastercam instead of 3D modeling program to manipulate surface; A 3-axis router can’t undercut so the stock is flipped to create hollows.

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STUDY IN EFFICIENCY

This project was designed to use a 4X4’ 1/2” piece of plywood, no hardware and the most efficient use of the CNC machine in order to create an attractive but cost effective bench that can break down for storage.

Birchwood ply (16” x 40” x 13”) 2013

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PROCESS The initial explorations for the plywood bench involved creating volume out of a slatted structure. From this point the design was refined to reduce material and CNC cut time. Creating efficient tool paths in production can greatly reduce manufacture cost. Before working in plywood, a foam core bench was assembled to explore form and structural issues.

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WOODWORK

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MESA FOR MEDICINA Walnut, Laurel Burl Veneer, Ply, Shellac (30” x 34” x 34”) 2011

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This table was inspired by ceremonial mesas from Peru. The legs look like a compound bend, but in reality are a single curve that follows the parabola of a diagonal cross section of a cylinder. In order to achieve the compound angle bridal joint, a jig was developed for the table saw that was tuned on a series of mock-up joints. CAD was vital in understanding the curvature of the legs.

In the Amazon mundane objects-- a branch, a bottle of cologne-take on ceremonial importance. Preparing for glue up.

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HERACLITUS TABLE Mesquite Burl, ash (34” x 72” x 18”) 2012

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The inspiration for this foyer table is the Heraclitus quote, “No man steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.� The burl top hints at chaotic water while the double helix, or infinity legs, suggest an underlying continual order.

CAD helped to visualize the piece, but was inadequate for the final design; the curve of the leg is largely dependent on the flexibility of the ash laminate.

E pluribus unum: Bent laminates. ALEXANDER KUZIO

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VANCE CABINET White Oak, Oak Burl, Poplar, Birch Ply, Mahogany, Linseed Oil, Polyurethane (36” x 62” x 20”) 2012

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The piece was designed to have a bohemian feel to complement a client’s house in the south of France; the cabinet was built to specification to hold media equipment. Louvres were incorporated in the doors to allow remote control signals to pass through. Console sketches.

Case construction.

Preparing the louvered doors.

Frame and panel construction with bookmatched oak veneers.

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ROSEMARY’S CRADLE Walnut, Purpleheart, Tung oil (36” x 48” x 26”) 2011

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This piece was influenced by the sculptural work of Wendell Castle. Designing a cradle is unique because of the added challenge of meeting government mandated safety guidelines. The piece was also designed to breakdown into component parts for easy storage.

Initial sketches and blue prints

Constructing railings

Cradle base before and after shaping

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SUNDOWNER (BAR & DESK) Cherry, Maple, polyurethane (22” x 26” x 12”) 2010

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This piece can function as a bar or desk. The design element that ties both functions together is the scooped lid, which can either flip up as a shelf for glasses or down as a table. The drawer was designed to hold four hi-ball glasses and has two flipper catches so that when pulled up, the drawer will stay in the open position for easy bartending. The entire piece is constructed using 40 frame and panels. Early 18th century british trunk provided inspiration for lid.

Sketch of flipper catch. you can see in the bar shot, the glasses tray is in the open locked position.

Testing the door fit

Removable waterproof icebox

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WORKSHOP

A group of four friends built out a studio in September 2011 from scratch in Texas (before & after shot above). A shop coming together is as exciting and design intensive as the products it produces. We began working with the city and local developers to find out about construction projects and weather incidents that resulted in felled trees. With the leads we got, we hauled back discarded timber to our shop, where it was milled and air dried. ALEXANDER KUZIO

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